HOME
The Info List - Xavier University


--- Advertisement ---



Xavier University
University
(/ˈzeɪviər/ ZAY-vee-ər) is a co-educational Jesuit, Catholic
Catholic
university in Norwood and Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. The school is the sixth-oldest Catholic
Catholic
and fourth-oldest Jesuit
Jesuit
university in the United States.[4] Xavier has an undergraduate enrollment of 4,485 students and graduate enrollment of 2,165. Xavier is primarily an undergraduate, liberal arts institution.

Contents

1 History 2 Campus

2.1 Academic mall 2.2 Residential Mall 2.3 Across Victory 2.4 Cintas Center
Cintas Center
and Cohen Center 2.5 Campus growth

3 Academics and demographics

3.1 Major requirements 3.2 Honorary society chapters 3.3 Rankings

4 Athletics

4.1 Men's basketball 4.2 Football 4.3 Baseball 4.4 Swimming 4.5 Club sports 4.6 Mascots 4.7 Media

5 Dorothy Day Center for Faith and Justice

5.1 Student programs 5.2 Faculty and staff 5.3 Alumni

6 Notable alumni 7 Notable faculty 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External links

History[edit]

1848

Xavier University
University
was the first Catholic
Catholic
institution of higher learning in the Northwest Territory
Northwest Territory
and is the fourth oldest Jesuit University
University
and the sixth oldest Catholic
Catholic
university in the United States. The school was founded in 1831 as a men's college in downtown Cincinnati
Cincinnati
next to St. Francis Xavier
Francis Xavier
Church on Sycamore Street. The Athenaeum, as it was then called, was dedicated to the patronage of Saint Francis Xavier
Francis Xavier
by Bishop Edward Fenwick on October 17, 1831. Upon Bishop John Baptist Purcell's request, the Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
took control of The Athenaeum in 1840, and the name was changed to St. Xavier College in honor of the 16th century Jesuit
Jesuit
missionary, St. Francis Xavier
Francis Xavier
who, like the founder of the Jesuits, Ignatius Loyola, was a Spanish Basque. St. Xavier College moved in 1912 to its current North Avondale location, about 5 miles (8.0 km) north of downtown Cincinnati, after the purchase of 26 acres (0.11 km2) from the Avondale Athletic Club. The "original" Anthenaeum is now the seminary of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. St. Xavier College and St. Xavier High School officially split in 1919, though they did not become financially independent until 1934. The school's name was changed a second time to its current name, Xavier University, in 1930. The Williams College of Business was established in 1961 and Xavier's first doctoral program, in psychology, began in 1997. Xavier fully admitted women in 1969, but women began attending the college in 1914 in the evening, weekend, and summer school divisions. Edgecliff College, another Catholic
Catholic
college in Cincinnati, merged with Xavier University
University
in 1980. In 2000, Xavier opened the doors to the Cintas Center,[8] an arena for the Musketeers. Xavier also opened the Gallagher Student Center
Gallagher Student Center
in 2002. Smith Hall and the Conaton Learning Commons opened in 2010 as part of the James E. Hoff, S.J., Academic Quadrangle. Fr. Hoff was the University's 33rd President, 1991–2000. Fr. Michael J. Graham, S.J., Hoff's successor and 34th President, still serves Xavier. Fenwick Place, a residential complex, opened in the fall of 2011. Campus[edit] The campus covers approximately 190 acres (0.77 km2)[4] in the City of Cincinnati
Cincinnati
( North Avondale
North Avondale
and Evanston neighborhoods) and features residential and academic malls, flanked by the older west campus and by the expanding east campus. At the center of campus are the Gallagher Student Center
Gallagher Student Center
and Bellarmine Chapel. Bellarmine Chapel's roof is in the shape of a hyperbolic paraboloid, also known as a saddle roof, that will not collapse even if the Chapel walls were removed. The chapel is also home to an active parish community independent of the university. Academic mall[edit] Six buildings with castle architecture sit elevated overlooking Victory Parkway to the west and resemble a single fortress. Next to the Gallagher Student Center
Gallagher Student Center
(north to south) is Science Row: Lindner Hall (Physics), Logan Hall (Chemistry), and Albers Hall (Biology). In the middle of this impressive chain is Hinkle Hall, the three-story Tudor-Gothic structure that is the oldest standing building on campus (1919) and whose turrets were modeled after the Xavier Family Castle in Navarre, Spain. It houses the Departments of Mathematics, Computer Science, English, History, Philosophy, and Theology. Schmidt Hall sits next as the University’s current Administration Building. It is followed by Edgecliff Hall which was Alumni Science Hall (1919) but was renamed after the former Edgecliff College
Edgecliff College
and is home to the Department of Music. On the opposite side of the mall to the east stands the tallest structure on campus, Schott Hall. It houses the Office of Admission and Office of Financial Aid as well as the Departments of Modern Languages, Classics, Communication Arts, Political Science, and Sociology. Next (south to north) is McDonald Library followed by Alter Hall, which is being rebuilt. Alter Hall is the main classroom building on campus, and was scheduled to be reopened for the 2015 fall semester. Finally, Hailstones Hall, which was the former home of the Williams College of Business, is adjoined behind Alter to the east, and so is not truly on the mall. Alter and Hailstones are next to Bellarmine Chapel.

