Important Cultural Property (Japan)
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Important Cultural Property (Japan)
An The term is often shortened into just is an item officially classified as Tangible Cultural Property by the Japanese government's Agency for Cultural Affairs (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) and judged to be of particular importance to the history, arts, and culture of the Japanese people. Classification of Cultural Properties To protect the cultural heritage of Japan, the Law for the Protection of Cultural Properties was created as a under which important items are appropriated as Cultural Properties,In this article, capitals indicate an official designation as opposed to a simple, unofficial definition, e.g "Cultural Properties" as opposed to "cultural properties". thus imposing restrictions to their alteration, repair and export. Besides the "designation system", there exists a , which guarantees a lower level of protection and support to Registered Cultural Properties. Cultural Properties are classified according to their nature. Items de ...
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Sankeien Rinshunkaku 2
is a traditional Japanese-style garden in Naka Ward, Yokohama, Japan, which opened in 1906.Yokohama Sankei Garden
Sankei-en's official site accessed on November 3, 2009 (in Japanese)
Sankei-en was designed and built by (1868–1939), known by the Sankei Hara, who was a trader. Almost all of its buildings are historically significant structures bought by Hara himself in locations all over the country, among them Tokyo,

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Hōryū-ji
is a Buddhist temple that was once one of the powerful Seven Great Temples, in Ikaruga, Nara Prefecture, Japan. Its full name is , or Learning Temple of the Flourishing Law, the complex serving as both a seminary and monastery. The temple was founded by Prince Shōtoku in 607, but according to the '' Nihon Shoki'', in 670 all buildings were burned down by lightning. However, reconstructed at least 1,300 years ago, the Kondō (main hall) is widely recognized as the world's oldest wooden building. A fire that broke out during the dismantling and repair of the Kondō on January 26, 1949 destroyed a mural of the Asuka period, a national treasure, and shocked the Japanese. Based on this accident, the day when the fire broke out is now fire prevention day for cultural properties. In 1993, Hōryū-ji Temple, along with Hokki-ji, was registered as Japan's first UNESCO World Heritage Site under the name of ''Buddhist Monuments in the Hōryū-ji Area''. A tree ring survey conducted in ...
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Special Tea Utensils
The Special utensils (名物 ''meibutsu'') are historic and precious Japanese tea utensils (茶道具). They consisted of important tea bowls, kettles, spoons, whisks, etc. The classification came not only from value of the tool itself but also by the possessor and the inheritance. History The Ashikaga ''shōgun'' accumulated a number of precious items into the treasury called Higashiyama Treasure (東山御物 ''Higashiyama gomotsu''), which also contained a number of tea items. After the fall of the shogunate, the treasury broke up and many of the items were dispersed or lost. Those that have survived today are designed National Treasures by the government. At the beginning of the Muromachi period, with the rise of the Japanese tea culture, the demand for tea was soaring, and an appreciation began to develop for locally-made items and wares. Until then the most appreciated items by the aristocracy were items from China that started with the Tang dynasty. A classic example i ...
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Meiji Seimei Kan
''Meiji Seimei Kan'' (明治生命館) is a building in Marunouchi, Tokyo, Japan. History It was designed by Shinichiro Okada and completed in March 1934. The building was one of the first of its kind to be completely designed by Japanese architects, executed by craftsmen and material coming from Japan, as opposed to earlier western-style buildings. This was accomplished just over 60 years after the end of the feudal Edo period and the opening of the country. During the Shōwa period, its metal fittings were requisitioned by the government of Japan. It survived the bombing of Tokyo during World War II, but was taken over by the General Headquarters / Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (GHQ/SCAP) after the war. It was returned to the government of Japan in 1956. In 1997, this building was designated a National Important Cultural Property. It was the first building erected in the Showa period to receive this honour. 明治生命館 ご案内 (Guide to Meiji Seim ...
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Kamakura, Kanagawa
is a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. Kamakura has an estimated population of 172,929 (1 September 2020) and a population density of 4,359 persons per km² over the total area of . Kamakura was designated as a city on 3 November 1939. Kamakura was the ''de facto'' capital of Japan from 1185 to 1333 as the seat of the Kamakura Shogunate, and became the nation's most populous settlement during the Kamakura period. Kamakura is a popular domestic tourist destination in Japan as a coastal city with a high number of seasonal festivals, as well as ancient Buddhist and Shinto shrines and temples. Geography Surrounded to the north, east, and west by hills and to the south by the open water of Sagami Bay, Kamakura is a natural fortress. Before the construction of several tunnels and modern roads that now connect it to Fujisawa, Ofuna ( ja) and Zushi, on land it could be entered only through narrow artificial passes, among which the seven most important were called , a name so ...
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Tsurugaoka Hachimangū
is the most important Shinto shrine in the city of Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The shrine is a cultural center of the city of Kamakura and serves as the venue of many of its most important festivals with two museums. For most of its history, it served both as a Hachiman shrine, and in latter years a Tendai Buddhist temple typical of Japanese Buddhist architecture. The famed Buddhist priest Nichiren Daishonin once reputedly visited the shrine to reprimand the kami Hachiman just before his execution at Shichirigahama beach. A former one thousand-year-old ginkgo tree near its entrance was uprooted by a storm on 10 March 2010. The shrine continues to serve as one of the Important Cultural Properties of Japan. History This shrine was originally built in 1063 as a branch of Iwashimizu Shrine in Zaimokuza where tiny Moto Hachiman now stands and dedicated to the Emperor Ōjin, (deified with the name Hachiman, tutelary ''kami'' of warriors), his mother Empress Jingu and ...
