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Her Majesty's Attorney General for England and Wales, usually known as the Attorney General, is one of the
Law Officers of the Crown In England and Wales England and Wales () is a legal jurisdiction covering England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom, parts of the United Kingdom. England and Wales forms the constitutional successor to the former Kingdom ...
. The Attorney General serves as the principal legal adviser to the Crown and the Government in
England and Wales England and Wales () is a legal jurisdiction covering England and Wales, two of the four countries of the United Kingdom, parts of the United Kingdom. England and Wales forms the constitutional successor to the former Kingdom of England and follows ...

England and Wales
. The Attorney General maintains their own office and currently attends Cabinet. The office is also concurrently held with that of Advocate General for Northern Ireland. The position of Attorney General has existed since at least 1243, when records show a professional attorney was hired to represent the King's interests in court. The position first took on a political role in 1461 when the holder of the office was summoned to the
House of Lords The House of Lords, formally The Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the of the . Membership is by , or . Like the , it meets in the . ar ...

House of Lords
to advise the government there on legal matters. In 1673, the Attorney General officially became the Crown's adviser and representative in legal matters, although still specialising in litigation rather than advice. The beginning of the twentieth century saw a shift away from litigation and more towards legal advice. Today, prosecutions are carried out by the
Crown Prosecution Service The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is the principal public agency for conducting criminal prosecution A prosecutor is a legal representative of the prosecution in states with either the common law In law, common law (also known as judicial ...

Crown Prosecution Service
and most legal advice to government departments is provided by the Government Legal Service, both under the supervision of the Attorney General. The job of the Attorney General is highly demanding, and
Sir Patrick Hastings Sir Patrick Gardiner Hastings, (17 March 1880 – 26 February 1952) was a British barrister and politician noted for his long and highly successful career as a barrister and his short stint as Attorney General for England and Wales, Attorney Gen ...
wrote while serving that "to be a law officer is to be in hell". Duties include superintending the
Crown Prosecution Service The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is the principal public agency for conducting criminal prosecution A prosecutor is a legal representative of the prosecution in states with either the common law In law, common law (also known as judicial ...

Crown Prosecution Service
, the Serious Fraud Office, and other government lawyers with the authority to prosecute cases. Additionally, the Attorney General superintends the
Government Legal Department The Government Legal Department (previously called the Treasury Solicitor's Department) is the largest in-house legal organisation in the United Kingdom's Government Legal Service. The Department is headed by the Treasury Solicitor. This office go ...
(formerly the Treasury Solicitor's Department), HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate and the Service Prosecuting Authority. The Attorney General advises the government, individual government departments and individual government ministers on legal matters, answering questions in Parliament and bringing "unduly lenient" sentences and points of law to the
Court of Appeal of England and Wales The Court of Appeal (formally "Her Majesty's Court of Appeal in England", commonly cited as "CA", "EWCA" or "CoA") is the highest court within the Senior Courts of England and Wales The courts of England and Wales, supported administratively ...
. As per the passing of the
Law Officers Act 1997 The Law Officers Act 1997 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom, Act of Parliament which allowed the Attorney General for England and Wales and Attorney General for Northern Ireland, for Northern Ireland to delegate powers to the Solicitor ...
, duties can be delegated to the
Solicitor General A solicitor general or solicitor-general, in common law countries, is usually a legal officer who is the chief representative of a regional or national government in courtroom proceedings. In systems that have an Attorney general, attorney-general ...
, and any actions are treated as if they came from the Attorney General.


History

The origins of the office are unknown, but the earliest record of an "attorney of the crown" is from 1243, when a professional attorney named Laurence Del Brok was paid to prosecute cases for the King, who could not appear in courts where he had an interest.Jones (1969) p. 43 During the early days of the office the holder was largely concerned with representing the Crown in litigation, and held no political role or duties.Jones (1969) p. 45 Although a valuable position, the Attorney General was expected to work incredibly hard; although Francis North (1637–1685) was earning £7,000 a year as Attorney General he was pleased to give up the office and become
Chief Justice of the Common Pleas The chief justice of the Common Pleas was the head of the Court of Common Pleas A court of common pleas is a common kind of court structure found in various common law jurisdictions. The form originated with the Court of Common Pleas (England), ...
because of the smaller workload, despite the heavily reduced pay. The office first took on a political element in 1461, when the holder was summoned by writ to the
House of Lords The House of Lords, formally The Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the of the . Membership is by , or . Like the , it meets in the . ar ...

