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("Slowly but surely") , established = , closed = , type = Public school
Independent Independent or Independents may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Artist groups * Independents (artist group), a group of modernist painters based in the New Hope, Pennsylvania, area of the United States during the early 1930s * Independent ...
day school , religion = , president = , head_label = Headmaster , head = Mark Beard , r_head_label = , r_head = , chair_label = Chair of council , chair =
Simon LewisSimon Lewis may refer to: *Simon Lewis (writer) (born 1971), British novelist and screenwriter *Simon Lewis (The Mortal Instruments), Simon Lewis (''The Mortal Instruments''), a character in ''The Mortal Instruments'' series of novels *Simon Lewis (p ...
, founder =
Jeremy Bentham Jeremy Bentham (; 15 February 1748 Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates">O.S._4_February_1747.html" ;"title="Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates.html" ;"title="nowiki/>Old Style and New Style dates">O.S. 4 February 1747">Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates.htm ...

Jeremy Bentham
, specialist = , address = , city =
Frognal Frognal is a small area of Hampstead Hampstead () is an area in North West London, England. Lying northwest of Charing Cross, it extends from Watling Street, the A5 road (Roman Watling Street) to Hampstead Heath, a large, hilly expanse of p ...
, county = London, NW3 , country = England , postcode = , local_authority =
Camden Camden may refer to: People * Camden (surname), a surname of English origin * Camden Joy (born 1964), American writer * Camden Toy (born 1957), American actor Places Australia * Camden, New South Wales * Camden, Rosehill, a heritage-listed ...
, dfeno = , urn = 100065 , ofsted = , staff = , enrolment = 1180~ , gender = Boys;
coeducational
sixth form In the education systems of England England is a that is part of the . It shares land borders with to its west and to its north. The lies northwest of England and the to the southwest. England is separated from by the to the east ...
, lower_age = 3 , upper_age = 18 , colours = Maroon, black , publication = , free_label_1 = Former pupils , free_1 = Old Gowers , free_label_2 = , free_2 = , free_label_3 = , free_3 = , website = University College School, generally known as UCS, is an independent day school in
Frognal Frognal is a small area of Hampstead Hampstead () is an area in North West London, England. Lying northwest of Charing Cross, it extends from Watling Street, the A5 road (Roman Watling Street) to Hampstead Heath, a large, hilly expanse of p ...
,
Hampstead Hampstead () is an area in London, which lies northwest of Charing Cross, and extends from Watling Street, the A5 road (Roman Watling Street) to Hampstead Heath, a large, hilly expanse of parkland. The area forms the northwest part of the Lond ...

Hampstead
, northwest London, England. The school was founded in 1830 by
University College London University College London, which Trade name, operates as UCL, is a major public university , public research university located in London, United Kingdom. UCL is a Member institutions of the University of London, member institution of the Federa ...
and inherited many of that institution's progressive and secular views. The UCS Hampstead Foundation is composed of four main entities: * "The UCS Pre-Prep" (previously known as "The Phoenix"), currently co-educational (though from September 2017 new entry has been for boys only) for ages 4 to 7 on the Finchley Road site. This was acquired by UCS in 2003. * "The Junior Branch", for boys aged 7 to 11 on the Holly Hill site in the heart of Hampstead. * "The Senior School", for boys aged 11 to 16 and co-educational for ages 16 to 18 on the Frognal site, which is the largest school site. The main campus and the Great Hall are noted examples of Edwardian architecture. Inside the hall is a Walker
pipe organ #REDIRECT Pipe organ #REDIRECT Pipe organ The pipe organ is a musical instrument A musical instrument is a device created or adapted to make Music, musical sounds. In principle, any object that produces sound can be considered a musical instru ...

pipe organ
, used for school concerts, professional recordings and other festivities. * "The Playing Fields" are situated in Ranulf Road in West Hampstead. UCS is a member of the
Eton Group The Eton Group is an association of 12 English public schools within the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference The Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC) is an association of the head teacher A head teacher, head instructor, he ...
of twelve independent schools and the
Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference The Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC) is an association of the head teacher A head teacher, head instructor, headmaster, headmistress, head, chancellor, principal or school director (sometimes another title is used) is the teac ...
. It is well known for its established bursary programme and music scholarships, as well as its outreach work with a number of other schools in North and West London, including Westminster Academy, the
London Academy of Excellence The London Academy of Excellence, Stratford (LAE) is a selective free school sixth form In the education systems of England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land border ...
and UCL Academy. It also has strong ties with the
Equatorial College School Equatorial College School, also known as ECS, is a private secondary school in the Ibanda District of Uganda. It was founded by a group of professionally skilled teachers in 2002 under the board of Directors headed by Robert Kamasaka, and the curren ...
in Uganda, and charitable work in
Romania Romania ( ; ro, România ) is a country at the crossroads of Central Central is an adjective usually referring to being in the center (disambiguation), center of some place or (mathematical) object. Central may also refer to: Directions ...

