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Live Oak
Live oak or evergreen oak is any of a number of oaks in several different sections of the genus ''Quercus'' that share the characteristic of evergreen foliage. These oaks are not more closely related to each other than they are to other oaks. The name ''live oak'' comes from the fact that evergreen oaks remain green and "live" throughout winter, when other oaks are dormant and leafless. The name is used mainly in North America, where evergreen oaks are widespread in warmer areas along the Atlantic coast from southeast Virginia to Florida, west along the Gulf Coast to Louisiana and Mexico, and across the southwest to California. Evergreen oak species are also common in parts of southern Europe and south Asia, and are included in this list for the sake of completeness. These species, although not having "live" in their common names in their countries of origin, are colloquially called live oaks when cultivated in North America. When the term live oak is used in a specific rath ...
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Quercus Ilex
''Quercus ilex'', the evergreen oak, holly oak or holm oak is a large evergreen oak native to the Mediterranean region. It is a member of the '' Ilex'' section of the genus, with acorns that mature in a single summer. Description An evergreen tree of large size, attaining in favourable places a height of , and developing in open situations a huge head of densely leafy branches as much across, the terminal portions of the branches usually pendulous in old trees. The trunk is sometimes over in girth. The young shoots are clothed with a close gray felt. The leaves are very variable in shape, most frequently narrowly oval or ovate-lanceolate, long, 1.2–2.5 cm wide, rounded or broadly tapered at the base, pointed, the margins sometimes entire, sometimes (especially on young trees) more or less remotely toothed. When quite young, both surfaces are clothed with whitish down, which soon falls away entirely from the upper surface leaving it a dark glossy green; on the l ...
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Live Oak Society
The Live Oak Society is a membership organization for mature live oak trees. It was founded in 1934 to advance the culture, distribution, preservation, and appreciation of the southern live oak (''Quercus virginiana'') and functions under the auspices of the Louisiana Garden Club Federation, Inc. By 2013, more than 7,000 live oaks were registered with the Society. History Dr. Edwin Lewis Stephens, president of Southwestern Louisiana Institute (now University of Louisiana at Lafayette) from 1900 to 1938, founded the Live Oak Society in 1934. In 1957, responsibility for maintaining records and registering new applicants was assumed by the Louisiana Garden Club Federation, Inc. According to Society bylaws, the only human member permitted in the Society is the honorary Chairman, who is responsible for registering and recording live oak members. The only requirement for becoming a member is that the live oak must have a girth (trunk circumference) of 8 feet (2.4 meters) or greater, m ...
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Quercus Geminata
''Quercus geminata'', commonly called sand live oak, is an evergreen oak tree native to the coastal regions of the subtropical southeastern United States, along the Atlantic Coast from southern Florida northward to southeastern Virginia and along the Gulf Coast westward to southern Mississippi,
"FloriData — Quercus geminata", Retrieved 2011-07-06
on seacoast Dune, dunes and on white sands in evergreen oak scrubs. A small- to medium-sized tree, the sand live oak is scrubby and forms thickets. The bark is dark, thick, furrowed, and roughly ridged. The leaves are thick, leathery, and coarsely veined, with extremely revolute margins, giving them the appearance of inverted shallow bowls; their tops dark green, their bottoms dull gray ...
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Quercus Fusiformis
''Quercus fusiformis'' (also often referred to as ''Q. virginiana'' var. ''fusiformis''), commonly known as escarpment live oak, plateau live oak, plateau oak, or Texas live oak, is an evergreen or nearly evergreen tree. Its native range includes the Quartz Mountains and Wichita Mountains in southwestern Oklahoma, through Texas, to the Mexican states of Coahuila, Tamaulipas, and Nuevo León. ''Quercus fusiformis'' is an evergreen tree in the white oak section of the genus ''Quercus''. It is distinguished from ''Quercus virginiana'' (southern live oak) most easily by the acorns, which are slightly larger and with a more pointed apex. It is also a smaller tree, not exceeding in trunk diametercompared to 2.5 m (75 in) in diameter in southern live oakwith more erect branching and a less wide crown. Like ''Q. virginiana'', its magnificent, stately form and unparalleled longevity has endeared it to generations of residents throughout its native range. Its low hanging branche ...
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Quercus Arizonica
''Quercus arizonica'', the Arizona white oak, is a North American tree species in the beech family. It is found in Arizona, New Mexico, western Texas, Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Sinaloa, and Durango. Description The Arizona white oak is one of the largest southwestern oaks. This tree may grow to 60 feet (18 meters), with a trunk diameter of . It has stout branches and a spreading crown. The leaves are about long, thick, and evergreen. It grows very slowly once it has become mature, adding approximately of diameter per year. * Bark: color is light grayish. The bark is initially thin and lenticelled, but later becomes quite thick, with shallow fissures and scaly ridges. * Twig: medium-sized, fuzzy. The color can be light brown or reddish brown. Twigs have pointy and fat clusters of terminal buds. * Leaves: alternate, evergreen, simple, and oblong. The color is yellowish green or bluish green. Leaves are usually 1 to 3 in long. The margins are usually entire or too ...
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List Of Quercus Species
The genus ''Quercus'' contains about 500 species, some of which are listed here. The genus, as is the case with many large genera, is divided into subgenera and sections. Traditionally, the genus ''Quercus'' was divided into the two subgenera ''Cyclobalanopsis'', the ring-cupped oaks, and ''Quercus'', which included all the other sections. However, a comprehensive revision in 2017 identified different relationships. Now the genus is commonly divided into a subgenus ''Quercus'' and a sugenus ''Cerris'', with ''Cyclobalanopsis'' included in the latter. The sections of subgenus ''Quercus'' are mostly native to the New World, with the notable exception of the white oaks of sect. ''Quercus'' and the endemic Quercus pontica. In contrast, the sections of the subgenus ''Cerris'' are exclusively native to the Old World. Legend Species with evergreen foliage (" live oaks") are tagged '#'. Species in the genus have been recategorized between deciduous and evergreen on numerous occasions, a ...