House of Lords
to advise the government on legal matters. This was also the first time that the office was referred to as the office of the "Attorney General". The custom of summoning the Attorney General to the Lords by writ when appointed continues unbroken to this day, although until the appointment of
Lord Williams of Mostyn Gareth Wyn Williams, Baron Williams of Mostyn, (5 February 1941 – 20 September 2003), was a Welsh people, Welsh barrister and Labour Party (UK), Labour politician who was Leader of the House of Lords, Lord President of the Council and a membe ...
in 1999, no Attorney General had sat in the Lords since 1700, and no Attorney General had obeyed the writ since 1742.Jones (1969) p. 44 During the sixteenth century, the Attorney General was used to pass messages between the
House of Lords The House of Lords, formally The Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the of the . Membership is by , or . Like the , it meets in the . ar ...

House of Lords
and House of Commons, although he was viewed suspiciously by the Commons and seen as a tool of the Lords and the King. In 1673 the Attorney General began to take up a seat in the House of Commons, and since then it has been convention to ensure that all Attorneys General are members of the House of Commons or House of Lords, although there is no requirement that they be so. During the constitutional struggle centred on the
Royal Declaration of Indulgence The Royal Declaration of Indulgence was Charles II of England's attempt to extend religious liberty to Protestant Nonconformist (Protestantism), nonconformists and Roman Catholics in his realms, by suspending the execution of the British penal la ...
in 1672 and 1673 the Attorney General officially became the Crown's representative in legal matters. In 1890, the ability of an Attorney General to continue practising privately was formally taken away, turning the office-holder into a dedicated representative of the government. Since the beginning of the twentieth century the role of the Attorney General has moved away from representing the Crown and government directly in court, and it has become more of a political and ministerial post, with the Attorney General serving as a legal adviser to both the government as a whole and individual government departments.Jones (1969) p. 46 Despite this change, until the passing of the
Homicide Act 1957 The Homicide Act 1957 (5 & 6 Eliz.2 c.11) is an Act of Parliament, Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was enacted as a partial reform of the common law offence of murder in English law by abolishing the doctrine of constructive mali ...
the Attorney General was bound to prosecute any and all poisoning cases. However, in recent times the Attorney General has exceptionally conducted litigation in person before the courts, for instance before the House of Lords in ''
A and Others v Secretary of State for the Home Department ''A and others v Secretary of State for the Home Department''
004 004, 0O4, O04, OO4 may refer to: * 004, fictional British 00 Agent * 0O4, Corning Municipal Airport (California) * O04, the Oversea-Chinese Banking Corporation * Abdul Haq Wasiq, Guantanamo detainee 004 * Junkers Jumo 004 turbojet engine * Lauda Ai ...
UKHL 56 (also known as the ''Belmarsh 9'' case) is a UK human rights case heard before the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords, House of Lords. It held that the indefinite ...
'', where the legality of the Government's detention of terrorist suspects at Belmarsh was at issue.