Romania
and
India India, officially the Republic of India (Hindi: ), is a country in South Asia. It is the List of countries and dependencies by area, seventh-largest country by area, the List of countries and dependencies by population, second-most populous ...

India
.


History

University College School was founded in 1830 as part of
University College London University College London, which Trade name, operates as UCL, is a major public university , public research university located in London, United Kingdom. UCL is a Member institutions of the University of London, member institution of the Federa ...
and moved to its current location in
Hampstead Hampstead () is an area in London, which lies northwest of Charing Cross, and extends from Watling Street, the A5 road (Roman Watling Street) to Hampstead Heath, a large, hilly expanse of parkland. The area forms the northwest part of the Lond ...

Hampstead
in 1907. Continuing on the long tradition of
dissenting academies The dissenting academies were schools, colleges and seminaries (often institutions with aspects of all three) run by English Dissenters, that is, those who Nonconformist (Protestantism), did not conform to the Church of England. They formed a sign ...
, the University of London had been inspired by the work of
Jeremy Bentham Jeremy Bentham (; 15 February 1748 Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates">O.S._4_February_1747.html" ;"title="Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates.html" ;"title="nowiki/>Old Style and New Style dates">O.S. 4 February 1747">Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates.htm ...

Jeremy Bentham
and others to provide opportunities for higher education regardless of religious beliefs. At the time, only members of the
established Church A state religion (also called an established religion or official religion) is a or officially endorsed by a . A state with an official religion, while not , is not necessarily a . State religions are official or government-sanctioned establis ...
could study at
Cambridge Cambridge ( ) is a College town, university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam approximately north of London. At the United Kingdom Census 2011, the population of the Cambridge built-up area (which is larger ...
and
Oxford Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town and only city of Oxfordshire. In 2017, its population was estimated at 152,450. It is northwest of London, southeast of Birmingham, and northeast of Bristol. The city is home to the Unive ...
(the only other two universities in England at the time) while similar religious tests were imposed at the other universities dating from the medieval and renaissance periods present in the rest of the British Isles, namely
St Andrews St Andrews ( la, S. Andrea(s); sco, Saunt Aundraes; gd, Cill Rìmhinn) is a town on the east coast of Fife Fife (, ; gd, Fìobha, ; sco, Fife) is a council area{{Unreferenced, date=May 2019, bot=noref (GreenC bot) A council area is o ...
,
Glasgow Glasgow ( ; sco, Glesga; gd, Glaschu) is the most populous city A city is a large .Goodall, B. (1987) ''The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography''. London: Penguin.Kuper, A. and Kuper, J., eds (1996) ''The Social Science Encyclopedia'' ...

Glasgow
,
Aberdeen Aberdeen (; sco, Aiberdeen, ; gd, Obar Dheathain ; la, Aberdonia) is a city in northeast Scotland. It is the List of towns and cities in Scotland by population, third most populous city in Scotland, one of Scotland's 32 Local government in ...
,
Edinburgh Edinburgh (; sco, Edinburgh; gd, Dùn Èideann ) is the capital city A capital or capital city is the holding primary status in a , , , , or other , usually as its seat of the government. A capital is typically a that physically enc ...
and
Dublin Dublin (; , or ) is the capital and largest city of Ireland Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster-Scots: ) is an island upright=1.15, Great_Britain.html"_;"title="Ireland_(left)_and_Great_Britain">Ireland_(left)_and_Great_Britain_ ...

Dublin
. Furthermore, the subjects taught at these
Ancient Universities The ancient universities are British and Irish Medieval university, medieval universities and List of early modern universities in Europe, early modern universities founded before the year 1600. Four of these are located in Scotland, two in Engla ...
during this period, especially at Cambridge and Oxford, were relatively narrow, with classical subjects and divinity dominating. Several of the founders of the University of London are directly associated with the founding of the school; they include
Henry Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux, (; 19 September 1778 – 7 May 1868) was a British statesman who became Lord Chancellor, Lord High Chancellor and played a prominent role in passing the 1832 Reform Act and 1833 Slavery ...
(who appears to be singled out as the ring leader in ''A tradition for Freedom''), Lord Auckland (probably
George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland George may refer to: People * George (given name) George (in English or in Romanian) is a masculine given name derived from the Greek language, Greek Georgios, Geōrgios (; ). The name gained popularity due to its association with the Christia ...

