HOME
*





List Of Guilds In The United Kingdom
This is a list of guilds in the United Kingdom. It includes guilds of merchants and other trades, both those relating to specific trades, and the general guilds merchant in Glasgow and Preston. No religious guilds survive, and the guilds of freemen in some towns and cities are not listed. Almost all guilds were founded by the end of the 17th century, although some went out of existence and were refounded in the 20th century. England Alnwick :Black and White Smiths Tom Hoffman,Guilds and Related Organisations in Great Britain and Ireland: a bibliography (Part II) :Butchers :Cordwainers :Joiners and Shoemakers :Merchants :Skinners and Glovers :Tanners :Weavers Bristol :Society of Merchant Venturers (1552), meets Merchant HallJohn Kennedy Melling, ''London's Guilds and Liveries'', pp.6-12 Carlisle :Butchers :Cordwainers :Merchants :Skinners and Glovers Chester :Bakers (1462) :Barber Surgeons :Brewers :Bricklayers :Butchers :Cappers and Pinners :Coopers :Cordwainers :Goldsmith ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Guild
A guild ( ) is an association of artisans and merchants who oversee the practice of their craft/trade in a particular area. The earliest types of guild formed as organizations of tradesmen belonging to a professional association. They sometimes depended on grants of letters patent from a monarch or other ruler to enforce the flow of trade to their self-employed members, and to retain ownership of tools and the supply of materials, but were mostly regulated by the city government. A lasting legacy of traditional guilds are the guildhalls constructed and used as guild meeting-places. Guild members found guilty of cheating the public would be fined or banned from the guild. Typically the key "privilege" was that only guild members were allowed to sell their goods or practice their skill within the city. There might be controls on minimum or maximum prices, hours of trading, numbers of apprentices, and many other things. These rules reduced free competition, but sometimes main ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Guildable Manor
Guildable Manor is a Court Leet in Southwark under the authority of the City of London, along with the King's Manor, Southwark, and the Great Liberty. The name of 'Guildable' first recorded in 1377 refers to the collection of taxes there and was adopted to distinguish this from the other manors of the Southwark area. Its legal title, according to a Royal charter granted to the City by King Edward III in 1327, is 'the ville of Southwark' i.e. 'ville = 'town'; in the more substantive charter of Edward VI it is designated 'The Town and Borough of Southwark' as is stated on its Seal. It is a preserved limited jurisdiction under the Administration of Justice Act 1977. Although neither a guild nor a livery company, the Guildable Manor does have a permanent organization, consisting of Officers and Jurors. The Court of Aldermen of the City appoints a High Steward. Since 1900 this has been the Recorder of London, sitting at the Old Bailey. The Aldermen also appoint a High Bailiff, si ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Merchant Taylors' Hall, York
The Merchant Taylors' Hall in York, England, is a medieval guildhall near the city wall in the Aldwark area of the city. History The hall was built by the Fraternity of St John the Baptist (an organisation connected to the Taylors' Guild) in c.1415. It received a new cladding in the seventeenth century. The main hall is , with ceilings. The adjoining Counsel House (sometimes called the Counting House) contains two stained glass windows by York glass painter Henry Gyles Henry Gyles or Giles (1640?-1709), was an English glass painter based in York. Life He was the fifth child of E. (perhaps Edmund) Gyles, a glazier from York, and lived in Micklegate in the city. His entry in the first edition of the ''Dictionar .... The south window shows Queen Anne, and was made to commemorate her accession to the throne while the side window depicts the coat of arms of the London Company of Merchant Taylors. In the eighteenth century, the building was used for banquets and entertain ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Merchant Adventurers' Hall
The Merchant Adventurers' Hall is a medieval guildhall in the city of York, England. It is a Grade I listed building and scheduled ancient monument. History The majority of the Hall was built in 1357 by a group of influential men and women who came together to form a religious fraternity called the Guild of Our Lord Jesus and the Blessed Virgin Mary. In 1371, a hospital was established in the undercroft for the poor people of York and, in 1430, the fraternity was granted a royal charter by King Henry VI and renamed 'The Mistry of Mercers'. It was granted the status of the Company of Merchant Adventurers of the City of York by Queen Elizabeth I in 1581. The principal parts of the building are the Great Hall, the chapel and the undercroft. The Great Hall is a timber-framed structure and was built over a five-year period. It is the largest timber-framed building in the UK still standing and used for its original purpose. The roof of the hall is of two spans supported by a row of ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Jacob's Well, York
Jacobs Well is a mediaeval Grade I listed building in the Micklegate area of York, in England. It is the church hall of Holy Trinity, Micklegate. Architecture The building was originally a hall house, consisting of a hall rising the full two-stories of the building, with a wing at the east end. It may have had a matching wing at the west end, but no evidence survives. The house is timber-framed, with the ground floor infilled with Mediaeval brick. Its upper floor is jettied. Its main entrance has a 15th-century canopy. The roof is of crown post construction, the roof in the wing being a reconstruction. History The origin of the building is not known with certainty, but its current custodians claim that it was built in about 1474 as lodgings for a chantry priest based at neighbouring Holy Trinity Priory. The construction was funded by Thomas Nelson, a city alderman, who wished the priest to pray for his family. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the building ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