The Gallagher Student Center.

Residential Mall[edit] To the north of the Academic Mall and on the opposite side of the Gallagher Student Center
Gallagher Student Center
and Bellarmine Chapel is the Residential Mall. All four underclassmen residence halls are here. Brockman Hall is due north of Gallagher and is an all-freshmen, community-style residence where about 300 students have one or two roommates and share a bathroom with their wing. Diagonally north across the mall is Buenger Hall. Buenger accommodates over 200 freshmen and sophomore athletes and honors students in suites. Diagonally south across the mall from Brockman and due east of Gallagher are Kuhlman Hall and Husman Hall. Kuhlman and Husman together house about 1,000 freshmen and sophomore students and feature suite style, where students have one or two roommates and share a bathroom with another room. Between Kuhlman, Husman, and Gallagher is what is often referred to as "The Xavier Yard," a large open all-purpose area for students and events. Across Victory[edit] On the opposite side of Victory Parkway from the Academic and Residential malls is west campus. It is home to most of the athletics and recreational sports with facilities including J. Page Hayden Field, Corcoran Soccer Field, Schmidt Fieldhouse, Corbett Physical Education Building, and the O'Connor Sports Center. St. Barbara Hall and the Armory are home to Xavier's ROTC. Joseph Hall and Elet Hall are home to the School of Education and Department of Psychology. Cintas Center
Cintas Center
and Cohen Center[edit] The Cintas Center, where the Musketeers host their basketball games, is adjacent to the Residential Mall. Besides the 10,250-seat arena, Cintas also includes the Hoff Student Dining Center, the Schiff Conference Center, and the James and Caroline Duff Banquet Center. Cintas is surrounded on all sides by several parking lots, and on the far east side is the A. B. Cohen Center. Cohen is home to the Art Department and Xavier Art Gallery, as well as the School of Nursing and departments of Criminal Justice, Social Work, Occupational Therapy, Health Services Administration, and some of the offices of the School of Education. Campus growth[edit] As part of the latest construction on campus, a new residential complex called Fenwick Place opened in fall 2011 to the west of The Commons and south of the Residential Mall. It features four residential towers with 535 beds in a suite-style setup, similar to Buenger Hall, for sophomores and juniors. It is the home to a new dining center for all of campus. Fenwick Place opened for the 2011–2012 academic year. The Hoff Academic Quadrangle, to the south of Fenwick Place and east of the Academic Mall, opened in 2010. Smith Hall is home to the Williams College of Business and features a Wall Street-style trading center with Bloomberg Terminals and two stock tickers. Smith is also home to Xavier's MBA programs and Xavier's Entrepreneurial Center. The D'Artagnan
D'Artagnan
Capital Fund (Xavier's undergraduate student investment fund) is in the building's Fifth Third Trading Center. Xavier's Entrepreneurship is ranked 11th nationally according to The Princeton Review.[9] The Conaton Learning Commons is west of Smith Hall and next to the Academic Mall. The Learning Commons is home to all of Xavier's academic support services. Academics and demographics[edit]