Role and duties

The Attorney General is currently not a Cabinet minister, but is designated as also attending Cabinet. The rule that no Attorney General may be a cabinet minister is a
political convention The terms party conference (British English, UK English), political convention (American English, US and Canadian English), and party congress usually refer to a general meeting of a political party. The conference is attended by certain Delegati ...
rather than a law, and for a short time the Attorney General did sit in cabinet,Jones (1969) p. 47 starting with Sir Rufus Isaacs in 1912 and ending with
Douglas Hogg Douglas Martin Hogg, 3rd Viscount Hailsham, Baron Hailsham of Kettlethorpe (born 5 February 1945), is a United Kingdom, British politician and barrister. A member of the Conservative Party (UK), Conservative Party he served in the Cabinet of t ...
in 1928. There is nothing that prohibits Attorneys General from attending meetings of the cabinet, and on occasion they have been asked to attend meetings to advise the government on the best course of action legally. Despite this it is considered preferable to exclude Attorneys General from cabinet meetings so as to draw a distinct line between them and the political decisions on which they are giving legal advice. As a government minister, the Attorney General is directly answerable to Parliament.Jones (1969) p. 49 The Attorney General is also the chief legal adviser of the Crown and its government, and has the primary role of advising the government on any legal repercussions of their actions, either orally at meetings or in writing. As well as the government as a whole, they also advise individual departments. Although the primary role is no longer one of litigation, the Attorney General still represents the Crown and government in court in some select, particularly important cases, and chooses the
Treasury Counsel A treasury is either *A government department related to finance and taxation, a Finance minister, finance ministry. *A place or location where treasure, such as currency or precious items are kept. These can be State ownership, state or roy ...
who handle most government legal cases.Jones (1969) p. 48 By convention, they represent the government in every case in front of the
International Court of Justice The International Court of Justice (ICJ; french: Cour internationale de justice, links=no; ), sometimes known as the World Court, is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmenta ...

International Court of Justice
. The Attorney General also superintends the
Crown Prosecution Service The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is the principal public agency for conducting criminal prosecution A prosecutor is a legal representative of the prosecution in states with either the common law In law, common law (also known as judicial ...

Crown Prosecution Service
and appoints its head, the
Director of Public Prosecutions The Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) is the office or official charged with the prosecution of Crime, criminal offences in several criminal jurisdictions around the world. The title is used mainly in jurisdictions that are or have been mem ...
. Decisions to prosecute are taken by the Crown Prosecution Service other than in exceptional cases i.e. where the Attorney General's consent is required by statute or in cases relating to national security. An example of a consent case is the
Campbell Case The Campbell Case of 1924 involved charges against a British communist newspaper editor, John Ross Campbell, J.R. Campbell, for alleged "incitement to mutiny" caused by his publication of a provocative open letter to members of the military. The d ...
, which led to the fall of the first
Labour Labour or labor may refer to: * Childbirth Childbirth, also known as labour or delivery, is the ending of pregnancy where one or more babies leaves the uterus by passing through the vagina or by Caesarean section. In 2015, there were about 13 ...
government in 1924.Jones (1969) p. 50 The Attorney General also superintends the
Government Legal Department The Government Legal Department (previously called the Treasury Solicitor's Department) is the largest in-house legal organisation in the United Kingdom's Government Legal Service. The Department is headed by the Treasury Solicitor. This office go ...
and the Serious Fraud Office. The Attorney General also has powers to bring "unduly lenient" sentences and points of law to the
Court of Appeal An appellate court, commonly called an ''appeals court'', ''court of appeals'' (American English American English (AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US), sometimes called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of variety (linguistics ...
, issue writs of ''
nolle prosequi , abbreviated or , is legal Latin meaning "to be unwilling to pursue".Nolle prosequi
. refe ...
'' to cancel criminal prosecutions, supervise other prosecuting bodies (such as DEFRA) and advise individual ministers facing legal action as a result of their official actions. They are responsible for making applications to the court restraining vexatious litigants, and may intervene in litigation to represent the interests of charity, or the public interest in certain family law cases. They are also officially the leader of the
Bar of England and Wales Barristers in England and Wales are one of the two main categories of lawyer in England and Wales, the other being solicitors. Barristers have traditionally had the role of handling cases for representation in court, both defence and prosecutio ...
, although this is merely custom and has no duties or rights attached to it. The Attorney General's duties have long been considered strenuous, with Sir
Patrick Hastings Sir Patrick Gardiner Hastings (17 March 1880 – 26 February 1952) was an English barrister and politician noted for his long and highly successful career as a barrister and his short stint as Attorney General for England and Wales, Attorney G ...
saying that "to be a law officer is to be in hell". Since the passing of the
Law Officers Act 1997 The Law Officers Act 1997 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom, Act of Parliament which allowed the Attorney General for England and Wales and Attorney General for Northern Ireland, for Northern Ireland to delegate powers to the Solicitor ...
, any duties of the Attorney General can be delegated to the
Solicitor General for England and Wales A solicitor is a legal practitioner who traditionally deals with most of the legal matters in some jurisdictions. A person must have Admission to practice law, legally-defined qualifications, which vary from one jurisdiction to another, to be des ...
, and his or her actions are treated as coming from the Attorney General.Elliott (2008) p. 249


