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Remembrancer
The Remembrancer was originally a subordinate officer of the English Exchequer. The office is of great antiquity, the holder having been termed remembrancer, memorator, rememorator, registrar, keeper of the register, despatcher of business. The Remembrancer compiled memorandum rolls and thus “reminded” the barons of the Exchequer of business pending. There were at one time three clerks of the remembrance, the King's Remembrancer, Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer and Remembrancer of First-Fruits and Tenths (see Court of First Fruits and Tenths). In England, the latter two offices have become extinct, the Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer being merged in the office of King's Remembrancer in 1833, and the remembrancer of first-fruits by the diversion of the fund (Queen Anne's Bounty Act 1838). By the Queen's Remembrancer Act 1859 that office ceased to exist separately, and the monarch's remembrancer was required to be a master of the court of exchequer. The Judicature Act 1873 attach ...
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City Remembrancer
The Remembrancer is one of the City of London Corporation’s Chief Officers; the role dates back to 1571. His traditional role is as the channel of communications between the Lord Mayor and the City of London on the one hand and the Sovereign, Royal Household and Parliament on the other. The Remembrancer is also the city's Ceremonial Officer and Chief of Protocol. Since 2003, the Remembrancer has been Paul Double. He joined the City of London from the Bar and earlier government service. His work in Parliament has centred on the legislation to implement the changes to the city's electoral system. Origins On 6 February 1571 the Corporation of the City of London created the office of Remembrancer, appointing Thomas Norton to the position. The record of the decision reads: The title 'remembrancer' was used for the office as it was responsible for keeping in remembrance the important affairs of the corporation – to act as the corporation's memory. Remembrancer's role and d ...
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King's Remembrancer
The King's Remembrancer (or Queen's Remembrancer) is an ancient judicial post in the legal system of England and Wales. Since the Lord Chancellor no longer sits as a judge, the Remembrancer is the oldest judicial position in continual existence. The post was created in 1154 by King Henry II as the chief official in the Exchequer Court, whose purpose was "to put the Lord Treasurer and the Barons of Court in remembrance of such things as were to be called upon and dealt with for the benefit of the Crown", a primary duty being to keep records of the taxes, paid and unpaid. The first King's Remembrancer was Richard of Ilchester, a senior servant of the Crown and later Bishop of Winchester. The King's Remembrancer continued to sit in the Court of the Exchequer until its abolition in 1882. The post of King's Remembrancer is held by the Senior Master of the King's Bench Division of the High Court. Quit Rents ceremonies The Exchequer Court is reconstituted every year for the thre ...
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King's And Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer
The King's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer is an officer in Scotland who represents the Crown's interests in '' bona vacantia'', '' ultimus haeres'' and treasure trove. The K<R holds two offices, both instituted at the foundation of the Court of Exchequer in 1707 and which were joined in 1836. The King's Remembrancer was the chief executive officer of the Exchequer under the Barons of Exchequer. The Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer's principal duty was the examination and audit of the criminal accounts for Scotland. In more recent history, this officer was the Treasury representative on various Scottish government boards and acted as Paymaster-General in Scotland. From 1835, the King's Rembrancer carried out the duties of the King's Almoner (which office had been suppressed in 1832), including the payment of annuities to those on the royal charity roll. From 1858 the office of K<R was held in conjunction with that of Registrar of Companies, Limited Partnerships and Busin ...
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Treasure Trove
A treasure trove is an amount of money or coin, gold, silver, plate, or bullion found hidden underground or in places such as cellars or attics, where the treasure seems old enough for it to be presumed that the true owner is dead and the heirs undiscoverable. An archaeological find of treasure trove is known as a hoard. The legal definition of what constitutes treasure trove and its treatment under law vary considerably from country to country, and from era to era. The term is also often used metaphorically. Collections of articles published as a book are often titled ''Treasure Trove'', as in ''A Treasure Trove of Science''. This was especially fashionable for titles of children's books in the early- and mid-20th century. Terminology ''Treasure trove'', sometimes rendered ''treasure-trove'', literally means "treasure that has been found". The English term ''treasure trove'' was derived from ''tresor trové'', the Anglo-French equivalent of the Latin legal term ''thesaurus ...
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Crown Office And Procurator Fiscal Service
The Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service is the independent public prosecution service for Scotland, and is a Ministerial Department of the Scottish Government. The department is headed by His Majesty's Lord Advocate, who under the Scottish legal system is responsible for prosecution, along with the area procurators fiscal. In Scotland, virtually all prosecution of criminal offences is undertaken by the Crown. Private prosecutions are extremely rare. The Service's responsibilities extend to the whole of Scotland, and include: * Investigation and prosecution of criminal offences * Investigation of sudden or suspicious deaths * The investigation and prosecution of criminal conduct by the police * Assessment and possession of bona vacantia * Assessment and possession of treasure trove The Lord Advocate is assisted by the Solicitor General for Scotland, both Law Officers. The day-to-day running of the Service is done by the Crown Agent & Chief Executive and an execu ...
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Trial Of The Pyx
The Trial of the Pyx () is a judicial ceremony in the United Kingdom to ensure that newly minted coins from the Royal Mint conform to their required dimensional and fineness specifications. Although coin quality is now tested throughout the year under laboratory conditions, the event has become an annual historic tradition. First held in the 12th century, the event takes place in the hall of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths in London, where the Deputy Master of the Mint (CEO of the Royal Mint) is in effect put on trial before a High Court judge as metallurgical assayers and selected leaders from the financial world sample coins from the mint's output. The boxes in which coins are stored form the ceremony's namesake: the word ''pyx'' derives from the Greek, πυξίς, (''pyxis'') meaning wooden box. In 2017, a total of 35,000 coins were put on trial, consisting of both those struck for circulation and non-circulating commemorative coins. History According to records from ...