Smith Hall, which houses the Williams College of Business

Xavier University
University
offers 81 majors within the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Social Sciences, Health and Education, and the Williams College of Business.[10] Several minors and pre-professional programs are also offered including a blended Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree.[11] All students must complete the core curriculum. Undergraduate students attending Xavier must complete a significant number of distribution requirements that are more commonly known as the Core Curriculum. There are required courses in: Theology, Philosophy, Mathematics, Fine Arts, History, Physical Science, Literature, Foreign Language, and the Social Sciences. The Core Curriculum is a confluence of Jesuit
Jesuit
ideals known as the Ratio Studiorum and a Great Books
Great Books
program. All students upon completion of a bachelor's degree have read The Republic, Discourse on Method, and selections from the Bible
Bible
among other original texts. Major requirements[edit] All undergraduate students are required to complete the Core Curriculum (see above) and comply with departmental requirements. Business majors (from the Williams College of Business) are also required to complete the Business Core, which consists of courses in Accounting, Business Law, Economics, Finance, Human Resources, Information Systems, Management, Marketing, and Statistics (the Business Core occupies 35 credit hours). Business majors, therefore, are only required to take 18–21 hours in their chosen field (providing many students with an incentive to declare a second major within the Williams College of Business). Students in the other colleges (the College of Social Sciences
Social Sciences
and the College of Arts and Sciences) generally have to complete at least 60 credit hours of courses within the major and electives within the College. To graduate with a B.A. or B.S. degree, 120 credit hours must be obtained, and all students must achieve a 2.0 GPA minimum in their major course of study. Most scholarships require a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Transfer scholarships are awarded based on GPA from previous university attended. Certain majors, such as Politics Philosophy
Philosophy
and the Public (PPP), Honors Bachelor of Arts (HAB), and Philosophy, require a written thesis and defense before a selected committee. Philosophy
Philosophy
also requires a written comprehensive exam. Honorary society chapters[edit] Xavier has several honorary society chapters, including:

Alpha Sigma Nu, the honor society of Jesuit
Jesuit
institutions of higher education[12] Beta Alpha Psi, an honor organization for financial information students and professionals[13] Beta Gamma Sigma, the international honor society serving business programs accredited by AACSB International[14] Phi Beta Kappa, an elite honor society present within only 10% of universities[15] Mortar Board, national honor society recognizing college seniors[16] Eta Sigma Phi, an honor society aimed at preserving interest and scholarship in Classical Studies.

Rankings[edit]

Xavier was ranked 4th among 142 Midwest colleges and universities by U.S. News & World Report for its 2013 edition of America's Best Colleges report.[4] It was ranked 1st for average six-year graduation rate in the Midwest at 78%, 3rd for alumni giving and 2nd for "up and coming schools."[4] Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Kiplinger's Personal Finance
listed Xavier 70th among 100 private college and universities as a "Best Value" for 2013.[4] Forbes
Forbes
ranked 220th among America's Top Colleges for 2013, 174th among private colleges and 46th in the Midwest.[4]

