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Enniskillen
Enniskillen (, from ga|Inis Ceithleann , 'Ceithlenn's island') is a town and civil parish in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It is almost exactly in the centre of the county, between the Upper and Lower sections of Lough Erne. It had a population of 13,823 at the 2011 Census. It was the seat of local government for the former Fermanagh District Council, and is the county town of Fermanagh as well as its largest town. Enniskillen was named as one of the best places to live in the UK in 2019 by the Times of London; the area comprising Hollyhill, Chanterhill Road and Cooper Crescent was described as 'the best address' for having the 'finest properties' and due to its close proximity to the centre of town. Toponymy The town's name comes from the ga|Inis Ceithleann. This refers to Cethlenn, a figure in Irish mythology who may have been a goddess. Local legend has it that Cethlenn was wounded in battle by an arrow and attempted to swim across the River Erne, which surrounds the i ...
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Enniskillen Castle
Enniskillen Castle is situated in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It was originally built in the 16th century and now houses the Fermanagh County Museum and the regimental museum of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards. History The first Enniskillen castle was built on this site by Hugh Maguire in 1428. It featured greatly in Irish rebellions against English rule in the 16th century. It was besieged by Captain John Dowdall's troops at the start of 1594 and fell on 2 February after a short siege, when the occupants were massacred after they surrendered. The castle was again under siege later that year but was relieved. The fortress finally fell to the irish in 1595. The castle remained in Irish hands until it fell to the crown's Irish ally, Niall Garve O'Donnell in the summer of 1602. Captain William Cole remodelled and refurbished the castle adding the riverside tower at the south, known as the Watergate, in 1609. The ca ...
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Siege Of Enniskillen (1594)
The Siege of Enniskillen took place at Enniskillen in Fermanagh, Ireland, in 1594 and 1595, during the Nine Years' War. In February 1594, the English had captured Enniskillen Castle from the Irish after a waterborne assault and massacred the defenders after they surrendered. From May 1594, an Irish army under Hugh Maguire and Cormac MacBaron O'Neill besieged the English garrison in the castle, and in August they defeated an English relief force. A second relief force was allowed to resupply the garrison, but the castle remained cut off. Eventually, in May 1595, the English garrison surrendered to the Irish and were then executed. Background In 1593, Hugh Maguire, the Gaelic lord of Fermanagh, had objected to the behaviour of the newly-appointed English Crown sheriff Humphrey Willis. Willis had raided and plundered in Maguire's territory. Maguire was not strong enough to resist the sheriff, but after receiving troops from Hugh O'Neill, Earl of Tyrone, Maguire expelled Willis. In May ...
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County Fermanagh
County Fermanagh ( ; ) is one of the thirty-two counties of Ireland, one of the six counties of Northern Ireland and one of the nine counties of Ulster. The county covers an area of 1,691 km2 (653 sq mi) and has a population of 61,805 as of 2011. Enniskillen is the county town and largest in both size and population. Fermanagh is one of four counties of Northern Ireland to have a majority of its population from a Catholic background, according to the 2011 census. Geography Fermanagh is situated in the southwest corner of Northern Ireland. It spans an area of 1,851 km2 (715 sq; mi), accounting for 13.2% of the landmass of Northern Ireland. Nearly a third of the county is covered by lakes and waterways, including Upper and Lower Lough Erne and the River Erne. Forests cover 14% of the landmass (42,000 hectares). It is the only county in Northern Ireland that does not border Lough Neagh. The county has three prominent upland areas: * the expansive West Ferma ...
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Portora Royal School
Portora Royal School located in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, was one of the Public Schools founded by the Royal Charter in 1608, by James I, making it one of the oldest schools in Ireland at the time of its closure. Originally called Enniskillen Royal School, the school was established some ten years after the Royal Decree, in 1618, 15 miles outside Enniskillen at Ballybalfour, before moving to Enniskillen in 1661. It was not until 1778 that the school moved to its final location on Portora Hill, Enniskillen, where the nucleus of the later all boys school was built. The school admitted a mixture of boarders and day pupils for much of its history, but became a day school in the 1990s. On 28 June 2016, Portora Royal School closed. Portora Royal School amalgamated with Enniskillen Collegiate Grammar School which launched the mixed Enniskillen Royal Grammar School on 1 September 2016, which is partially based on the original site of Portora Hill and the site of En ...
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Battle Of The Ford Of The Biscuits
The Battle of the Ford of the Biscuits took place in Fermanagh, Ireland on 7 August 1594, during the Nine Years' War. A column of almost 650 English troops led by Sir Henry Duke was ambushed and defeated by a Gaelic Irish force under Hugh Maguire and Cormac MacBaron O'Neill at the Arney River. The English column had been sent to relieve and resupply Enniskillen Castle, which had been under siege by the Irish since May. The English suffered at least 56 killed and 69 wounded, and were forced to make a hasty retreat. The battle gained its name because the supplies of the English, largely hard biscuits, were left scattered and floating in the river. The battle was an early engagement of the Nine Years' War, and exposed the vulnerability of the English to ambushes in the wilder parts of Ulster with its thick woods and bogs. Background As part of the Tudor conquest of Ireland, a policy of surrender and regrant was introduced that involved the formal submission of the Gaelic lords to t ...