George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland
),
William Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton William Bingham Baring, 2nd Baron Ashburton, (June 1799 – 23 March 1864) was a British businessman and a Whig (British political party), Whig politician who later became a Tory (British political party), Tory. Background and education William B ...
, Sir
Isaac Lyon Goldsmid Sir Isaac Lyon Goldsmid, 1st Baronet (13 January 1778 – 27 April 1859) was a financier and one of the leading figures in the Jewish emancipation in the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly know ...
,
Henry Hallam Henry Hallam (9 July 1777 – 21 January 1859) was an English historian. Educated at Eton College, Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, he practised as a barrister on the Oxford circuit for some years before turning to history. His major works were ...

Henry Hallam
,
Leonard Horner Leonard Horner FRSE FRS FGS (17 January 1785 – 5 March 1864) was a Scottish merchant, geologist and educational reformer. He was the younger brother of Francis Horner. Horner was a founder of the School of Arts of Edinburgh, now Heriot- ...

Leonard Horner
(The
Royal Society of Edinburgh The Royal Society of Edinburgh is Scotland's national academy of science and letters. It is a registered charity, operating on a wholly independent and non-party-political basis and providing public benefit throughout Scotland. It was establishe ...
has described UCS as his 'monument'),
James Mill James Mill (born James Milne; 6 April 1773 – 23 June 1836) was a Scottish historian ( 484– 425 BC) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC and one of the earliest historians whose work survives. A historian is a person who stu ...

James Mill
, Viscount Sandon (probably either
Dudley Ryder, 1st Earl of Harrowby Dudley Ryder, 1st Earl of Harrowby, PC, FSA (22 December 176226 December 1847) was a prominent British politician of the Pittite The Tories were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of Parliament of England, E ...
or
Dudley Ryder, 2nd Earl of Harrowby Dudley Ryder, 2nd Earl of Harrowby, KG, PC, FRS (19 May 179819 November 1882), styled Viscount Sandon between 1809 and 1847, was a British politician. He held office under Lord Palmerston as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster The Chance ...

Dudley Ryder, 2nd Earl of Harrowby
), James Lock, Stephen Lushington
D.C.L. Doctor of Civil Law (DCL; la, Legis Civilis Doctor or Juris Civilis Doctor) is a degree offered by some universities, such as the University of Oxford , mottoeng = The Lord is my light , established = , endowment = £6.1 billion ...
M.P., John Smith M.P., and Henry Waymouth. The first headmaster was Henry Browne, who quickly caused controversy, by publishing a prospectus for the school which appeared to include some type of communal worship. This was quickly replaced with a new version which also stated that the school would not use corporal punishment (highly unusual at the time). The school opened at 16 Gower Street (from where the sobriquet 'Old Gower' derives) on 1 November 1830 under the name 'The London University School'. Browne soon resigned from his position and was replaced by John Walker (an assistant master). By February 1831 it had outgrown its quarters, in October 1831, the council of UCL agreed to formally take over the school and it was brought within the walls of the college in 1832, with a joint headmastership of Professors
Thomas Hewitt Key Thomas Hewitt Key, Fellow of the Royal Society, FRS (20 March 179929 November 1875) was an England, English classical scholar. Life He was born in London and educated at St John's College, Cambridge, St John's and Trinity College, Cambridge, Tri ...
and Henry Malden. The school was original – it was never a boarding school, it was one of the first schools to teach
modern language A modern language is any human language that is currently in use. The term is used in language education to distinguish between languages which are used for day-to-day communication (such as French language, French and German language, German) and ...
s, and sciences, and it was one of the first to abolish
corporal punishment A corporal punishment or a physical punishment is a punishment The old village stocks in Chapeltown, Lancashire, England Punishment, commonly, is the imposition of an undesirable or suffering, unpleasant outcome upon a group or individual, ...
. It has also been noted that, in fact, UCS had a gymnasium before the school that is generally credited with having the first gym. Originally, there were no compulsory subjects and no rigid form system. Most boys learnt
Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language A classical language is a language A language is a structured system of communication Communication (from Latin ''communicare'', meaning "to share" or "to be in relation with") is "an appa ...

