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Zambales
Zambales
(Tagalog: Lalawigan ng Zambales; Ilokano: Probinsia ti Zambales; Sambal: Probinsya nin Zambales; Kapampangan: Lalawigan ning Zambales; Pangasinan: Luyag na Zambales) is a province in the Philippines
Philippines
located in the Central Luzon
Central Luzon
region in the island of Luzon. Its capital is Iba. Zambales
Zambales
borders Pangasinan
Pangasinan
to the north and northeast, Tarlac
Tarlac
to the east, Pampanga
Pampanga
to the southeast, Bataan to the south and the South China Sea
South China Sea
to the west. With a total land area of 3,830.83 square kilometres (1,479.09 sq mi) (including the independent city of Olongapo), Zambales
Zambales
is the second largest among the seven provinces of Central Luzon
Central Luzon
after Nueva Ecija. The province is noted for its mangoes, which are abundant from January to April. Zambales
Zambales
does not have a functional airport - the closest functional airport is the Clark International Airport
Clark International Airport
in the neighbouring province of Pampanga. Subic Bay
Subic Bay
International Airport, which is located in Cubi Point
Cubi Point
in the Subic Bay Freeport Zone
Subic Bay Freeport Zone
is no longer functional for domestic and international flights.[4] The Freeport Zone (SBMA) is host to many tourist attractions which include casinos, parks, malls, beach-side huts, cottages and resorts, as well as historical sites.

Contents

1 Etymology 2 History 3 Geography

3.1 Climate 3.2 Administrative divisions

3.2.1 Barangays

4 Demographics

4.1 Inhabitants 4.2 Religion 4.3 Languages

5 Education

5.1 Colleges and universities

6 Economy 7 Festivals and events 8 Notable people from Zambales 9 References 10 External links

Etymology[edit] The province's name came from the word zambal, which is a Hispanized term for Sambali. Zambal refers to the native language spoken by the early Austronesian inhabitants of the place. A contending version states that the name was derived from the word samba, meaning worship, because the Spanish supposedly found the native inhabitants to be highly superstitious; worshipping the spirits of their ancestors.[5] It could also originate from the word "Zambo", a term used by the Iberian (Spanish and Portuguese) empires to distinguish people of African ethnicity/descent. The province is home to the Aetas, the aboriginal people of the Philippines
Philippines
who share Afro-ethnic similarities. History[edit]

Zambales
Zambales
map in 1918

The area now occupied by Zambales
Zambales
was first explored by the Spanish in 1572, led by Juan de Salcedo.[5] Among the earliest towns founded were Subic (1572), Botolan
Botolan
(1572), Masinloc
Masinloc
(1607), Iba (1611), and Santa Cruz (1612).[6] Masinloc
Masinloc
became the province's first capital. However, the capital was moved among the last three towns above during its history before finally settling in Iba, due to its strategic location. Seven of the province's original northern towns, which included Bolinao, Infanta and Alaminos were later transferred under the jurisdiction of Pangasinan
Pangasinan
because of their distance from the capital.[5] The first civil governor of Zambales
Zambales
during the colonial American era was Potenciano Lesaca
Potenciano Lesaca
from 1901-1903.

Geography[edit]