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City Of London Corporation
The City of London Corporation, officially and legally the Mayor and Commonalty and Citizens of the City of London, is the municipal governing body of the City of London, the historic centre of London and the location of much of the United Kingdom's financial sector. In 2006, the name was changed from Corporation of London as the corporate body needed to be distinguished from the geographical area to avoid confusion with the wider London local government, the Greater London Authority. Both businesses and residents of the City, or "Square Mile", are entitled to vote in City elections, and in addition to its functions as the local authority—analogous to those undertaken by the 32 boroughs that administer the rest of the Greater London region—it takes responsibility for supporting the financial services industry and representing its interests. The corporation's structure includes the Lord Mayor, the Court of Aldermen, the Court of Common Council, and the Freemen and Livery ...
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Ultimus Haeres
''Ultimus haeres'' (Latin for ''ultimate heir'') is a concept in Scots law where if a person in Scotland who dies without leaving a will (i.e. intestate) and has no blood relative who can be easily traced, the estate is claimed by the King's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer on behalf of the Crown. It is one of two rights to ownerless property that the Crown possess, the others being bona vacantia. Because of ancient nature of the Crown's right, little academic or case law focuses on the application of ''ultimus haeres'' in Scots Law. However, the leading authoritative text in this area is A.G MacMillan, ''The Law of Bona Vacantia in Scotland''. (W. Green & Son, limited, 1936). In England & Wales, such matters are dealt with under '' bona vacantia''. In Scots law, bona vacantia relates to ownerless property alone, rather than property falling part of a deceased's estate with no living heirs. Operation of ''Ultimus Haeres'' Typically, where an individual dies without leaving ...
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Robert De Holywood
Robert de Holywood (died 1384) was an Irish judge and landowner who held the office of Chief Baron of the Irish Exchequer. He was the ancestor of the Holywood family of Artane Castle, and of the St. Lawrence family, Earls of Howth. He was a substantial landowner with property in Dublin, Meath and Louth. He became extremely unpopular, and was removed from office after numerous complaints of "oppression and extortion" were made against him. These were apparently inspired by his close association in the mid-1370s with Sir William de Windsor, the embattled Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.Otway-Ruthven, A.J. ''A History of Medieval Ireland'' Barnes and Noble reissue New York 1993 p.307 Career He took his surname from the parish of Holywood (also spelt Hollywood), near Balbriggan, County Dublin. He was a younger son: an inquest in 1408 described him as the younger brother of William Holywood.''Patent Roll 9 Henry IV '' He was appointed Chief Remembrancer of the Court of Exchequ ...
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Parliamentary Agent
Parliamentary agents are solicitors who are licensed (together with the firms they belong to) by the Houses of Parliament in the United Kingdom to draft, promote or oppose private bills. Private bills are a specific class of legislation promoted by organisations outside Parliament to obtain powers for themselves that differ from the general law. History In 1836, due to the obvious conflict of interest, the Clerks of the House were debarred from carrying out what had been a lucrative line of agency work. Parliamentary agents expanded into the space left by the clerks and formed the Society of Parliamentary Agents in 1840. The high point for parliamentary agency work was during the mid 19th century during the rise of the railway industry, as these companies often needed parliamentary powers in building and running their operations. This was a source of political controversy, since railway directors were becoming seen to be overly powerful, leading the prime minister at the time, Wi ...
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Judiciary Of England And Wales
There are various levels of judiciary in England and Wales—different types of courts have different styles of judges. They also form a strict hierarchy of importance, in line with the order of the courts in which they sit, so that judges of the Court of Appeal of England and Wales are generally given more weight than district judges sitting in county courts and magistrates' courts. On 1 April 2020 there were 3,174 judges in post in England and Wales. Some judges with United Kingdom-wide jurisdiction also sit in England and Wales, particularly Justices of the United Kingdom Supreme Court and members of the tribunals judiciary. By statute, judges are guaranteed continuing judicial independence. The following is a list of the various types of judges who sit in the Courts of England and Wales: Lord Chief Justice and Lord Chancellor Since 3 April 2006, the Lord Chief Justice has been the overall head of the judiciary. Previously they were second to the Lord Chancellor, but th ...
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Exchequer Of Ireland
The Exchequer of Ireland was a body in the Kingdom of Ireland tasked with collecting royal revenue. Modelled on the English Exchequer, it was created in 1210 after King John of England applied English law and legal structure to his Lordship of Ireland. The Exchequer was divided into two parts; the Superior Exchequer, which acted as a court of equity and revenue in a way similar to the English Exchequer of Pleas, and the Inferior Exchequer, which directly collected revenue from those who owed The Crown money, principally rents for Crown lands. The Exchequer primarily worked in a way similar to the English legal system, holding a similar jurisdiction (down to the use of the Writ of Quominus to take over cases from the Irish Court of Chancery). Following the Act of Union 1800, which incorporated Ireland into the United Kingdom, the Exchequer was merged with the English Exchequer in 1817 and ceased to function as an independent body, although the Irish Court of Exchequer, l ...
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