List of Attorneys General


13th century

*William of Boneville (1277–1278) * William de Giselham (1278–1279) * Gilbert de Thornton (1279–1280) *Alanus of Walkingham (1280–1281) *John le Fawconer (1281–1284) *William of Selby (1284–1286) * Gilbert de Thornton (1286–1286) *
William Inge William Motter Inge (; May 3, 1913 – June 10, 1973) was an American playwright and novelist, whose works typically feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. In the early 1950s he had a string of memorable Broad ...
(1286–1289) *John de Bosco (1289–1290), also called John de Boys *
William Inge William Motter Inge (; May 3, 1913 – June 10, 1973) was an American playwright and novelist, whose works typically feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. In the early 1950s he had a string of memorable Broad ...
and Hugo de Louther (1291–1293) *John de Mutford (1293–1299) *Nicholas de Warwick (1299)


14th century

*John de Cestria (1300–1301) *John de Mutford (1301–1308) *Matthew de Scacarrio (1308–1312) *John de Norton (1312–1315) *William de Langley (1315–1318) *Adam de Fyneham (1318–1320) *Galfridus de Scrope (1320–1322) *Galfridus de Fyngale (1322–1324) *Adam de Fyneham (1324–1327) *William of Merston (26 February 1327 – 1327) *Alexander de Hadenham and Adam de Fyneham (1327–1328) *Richard of Aldeburgh (1329–1334) *Simon of Trewythosa (c. 1334) *William of Hepton (1334–1338) *John of Lincoln (28 May 1338 – 4 August 1338) *John of Clone (4 August 1338 – 1338) *William of Merington (1338–1339) *John of Clone (1339–1342) *William of Thorpe (1342–1343) *John of Lincoln (1343–1343) *John of Clone (1343–1349) *Simon of Kegworth (1349–1353) *Henry of Greystok (1353–1356) *
John of Gaunt John of Gaunt (6 March 1340 – 3 February 1399) was an English prince, military leader, and statesman. He was the third of the five sons of King Edward III of England Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377), also known as Edwar ...

John of Gaunt
(1356 – 4 May 1360) *Richard of Fryseby (4 May 1360 – 1362) *William (or possibly Robert) of Pleste (1362–1363) *William of Nessefield (1363 – 9 November 1366) *Thomas of Shardelow (9 November 1366 – 20 May 1367) *John of Ashwell (20 May 1367 – 1367) *Michael Skilling (1367–1378) *Thomas of Shardelow (1378–1381) *William Ellis (1381–1381) *Laurence Dru (1381–1384) *William of Horneby (1384–1386) *Edmund Brudnell (1386–1398) *Thomas Coveley (1398 – 30 September 1399) *William of Lodington (30 September 1399 – 1401)


15th century

*Thomas Coveley (1401 – 13 July 1407) *Thomas Dereham (13 July 1407 – 17 August 1407) *Roger Hunt (17 August 1407 – 1410) *Thomas Tickhill (1410 – 16 January 1414) * William Babington (16 January 1414 – 1420) *William Babthorpe (1420 – 28 October 1429) *John Vampage (28 October 1429 – 30 June 1452) * William of Nottingham (30 June 1452 – 12 August 1461) *John Herbert (12 August 1461 – 1461) *Henry Sothill (1461 – 16 June 1471) * William Hussey (16 June 1471 – 7 May 1481) *
William Huddesfield Sir William Huddesfield (died 1499) of Shillingford St George in Devon, was List of Attorneys General for England and Wales, Attorney-General to Kings Edward IV (1461–1483) and Henry VII (1485–1509). He built the tower of St George's Church, ...
(7 May 1481 – 28 May 1483) *Morgan Kidwelly (28 May 1483 – 20 September 1485) * William Hody (20 September 1485 – 3 November 1486) *James Hobart (3 November 1486 – April 1509)