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Lough Erne
Lough Erne ( , ) is the name of two connected lakes in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. It is the second-biggest lake system in Northern Ireland and Ulster, and the fourth biggest in Ireland. The lakes are widened sections of the River Erne, which flows north and then curves west into the Atlantic. The smaller southern lake is called the Upper Lough as it is higher up the river. The bigger northern lake is called the Lower Lough or Broad Lough. The town of Enniskillen lies on the short stretch of river between the lakes. The lake has more than 150 islands, along with many coves and inlets. When windy, navigation on Lower Lough Erne, running for 26 miles (42 km) almost to the Atlantic, can be something of a challenge with waves of open-sea dimensions. Shallow Upper Lough Erne, spreading southeast of Enniskillen for about 12 miles, is a maze of islands. The River Erne is 80 miles (129 km) long and drains an area of about 1680 square miles (4,350 km2). Name, mytholo ...
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Fermanagh District Council
Fermanagh District Council was a local council in Northern Ireland. It was created out of Fermanagh County Council and later merged with Omagh District Council in April 2015 under local government reorganisation to become Fermanagh and Omagh District Council. The borders of the district were very similar to those of the traditional County Fermanagh, containing all of that county plus a small section of County Tyrone in the Dromore Road (Irvinestown ward) and Kilskeery Road areas. Council headquarters were in Enniskillen. Fermanagh District Council was a unique local authority in that it covered at least one entire county in Northern Ireland. County Fermanagh makes up one eighth of Northern Ireland's land mass, and the district council represented the largest local government district in geographical terms in Northern Ireland. One fifth of the area is covered by water, largely Lough Erne. The county has a population of just under 62,000, up 7% since 2001, of which 70% live in rura ...
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Maguire (surname)
Maguire ( , also spelled Mac Guire or McGuire) is an Irish surname from the Irish language , which is "son of Odhar" or "son of the dun or dark coloured one". According to legend, the eleventh in descent from Colla da Chrich, great-grandson of Cormac mac Airt, monarch of Ireland about the middle of the third century. From the 13th to the 17th centuries, the Maguires were kings of Fermanagh. As a given name, Maguire is uncommon. Naming conventions The surname has been Anglicised variously as Maguire, McGuire and McGwire. History The Maguire sept is primarily associated with modern-day County Fermanagh. They possessed the entire county, also known as Maguire's Country, from about 1250 C.E. and maintained their independence as Lords of Fermanagh down to the reign of King James VI & I, when their country was confiscated like other parts of Ulster. The Maguires supplied Chiefs or Princes to Fermanagh, from about A.D. 1264, when they supplanted the former Chieftains (Ó Daimhín, or ...
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Cethlenn
In Irish mythology, Caitlín ( sga|Cethlenn, Cethleann, Ceithlenn, Ceithlionn|italic=no) was the wife of Balor of the Fomorians and, by him, the mother of Ethniu. She was also a prophetess and warned Balor of his impending defeat by the Tuatha Dé Danann in the second battle of Magh Tuiredh. During that battle she wounded the Dagda with a projectile weapon. She was also known by the nickname Cethlenn of the Crooked Teeth. Name Ceithlinn in modern Irish is pronounced like "Kehlen", and her name is sometimes indicated by that spelling. Kethlenda is the form of the name that appeared in Roderick O'Flaherty's ''Ogygia'' or ''Rerum Hibernicarum Chronologia'', written in Latin, reused as "Kethlenda of the Crooked Teeth" by story-reteller P. W. Joyce. ;Nickname Ceithlinn is called by the nickname Ceithlion Chaisfhiaclach "the crooked toothed" in the ''Oidheadh Chloinne Tuireann'', also translatable as "twisted teeth", from Irish ''cas'' 'twisted'. She is also glossed as being "buck-toothed ...
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River Erne
The River Erne ( , ga|Abhainn na hÉirne or ''An Éirne'') in the northwest of the island of Ireland, is the second-longest river in Ulster, flowing through Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and forming part of their border. Course The Erne rises on the east shoulder of Slieve Glah mountain three miles south of Cavan in County Cavan, Republic of Ireland, and flows 80 miles (129 km) through Lough Gowna, Lough Oughter and Upper and Lower Lough Erne, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, to the sea at Ballyshannon, County Donegal back in the Republic. For 30 miles from Crossdoney in County Cavan to Enniskillen in County Fermanagh, it is difficult to distinguish the river as it winds its way through interconnected loughs or parts of loughs nestling among the drumlin hills of Cavan and south Fermanagh. The river is 120 kilometres long and is used for fly fishing for trout and salmon, with a number of fisheries along both the river itself and its tributaries. The t ...