Western coastline of the province featuring several coves

The Zambales Mountains
Zambales Mountains
seen from San Antonio

Zambales
Zambales
lies on the western shores of Luzon
Luzon
island along the South China Sea. Its shoreline is rugged and features many coves and inlets. The Zambales Mountains
Zambales Mountains
in the eastern length of the province occupies about 60% of the total land area of Zambales. Subic Bay, at the southern end of the province, provides a natural harbor, and was the location of the U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay
Subic Bay
until its closure in 1992.[5] The summit and crater lake of Mount Pinatubo
Mount Pinatubo
lies within Botolan municipality in Zambales, near the tripoint of Zambales, Pampanga
Pampanga
and Tarlac
Tarlac
provinces.[7] This volcano, once considered dormant, erupted violently in June 1991. The former summit of the volcano was obliterated by the massive eruption and replaced by a 2.5 km (1.6 mi) wide caldera, within which Lake Pinatubo
Lake Pinatubo
is situated. With an average depth of 800 m (2,600 ft), Lake Pinatubo
Lake Pinatubo
is the deepest lake in the Philippines. The highest point of the caldera rim is 1,485 m (4,872 ft) above sea level, some 260 m (850 ft) lower than the pre-eruption summit. A vast portion of the Zambales
Zambales
province acquired desert-like features in 1991,[5] after being buried by more than 20 feet (6.1 m) of lahar. Climate[edit] Zambales
Zambales
has two pronounced seasons: dry from October to June, and wet from July to September. Administrative divisions[edit] Zambales
Zambales
comprises 13 municipalities and 1 highly urbanized city, which are divided into two legislative districts.[8] Olongapo
Olongapo
City is a highly urbanized city and administers itself autonomously from the province. Panatag Shoal (Scarborough Shoal) a Philippine-claimed territory, is a designated part of the province.

Political map

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 3 [disputed] Luzon Is.

Disputed territory — Scarborough shoal, locally known as Panatag Shoal or Bajo Masinloc, is designated under Masinloc municipality. Internationally disputed. Claimed by the People's Republic of China, Philippines, and Republic of China (Taiwan). De facto controlled by the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
since 2012.

6 Botolan

7 Cabangan

2 Candelaria

12 Castillejos

5 Iba

3 Masinloc

14 Olongapo

4 Palauig

11 San Antonio

8 San Felipe

10 San Marcelino

9 San Narciso

1 Santa Cruz

13 Subic

 †  Provincial capital      Municipality  ‡  Highly urbanized city (geographically within but independent from the province)

City or municipality District[8] Population ±% p.a. Area[8] Density Brgy. Coordinates[A]

(2015)[3] (2010)[9]

km2 sq mi /km2 /sq mi

Botolan 2nd 7000980000000000000♠9.8% 57,707 54,434 1.12% 735.28 283.89 78 200 31 15°17′20″N 120°01′29″E / 15.2889°N 120.0247°E / 15.2889; 120.0247 (Botolan)

Cabangan 2nd 7000430000000000000♠4.3% 25,163 23,082 1.66% 175.29 67.68 140 360 22 15°09′32″N 120°03′20″E / 15.1589°N 120.0555°E / 15.1589; 120.0555 (Cabangan)

Candelaria 2nd 7000460000000099999♠4.6% 27,174 25,020 1.58% 333.59 128.80 81 210 16 15°37′38″N 119°55′45″E / 15.6271°N 119.9291°E / 15.6271; 119.9291 (Candelaria)

Castillejos 1st 7001110000000000000♠11.0% 64,841 48,845 5.54% 92.99 35.90 700 1,800 14 14°55′48″N 120°12′18″E / 14.9301°N 120.2051°E / 14.9301; 120.2051 (Castillejos)

Iba † 2nd 7000850000000000000♠8.5% 50,506 46,761 1.48% 153.38 59.22 330 850 14 15°19′35″N 119°58′43″E / 15.3264°N 119.9786°E / 15.3264; 119.9786 (Iba)

Masinloc 2nd 7000810000000000000♠8.1% 47,719 44,342 1.41% 331.50 127.99 140 360 13 15°32′16″N 119°57′06″E / 15.5379°N 119.9516°E / 15.5379; 119.9516 (Masinloc)

Olongapo ‡ 1st — 233,040 221,178 1.00% 185.00 71.43 1,300 3,400 17 14°49′53″N 120°17′01″E / 14.8314°N 120.2835°E / 14.8314; 120.2835 (Olongapo)

Palauig 2nd 7000590000000000000♠5.9% 34,947 33,286 0.93% 310.00 119.69 110 280 19 15°26′03″N 119°54′30″E / 15.4343°N 119.9084°E / 15.4343; 119.9084 (Palauig)

San Antonio 2nd 7000590000000000000♠5.9% 34,661 34,217 0.25% 188.12 72.63 180 470 14 14°56′56″N 120°05′20″E / 14.9488°N 120.0889°E / 14.9488; 120.0889 (San Antonio)