16th century

*
John Ernley Sir John Ernley (or Ernle) (1464 – 22 April 1520) was a British justice. He was educated at one of the Inns of Chancery from 1478 to 1480 before being admitted to Gray's Inn. By 1490 he was a particularly conspicuous member of the "Sussex circle ...
(April 1509 – 26 January 1518) * John Fitz-James (26 January 1518 – February 1522) * John Roper (February 1522 – 1 April 1524) * Ralph Swillington (1 April 1524 – August 1525) *
Richard Lyster Sir Richard Lyster (c. 1480 – 14 March 1554) was an English judge and Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, Chief Justice of the King's Bench. Origins and early career Sir Frederick Madden in his "Remarks on the Monument of Sir Richard Lyst ...
(August 1525 – 3 June 1529) * Christopher Hales (3 June 1529 – 10 July 1535) *Sir John Baker (10 July 1535 – 8 November 1540) * Sir William Whorwood (8 November 1540 – 8 June 1545) * Henry Bradshaw (8 June 1545 – 21 May 1552) * Edward Griffin (21 May 1552 – 22 January 1559) *
Sir Gilbert Gerard Sir Gilbert Gerard (died 4 February 1593) was a prominent lawyer, politician, and landowner of the Tudor period. He was returned six times as a member of the English parliament for four different constituencies. He was Attorney-General for England ...
(22 January 1559 – 1 June 1581) * Sir John Popham (1 June 1581 – 2 June 1592) *
Sir Thomas Egerton Thomas Egerton, 1st Viscount Brackley, (1540 – 15 March 1617), known as 1st Baron Ellesmere from 1603 to 1616, was an English Peerage of England, nobleman, judge and Politician, statesman from the Egerton family who served as Lord Keeper of ...
(2 June 1592 – 10 April 1594) *
Sir Edward Coke Sir Edward Coke ( "cook", formerly ; 1 February 1552 – 3 September 1634) was an English barrister, judge, and politician who is considered the greatest jurist of the Elizabethan era, Elizabethan and Jacobean era, Jacobean eras. Born into ...

Sir Edward Coke
(10 April 1594 – 4 July 1606)


17th century

*
Sir Henry Hobart Sir Henry Hobart, 1st Baronet (1 Jan 1560 – 29 December 1625), of Blickling Hall, was an England, English politician who succeeded Sir Edward Coke to become Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas. Background and education The son of Thom ...
(4 July 1606 – 27 October 1613) *
Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban, (; 22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626), also known as Lord Verulam, was an English philosopher and statesman who served as Attorney General for England and Wales, Attorney General and as Lord Chancellor of K ...

Sir Francis Bacon
(27 October 1613 – 12 March 1617) *
Sir Henry Yelverton Sir Henry Yelverton (29 June, 1566 – 24 January, 1630) was an English lawyer, politician, and judge. Life The eldest son of Sir Christopher Yelverton and his wife Margaret Catesby, Henry Yelverton was born on 29 June 1566, most likely at Ea ...
(12 March 1617 – 11 January 1621) * Sir Thomas Coventry (11 January 1621 – 31 October 1625) *
Robert Heath Sir Robert Heath (20 May 1575 – 30 August 1649) was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons The House of Commons is the name for the elected lower house A lower house is one of two chambers Chambers may refer ...
(31 October 1625 – 27 October 1631) *
William Noy William Noy (1577 – 9 August 1634) was an England, English jurist. He was born on the family estate of Pendrea in St Buryan, Cornwall. He left Exeter College, Oxford, without taking a degree, and entered Lincoln's Inn in 1594. From 1603 unti ...
(27 October 1631 – 27 September 1634) * Sir John Bankes (27 September 1634 – 29 January 1641) * Sir Edward Herbert (29 January 1641 – 3 November 1645) * Thomas Gardiner (royalist) (3 November 1645 – 1649) *
Oliver St John Sir Oliver St John (; c. 1598 – 31 December 1673), was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons The House of Commons is the name for the elected lower house A lower house is one of two chambers Chambers may refe ...

