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Thomas Coram
Sea captain, Captain Thomas Coram (c. 1668 – 29 March 1751) was a philanthropist who created the London Foundling Hospital in Lamb's Conduit Fields, Bloomsbury, to look after abandoned children on the streets of London. It is said to be the world's first incorporated charity. Early life Thomas Coram was born in Lyme Regis, Dorset, England. His father is believed to have been a master mariner. He was sent to sea at age 11. As such, he never received a proper education. In 1694, he was settled in what is now Dighton, Massachusetts, then part of Taunton, Massachusetts, Taunton. Coram lived in Dighton for ten years, founding Coram Shipyard Historic District, a shipyard there. By a deed dated 8 December 1703, he gave of land at Taunton to be used for a schoolhouse, whenever the people should desire the establishment of the Church of England. In the deed, he is described as "of Boston, sometimes residing in Taunton", and he seems to have been a shipwright. He gave some books to f ...
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William Hogarth
William Hogarth (; 10 November 1697 – 26 October 1764) was an English painter, printmaker 300px, Rembrandt, ''Self-portrait'', etching">Self-portrait.html" ;"title="Rembrandt, ''Self-portrait">Rembrandt, ''Self-portrait'', etching, c.1630 Printmaking is the process of creating artworks by printing Printing is a process for ..., pictorial satirist This is an incomplete list of writers, cartoonists and others known for involvement in satire Satire is a genre Genre () is any form or type of communication in any mode (written, spoken, digital, artistic, etc.) with socially-agreed-u ..., social critic Social criticism is a form of Academic or journalistic criticism focusing on sociological issues in contemporary society, in particular with respect to perceived injustices and Power (social and political), power relations in general. It often re ..., and editorial cartoon A political cartoon, a type of editorial cartoon, is a cartoon A cartoon ...
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War Of The Spanish Succession
The War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) was an early-18th-century European war, triggered by the death in November 1700 of the childless Charles II of Spain. It established the principle that dynastic rights were secondary to maintaining the Balance of power (international relations), balance of power between different countries. Related conflicts include the 1700–1721 Great Northern War, Rákóczi's War of Independence in Hungary, the Camisard revolt in southern France, Queen Anne's War in North America and minor struggles in colonial India. Although weakened by over a century of continuous conflict, in 1700 the Spanish Empire remained a global power with its vast dominions including the Spanish Netherlands, large parts of Italy, the Philippines and Colonial Spanish America, much of the Americas. Charles's closest heirs were members of the House of Habsburg, Austrian Habsburgs or House of Bourbon, French Bourbons; acquisition of an undivided Spanish Empire by either ...
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Statue Of Thomas Coram-Brunswick Square
A statue is a free-standing sculpture in which the realistic, full-length figures of persons or animals are carved or Casting (metalworking), cast in a durable material such as wood, metal or stone. Typical statues are life-sized or close to life-size; a sculpture that represents persons or animals in full figure but that is small enough to lift and carry is a statuette or figurine, whilst one more than twice life-size is a colossal statue. Statues have been produced in many cultures from prehistory to the present; the oldest-known statue dating to about 30,000 years ago. Statues represent many different people and animals, real and mythical. Many statues are placed in public places as public art. The world's tallest statue, ''Statue of Unity'', is tall and is located near the Narmada dam in Gujarat, India. Color Ancient statues often show the bare surface of the material of which they are made. For example, many people associate Greek classical art with white marble sculptu ...
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George Frideric Handel
George Frideric (or Frederick) Handel (; baptised , ; 23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German-British Baroque The Baroque (, ; ) is a of , , , , and other arts that flourished in Europe from the early 17th century until the 1740s. In the territories of the Spanish and Portuguese empires including the Iberian Peninsula it continued, together with new s ... composer well known for his operas Opera is a form of theatre Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of performing art that uses live performers, usually actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific ..., oratorio An oratorio () is a large musical composition for orchestra, choir, and solo (music), soloists. Like most operas, an oratorio includes the use of a choir, soloists, an instrumental ensemble, various distinguishable Fictional character, characters, ...s, anthem An anthem is a musical composition File:Chord chart.s ...
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James Cecil, 6th Earl Of Salisbury
James Cecil, 6th Earl of Salisbury (20 October 1713 – 19 September 1780) was a British nobleman, politician, and peer Peer may refer to: Sociology * Peer, an equal in age, education or social class; see Peer group * Peer, a member of the peerage Computing * Peer, one of several functional units in the same layer of a network; See Peer group (computer networking) .... He was the son of James Cecil, 5th Earl of Salisbury James Cecil, 5th Earl of Salisbury (8 June 1691 – 9 October 1728), known as Viscount Cranborne from 1691 to 1694, was a United Kingdom, British nobleman, politician, and Peerage, peer. Salisbury was the son of James Cecil, 4th Earl of Salisbury, ..., and his wife, Anne Cecil, Countess of Salisbury. He was known for his irregular life as "the Wicked Earl". He was educated at Westminster School, was High Steward of Hertford, and a Governor of the Foundling Hospital of London. He married in 1745 Elizabeth (1721–1776), daughter of Edward Keet of Canterbury, ...