Latin
and French, and many learnt German (a highly unusual subject to teach at that time). Mathematics,
chemistry Chemistry is the study of the properties and behavior of . It is a that covers the that make up matter to the composed of s, s and s: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo during a with other . ...

chemistry
,
Classical Greek Ancient Greek includes the forms of the Greek language Greek (modern , romanized: ''Elliniká'', Ancient Greek, ancient , ''Hellēnikḗ'') is an independent branch of the Indo-European languages, Indo-European family of languages, nati ...
and English were also taught. There was no religious teaching. Under the University College London (Transfer) Act 1905, University College London became part of the federal University of London, and the school was created as a separate corporation. UCS moved away to new purpose-built buildings in Frognal in
Hampstead Hampstead () is an area in London, which lies northwest of Charing Cross, and extends from Watling Street, the A5 road (Roman Watling Street) to Hampstead Heath, a large, hilly expanse of parkland. The area forms the northwest part of the Lond ...

Hampstead
in 1907, which were opened by
Edward VII Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland There have been 12 British monarchs since the political union of the Kingdom of England The Kingdom of Engla ...
with the
Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Clergy#Christianity, Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Cat ...
in attendance on 27 July.
Kikuchi Dairoku Baron was a mathematician, educator, and education administrator in Meiji period The is an era of Japanese history which extended from October 23, 1868 to July 30, 1912. This era represents the first half of the Empire of Japan ...

Kikuchi Dairoku
was invited to the first annual prize giving at Frognal where he represented those who had received their prizes at Gower Street. The new school buildings were designed by Arnold Mitchell and built by the Dove Brothers. The main school block has been
Grade II listed A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England Historic England (officially the Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England) is an executive ...

Grade II listed
on the
National Heritage List for England The National Heritage List for England (NHLE) is England's official database of protected heritage assets. It includes details of all English listed building A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the fou ...
since May 1974.
Prince Edward, Duke of Kent Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, (Edward George Nicholas Paul Patrick; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British royal family The British royal family comprises Queen Elizabeth II and her close relations. There is no strict legal or f ...
, opened the Sixth Form Centre (which also houses the Lund Theatre) in 1974.
Elizabeth II Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of the United Kingdom The monarchy of the United Kingdom, commonly referred to as the British monarchy, is the constitutional monarchy A constitutional mo ...
visited the school in 1980 to celebrate its 150th anniversary and to inaugurate the rebuilt hall, which had been destroyed by fire in 1978. A new library, music school, lecture theatre, computer laboratory, sports hall, geography block, mathematics school and further classrooms were added to the senior school site in 1993 and the Junior Branch buildings were also refurbished, with the addition of an Art & Technology Centre. In 2006 the Sir
Roger Bannister Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister (23 March 1929 – 3 March 2018) was an English middle-distance athlete and neurologist Neurology (from el, νεῦρον (neûron), "string, nerve" and the suffix -logia, "study of") is a branch of medicin ...

Roger Bannister
Sports Centre was officially opened by Bannister (himself an Old Gower). In 2007 a new art, design technology and modern languages building came into use and, in a gesture of respect to one of the school's intellectual founding fathers, was formally opened as the
Jeremy Bentham Jeremy Bentham (; 15 February 1748 Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates">O.S._4_February_1747.html" ;"title="Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates.html" ;"title="nowiki/>Old Style and New Style dates">O.S. 4 February 1747">Old_Style_and_New_Style_dates.htm ...

Jeremy Bentham
building by
Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester, (Richard Alexander Walter George; born 26 August 1944) is a member of the British royal family. He is the second son of Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, as well a ...
on 22 May 2008. In 2009, girls were admitted into the newly co-educational
sixth form In the education systems of England England is a that is part of the . It shares land borders with to its west and to its north. The lies northwest of England and the to the southwest. England is separated from by the to the east ...
for the first time. The playing fields, situated in West Hampstead, were upgraded between 2017 and 2019, with an overhauled drainage system and the building of a new pavilion, named the Kantor Centre. 2018 saw the opening of a newly refurbished library, known as the AKO Centre, replacing the older Enav Library.