Oliver St John
(parliamentary) (May 1644 – 10 January 1649) * William Steele (commonwealth) (10 January 1649 – 9 April 1649) * Edmund Prideaux (commonwealth) (9 April 1649 – 1659) * Robert Reynolds (commonwealth) (1659 – 31 May 1660) * Sir Edward Herbert (in exile) (1649–1653) * Sir Geoffrey Palmer, Bt (31 May 1660 – 10 May 1670) *
Sir Heneage Finch Sir Heneage Finch (15 December 1580 – 5 December 1631) was an Kingdom of England, English nobleman, lawyer, Member of Parliament, and politician who sat in the House of Commons of England, House of Commons at various times between 1607 and 1626 ...
(10 May 1670 – 12 November 1673) *
Sir Francis North Francis North, 1st Baron Guilford, Privy Council of England, PC, King's Counsel, KC(22 October 1637 – 5 September 1685) was the third son of Dudley North, 4th Baron North, and his wife Anne Montagu, daughter of Sir Charles Montagu (of Boughton) ...
(12 November 1673 – 25 January 1675) *
Sir William Jones Sir William Jones (28 September 1746 – 27 April 1794) was an British people, British Philology, philologist, a puisne judge on the Supreme Court of Judicature at Fort William in Bengal, and a scholar of ancient India, particularly known for ...
(25 January 1675 – 27 October 1679) * Sir Creswell Levinz (27 October 1679 – 24 February 1681) * Sir Robert Sawyer (24 February 1681 – 13 December 1687) * Sir Thomas Powys (13 December 1687 – December 1688) * (March 1689 – 4 May 1689) * Sir George Treby (4 May 1689 – 3 May 1692) * Sir John Somers (3 May 1692 – 30 March 1693) * Sir Edward Ward (30 March 1693 – 8 June 1695) * Sir Thomas Trevor (8 June 1695 – 28 June 1701)


18th century

* Sir Edward Northey (28 June 1701 – 26 April 1707) * Sir Simon Harcourt (26 April 1707 – 22 October 1708) * Sir James Montagu (22 October 1708 – 19 September 1710) * Sir Simon Harcourt (19 September 1710 – 19 October 1710) * Sir Edward Northey (19 October 1710 – 18 March 1718) * Sir Nicholas Lechmere (18 March 1718 – 7 May 1720) * Sir Robert Raymond (7 May 1720 – 1 February 1724) * (1 February 1724 – January 1734) * Sir John Willes (January 1734 – 28 January 1737) * Sir Dudley Ryder (28 January 1737 – May 1754) * (May 1754 – 3 November 1756) * Sir Robert Henley (3 November 1756 – 1 July 1757) * Sir Charles Pratt (1 July 1757 – 25 January 1762) *
Charles Yorke Charles Yorke PC (30 December 172220 January 1770) was briefly Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. His father was also Lord Chancellor, and he began his career as a Member of Parliament. He served successively as Solicitor-General A so ...
(25 January 1762 – 16 December 1763) * Sir Fletcher Norton (16 December 1763 – 17 September 1765) *
Charles Yorke Charles Yorke PC (30 December 172220 January 1770) was briefly Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. His father was also Lord Chancellor, and he began his career as a Member of Parliament. He served successively as Solicitor-General A so ...
(17 September 1765 – 6 August 1766) * William de Grey (6 August 1766 – 26 January 1771) * Edward Thurlow (26 January 1771 – 11 June 1778) * Alexander Wedderburn (11 June 1778 – 21 July 1780) * James Wallace (21 July 1780 – 18 April 1782) * Lloyd Kenyon (18 April 1782 – 2 May 1783) * James Wallace (2 May 1783 – November 1783) (died in office) *
John Lee John Lee may refer to: Academia * John Lee (astronomer) (1783–1866), President of the Royal Astronomical Society * John Lee (university principal) (1779–1859), University of Edinburgh Principal * John Lee (pathologist) (born 1961), English ...
(22 November 1783 – 19 December 1783) * Lloyd Kenyon (26 December 1783 – 31 March 1784) * Richard Arden (31 March 1784 – 28 June 1788) * Sir Archibald Macdonald (28 June 1788 – 14 February 1793) *
Sir John Scott John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon, (4 June 1751 – 13 January 1838) was a British barrister and politician. He served as Lord Chancellor, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain between 1801 and 1806 and again between 1807 and 1827. Background and ...
(14 February 1793 – 18 July 1799) * Sir John Mitford (18 July 1799 – 14 February 1801)


19th century

Colour key (for political parties): * Sir Edward Law (14 February 1801 – 15 April 1802) *
Spencer Perceval Spencer Perceval (1 November 1762 – 11 May 1812) was a British statesman and barrister. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom The prime minister of the United Kingdom is the head of government The head of government is ...