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Hatton Garden
Hatton Garden is a street and quiet commercial zone in the Holborn Holborn ( or ) is a district in central London Central London is the innermost part of London London is the capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. The city s ... district of the London Borough of Camden The London Borough of Camden () is a London borough The London boroughs are the 32 local authority districts that make up the ceremonial county The counties and areas for the purposes of the lieutenancies, also referred to as the l ..., abutting the narrow precinct of Saffron Hill Saffron Hill is a street in the south eastern corner of the London Borough of Camden, between Farringdon, London, Farringdon Road and Hatton Garden. The name of the street derives from the fact that it was at one time part of an estate on which s ... which then abuts the City of London The City of London is a city ...
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Hatton Garden 20130413 039
Hatton may refer to: Places Canada * Hatton, Saskatchewan England * Hatton, Cheshire West and Chester, a former civil parish * Hatton, Derbyshire * Hatton, Lincolnshire * Hatton, London, in the London Borough of Hounslow * Hatton, Shropshire, a hamlet in the civil parish of Eaton-under-Heywood * Hatton, Warrington, in the county of Cheshire * Hatton, Warwickshire Scotland * Hatton, Aberdeenshire * Hatton, Angus Sri Lanka * Hatton, Sri Lanka United States * Hatton, Alabama (other), multiple places * Hatton, Arkansas * Hatton, Kentucky * Hatton Township, Michigan * Hatton, Missouri * Hatton, North Dakota * Hatton, Ohio * Hatton, Utah * Hatton, Washington * Hatton, Wisconsin, a ghost town * Hatton, Wyoming People * Angie Hatton (born 1972), American politician * Ann Hatton (1764–1838), British novelist * Bob Hatton (born 1947), English footballer * Bobby Joe Hatton (born 1976), Puerto Rican professional basketball player * Sir Christopher Hatton (1540–1591), promin ...
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Somerset House
Somerset House is a large Neoclassicism, Neoclassical complex situated on the south side of the Strand, London, Strand in central London, overlooking the River Thames, just east of Waterloo Bridge. The Georgian architecture, Georgian quadrangle, which was built on the site of a Tudor period, Tudor palace belonging to the Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, Duke of Somerset, was designed by William Chambers (architect), Sir William Chambers in 1776. It was further extended with Victorian architecture, Victorian outer wings to the east and west in 1831 and 1856 respectively.Humphreys (2003), pp. 165–166 Somerset House stood directly on the River Thames until the Victoria Embankment was built in the late 1860s. The Georgian structure was built to be a grand public building housing various government and public-benefit society offices. Its present tenants are a mixture of various organisations, generally centred around the arts and education. Old Somerset House 16th century I ...
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Rotherhithe
Rotherhithe () is a residential district in south-east London London is the Capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a estuary down to the North Sea, and has b ..., England England is a that is part of the . It shares land borders with to its west and to its north. The lies northwest of England and the to the southwest. England is separated from by the to the east and the to the south. The country cover ..., and part of the London Borough of Southwark The London Borough of Southwark ( ) in south London South London is the southern part of London, England England is a Countries of the United Kingdom, country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its w .... Historically the area was the most northeastern settlement in the county of Surrey. It is located on a peninsula ...
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James Oglethorpe
James Edward Oglethorpe (22 December 1696 – 30 June 1785) was a British soldier, Member of Parliament, and philanthropist, as well as the founder of the colony of Georgia in what was then British America. As a social reformer, he hoped to resettle Britain's worthy poor in the New World, initially focusing on those in debtors' prisons. Born to a prominent British family, Oglethorpe left college in England and a British Army commission to travel to France, where he attended a military academy before fighting under Prince Eugene of Savoy in the Austro-Turkish War (1716–1718), Austro-Turkish War. He returned to England in 1718, and was elected to the House of Commons in 1722. His early years were relatively undistinguished until 1729, when Oglethorpe was made chair of the Gaols Committee that investigated British debtors' prisons. After the report was published, to widespread attention, Oglethorpe and others began publicizing the idea of a new colony, to serve as a buffer betwe ...
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Georgia Colony
The Province of Georgia (also Georgia Colony) was one of the Southern colonies in British America. It was the last of the Thirteen Colonies, thirteen original American colonies established by Kingdom of Great Britain, Great Britain in what later became the United States. In the original grant, a narrow strip of the province extended to the Pacific Ocean. The colony's corporate charter was granted to General James Oglethorpe on April 21, 1732, by King George II of Great Britain, George II, for whom the colony was named. The charter was finalized by the King's privy council on June 9, 1732. Oglethorpe envisioned a colony which would serve as a haven for English subjects who had been debtors' prison, imprisoned for debt and "the worthy poor". General Oglethorpe imposed very strict laws that many colonists disagreed with, such as the banning of alcoholic beverages. He disagreed with slavery in the colonial United States, slavery and thought a system of smallholdings more appropriate ...
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Trustee Georgia
Trustee Georgia is the name of the period covering the first twenty years of Georgia history, from 1732–1752, because during that time the English Province of Georgia The Province of Georgia (also Georgia Colony) was one of the Southern colonies The Southern Colonies within British America British America comprised the colonial territories of the British Empire in America from 1607 to 1783. These c ... was governed by a board of trustees A board of directors is a group of people who jointly supervise the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit or a nonprofit organization such as a business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. The powers, du .... England's King George II, for whom the colony was named, signed a charter establishing the colony and creating its governing board on July 7, 1732. His action culminated a lengthy process. Tomochichi was a Native American that resides along the Savannah River The Savanna ...
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