Traditions

The school motto is ''Paulatim Sed Firmiter''. In 2016, the school updated its school logo to incorporate its widely known name of UCS Hampstead and to include the full motto in its distinctive roundel emblem. The school's colours are maroon and black which are shown on the school's vertically striped blazers and striped ties. UCS publishes a termly online newsletter called ''The'' ''Frognal'' and a yearly printed magazine called ''The Gower'' sent to current and past pupils. The annual speech day and prize giving ceremony has been hosted by many notorious speakers including, The senior school is divided into three sections by age, and each year has a unique name. Each section is led by a head of section. * Lower school – entry (year 7) and shell (year 8) * Middle school – lower remove (year 9), remove (year 10) and upper remove (year 11) * Upper school – transitus (year 12) and sixth (year 13) Pupils in the lower school are arranged into houses, each named after a bird. In the lower school, there is one form (class) per year in each house. The four houses are Kestrel (blue), Eagle (yellow), Hawk (black) and Falcon (green). Pupils in the middle school and upper school are arranged into demes, each named after a former prominent member of staff. This is similar to a school
house A house is a single-unit residential building A building, or edifice, is a structure with a roof and walls standing more or less permanently in one place, such as a house or factory. Buildings come in a variety of sizes, shapes, and functio ...
. In the middle school, there is one form (class) per year in each deme. In the upper school there are at three form groups per year for each deme. As well as a deme warden (housemaster/housemistress), each deme has deme captains (head of house). Deme, half, and full colours are awarded through an accumulation of academic and extra-curricular achievements. There are regular inter-deme competitions in sport, music, and drama throughout the year. In the middle school, the distinctive school blazer carries a coloured school logo on the breast pocket depicting the pupil's deme. There are currently six demes: * Baxters – blue * Black Hawkins – yellow * Evans – black (pink badge) * Flooks – green * Olders – silver * Underwoods – purple In the final year of school, a team of monitors (prefects) is selected. There are two captains of monitors (informally known as head boy and head girl), and two vice captains of monitors. A notable captain of monitors includes
Hugh Dennis Peter Hugh Dennis (born 13 February 1962) is an English comedian, presenter, actor, writer, impressionist Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement characterized by relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emph ...
, who held this role in 1980. The school song, ''Paulatim'', is sung at the end of every term and the annual speech day and prize giving ceremony. This usually involves pupils throwing their hands in the air in sets of threes, to the phrase ''Paulatim, Paulatim, Paulatim''.


Admissions

There are five main points of entry for prospective pupils: * Pre-prep, at age 4, by internal exam and assessment. As of 2019 the pre-prep no longer has a nursery section. * Junior branch, at age 7, judged by a combination of internal exam and interview. As of 2010, the junior branch no longer operates an 8+ entry point. * Lower school, at age 11, judged by a combination of internal exam and interview. * Middle school, at age 13, judged by a combination of internal exam and interview. * Upper school, at age 16, judged by a cognitive ability exam and interviews. All offers are conditional upon
GCSE The General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) is an academic qualification in a particular subject, taken in England England is a that is part of the . It shares land borders with to its west and to its north. The lies north ...
results. This point of entry is available for girls as well as boys and each year, between 35 and 40 new girls are accepted into the school.


Old Gowers

Former pupils are known as Old Gowers, which was derived from Gower Street where the school was founded. Notable Old Gowers include: *
Thomas Ades THOMAS was the first online database of United States Congress legislative information. A project of the Library of Congress, it was launched in January 1995 at the inception of the 104th Congress and retired on July 5, 2016; it has been supersed ...
– composer *
Roger Bannister Sir Roger Gilbert Bannister (23 March 1929 – 3 March 2018) was an English middle-distance athlete and neurologist Neurology (from el, νεῦρον (neûron), "string, nerve" and the suffix -logia, "study of") is a branch of medicin ...

Roger Bannister
– athlete, first man to run the 4-minute mile *
Dirk Bogarde Sir Dirk Bogarde (born Derek Niven van den Bogaerde; 28 March 19218 May 1999) was an English actor and writer. Initially a matinée idol in films such as '' Doctor in the House'' (1954) for the Rank Organisation The Rank Organisation was a ...
– actor *
Chris Bonington Sir Christian John Storey Bonington, CVO, CBE, DL (born 6 August 1934) is a British mountaineer Mountaineering, or alpinism, is the set of activities that involves ascending mountains. Mountaineering-related activities include traditional ...
– mountaineer *
Rob Buckman Robert Alexander Amiel Buckman (22 August 1948 – 9 October 2011) was a British doctor of medicine, comedian and author, and president of the Humanist Association of Canada. He first appeared in a Cambridge University Footlights Revue in 1968, ...
– doctor and medical writer *
Bertie Carvel Robert Hugh Carvel (born 6 September 1977) is an English actor. He has twice won a Laurence Olivier Award: for his performances as Miss Trunchbull in ''Matilda the Musical'' and Rupert Murdoch in ''Ink (play), Ink''. For the latter role, he als ...
– actor and singer * Gordon Corera – BBC security correspondent *
Joseph Chamberlain Joseph Chamberlain (8 July 1836 – 2 July 1914) was a British statesman who was first a radical Liberal Party (UK), Liberal, then, after opposing home rule for Ireland, a Liberal Unionist, and eventually served as a leading new Imperialism, imp ...

