Yiewsley And West Drayton Urban District Council
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Yiewsley And West Drayton Urban District Council
Yiewsley and West Drayton was a local government district in Middlesex, England from 1929 to 1965. Its area became the south-west of the London Borough of Hillingdon. Establishment and expansion The Yiewsley and West Drayton Urban District evolved from the Yiewsley Urban District which had been established on 14 April 1911 by an Order of the Middlesex County Council granting the Civil Parish of Yiewsley urban powers. Historically Yiewsley had been a district in the Parish of Hillingdon and became part of the Parish of Hillingdon East when the Hillingdon Parish was divided under the Local Government Act of 1894, also becoming part of the new Uxbridge Rural District. Yiewsley became a Civil Parish in 1896, remaining in the Uxbridge Rural District until becoming an Urban District in 1911. On 7 December 1928 Middlesex County Council issued an Order for the Uxbridge Rural District to be amalgamated into the Uxbridge Urban District, with the exception of the Parish of North ...
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Urban District (Great Britain And Ireland)
In England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland, an urban district was a type of local government district that covered an urbanised area. Urban districts had an elected urban district council (UDC), which shared local government responsibilities with a county council. England and Wales In England and Wales, urban districts and rural districts were created in 1894 (by the Local Government Act 1894) as subdivisions of administrative counties. They replaced the earlier system of urban and rural sanitary districts (based on poor law unions) the functions of which were taken over by the district councils. The district councils also had wider powers over local matters such as parks, cemeteries and local planning. An urban district usually contained a single parish, while a rural district might contain many. Urban districts were considered to have more problems with public health than rural areas, and so urban district councils had more funding and greater powe ...
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Ruislip-Northwood Urban District
Ruislip-Northwood was an urban district in west Middlesex, England, from 1904 to 1965. From its inception Ruislip-Northwood fell within the Metropolitan Police District and from 1933 it was part of the London Passenger Transport Area. The urban district council presided over a huge increase in population as the Metropolitan Railway gave rise to many new development opportunities. This created many challenges to improve public services and housing while preserving the area's heritage sites. In 1931 King's College, Cambridge sold their final plots of land to the council, having been owners of much of the land in the manor of Ruislip since the mid-15th century. The urban district was abolished in 1965 and its former area was incorporated into the newly established London Borough of Hillingdon, as part of Greater London. History Creation The urban district was created on 30 September 1904, covering the parish of Ruislip, which had previously been part of Uxbridge Rural District ...
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Chief (heraldry)
In heraldic blazon, a chief is a charge on a coat of arms that takes the form of a band running horizontally across the top edge of the shield. Writers disagree in how much of the shield's surface is to be covered by the chief, ranging from one-fourth to one-third. The former is more likely if the chief is ''uncharged'', that is, if it does not have other objects placed on it. If ''charged'', the chief is typically wider to allow room for the objects drawn there. The chief is one of the ordinaries in heraldry, along with the bend, chevron, fess, and pale. There are several other ordinaries and sub-ordinaries. Variations of chief The chief may bear charges and may also be subject to variations of the partition lines. It cannot, however, be ''cotised''. The chief may be combined with another ordinary, such as a pale or a saltire, but is almost never surmounted by another ordinary. The chief will normally be superimposed over a bordure, orle and tressure, if they share the sa ...
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Argent (heraldry)
In heraldry, argent () is the tincture of silver, and belongs to the class of light tinctures called "metals". It is very frequently depicted as white and usually considered interchangeable with it. In engravings and line drawings, regions to be tinctured ''argent'' are either left blank, or indicated with the abbreviation ''ar''. The name derives from Latin ''argentum'', translated as "silver" or "white metal". The word ''argent'' had the same meaning in Old French ''blazon'', whence it passed into the English language. In some historical depictions of coats of arms, a kind of silver leaf was applied to those parts of the device that were argent. Over time, the silver content of these depictions has tarnished and darkened. As a result, it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish regions that were intended as "argent" from those that were " sable". This leaves a false impression that the rule of tincture has been violated in cases where, when applied next to a dark colour, ar ...
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Eagle (heraldry)
The eagle is used in heraldry as a charge, as a supporter, and as a crest. Heraldic eagles can be found throughout world history like in the Achaemenid Empire or in the present Republic of Indonesia. The European post-classical symbolism of the heraldic eagle is connected with the Roman Empire on one hand (especially in the case of the double-headed eagle), and with Saint John the Evangelist on the other. History A golden eagle was often used on the banner of the Achaemenid Empire of Persia. Eagle (or the related royal bird ''vareghna'') symbolized ''khvarenah'' (the God-given glory), and the Achaemenid family was associated with eagle (according to legend, Achaemenes was raised by an eagle). The local rulers of Persis in the Seleucid and Parthian eras (3rd-2nd centuries BC) sometimes used an eagle as the finial of their banner. Parthians and Armenians used eagle banners, too. European heraldry In Europe the iconography of the heraldic eagle, as with other heraldic ...
