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Giuseppe Ottavio Pitoni
Giuseppe Ottavio Pitoni (Rieti, 18 March 1657 – Rome, 1 February 1743) was an Italian organist and composer. He became one of the leading musicians in Rome during the late Baroque era, the first half of the 18th century. Life Taken to Rome as an infant, he began vocal study with Pompeo Natali at the age of five and sang in the choir of San Giovanni dei Fiorentini from age eight. At Santi Apostoli, Rome, Santi Apostoli he sang and studied counterpoint with Francesco Foggia, where his early compositions were performed. By age sixteen he was ''maestro di cappella'' at Santa Maria Maggiore, Monterotondo, a historic church near Rome. In 1673 as ''maestro'' for the cathedral at Assisi he began intensive study of the works of Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Palestrina, and in 1676 moved to the cathedral at Rieti. In 1677 he returned to Rome for a lifelong appointment as ''maestro di cappella'' at the Basilica of San Marco, Rome, San Marco. In addition he held a series of prestigious ...
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Pitoni
Giuseppe Ottavio Pitoni (Rieti, 18 March 1657 – Rome, 1 February 1743) was an Italian organist and composer. He became one of the leading musicians in Rome during the late Baroque era, the first half of the 18th century. Life Taken to Rome as an infant, he began vocal study with Pompeo Natali at the age of five and sang in the choir of San Giovanni dei Fiorentini from age eight. At Santi Apostoli, Rome, Santi Apostoli he sang and studied counterpoint with Francesco Foggia, where his early compositions were performed. By age sixteen he was ''maestro di cappella'' at Santa Maria Maggiore, Monterotondo, a historic church near Rome. In 1673 as ''maestro'' for the cathedral at Assisi he began intensive study of the works of Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Palestrina, and in 1676 moved to the cathedral at Rieti. In 1677 he returned to Rome for a lifelong appointment as ''maestro di cappella'' at the Basilica of San Marco, Rome, San Marco. In addition he held a series of prestigious ...
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Pietro Ottoboni (cardinal)
Pietro Ottoboni (2 July 1667 – 28 February 1740) was an Italian cardinal and grandnephew of Pope Alexander VIII, who was also born Pietro Ottoboni. He is remembered especially as a great patron of music and art. Ottoboni was the last person to hold the curial office of Cardinal-nephew, which was abolished by Alexander's successor, Pope Innocent XII, in 1692. Ottoboni '"loved pomp, prodigality, and sensual pleasure, but was in the same time kind, ready to serve and charitable". Overview Pietro was born in Venice to the noble Ottoboni family, whose most prominent member had been his granduncle Pope Alexander VIII (1689–1691). The family bought their way into Venetian nobility in the 17th century. He received the clerical tonsure and minor orders on 20 October 1689 and was created cardinal deacon in the consistory of 7 November 1689, receiving the red hat on 14 November. He was superintendent general of the affairs of the Apostolic See and governor of the cities of Fermo a ...
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Just Intonation
In music, just intonation or pure intonation is the attempt to tune all musical intervals as whole number ratio In mathematics, a ratio indicates how many times one number contains another. For example, if there are eight oranges and six lemons in a bowl of fruit, then the ratio of oranges to lemons is eight to six (that is, 8∶6, which is equivalent to ...s (such as 3:2 or 4:3) of frequencies Frequency is the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit of time A unit of time is any particular time Time is the indefinite continued sequence, progress of existence and event (philosophy), events that occur in an apparent .... An interval tuned in this way is said to be pure, and may be called a just interval; when it is sounded, no beating is heard. Just intervals (and chords created by combining them) consist of members of a single harmonic series Harmonic series may refer to either of two related concepts: *Harmonic series (mathematics) *Harmonic ser ...
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Antiphon
An antiphon (Greek#REDIRECT Greek Greek may refer to: Greece Anything of, from, or related to Greece Greece ( el, Ελλάδα, , ), officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country located in Southeast Europe. Its population is approximately 10.7 million as of ... ἀντίφωνον, ἀντί "opposite" and φωνή "voice") is a short chant A chant (from French French (french: français(e), link=no) may refer to: * Something of, from, or related to France France (), officially the French Republic (french: link=no, République française), is a country primarily located in We ... in Christian Christians () are people who follow or adhere to Christianity, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus in Christianity, Jesus Christ. The words ''Christ (title), Christ'' and ''Christian'' derive from the Koi ... ritual A ritual is a sequence of activities involving gestures, words, actions, or objects, performed according to a ...
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Division (music)
In music Music is the of arranging s in time through the of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre. It is one of the aspects of all human societies. General include common elements such as (which governs and ), (and its associated concepts , , and ..., division (also called diminution In Western Western may refer to: Places *Western, Nebraska, a village in the US *Western, New York, a town in the US *Western Creek, Tasmania, a locality in Australia *Western Junction, Tasmania, a locality in Australia *Western world, cou ... or coloration) refers to a type of ornamentation An ornament is something used for decoration. Ornament may also refer to: Decoration *Ornament (art), any purely decorative element in architecture and the decorative arts *Biological ornament, a characteristic of animals that appear to serve onl ... or variation Variation or Variations may refer to: Science and mathematics * Variation (astronomy), any perturbation of the mean motion or ...
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Concertato
Concertato is a term in early Baroque music referring to either a ''genre'' or a ''style'' of music in which groups of instruments or voices share a melody, usually in alternation, and almost always over a basso continuo. The term derives from Italian ''concerto'' which means "playing together"—hence ''concertato'' means "in the style of a concerto." In contemporary usage, the term is almost always used as an adjective, for example "three pieces from the set are in ''concertato'' style." A somewhat oversimplified, but useful distinction between ''concertato'' and ''concerto'' can be made: the ''concertato'' style involves contrast between opposing groups of voices and groups of instruments: the ''concerto'' style, especially as it developed into the ''concerto grosso'' later in the Baroque, involves contrast between large and small groups of similar composition (later called "ripieno" and "concertino"). The style developed in Venice in the late 16th century, mainly through th ...