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Ulster
Ulster (; ga|Ulaidh or ''Cúige Uladh'' ; sco|label=Ulster Scots|Ulstèr or ''Ulster'') is one of the four traditional Irish provinces, in the north of Ireland. It is made up of nine counties: six of these constitute Northern Ireland (a part of the United Kingdom); the remaining three are in the Republic of Ireland. It is the second-largest (after Munster) and second-most populous (after Leinster) of Ireland's four provinces, with Belfast being its biggest city. Unlike the other provinces, Ulster has a high percentage of Protestants, making up almost half of its population. English is the main language and Ulster English the main dialect. A minority also speak Irish, and there are Gaeltachtaí (Irish-speaking regions) in southern County Londonderry, the Gaeltacht Quarter of Belfast and in Donegal, where 25% of the total Gaeltacht population of Ireland is located. Lough Neagh, in the east, is the largest lake in the British Isles, while Lough Erne in the west is one of its la ...
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Fermanagh And Omagh District Council
Fermanagh and Omagh District Council ( ga|Comhairle Ceantair Fhear Manach agus na hÓmaí; Ulster-Scots: ''Districk Cooncil o Fermanagh an Omey'') is a local authority in Northern Ireland and was established on 1 April 2015. It replaced Fermanagh District Council and Omagh District Council and covers most of the southwest of Northern Ireland. Its first election was on 22 May 2014, and it acted as a shadow authority prior to the creation of the Fermanagh and Omagh district in April 2015. Chairmanship Chairman Vice Chairman Councillors For the purpose of elections the council is divided into seven district electoral areas (DEA): Seat summary Councillors by electoral area †'' Co-opted to fill a vacancy since the election.''‡'' Changed party affiliation since the election.Last updated 28 March 2020.'' ''For further details see 2019 Fermanagh and Omagh District Council election'' Population The area covered by the new council has a population of 113,161 resi ...
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Fermanagh And South Tyrone (UK Parliament Constituency)
Fermanagh and South Tyrone is a parliamentary constituency in the British House of Commons. The current MP is Michelle Gildernew of Sinn Féin. Boundaries 1950–1983: The county of Fermanagh, the Urban District of Dungannon, the Rural Districts of Clogher and Dungannon, and that part of the Rural District of Omagh consisting of the District Electoral Divisions of Aghafad, Dervaghroy, Dromore, Drumharvey, Ecclesville, Fallaghearn, Fintona, Greenan, Killskerry, Lifford, Moorfield, Rahoney, Seskinore, Tattymoyle and Trillick. 1983–1997: The District of Fermanagh, and the District of Dungannon. 1997–present: The District of Fermanagh, and the District of Dungannon wards of Augher, Aughnacloy, Ballygawley, Ballysaggart, Benburb, Caledon, Castlecaulfield, Clogher, Coolhill, Drumglass, Fivemiletown, Killyman, Killymeal, Moy, Moygashel, and Mullaghmore. The constituency was created in 1950 when the old Fermanagh and Tyrone two-member constituency was abolished as part of the fin ...
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Arney River
The Arney River is a small river in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, feeding from Lower Lough MacNean and into Upper Lough Erne. It meanders through a wide, flat Glacial Trough between the uplands of Fermanagh, Belmore Mountain and the Cuilcagh Mountains. The valley is characterised by wide flat lowlands enclosed by low hills. The Cladagh River drains into the Arney River. There are six bridging points on the Arney River, five of these are suitable for motorised vehicles, while one is located on private land near to the source of the river. Angling The river is often used by amateur anglers who are fishing for salmon and trout, however, the river is mainly populated by perch. Battle of the Ford of the Biscuits In February 1594, an English army took and garrisoned Enniskillen. The fort was promptly besieged by Hugh Maguire, Red Hugh O’Donnell and Cormac McBarron O’Neill (Hugh O’Neill’s brother). In August 1594 an English relief army led by Sir Henry Duke was ambushed o ...
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County Town
In the United Kingdom and Ireland, a county town is the most important town or city in a county. It is usually the location of administrative or judicial functions within a county and the place where the county's members of Parliament are elected. Following the establishment of the English county councils in 1889, the headquarters of the new councils were usually located in the county town of each county. However, the concept of a county town pre-dates the establishment of these councils. The concept of a county town is ill-defined and unofficial. Some counties have their administrative bodies located elsewhere. For example, Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire, but the county council is located in Preston. Some county towns are no longer situated within the administrative county because of changes in the county's boundaries. For example, Nottingham is administered by a unitary authority separate from the rest of Nottinghamshire. UK county towns, pre-19th-century reforms H ...
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