Joseph Chamberlain
J. L. Garvin, ''Life of Joseph Chamberlain'', 1935, p. 33 – Leader of the Opposition, Late Victorian and Edwardian-era politician *
Paul Dacre Paul Michael Dacre (; born 14 November 1948) is an English journalist and the former long-serving editor of the British right-wing tabloid the '' Daily Mail''. He is editor-in-chief of DMG Media, which publishes the ''Daily Mail'', '' The Mail ...
– editor of the ''
Daily Mail The ''Daily Mail'' is a British daily Middle-market newspaper, middle-market newspaper and online newspaper, news websitePeter Wilb"Paul Dacre of the Daily Mail: The man who hates liberal Britain", ''New Statesman'', 19 December 2013 (online ...
'' *
Hugh Dennis Peter Hugh Dennis (born 13 February 1962) is an English comedian, presenter, actor, writer, impressionist Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement characterized by relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emph ...
– comedian and writer * Horace Field – architect * Daniel Finkelstein – ''
The Times ''The Times'' is a British Newspaper#Daily, daily Newspaper#National, national newspaper based in London. It began in 1785 under the title ''The Daily Universal Register'', adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. ''The Times'' and its s ...
'' executive editor, journalist *
Ford Madox Ford Ford Madox Ford (né Joseph Leopold Ford Hermann Madox Hueffer ( ); 17 December 1873 – 26 June 1939) was an English novelist, poet, critic and editor whose journals ''The English Review'' and ''The Transatlantic Review (1924), The Transatlant ...

Ford Madox Ford
– novelist *
Jonathan Freedland Jonathan Saul Freedland (born 25 February 1967) is a British journalist, who writes a weekly column for ''The Guardian ''The Guardian'' is a British daily newspaper. It was founded in 1821 as ''The Manchester Guardian'', and changed its na ...
– writer and journalist *
Alex Garland Alexander Medawar Garland (born 26 May 1970) is an English writer and filmmaker. He rose to prominence as a novelist in the late 1990s with his novel '' The Beach'', which led some critics to call Garland a key voice of Generation X. He subsequ ...
– author and screenwriter * William Court Gulley, 1st Viscount Selby – Speaker of the House of Commons *
Bernard Hart Bernard Hart (1879–1966) was a British physician and psychiatrist. After secondary education at University College School, Hampstead, and undergraduate education at University College London , mottoeng = Let all come who by merit deserve ...
– psychiatrist (1945) *
Tristram Hunt Tristram Julian William Hunt, (born 31 May 1974) is a British historian, broadcast journalist and former Labour Party politician who served as the Member of Parliament A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the people who live ...
– historian and former Labour MP * Oliver Hart – economist, awarded the
Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, officially the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel ( sv, Sveriges riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne), is an economics award administered ...
in 2016 * Leonard Huxley – author and teacher * Rufus Isaacs – Viceroy of India, Lord Chief Justice of England, and Foreign Secretary *
Ian Katz Ian Alexander Katz (born 9 February 1968) is a British journalist and broadcasting executive who became Director of Programmes at Channel 4 Channel 4 is a British free-to-air public-service television network with a remit to produce "high q ...
– BBC ''
Newsnight ''Newsnight'' (or ''BBC Newsnight'') is the BBC's news and current affairs (news format), current affairs programme, that provides "in-depth investigative journalism, investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines." It bro ...
'' editor *
Edward Levy-Lawson Edward Levy-Lawson, 1st Baron Burnham, (28 December 1833 – 9 January 1916), known as Sir Edward Levy-Lawson, 1st Baronet, from 1892 to 1903, was an English newspaper proprietor. He was the owner and publisher of the ''Daily Telegraph''. Bio ...
– editor of the ''
Daily Telegraph Daily or The Daily may refer to: Journalism * Daily newspaper A newspaper is a Periodical literature, periodical publication containing written News, information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray ba ...

Daily Telegraph
'' *
Colin Marshall, Baron Marshall of Knightsbridge Colin Marsh Marshall, Baron Marshall of Knightsbridge (16 November 1933 – 5 July 2012) was a British businessman and member of the House of Lords The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is ...
– businessman, Former CEO of British Airways *
Ernest William Moir Sir Ernest William Moir (9 June 1862 – 14 June 1933) was a British civil engineer and the first Moir baronets, Moir baronet. He is credited with inventing the first medical airlock while working on the Downtown Hudson Tubes, Hudson River Tunne ...
– civil engineer *
David McCallum David Keith McCallum Jr. (born 19 September 1933) is a British actor and musician. He first gained recognition in the 1960s for playing secret agent Illya Kuryakin in the television series '' The Man from U.N.C.L.E.''. In recent years, McCallum ...