San Felipe 2nd 7000390000000000000♠3.9% 23,183 22,020 0.98% 111.60 43.09 210 540 11 15°03′40″N 120°04′13″E / 15.0610°N 120.0702°E / 15.0610; 120.0702 (San Felipe)

San Marcelino 1st 7000570000000000000♠5.7% 33,665 31,879 1.04% 416.86 160.95 81 210 18 14°58′31″N 120°09′24″E / 14.9754°N 120.1566°E / 14.9754; 120.1566 (San Marcelino)

San Narciso 2nd 7000480000000000000♠4.8% 28,360 26,966 0.96% 71.60 27.64 400 1,000 17 15°00′54″N 120°04′44″E / 15.0149°N 120.0789°E / 15.0149; 120.0789 (San Narciso)

Santa Cruz 2nd 7000980000000000000♠9.8% 58,151 53,867 1.47% 438.46 169.29 130 340 25 15°45′45″N 119°54′36″E / 15.7626°N 119.9100°E / 15.7626; 119.9100 (Santa Cruz)

Subic 1st 7001177000000000000♠17.7% 104,771 89,724 3.00% 287.16 110.87 360 930 16 14°52′39″N 120°14′04″E / 14.8774°N 120.2344°E / 14.8774; 120.2344 (Subic)

Total[B] 590,848 534,443 1.93% 3,645.83 1,407.66 160 410 230 (see GeoGroup box)

^ Coordinates
Coordinates
mark the city/town center, and are sortable by latitude. ^ Total figures exclude the highly urbanized city of Olongapo.

Barangays[edit] Further information: List of barangays in Zambales The 13 municipalities and 1 city of the province comprise a total of 247 barangays, with Santa Rita in Olongapo
Olongapo
City as the most populous in 2010, and Owaog-Nibloc in Botolan
Botolan
as the least. If cities are excluded, Calapacuan in Subic has the highest population as of 2010.[9] Demographics[edit]

Population census of Zambales

Year Pop. ±% p.a.

1990 369,665 —    

1995 389,512 +0.98%

2000 433,542 +2.32%

2007 493,085 +1.79%

2010 534,443 +2.97%

2015 590,848 +1.93%

(excluding Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[3][9][9]

See also: Aeta, Sambal people, Tagalog people, Ilocano people, Kapampangan people, and Pangasinan
Pangasinan
people The population of Zambales
Zambales
in the 2015 census was 590,848 people,[3] with a density of 160 inhabitants per square kilometre or 410 inhabitants per square mile. When Olongapo
Olongapo
City is included for geographical purposes, the province's population is 823,888 people, with a density of 215/km2 (557/sq mi). Inhabitants[edit] The Aetas of Mount Pinatubo
Mount Pinatubo
were the earliest inhabitants of what is now the province of Zambales.[5] They were later displaced[5] by the Sambal, an Austronesian people
Austronesian people
after whom the province is named. Many Sambal still believe in superstitions and mysteries that have been handed down through the generations. The Tagalogs, the Ilocanos, the Sambal, the Kapampangans, and the Pangasinans today constitute the five largest ethnic groups in Zambales; these identities may and do, however, overlap with one another due to intermarriage[10] and other factors. Most of the people of southern Zambales
Zambales
are migrants from different parts of the country owing the influx of job opportunities brought on by the U.S Subic Naval Base (San Antonio and Subic) during the American regime of the country. Many people found jobs and permanently settled there. The presence of the Americans greatly influenced the culture and way of life of the inhabitants.