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Former Hokkaidō Government Office
The facilities of the former Hokkaidō Government Office in Sapporo, Japan, include a conference room, a museum shop, a tourist information office, and a few historical exhibition rooms and libraries. Visitors can enter the building for free. Flower gardens and a pond are located in front of the building, which occasionally are designated as some event venues. History In 1869, the Kaitakushi, the development commission and government of Hokkaidō prefecture, was established to pioneer the primitive ground of Hokkaidō, and its main office was moved to Sapporo in 1871. An American advisor to the Development Commission, Horace Capron, planned to construct the building for the Kaitakushi office with an octagonal dome topping on the building, which was popular architectural style in the United States at that time. The building, named as the , was built in 1873, and was then one of the largest buildings in Japan.The brochure of the Former Hokkaidō government office building, English ...
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Holy Resurrection Cathedral
, also known as , in Chiyoda, Tokyo, is the main cathedral of the Japanese Orthodox Church. History The founder of the Japanese Orthodox Church Ivan Dmitrievich Kasatkin (1836–1912), later St. Nicholas of Japan, was an archbishop who devoted himself to improving Japanese-Russian relations during the Meiji period. He selected the location on the hill at Kanda Surugadai. The site is on a height that overlooked the Imperial Palace. Today it is hidden among the many tall buildings erected since the 1960s. St. Nicholas toured Russia raising funds for the cathedral. The edifice was planned by Dr. Michael A. Shchurupov, designed by Josiah Conder, and constructed by Nagasato Taisuke. The cathedral was completed on March 8, 1891, construction having begun seven years earlier. Depictions of its exotic Byzantine architecture and the unique sound of its bell often appeared in literature and illustrations of the day. The original cathedral was seriously damaged in the Great Kantō ...
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Kumamoto Prefecture
is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Kyūshū. Kumamoto Prefecture has a population of 1,748,134 () and has a geographic area of . Kumamoto Prefecture borders Fukuoka Prefecture to the north, Ōita Prefecture to the northeast, Miyazaki Prefecture to the southeast, and Kagoshima Prefecture to the south. Kumamoto is the capital and largest city of Kumamoto Prefecture, with other major cities including Yatsushiro, Amakusa, and Tamana. Kumamoto Prefecture is located in the center of Kyūshū on the coast of the Ariake Sea, across from Nagasaki Prefecture, with the mainland separated from the East China Sea by the Amakusa Archipelago. Kumamoto Prefecture is home to Mount Aso, the largest active volcano in Japan and among the largest in the world, with its peak above sea level. History Historically, the area was called Higo Province; and the province was renamed Kumamoto during the Meiji Restoration. The creation of prefectures was part of the aboli ...
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Tsūjun Bridge
Tsūjun Bridge (通潤橋 ''-kyō'') is an aqueduct in Yamato, Kumamoto, Japan. It is an arch bridge completed in 1854 and is 84.0m long. The arch spans 27.3m. It is the largest stone aqueduct in Japan. The Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs has designated the bridge an Important Cultural Property. History and technology This bridge proves the high level of stone bridge technology in existence at the time of its construction. Yasunosuke Futa (1801–1873), who was the head of the then Yabe village, planned it and, after obtaining funding, succeeded in building the bridge in 1854 with the help of the group of 41 stone technicians and many farmers. Its purpose was to let water flow into a higher area (Shiroito Plateau) for farming. After placing wooden frames, stones were placed on the frames and three stone aqueducts were made. After that, the wooden frames were removed. Because the aqueducts were lower than the upper part of the waterway by , water a reversed siphon mech ...
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Tokyo
Tokyo (; ja, 東京, , ), officially the Tokyo Metropolis ( ja, 東京都, label=none, ), is the capital and largest city of Japan. Formerly known as Edo, its metropolitan area () is the most populous in the world, with an estimated 37.468 million residents ; the city proper has a population of 13.99 million people. Located at the head of Tokyo Bay, the prefecture forms part of the Kantō region on the central coast of Honshu, Japan's largest island. Tokyo serves as Japan's economic center and is the seat of both the Japanese government and the Emperor of Japan. Originally a fishing village named Edo, the city became politically prominent in 1603, when it became the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate. By the mid-18th century, Edo was one of the most populous cities in the world with a population of over one million people. Following the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the imperial capital in Kyoto was moved to Edo, which was renamed "Tokyo" (). Tokyo was dev ...
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Nihonbashi
is a business district of Chūō, Tokyo, Japan which grew up around the bridge of the same name which has linked two sides of the Nihonbashi River at this site since the 17th century. The first wooden bridge was completed in 1603. The current bridge, designed by Tsumaki Yorinaka and constructed of stone on a steel frame, dates from 1911. The district covers a large area to the north and east of the bridge, reaching Akihabara to the north and the Sumida River to the east. Ōtemachi is to the west and Yaesu and Kyobashi to the south. Nihonbashi, together with Kyobashi and Kanda, is the core of Shitamachi, the original downtown center of Edo-Tokyo, before the rise of newer secondary centers such as Shinjuku and Shibuya. History The Nihonbashi district was a major mercantile center during the Edo period: its early development is largely credited to the Mitsui family, who based their wholesaling business in Nihonbashi and developed Japan's first department store, ...
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