David McCallum
– actor, Ilya Kuryakin, Man from UNCLE *
Max Minghella Max Giorgio Choa Minghella (born 16 September 1985) is an English actor and filmmaker. He has appeared in several American films, making his debut in '' Bee Season'' (2005) before starring in '' Art School Confidential'' (2006), ''The Social Net ...

Max Minghella
– actor * David Patrikarakos – author and journalist *
Karl Pearson Karl Pearson (; born Carl Pearson; 27 March 1857 – 27 April 1936) was an English mathematician A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics Mathematics (from Ancient Greek, Greek: ) includes the study of ...

Karl Pearson
– mathematician, inventor of statistical methods *Sir
Roger Penrose Sir Roger Penrose (born 8 August 1931) is a British mathematician A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics Mathematics (from Greek: ) includes the study of such topics as numbers ( and ), formulas an ...
– mathematical physicist, awarded the
Nobel Prize in Physics The Nobel Prize in Physics is a yearly award given by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for those who have made the most outstanding contributions for mankind in the field of physics. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will ...
in 2020 * Daniel Roche – actor *
Herbert Samuel Herbert Louis Samuel, 1st Viscount Samuel, (6 November 1870 – 5 February 1963) was a British Liberal politician who was the party leader from 1931 to 1935. He was the first nominally-practising Jew to serve as a Cabinet minister and to be ...
– leader of the Liberal Party, Home Secretary and High Commissioner for Palestine *
Philippe Sands Philippe Joseph Sands, QC (born 17 October 1960) is a British and French lawyer at Matrix Chambers, and Professor of Laws and Director of the Centre on International Courts and Tribunals at University College London , mottoeng = Let all com ...
– author and human rights lawyer *
Will Self William Woodard Self (born 26 September 1961) is an English author, journalist, political commentator and television personality. He has written eleven novels, five collections of shorter fiction, three novellas, and five collections of non-ficti ...
– writer and TV presenter *
Joseph Horovitz Joseph Horovitz (born 26 May 1926) is a British composer and conductor. Biography Horovitz was born in Vienna en, Viennese , iso_code = AT-9 , registration_plate = Vehicle registration plates of Aus ...
– composer and conductor *
Stephen Spender Sir Stephen Harold Spender (28 February 1909 – 16 July 1995) was an English poet, novelist and essayist whose work concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle Class conflict, also referred to as class struggle and c ...
– poet *
Mark Turin
Mark Turin
– anthropologist and linguist * Sir Julius Vogel – former New Zealand Premier * Dan Wagner – internet entrepreneur *
Julian Lloyd Webber Julian Lloyd Webber (born 14 April 1951) is a British solo cellist, conductor and broadcaster, a former principal of Royal Birmingham Conservatoire and the founder of the In Harmony music education programme. Early years and education Julian Ll ...
– musician *
Geoffrey Wheatcroft Geoffrey Albert Wheatcroft (born 23 December 1945, in London London is the capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. The city stands on the River Thames in the south-ea ...
– journalist and writer


Notable staff

Notable former staff include: *
Alexander William Williamson Prof Alexander William Williamson FRS FRSE Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (FRSE) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Scotland's national academy of science and Literature, letters, judged to ...
; according to ''A Tradition for Freedom'' he taught pupils at the school. *
Augustus De Morgan Augustus De Morgan (27 June 1806 – 18 March 1871) was a British mathematician A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics Mathematics (from Greek: ) includes the study of such topics as numbers ( and ), f ...

Augustus De Morgan
, distinguished mathematician. First professor of mathematics,
University College London University College London, which Trade name, operates as UCL, is a major public university , public research university located in London, United Kingdom. UCL is a Member institutions of the University of London, member institution of the Federa ...
; according to the British Society for the History of Mathematics, taught pupils when the distinctions between the school and college were somewhat blurred. Believed to have taught
James Joseph Sylvester James Joseph Sylvester (3 September 1814 – 15 March 1897) was an United Kingdom, English mathematician. He made fundamental contributions to Matrix (mathematics), matrix theory, invariant theory, number theory, Integer partition, partitio ...