York Press
''The Press'' is a local, daily, paid for, newspaper, for North and East Yorkshire. It is published in the City of York by Newsquest Media Group Ltd, a subsidiary of Gannett Company Inc. The ''Yorkshire Evening Press'' was established in 1882. It changed from broadsheet to compact format in 2004 and shortly afterwards dropped "Yorkshire" from the title. Morning printing began on 24 April 2006, and the paper was given its present name. William Wallace Hargrove printed at 9 Coney Street. Paper was delivered by barge Barge nowadays generally refers to a flat-bottomed inland waterway vessel which does not have its own means of mechanical propulsion. The first modern barges were pulled by tugs, but nowadays most are pushed by pusher boats, or other vessels. ... along the River Ouse. In 1989, publication moved to Walmgate. ''The Press'' has run campaigns including their ''Guardian Angels Appeal'' and ''Change It''. Circulation ABC print circulation for second half of ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Bedern Hall
Bedern is a street in the city centre of York, in England, which originated as a college for the vicars choral of York Minster. History The Bedern College was founded in 1252, to house 36 vicars choral associated with York Minster. The name "Bedern" meant "house of prayer", and was in use by 1270. It was funded by three grants of land in Yorkshire, one in Hampshire, and the rents of 200 houses in York. It was built on land associated with somebody named Ulphus, which was donated by William of Laneham. The buildings consisted of small houses, a chapel, and a dining hall with kitchens, a buttery and a brewhouse, all built around a green. There was also a record room, and behind the buildings lay a garden and an orchard. In 1396, the site was improved by the construction of a latrine, and a bridge across Goodramgate, so that the vicars could enter the Minster Close without crossing the public street. In 1574, the vicars stopped dining together, and from 1640, the dining hall ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Bermondsey
Bermondsey () is a district in southeast London, part of the London Borough of Southwark, England, southeast of Charing Cross. To the west of Bermondsey lies Southwark, to the east Rotherhithe and Deptford, to the south Walworth and Peckham, and to the north is Wapping across the River Thames. It lies within the historic county boundaries of Surrey. History Toponymy Bermondsey may be understood to mean ''Beornmund''s island; but, while ''Beornmund'' represents an Old English personal name, identifying an individual once associated with the place, the element "-ey" represents Old English ''eg'', for "island", "piece of firm land in a fen", or simply a "place by a stream or river". Thus Bermondsey need not have been an island as such in the Anglo-Saxon period, and is as likely to have been a higher, drier spot in an otherwise marshy area. Though Bermondsey's earliest written appearance is in the Domesday Book of 1086, it also appears in a source which, though surviving onl ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  




St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey
St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey is an Anglican church dedicated to St Mary Magdalen in Bermondsey in the London Borough of Southwark. The majority of the present building is late 17th century and is Grade II* listed. Its parish extends as far as the Thames (including the south tower of Tower Bridge, City Hall and part of London Bridge station). The parishes of St Olave Tooley Street, St Luke Grange Road and St John Horsleydown have all been merged into it. History A church of this dedication is first recorded on this site in 1290, serving lay workers at Bermondsey Abbey. The design of that building is not known, but in 1680 the church was demolished and rebuilt, retaining the fifteenth century late medieval tower with a gothic window and arches. This rebuilding was completed in about 1690, and was followed by the addition of a north gallery in 1705 and a south gallery in 1794. The south gallery retains its complete original boxed pews but those in the north gallery have ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

Bermondsey Tanners
"The Master, Wardens and Comonalty of the Art or Mistery of Tanners of the Parish of St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey of Surrey" was incorporated by Royal Charter by Queen Anne on 15 July 1703.Patent Rolls, 2 Anne, Part 4, No. 8, National Archives, C 66/3441 Its authority was to check on the quality of tanning within Bermondsey and an area of thirty miles from it and to apprentice suitable persons to qualify as tanners to a Master i.e. member of the Company. It is therefore a guild. Its practical authority and control of the trade was abolished by the Municipal Corporations Act 1835 but it remained a membership organisation and was largely an association of the leading Bermondsey tanning proprietors throughout the 19th Century. They created the Leather Market and the London Leather Exchange and gentlemen's club on Weston Street which buildings are still extant. These were the families of Bevington, Gale, Barrow, Hepburn and Enderby, among many others. Although the last remnant o ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


picture info

The Boot And Flogger
''The'' () is a grammatical article in English, denoting persons or things already mentioned, under discussion, implied or otherwise presumed familiar to listeners, readers, or speakers. It is the definite article in English. ''The'' is the most frequently used word in the English language; studies and analyses of texts have found it to account for seven percent of all printed English-language words. It is derived from gendered articles in Old English which combined in Middle English and now has a single form used with pronouns of any gender. The word can be used with both singular and plural nouns, and with a noun that starts with any letter. This is different from many other languages, which have different forms of the definite article for different genders or numbers. Pronunciation In most dialects, "the" is pronounced as (with the voiced dental fricative followed by a schwa) when followed by a consonant sound, and as (homophone of pronoun '' thee'') when followed by a ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Great Liberty Of Southwark
Great may refer to: Descriptions or measurements * Great, a relative measurement in physical space, see Size * Greatness, being divine, majestic, superior, majestic, or transcendent People * List of people known as "the Great" *Artel Great (born 1981), American actor Other uses * ''Great'' (1975 film), a British animated short about Isambard Kingdom Brunel * ''Great'' (2013 film), a German short film * Great (supermarket), a supermarket in Hong Kong * GReAT, Graph Rewriting and Transformation, a Model Transformation Language * Gang Resistance Education and Training Gang Resistance Education And Training, abbreviated G.R.E.A.T., provides a school-based, police officer instructed program that includes classroom instruction and various learning activities. Their intention is to teach the students to avoid gan ..., or GREAT, a school-based and police officer-instructed program * Global Research and Analysis Team (GReAT), a cybersecurity team at Kaspersky Lab *'' Great!'', a 20 ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]