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Venetian Polychoral Style
The Venetian polychoral style was a type of music of the late Renaissance music, Renaissance and early Baroque music, Baroque eras which involved spatially separate choirs singing in alternation. It represented a major stylistic shift from the prevailing polyphony, polyphonic writing of the middle Renaissance, and was one of the major stylistic developments which led directly to the formation of what is now known as the Baroque style. A commonly encountered term for the separated choirs is ''cori spezzati''—literally, separated choirs. History of the style The style arose in Northern Italian churches in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and proved to be a good fit for the architectural peculiarities of the imposing Basilica San Marco di Venezia in Venice. Composers such as Adrian Willaert, the ''maestro di cappella'' of St. Mark's in the 1540s, wrote antiphonal music, in which opposing choirs sang successive, often contrasting phrases of the music from opposing ch ...
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Homophony
In music, homophony (;, Greek: ὁμόφωνος, ''homóphōnos'', from ὁμός, ''homós'', "same" and φωνή, ''phōnē'', "sound, tone") is a texture Texture may refer to: Science and technology * Surface texture, the texture means smoothness, roughness, or bumpiness of the surface of an object * Texture (roads), road surface characteristics with waves shorter than road roughness * Texture (co ... in which a primary part Part, parts or PART may refer to: People *Armi Pärt Armi Pärt (born 18 June 1991) is an Estonian handballer, playing in French D2 for Massy Essonne Handball. He is also a member of Estonian national team. Club career HC Kehra Armi Pärt ... is supported by one or more additional strands that flesh out the harmony In music, harmony is the process by which the composition of individual sounds, or superpositions of sounds, is analysed by hearing. Usually, this means simultaneously occurring frequencies, pitch (music), pitches (timbre, t ...
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Counterpoint
In music Music is the of arranging s in time through the of melody, harmony, rhythm, and timbre. It is one of the aspects of all human societies. General include common elements such as (which governs and ), (and its associated concepts , , and ..., counterpoint is the relationship between two or more musical lines (or voices) which are harmonically In music, harmony is the process by which the composition of individual sounds, or superpositions of sounds, is analysed by hearing. Usually, this means simultaneously occurring frequencies, pitch (music), pitches (timbre, tones, note (music), ... interdependent yet independent in rhythm Rhythm (from , ''rhythmos'', "any regular motion, " generally means a " marked by the regulated succession of strong and weak elements, or of opposite or different conditions". This general meaning of regular recurrence or pattern in time can ap ... and melodic contour Melodic motion is the quality of movement of a melody, in ...
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Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia
The Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia ( en, National Academy of St Cecilia) is one of the oldest musical institutions in the world, founded by the papal bull ''Ratione congruit'', issued by Sixtus V in 1585, which invoked two saints prominent in Western musical history: Gregory the Great, for whom the Gregorian chant is named, and Saint Cecilia, the patron saint of music. Since 2005 it has been headquartered at the Renzo Piano designed Parco della Musica in Rome. It was founded as a "congregation", or "confraternity", and over the centuries has grown from a forum for local musicians and composers to an internationally acclaimed academy active in music scholarship (with 100 prominent music scholars forming the body of the Accademia), music education (in its role as a College or university school of music, conservatory) and performance (with an active choir and a symphony orchestra, the Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia). The :Conservatorio Santa Cecilia al ...
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Filippo Amadei
Filippo Amadei, also known as Pippo del Violoncello (floruit, fl. 1690–1730) was an Italian composer from Reggio Emilia, who was active in Rome and London. He appears to have worked as composer of cantatas, oratorios, and as a cellist for Pietro Ottoboni (cardinal), Cardinal Ottoboni from 1690 to 1711, the year of his oratorio ''Teodosio il giovane'' (1711), then again from 1723 to 1729. From 1719 to 1722 he was in London, where he wrote the first act of the opera ''Muzio Scevola'' (1721), with the second act by Giovanni Bononcini and the third by George Frideric Handel. Works Oratorio: * ''Teodosio il giovane'' Rome, 1711 on the story of Byzantine emperor Theodosius II (401–450) Operas * ''Arsace'' London, Royal Academy of Music, 1st Feb. 1721. * ''Muzio Scevola'' Act 1, London, Royal Academy of Music, 15 April 1721. Recordings * ''Muzio Scevola''. Palmer. * ''Handel's Rivals'' References {{DEFAULTSORT:Amadei, Filippo 1670s births 18th-century death ...
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Bernardo Pasquini
Bernardo Pasquini (Massa e Cozzile, 7 December 1637Rome, 21 November 1710) was an Italian composer of operas, oratorios, cantatas and keyboard music. A renowned virtuoso keyboard player in his day, he was one of the most important Italian composers for harpsichord between Girolamo Frescobaldi and Domenico Scarlatti, having also made substantial contributions to the opera and oratorio. Biography Pasquini was born in Massa in Val di Nievole (today Massa e Cozzile, in the province of Pistoia, Tuscany). He was a pupil of Mariotto Bocciantini in Uzzano (Pistoia). When he was 13, he moved to Ferrara with his uncle Giovanni Pasquini, where, at the age of 16, he would become the organist of Accademia della Morte and serve from 1653–55, a prestigious post that would later serve as a launching pad for his successors. He was quickly drawn to Rome, and, in 1657, he was appointed as the organist of Santa Maria in Vallicella (Chiesa nuova). In February 1664 he was appointed organist of th ...
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