Religion[edit]

National Shrine of Our Lady of Poon Bato in Botolan

The people of Zambales
Zambales
are predominantly Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Iglesia Ni Cristo with a proportion each of the population in religious adherence while Aglipayan
Aglipayan
is a significant minority religious group like in most other provinces in Northern and Central Luzon.[citation needed] The remaining proportions are divided with other Christian groups such as Born-again Christians, United Methodist Church, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-day Adventist
Seventh-day Adventist
as well as Non Christians which is usually represented by Muslims. Town fiestas honoring patron saints are practiced in each parish. Further information: Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Diocese of Iba Languages[edit]

Languages
Languages
Spoken (2000)[11]

Language

Number of speakers

Tagalog

164,000

Ilocano

119,000

Sambal

117,000

Main articles: Sambalic languages, Tagalog language, Ilocano language, Kapampangan language, and Pangasinan
Pangasinan
language Sambal, Tagalog, and Ilocano are the three main languages of Zambales.[5] Ilocano has 115,337 native speakers, Sambal has 114,637, and Tagalog has 250,637 (plus 24,995 non-native speakers).[12] More than 119,126 spoke other languages as their parent tongue, such as Kapampangan and Pangasinan, including non- Philippine languages
Philippine languages
such as English and Hokkien Chinese.[12] About 75 percent of the population speaks and understands English to varying degrees of fluency, and road signs are mostly written in that language. Education[edit] There are a number of higher educational institutions in the province. The Ramon Magsaysay
Ramon Magsaysay
Technological University, the first state university in the province can be found in Iba. It has also satellite campuses in the municipalities of Sta. Cruz, Candelaria, Masinloc, Botolan, San Marcelino and Castillejos. St. Joseph College-Olongapo, a college run by the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church can be found in Olongapo City. The Columban College, run by the Catholic Church can be found also in Olongapo. The Magsaysay Memorial College is also run by the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Church and can be found in San Narciso. Colleges and universities[edit]

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AIE College International ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) AMA Computer College ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) AMA Computer Learning Center ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Asian Institute of Computer Studies
Asian Institute of Computer Studies
( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Best Freeport Colleges Inc. ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Botolan
Botolan
Community College (Botolan) Capstone Institute of Business and Arts ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Central Luzon
Central Luzon
College of Science and Technology ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) College of Subic Montessori Subic Bay
Subic Bay
( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Collegio de Castillejos
Castillejos
(Castillejos) Columban College
Columban College
- Barreto Campus ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Columban College
Columban College
- Sta. Cruz Campus (Sta. Cruz) Columban College
Columban College
- Main Campus ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Comteq Computer and Business College ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Don Bosco College of Zambales
Zambales
(Castillejos) Don Luis Orin Junior College of Criminology, Inc. (Iba) First EDT Learning Center, Inc. ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Freeport SBLC Inc. ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) GIS Institute of Technology Phils Inc. (San Marcelino) Global City Innovative College Subic ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Gordon College ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Holy Infant Jesus College( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Hopeful Beginnings Institute (Iba) Keystone Subic International Language Center ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Kolehiyo ng Subic (Subic) Lorraine Technical School ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Lyceum of Subic Bay
Subic Bay
( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Magsaysay Memorial College (San Narciso) Metro Subic Colleges ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Micro Asia College of Science and Technology (Sta. Cruz) Micro Asia College of Science and Technology (Iba) Mondrian Aura College ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Network Computer and Business Colleges ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Northern Zambales
Zambales
College (Masinloc) Philippine Merchants Marine Academy (San Narciso) Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
- Candelaria (Candelaria) Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
- Castillejos
Castillejos
(Castillejos) Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
- Main Campus (Iba) Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
- Masinloc
Masinloc
(Masinloc) Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
- Mondriaan Aura College ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
- Western Luzon
Luzon
Agricultural College (San Marcelino) San Antonio Institute of Commerce and Technology (San Antonio) Sand Valley Institute of Arts and Trades (Iba) St. Benilde Center for Global Competence ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) St. Joseph College ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) St. Nicolas Systeq College (Palauig) St. Theresa's College - (San Marcelino) STI College ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Foreign Language Center ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority
Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority
Law Enforcement Academy (Subic Bay Freeport Zone) Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Colleges Inc. - (Iba) Subic Institute of International Studies ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) Technological College of San Felipe (San Felipe) The Thomasites Center for International Studies ( Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone) University of the Philippines
Philippines
- Extension Program in Olongapo
Olongapo
(Subic Bay Freeport Zone) Virgen de los Remedios College ( Olongapo
Olongapo
City) Virgin de los Remedios College of Criminology (Iba) Zambales
Zambales
Academy (San Narciso) Zambales
Zambales
Lifesaving Inc. PCG Accredited Lifeguard training organization (Botolan)

Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
Ramon Magsaysay Technological University
(RMTU), Iba

The Ramon Magsaysay
Ramon Magsaysay
Technological University, commonly referred to as RMTU, is a state university/government-funded higher education institution in Zambales
Zambales
established in 1910. The university is named after former President Ramon Magsaysay, a native of the province. Its main campus is situated in the capital town of Iba, while satellite campuses are located in Santa Cruz, Candelaria, Masinloc, Botolan, San Marcelino, and Castillejos. The university also offers nursing courses at the Mondriaan Aura College in Subic Bay
Subic Bay
Freeport Zone, Business Administration at the Wesleyan College of Manila
Manila
under a consortium program.

Mangoes
Mangoes
from Zambales

Economy[edit] Tourism plays a large role in the economy of Zambales. Local and foreign tourist flock its many beaches creating many job opportunities and contributing to the economy. Most of the province is still agricultural but there are considerable industrial zones that provide jobs not just for residents of Zambales
Zambales
but also for neighboring provinces. Mining has recently been booming in Zambales
Zambales
where there is an abundant deposit of Nickel and other minerals.[5] Zambales
Zambales
is basically an agricultural province. The chief products are rice, corn, vegetables, and root crops. Major industries include farming, fishing, and mining. Festivals and events[edit]

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Feast Day of Ina Poon Bato (Botolan) — January 24. The Ina Poón Bató is a purportedly miraculous, syncretised image of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Legend has it that before the arrival of the Spanish in the area sometime in the 17th century, local Aeta
Aeta
peoples had discovered a carved wooden statue on a large rock that they called Apo Apang ("Little Queen") and began worshipping the image. On the arrival of Recollect missionaries in 1607, the natives associated the statue with the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
depictions of the Virgin Mary, and the image was subsequently Christianised as Ina Poón Bato ("Mother of the Lord Rock"). Singkamas Festival and Town Fiesta (San Marcelino) — 3rd Week of February Town Fiesta (San Narciso) — February 19–25 Pundakit Festival of the Arts (San Antonio) — February‑July Zambales
Zambales
Multi Sports Festival Senakulo — 3rd Week of March Good Friday (Castillejos) — April Foundation Day Celebration (Palauig) — April 10 Grand Fiesta (Cabangan) — April 21–25 The Dinamulag Festival " Zambales
Zambales
Mango Festival" (Iba) — 3rd Tuesday of April The Dinamulag Festival also known as the Zambales
Zambales
Mango Festival is an annual festival held in the province of Zambales
Zambales
in the Philippines
Philippines
to celebrate or encourage bountiful harvest of the province's mangoes. The festival was first held in 1999. Paynawen Festival (Iba) — 3rd Week of April Paynauen ‘Duyan’ Festival is held every April 25 – May 1 in Iba, Zambales. It commemorates the provincial capital’s founding anniversary (founded in 1611) traces its origin from a Zambal word which means rest or pahingahan – the ancient name of Iba before the Spanish conquistadores founded the village on the shore of the Bancal River in 1611. The festival features photo competition and exhibit, sand sculpture competition, skate boarding, 2-cock derby, carabao race, beauty pageant, kite flying, banca race, boxing tournament, street dancing / Duyan Parade, among other activities. Marunggay Festival and Town Fiesta (San Antonio) — Last Week of April Domorokdok Festival (Botolan) — May 4 Laruk Laruk Festival (Candelaria) — Last Week of October Binabayani Festival and Town Fiesta (Masinloc) — November 30 The Binabayani Festival occurs every November in the city of Masinloc in Zambales. . A dance/play depicting the clash between the Spanish and the Natives of Masinloc
Masinloc
or the triumph of Christianity over Paganism. The war dance starts with a procession in the afternoon of November 29 and opens in a mass on November 30. This annual religious festival is celebrated with day long activities in honor of San Andres, the patron saint of Masinloc. Binabayani is a war dance that portrays the battle between the Christian and the Aetas in the town of Masinloc. It is a word that means “bravery”. It is usually featured at the town plaza on the 30th day of November for the public to witness. Kaligawan Ha Mayanan (Candelaria) — December 29–30 Olongapo
Olongapo
Mardigras (Olongapo) — Last Week of October