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Sable (heraldry)
In heraldry, sable () is the tincture black, and belongs to the class of dark tinctures, called "colours". In engravings and line drawings, it is sometimes depicted as a region of crossed horizontal and vertical lines, or else marked with ''sa.'' as an abbreviation. The name derives from the black fur of the sable, a species of marten. Poetic meanings Centuries ago, arms were often described poetically and the tinctures were connected to different gemstones, flowers and heavenly bodies. Sable usually represented the following: * Of jewels, the diamond * Of heavenly bodies, Saturn * Of flowers, the herb nightshade, in these circumstances also called dwal Gallery File:Arms of Dalzell, Earl of Carnwath.svg, Arms of Dalziel family of Scotland File:Arms of the Foljambe family of Walton.png, Arms of the Foljambe family of Walton, Osberton and Aldwark. File:Blason fam nl van Borssele de Zuylen 1.svg, Coat of arms of Frank II van Borselen. File:DEU Hueckelhoven COA.svg, Coat of arms ...
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Vert (heraldry)
In classical heraldry, vert () is the tincture equivalent to the colour "green". It is one of the five dark tinctures (''colours''). The word ''vert'' is simply the French for "green". It is used in English in the sense of a heraldic tincture since the early 16th century. In Modern French, ''vert'' is not used as a heraldic term. Instead, the French heraldic term for green tincture is ''sinople''. This has been the case since c. the 16th century. In medieval French heraldry, ''vert'' also meant "green" while ''sinople'' was a shade of red. Vert is portrayed by the conventions of heraldic "hatching" (in black and white engravings) by lines at a 45-degree angle from upper left to lower right, or indicated by the abbreviation vt. when a coat of arms is tricked. The colour green is commonly found in modern flags and coat of arms, and to a lesser extent also in the classical heraldry of the Late Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. Green flags were historically carried by Ottoka ...
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Or (heraldry)
In heraldry, or (/ɔːʁ/; French for "gold") is the tincture of gold and, together with argent (silver), belongs to the class of light tinctures called "metals", or light colours. In engravings and line drawings, it is hatched using a field of evenly spaced dots. It is very frequently depicted as yellow, though gold leaf was used in many illuminated manuscripts and more extravagant rolls of arms. The word "gold" is occasionally used in place of "or" in blazon, sometimes to prevent repetition of the word "or" in a blazon, or because this substitution was in fashion when the blazon was first written down, or when it is preferred by the officer of arms. The use of "gold" for "or" (and "silver" for "argent") was a short-lived fashion amongst certain heraldic writers in the mid-20th century who attempted to "demystify" and popularise the subject of heraldry. "Or" is sometimes spelled with a capital letter (e.g. "Gules, a fess Or") so as not to confuse it with the conjunction "or". ...
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Chevron (insignia)
A chevron (also spelled cheveron, especially in older documents) is a V-shaped mark or symbol, often inverted. The word is usually used in reference to a kind of fret in architecture, or to a badge or insignia used in military or police uniforms to indicate rank or length of service, or in heraldry and the designs of flags (see flag terminology). Ancient history Appearing on pottery and petrographs throughout the ancient world, the chevron can be considered to be one of the oldest symbols in human history, with V-shaped markings occurring as early as the Neolithic era (6th to 5th millennia BC) as part of the Vinča symbols inventory. The Vinča culture responsible for the symbols appear to have used the chevron as part of a larger proto-writing system rather than any sort of heraldic or decorative use, and are not known to have passed the symbol on to any subsequent cultures.Mäder, Michael: ''Ist die Donauschrift Schrift?'' Budapest: Archaeolingua. , (2019), Many comparativ ...
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Coronation Of Queen Elizabeth II
The coronation of the British monarch, coronation of Elizabeth II took place on 2 June 1953 at Westminster Abbey in London. She acceded to the throne at the age of 25 upon the death of her father, George VI, on 6 February 1952, being Proclamation of accession of Elizabeth II, proclaimed queen by her privy and executive councils shortly afterwards. The coronation was held more than one year later because of the tradition of allowing an appropriate length of time to pass after a monarch dies before holding such festivals. It also gave the planning committees adequate time to make preparations for the ceremony. During the service, Elizabeth took an Oath of office, oath, was Anointing, anointed with Chrism, holy oil, was invested with robes and Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom, regalia, and was crowned Queen of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Union of South Africa, South Africa, Dominion of Pakistan, Pakistan, and Dominion of Ceylon, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). Cel ...
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London Heathrow Airport
Heathrow Airport (), called ''London Airport'' until 1966 and now known as London Heathrow , is a major international airport in London, England. It is the largest of the six international airports in the London airport system (the others being Gatwick, City, Luton, Stansted and Southend). The airport facility is owned and operated by Heathrow Airport Holdings. In 2021, it was the seventh-busiest airport in the world by international passenger traffic and eighth-busiest in Europe by total passenger traffic. Heathrow was founded as a small airfield in 1929 but was developed into a much larger airport after World War II. The airport lies west of Central London on a site that covers . It was gradually expanded over seventy-five years and now has two parallel east-west runways, four operational passengers terminals and one cargo terminal. The airport is the primary hub for both British Airways and Virgin Atlantic. Location Heathrow is west of central London. It is locate ...
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Greater London
Greater may refer to: *Greatness, the state of being great *Greater than, in inequality * ''Greater'' (film), a 2016 American film *Greater (flamingo), the oldest flamingo on record * "Greater" (song), by MercyMe, 2014 *Greater Bank, an Australian bank *Greater Media Greater Media, Inc., known as Greater Media, was an American media company that specialized in radio stations. The markets where they owned radio stations included Boston, Detroit, Philadelphia, Charlotte, and the state of New Jersey. The co ..., an American media company See also

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