James Joseph Sylvester
. Was the first president of the
London Mathematical Society The London Mathematical Society (LMS) is one of the United Kingdom's learned societies A learned society (; also known as a learned academy, scholarly society, or academic association) is an organization An organization, or organisatio ...
. The
De Morgan Medal The De Morgan Medal is a prize for outstanding contribution to mathematics, awarded by the London Mathematical Society. The Society's most prestigious award, it is given in memory of Augustus De Morgan, who was the first President of the society. ...
is named in his honour. It has been awarded to at least one Old Gower – Sir
Roger Penrose Sir Roger Penrose (born 8 August 1931) is a British mathematician A mathematician is someone who uses an extensive knowledge of mathematics Mathematics (from Greek: ) includes the study of such topics as numbers ( and ), formulas an ...
. *
Carey Foster George Carey Foster Fellow of the Royal Society, FRS (October 1835 – 9 February 1919) was a chemist and physicist, born at Sabden in Lancashire. He was Professor of Physics at University College London, and served as the first Principal (academi ...
, professor of physics at
University College London University College London, which Trade name, operates as UCL, is a major public university , public research university located in London, United Kingdom. UCL is a Member institutions of the University of London, member institution of the Federa ...
* G. S. Carr, according to the British Society for the History of Mathematics * Henry Malden, headmaster *
John Williams John Towner Williams (born February 8, 1932) is an American composer A composer (Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally spoken ...
, taught at UCS post World War II, first Master of Music at St Peter ad Vincula, Tower of London, which was then a royal chapel. Professor at the
Royal College of Music The Royal College of Music is a music school, conservatoire established by royal charter in 1882, located in South Kensington, London, UK. It offers training from the undergraduate to the doctoral level in all aspects of Western Music includin ...

Royal College of Music
. Honorary fellow of the Royal College of Music and Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts * Sir William Smith, lexicographer and teacher * Henry Browne, headmaster *
Thomas Archer Hirst Thomas Archer Hirst Fellow of the Royal Society, FRS (22 April 1830 – 16 February 1892) was a 19th-century mathematician, specialising in geometry. He was awarded the Royal Society's Royal Medal in 1883. Life Thomas Hirst was born in Heckmondw ...

Thomas Archer Hirst
, teacher 1860–1864. Nominated and admitted to the Royal Society whilst teaching at UCS. Later, professor of physics,
University College London University College London, which Trade name, operates as UCL, is a major public university , public research university located in London, United Kingdom. UCL is a Member institutions of the University of London, member institution of the Federa ...
*
Thomas Hewitt Key Thomas Hewitt Key, Fellow of the Royal Society, FRS (20 March 179929 November 1875) was an England, English classical scholar. Life He was born in London and educated at St John's College, Cambridge, St John's and Trinity College, Cambridge, Tri ...
, headmaster * Kenneth Durham, headmaster. Chairman of the
Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference The Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference (HMC) is an association of the head teacher A head teacher, head instructor, headmaster, headmistress, head, chancellor, principal or school director (sometimes another title is used) is the teac ...
2011–2012 * Michael Stanford, taught history at UCS 1958–1967, writer of three books on the philosophy of history ''The Nature of Historical Knowledge'', ''A Companion to the Study of History'', and ''An Introduction to the Philosophy of History''.


Further reading

* ''A Tradition for Freedom The Story of University College School'' by Nigel Watson, James and James (Publishers) Ltd 2007. * ''An angel without wings: The history of University College School 1830–1980'' by H. J. K. Usher, C. D. Black-Hawkins and G. J. Carrick, edited by G. G. H. Page (University College School, 1981). * ''University College School Register for 1860–1931 : with a short history of the school'' by Stanley Leathes, with an introduction by S. N. Carvalho (Published 1931) * ''From Gower Street to Frognal: a short history of University College School from 1830 to 1907'' by F. W. Felkin, (Published Arnold Fairbairns 1909) * ''University College School Register, 1901–63'' compiled by N. Holland (Published 1964) * ''University College School Register for 1831–1891'' edited by Temple Augustus Orme, (published H. W. Lawrence [1892?]) * ''University College School Roll of Honour and War List 1914–18'' compiled by Charles Roadnight Cockman and Cyril Leonard Ross Thomas, (published St. Albans Campfield Press 1922) * On the Japanese connection with UCS see
Japanese Students at Cambridge University in the Meiji Era, 1868–1912: Pioneers for the Modernization of Japan
', by Noboru Koyama, translated by Ian Ruxton, (Lulu Press, September 2004, ).


References


External links

*
University College London

Profile at the Good Schools Guide

Beyond Words Festival website


{{Authority control 1830 establishments in England Educational institutions established in 1830 Frognal Grade II listed buildings in the London Borough of Camden Grade II listed educational buildings History of University College London Independent boys' schools in London Independent co-educational schools in London Independent schools in the London Borough of Camden Member schools of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference People educated at University College School, * Schools in Hampstead