Notable people from Zambales[edit]

Manuel C. Espolong Jr. Gerald Anderson Megan Young Elmer Borlongan Rafael Corpus Hermogenes Ebdane Loi Ejercito Richard J. Gordon Luz Magsaysay Mitos Magsaysay Ramon Magsaysay Ramon Magsaysay
Ramon Magsaysay
Jr. Lou Diamond Phillips Ruben Torres Teodoro R. Yangco Freddie Aguilar K Brosas Gladys Guevarra Wowie de Guzman Kristofer Martin Willie Miller Arnel Pineda Angelee delos Reyes Lauren Young Tom Rodriguez Angelu de Leon Raikko Mateo Ruby Rodriguez

References[edit]

^ "Mining Firms Seek to Export Black Sand Thru Subic Port". Dean Alegado Reality. PIA Press Release. 14 March 2011. Retrieved 23 March 2016. The miners told Salonga that Zambales
Zambales
was known before as the chromite capital of the Philippines, but with big developments in China today, magnetite iron ore has become more important than chromite.  ^ "List of Provinces". PSGC Interactive. Makati City, Philippines: National Statistical Coordination Board. Retrieved 13 February 2013.  ^ a b c d Census of Population (2015). "Region III (Central Luzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016.  ^ Orejas, Tonnette (7 March 2012). "It's more fun than an airport in Subic". Inquirer. Retrieved 15 May 2014.  ^ a b c d e f g h i Lancion, Jr., Conrado M.; de Guzman, Rey (cartography) (1995). "The Provinces". Fast Facts about Philippine Provinces (The 2000 Millenium ed.). Makati, Metro Manila: Tahanan Books. pp. 162–163. ISBN 971-630-037-9. Retrieved 7 February 2015.  ^ "Municipalities". Zambales
Zambales
Now, Official Website of Zambales. Retrieved on 2012-05.24. ** The year of 1542 in the founding of Subic is a misprint and should be the year 1572 like in Botolan
Botolan
as Salcedo was born in 1549. ^ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (1955). " Tarlac
Tarlac
map". University of Texas in Austin Library. Retrieved on 2012-05-24. ^ a b c "Province: Zambales". PSGC Interactive. Quezon
Quezon
City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 January 2016.  ^ a b c d Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region III (Central Luzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016.  ^ Iba travel guide ^ Zambales: Dependency Ratio Down by Five Persons ^ a b Zambales

External links[edit]

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap · Google Maps

Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Media related to Zambales
Zambales
at Wikimedia Commons Geographic data related to Zambales
Zambales
at OpenStreetMap Baluate Ng Sambal [permanent dead link] Olongapo
Olongapo
city news archive

Places adjacent to Zambales

Pangasinan

South China Sea

Zambales

Tarlac Pampanga

Bataan

v t e

Province of Zambales

Iba (capital)

Municipalities

Botolan Cabangan Candelaria Castillejos Iba Masinloc Palauig San Antonio San Felipe San Marcelino San Narciso Santa Cruz Subic

Highly urbanized city

Olongapo
Olongapo
(Administratively independent from the province but grouped under Zambales
Zambales
by the Philippine Statistics Authority.)