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Specific Gravity
Relative density, or specific gravity, is the ratio of the density (mass of a unit volume) of a substance to the density of a given reference material. Specific gravity for liquids is nearly always measured with respect to water at its densest (at ); for gases, the reference is air at room temperature (). The term "relative density" (often abbreviated r.d. or RD) is often preferred in scientific usage, whereas the term "specific gravity" is deprecated. If a substance's relative density is less than 1 then it is less dense than the reference; if greater than 1 then it is denser than the reference. If the relative density is exactly 1 then the densities are equal; that is, equal volumes of the two substances have the same mass. If the reference material is water, then a substance with a relative density (or specific gravity) less than 1 will float in water. For example, an ice cube, with a relative density of about 0.91, will float. A substance with a relative density grea ...
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White Oak
The genus ''Quercus'' contains about 500 species, some of which are listed here. The genus, as is the case with many large genera, is divided into subgenera and sections. Traditionally, the genus ''Quercus'' was divided into the two subgenera ''Cyclobalanopsis'', the ring-cupped oaks, and ''Quercus'', which included all the other sections. However, a comprehensive revision in 2017 identified different relationships. Now the genus is commonly divided into a subgenus ''Quercus'' and a sugenus ''Cerris'', with ''Cyclobalanopsis'' included in the latter. The sections of subgenus ''Quercus'' are mostly native to the New World, with the notable exception of the white oaks of sect. ''Quercus'' and the endemic Quercus pontica. In contrast, the sections of the subgenus ''Cerris'' are exclusively native to the Old World. Legend Species with evergreen foliage ("live oaks") are tagged '#'. Species in the genus have been recategorized between deciduous and evergreen on numerous occasions, alt ...
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Red Oak
The genus ''Quercus'' contains about 500 species, some of which are listed here. The genus, as is the case with many large genera, is divided into subgenera and sections. Traditionally, the genus ''Quercus'' was divided into the two subgenera ''Cyclobalanopsis'', the ring-cupped oaks, and ''Quercus'', which included all the other sections. However, a comprehensive revision in 2017 identified different relationships. Now the genus is commonly divided into a subgenus ''Quercus'' and a sugenus ''Cerris'', with ''Cyclobalanopsis'' included in the latter. The sections of subgenus ''Quercus'' are mostly native to the New World, with the notable exception of the white oaks of sect. ''Quercus'' and the endemic Quercus pontica. In contrast, the sections of the subgenus ''Cerris'' are exclusively native to the Old World. Legend Species with evergreen foliage ("live oaks") are tagged '#'. Species in the genus have been recategorized between deciduous and evergreen on numerous occasions, alt ...
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Butt (sailing)
A butt joint is a technique in which two pieces of material are joined by simply placing their ends together without any special shaping. The name "butt joint" comes from the way the material is joined. The butt joint is the simplest joint to make since it merely involves cutting the material to the appropriate length and butting them together. It is also the weakest because unless some form of reinforcement is used (see below), it relies upon glue or welding alone to hold it together. Because the orientation of the material usually presents only one end to a long gluing or welding surface, the resulting joint is inherently weak. Nonetheless, it generally provides sufficient strength in most cases, particularly when fasteners are used. The butt joint is widely used in many applications due to its simplicity, notably in rough carpentry and construction. Methods The butt joint is a very simple joint to construct. Members are simply docked (cut off) at the right angle and have a ...
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Mott
Mott is both an English surname and given name. Notable people with the name include: Surname B *Basil Mott (1859–1938), British civil engineer *Bitsy Mott (1918–2001), American baseball player C * Charles James Mott (1880–1918), British baritone * Charles Stewart Mott (1875–1973), American businessman * Christopher Mott, American academic D *Dan Mott (fl. 2000 – 2007), American actor E * Edward John Mott (1893–1967), British soldier *Elias Bertram Mott (1897–1961), American politician F *Frank Luther Mott (1886–1964), American historian * Frederick Walker Mott (1853–1926), British biochemist G * Gershom Mott (1822–1884), American army officer * Gordon Newell Mott (1812–1887), American Congressman from Nevada J *James Mott (1788–1868), American Quaker leader, husband of Lucretia *James Mott (New Jersey politician) (1739–1823), American Congressman from New Jersey * James Wheaton Mott (1883–1945), American Congressman from Oregon * Joe Mott (born 1956), A ...
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Grove (nature)
A grove is a small group of trees with minimal or no undergrowth, such as a sequoia grove, or a small orchard planted for the cultivation of fruits or nuts. Other words for groups of trees include ''woodland'', '' woodlot'', '' thicket'', and '' stand''. The main meaning of " grove" is a group of trees that grow close together, generally without many bushes or other plants underneath. It is an old word in the English language, with records of its use dating as far back as the late 9th century. The word's true origins are unknown; the word, or a related root, cannot be found in any other Germanic language. Naturally-occurring groves are typically small, perhaps a few acres at most.In contrast, orchards, which are normally intentional planting of trees, may be small or very large, like the apple orchards in Washington state, and orange groves in Florida. Historically, groves were considered sacred in pagan, pre-Christian Germanic and Celtic cultures. Helen F. Leslie-Jacobs ...
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