Spencer Perceval
(15 April 1802 – 12 February 1806) * Sir Arthur Piggott (12 February 1806 – 1 April 1807) *Vicary Gibbs, Sir Vicary Gibbs (1 April 1807 – 26 June 1812) *Thomas Plumer, Sir Thomas Plumer (26 June 1812 – 4 May 1813) *William Garrow, Sir William Garrow (4 May 1813 – 7 May 1817) *Samuel Shepherd, Sir Samuel Shepherd (7 May 1817 – 24 July 1819) *Robert Gifford, 1st Baron Gifford, Sir Robert Gifford (24 July 1819 – 9 January 1824) *John Copley, 1st Baron Lyndhurst, Sir John Singleton Copley (9 January 1824 – 20 September 1826) *Charles Wetherell, Sir Charles Wetherell (20 September 1826 – 27 April 1827) *James Scarlett, 1st Baron Abinger, Sir James Scarlett (27 April 1827 – 19 February 1828) *Charles Wetherell, Sir Charles Wetherell (19 February 1828 – 29 June 1829) *James Scarlett, 1st Baron Abinger, Sir James Scarlett (29 June 1829 – 19 November 1830) *Thomas Denman, 1st Baron Denman, Sir Thomas Denman (24 November 1830 – 26 November 1832) *William Horne (Liberal politician), Sir William Horne (26 November 1832 – 1 March 1834) *John Campbell, 1st Baron Campbell, Sir John Campbell (1 March 1834 – 14 November 1834) *Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet, Sir Frederick Pollock (17 December 1834 – 8 April 1835) *John Campbell, 1st Baron Campbell, Sir John Campbell (30 April 1835 – 3 July 1841) *Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro, Sir Thomas Wilde (3 July 1841 – 30 August 1841) *Sir Frederick Pollock, 1st Baronet, Sir Frederick Pollock (6 September 1841 – 15 April 1844) * William Webb Follett, Sir William Webb Follett (15 April 1844 – 29 June 1845) * Frederic Thesiger, 1st Baron Chelmsford, Sir Frederic Thesiger (29 June 1845 – 27 June 1846) * Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro, Sir Thomas Wilde (7 July 1846 – 17 July 1846) * John Jervis (politician), Sir John Jervis (17 July 1846 – 11 July 1850) * John Romilly, 1st Baron Romilly, Sir John Romilly (11 July 1850 – 28 March 1851) * Sir Alexander Cockburn, 12th Baronet, Sir Alexander Cockburn, Bt (28 March 1851 – 21 February 1852) * Frederic Thesiger, 1st Baron Chelmsford, Sir Frederic Thesiger (27 February 1852 – 17 December 1852) * Sir Alexander Cockburn, 12th Baronet, Sir Alexander Cockburn, Bt (28 December 1852 – 15 November 1856) * Richard Bethell, 1st Baron Westbury, Sir Richard Bethell (15 November 1856 – 21 February 1858) * Fitzroy Kelly, Sir Fitzroy Kelly (21 February 1858 – 11 June 1859) * Richard Bethell, 1st Baron Westbury, Sir Richard Bethell (18 June 1859 – 4 July 1861)


1900–2001

Colour key (for political parties):


2001–present

Colour key (for political parties):


See also

*
Solicitor General for England and Wales A solicitor is a legal practitioner who traditionally deals with most of the legal matters in some jurisdictions. A person must have Admission to practice law, legally-defined qualifications, which vary from one jurisdiction to another, to be des ...
*Attorney General for Northern Ireland (held by Attorney General for England and Wales from 1972 to 2010) *Advocate General for Scotland *Attorney-General for Ireland


Notes


References

* * * * * *


External links

* * {{DEFAULTSORT:Attorney General For England And Wales Attorneys general Attorneys General for England and Wales, Law Officers of the Crown in the United Kingdom