Barangays

See: List of barangays in Zambales

Articles related to Zambales

v t e

Central Luzon
Central Luzon
(Region III)

Regional Center

San Fernando

Provinces

Aurora Bataan Bulacan Nueva Ecija Pampanga Tarlac Zambales

Highly Urbanized Cities

Angeles Olongapo

Component Cities

Balanga Cabanatuan Gapan Mabalacat Malolos Meycauayan Muñoz Palayan San Fernando San Jose San Jose del Monte Tarlac
Tarlac
City

Provincial Capitals

Balanga Baler Iba Malolos Palayan San Fernando Tarlac
Tarlac
City

Municipalities

Abucay Aliaga Anao Angat Apalit Arayat Bacolor Bagac Balagtas Baler Baliuag Bamban Bocaue Bongabon Botolan Bulakan Bustos Cabangan Cabiao Calumpit Camiling Candaba Candelaria Capas Carranglan Casiguran Castillejos Concepcion Cuyapo Dilasag Dinalungan Dinalupihan Dingalan Dipaculao Doña Remedios Trinidad Floridablanca Gabaldon General Mamerto Natividad General Tinio Gerona Guagua Guiguinto Guimba Hagonoy Hermosa Iba Jaen La Paz Laur Licab Limay Llanera Lubao Lupao Macabebe Magalang Maria Aurora Marilao Mariveles Masantol Masinloc Mayantoc Mexico Minalin Moncada Morong Nampicuan Norzagaray Obando Orani Orion Palauig Pandi Paniqui Pantabangan Paombong Peñaranda Pilar Plaridel Porac Pulilan Pura Quezon Ramos Rizal Samal San Antonio (Nueva Ecija) San Antonio (Zambales) San Clemente San Felipe San Ildefonso San Isidro San Jose (Tarlac) San Leonardo San Luis (Aurora) San Luis (Pampanga) San Manuel San Marcelino San Miguel San Narciso San Rafael San Simon Santa Ana Santa Cruz Santa Ignacia Santa Maria Santa Rita Santa Rosa Santo Domingo Santo Tomas Sasmuan Subic Talavera Talugtug Victoria Zaragoza

Luzon, Republic of the Philippines

v t e

  Administrative divisions of the Philippines

Capital

Manila
Manila
(National Capital Region)

Island groups

Luzon Visayas Mindanao

Regions

Administrative

I – Ilocos Region II – Cagayan
Cagayan
Valley III – Central Luzon IV-A – Calabarzon Mimaropa
Mimaropa
– Southwestern Tagalog Region V – Bicol Region VI – Western Visayas VII – Central Visayas VIII – Eastern Visayas IX – Zamboanga Peninsula X – Northern Mindanao XI – Davao Region XII – Soccsksargen XIII – Caraga CAR – Cordillera Administrative Region NCR – National Capital Region

Autonomous

Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao

Provinces

Abra Agusan del Norte Agusan del Sur Aklan Albay Antique Apayao Aurora Basilan Bataan Batanes Batangas Benguet Biliran Bohol Bukidnon Bulacan Cagayan Camarines Norte Camarines Sur Camiguin Capiz Catanduanes Cavite Cebu Compostela Valley Cotabato Davao del Norte Davao del Sur Davao Occidental Davao Oriental Dinagat Islands Eastern Samar Guimaras Ifugao Ilocos Norte Ilocos Sur Iloilo Isabela Kalinga La Union Laguna Lanao del Norte Lanao del Sur Leyte Maguindanao Marinduque Masbate Misamis Occidental Misamis Oriental Mountain Province Negros Occidental Negros Oriental Northern Samar Nueva Ecija Nueva Vizcaya Occidental Mindoro Oriental Mindoro Palawan Pampanga Pangasinan Quezon Quirino Rizal Romblon Samar Sarangani Siquijor Sorsogon South Cotabato Southern Leyte Sultan Kudarat Sulu Surigao del Norte Surigao del Sur Tarlac Tawi-Tawi Zambales Zamboanga del Norte Zamboanga del Sur Zamboanga Sibugay

Cities

List of cities in the Philippines

Municipalities

List of cities and municipalities in the Philippines

Barangays

Lists of barangays by province Poblacion

Other subdivisions

Puroks Sitios List of primary LGUs Legislative districts Metropolitan areas

Historical

Former provinces Formally proposed provinces Negros Island Region Southern Tagalog

v t e

Philippines articles

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