Athletics[edit] Main article: Xavier Musketeers

Musketeers logo

Xavier competes at the NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
level in the Big East Conference, and their mascot is D'Artagnan
D'Artagnan
the Musketeer. Xavier sponsors eight intercollegiate sports for men, and eight sports for women.[17] The University's graduation rate of 94%[18] is the third highest graduation rate for athletes in the nation behind Duke University
University
and Stanford University. Xavier sports teams have several traditional rivalries with local universities, including the University
University
of Cincinnati
Cincinnati
and the University
University
of Dayton. Xavier was a founding member of the Midwestern City Conference
Midwestern City Conference
in 1979. Renamed the Midwestern Collegiate Conference in 1985, it is now known as the Horizon League. Xavier was a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference from 1995 to 2013 where it enjoyed many successful basketball seasons. On March 20, 2013, the Xavier administration announced that the school will join the newly created Big East following the realignment of the old Big East Conference,[19] and moved to the new conference July 1, 2013. The basketball and volleyball teams play in the 10,250-seat Cintas Center on campus which opened in 2000.[20] Men's basketball[edit] Main article: Xavier Musketeers
Xavier Musketeers
men's basketball The Xavier men's basketball team is perhaps the best known of the sports sponsored at Xavier. The team has enjoyed considerable recent success, reaching the Elite Eight in the NCAA
NCAA
Tournament in 2004, 2008, and 2017 and still has not made a Final Four. Since 1985, every men's basketball player who has played as a senior has graduated with a degree.[21] During the era of college football's now-defunct Bowl Championship Series, Xavier was one of only two schools outside the main BCS conferences (a group now known as the Power Five) to be listed among the top 20 most valuable programs in college basketball (the other being UNLV) according to Forbes.[22]

Hayden Field seen from Hinkle Hall

Football[edit] Main article: Xavier Musketeers
Xavier Musketeers
football Xavier fielded an NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
football team until the 1973 season; therefore, fans often claim that Xavier "hasn't won since 1973". Baseball[edit] The Xavier baseball team won the 2014 Big East Championship and participated in the Nashville Regional. The 2009 Xavier Baseball team won the Atlantic 10 tournament and participated in the Houston Regional. Swimming[edit] The Xavier men's swim team earned the school's first Big East Conference Championship in 2014.[23] The team was led by head coach Brent MacDonald, who earned Big East Coach of the Year in 2014 and 2015.[24] The Xavier men's swim team defended their title in 2015 and 2016, making it their third championship in a row since joining the conference in 2013.[25] Club sports[edit] The club sports program is designed to serve the interests of Xavier University
University
students, faculty, and staff in different sports and recreational activities. These interests may be competitive, recreational, and/or instructional in nature. Mascots[edit] Xavier is one of a handful of universities with two mascots.[26] D'Artagnan, the Musketeer, is the university's official mascot and is the origin of the school's nickname, The Xavier Musketeers. The Musketeer
Musketeer
concept was suggested in 1925 by the late Reverend Francis J. Finn, S.J. The Blue Blob came about in 1985 when the spirit squad coordinators realized that a more audience-friendly mascot was needed. The musketeer mascot, who sported a handlebar mustache and a prop sword, scared younger spectators.[7] The Blue Blob is a furry creature that has made several television and magazine appearances over the years, including a controversial PlayBoy[27] appearance. The Blue Blob has Bobble-Body dolls,[28] Plush replicas,[29] and T-shirts made in his likeness, and an annual Blue Blob Appreciation Night during the Musketeer's basketball season. He most recently appeared on two ESPN This is SportsCenter commercials with Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
member Jim Kelly
Jim Kelly
and SportsCenter
SportsCenter
anchors Scott Van Pelt
Scott Van Pelt
and John Anderson.[30] Media[edit] Most Xavier games can be heard on WLW
WLW
or WKRC-AM. Joe Sunderman does the play-by-play and Byron Larkin does color commentary. Fox Sports Net Ohio
Ohio
holds the local television rights to the Musketeers basketball games. Brad Johansen does play-by-play and Steve Wolf is the analyst. Over the air stations, WCPO-TV
WCPO-TV
and WSTR-TV
WSTR-TV
have held the rights to Xavier games in the past. Dorothy Day Center for Faith and Justice[edit] This center is an important part of Xavier University's mission to form men and women for others.[31] Student programs[edit] At the beginning of freshman year, the Center gives students opportunities to form community among themselves, with an effort at inclusiveness across all lines of faith and culture.[32] They are then encouraged to join the other students in choosing from a variety of service opportunities. Students can pursue community service through the following programs: work in the Nexus community garden, weekly service with organizations in the Cincinnati
Cincinnati
area through the X-CHANGE program, Community Action Day when the whole XU community and alumni are encouraged to give a day of service to the larger community, a monthly service opportunity at St. Francis Seraph Soup Kitchen,[33] and Alternative Breaks offering opportunities to serve in the States and abroad during spring break and in summer.[34] A total of 27 immersion trips are offered.[35] It is estimated that students perform more than 60,000 service hours in a year.[36] Most programs include reflection components, and the following programs facilitated by the Center are also staged to provoke reflection: Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice, Stories of Solidarity, Jesuit
Jesuit
Martyrs of El Salvador commemoration, and Contemplatives in Action.[37] More intensive service experiences include the following:

Summer Service Internship allows 20 students to live on campus while being paid for working at an area non-profit.[38] Graduate Internship employs graduates to work along with the CFJ staff.[39] Xavier eRecruiting is the Center's listing of non-profit internships nationwide. This is supplemented by Idealist.org which includes also international listings. Sponsors of internships include Scripps Howard Foundation, the Catholic
Catholic
Archdiocese, the Catholic
Catholic
Campaign for Human Development, and Community Shares.[40] GetAway for First Year Students, with opportunities to organize and make spiritual retreats.[41] Graduate School and Year-of-Service Fair introduces students to over 50 options for a year of service after graduation, at home and abroad. Some of the more popular are Peace Corps, Jesuit
Jesuit
Volunteer Corps, Public Allies, and Americorps. Long listings of possibilities are on websites hosted by Stanford, Notre Dame, Service Leader, and Volunteer.gov.[42]

Faculty and staff[edit] Opportunities include mixing with the students in the NEXUS Community Garden project, joining in on the Alternative Breaks immersion experiences, participating in Community Action Day, and working service-learning into the content of courses.[43] Alumni[edit] Alumni contribute to the service efforts of the university through The Magis Society. On the CFJ blogspot they share what they are doing and they meet at times as a group.[44] The CFJ office helps them to network with others on social causes in their profession.[45] Notable alumni[edit] Xavier has a number of notable alumni, including:

Danny Abramowicz, NFL wide receiver George Billman, physiology professor at Ohio
Ohio
State J. Kenneth Blackwell, Ohio
Ohio
Secretary of State, 2006 GOP Ohio gubernatorial candidate John Boehner, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives for the 112th Congress
112th Congress
and 113th Congress, U.S. House Of Representatives Minority Leader and Majority Leader Phil H. Bucklew, Naval Officer
Naval Officer
and professional football player. Widely credited as the "Father of Naval Special
Special
Warfare" Jim Bunning, former U.S. Senator from Kentucky, member of Baseball Hall of Fame. Threw baseball's seventh perfect game as a member of the Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
in 1964 Derrick Brown, small forward for the New York Knicks John A. Cade, Maryland State Senator Lionel Chalmers, American professional basketball player Donald D. Clancy, Congressman Bill Cunningham, radio talk show host for Cincinnati's 700 WLW Dane Dastillung, American football
American football
player Dennis E. Eckart, Congressman Russell Findlay, first Chief Marketing Officer, Major League Soccer Thomas J. Fogarty, surgeon and inventor of the balloon embolectomy catheter Edward J. Gardner, Congressman Charles Geschke, President, and co-founder of Adobe Systems Brian Grant, retired NBA
NBA
forward Los Angeles Lakers Richard Hague, poet Victor W. Hall, U.S. Navy
U.S. Navy
admiral Michael Hawkins, NBA
NBA
athlete Bob Heleringer (Class of 1973), member of the Kentucky House of Representatives and Louisville lawyer[46] Howard V. Hendrix, science fiction author Patricia L. Herbold, U.S. Ambassador to Singapore Tyrone Hill, retired NBA
NBA
All Star forward; played 14 seasons with 5 teams Jack Hoffman, NFL player Greg J. Holbrock, U.S. representative Robert Huebner, virologist Alfred James Lechner, Jr., United States federal judge John Logsdon, Director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University Ken Lucas, former U.S. Representative from Kentucky Tom Luken, Ohio
Ohio
politician Rhine McLin, Mayor of Dayton Art Mergenthal, American football
American football
player Jack Miles, Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
winner Ryan Nemeth, professional wrestler signed to WWE Donald C. Nugent, United States federal judge David Nordyke, educator Daniel Edward Pilarczyk, archbishop James Posey, forward for the New Orleans Hornets, two-time NBA champion with the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
and Boston Celtics. Dennis L. Riley (born 1945), politician who served in the New Jersey General Assembly, where he represented the 4th Legislative District from 1980 to 1990.[47] Richard Romanus, actor best known for recurring role in The Sopranos Robert Romanus, actor best known for a role in Fast Times at Ridgemont High Chris Seelbach (politician), current Cincinnati
Cincinnati
City Council member Dom Sigillo, American football
American football
player Matt Stainbrook, basketball player in the German Bundesliga Derek Strong, NBA
NBA
player Francis Wade, philosopher David West, power forward for the Golden State Warriors. 2003 United States Basketball
Basketball
Writers Association National Player of the Year and two-time NBA
NBA
All-Star Carroll Williams, American player of gridiron football Garry Wills, Pulitzer Prize-winning author

Notable faculty[edit]

Arthur J. Dewey, New Testament
New Testament
scholar John J. Gilligan, Congressman and Governor
Governor
of Ohio Paul F. Knitter, theologian Richard Polt, Heidegger
Heidegger
scholar; manual typewriter enthusiast Henry Heimlich, "inventor" of Heimlich Maneuver, Advanced Clinical Science Professor 1977–89 Boris Podolsky, physicist and "creator" of the EPR paradox Norman Finkelstein, poet and literary critic

See also[edit]

Xavier Newswire

References[edit]

^ a b "Xavier at a Glance". Xavier University.  ^ "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2016 Market Value of Endowment Assets and Change* in Endowment Market Value from FY2015 to FY2016" (PDF). NACUBO. Retrieved March 24, 2017.  ^ "Xavier at a Glance". Xavier University. Archived from the original on November 13, 2012.  ^ a b c d e f g h i j Xavier Facts Update, Norwood, Ohio: Xavier University, 2013  ^ "Xavier University
University
- The Xavier Brand - Design Elements". Xavier.edu. Retrieved April 9, 2017.  ^ "Xavier at a Glance". Xavier University.  ^ a b "Behind the Blue Blob". Xavier Magazine. Xavier University. Spring 2013.  ^ " Cintas Center
Cintas Center
rising on Xavier U.'s campus". Enquirer.com. September 7, 1999. Retrieved January 1, 2016.  ^ "2015 top 25 colleges in entrepreneurship for undergraduates". Entrepreneur.com. September 16, 2014. Retrieved January 1, 2016.  ^ "Admission Office". Xavier University. Archived from the original on December 5, 2008.  ^ "Second-Degree Accelerated BSN Program Xavier University". Xavier ABSN. Retrieved July 6, 2017.  ^ "Alpha Sigma Nu".  ^ "Beta Alpha Psi".  ^ "Beta Gamma Sigma". Archived from the original on May 10, 2013.  ^ "Phi Beta Kappa".  ^ "Mortar Board". Archived from the original on October 29, 2013.  ^ "About Xavier". Xavier University.  ^ "FRESHMAN-COHORT GRADUATION RATES" (PDF). NCAA.  ^ Athletics Website[permanent dead link] ^ "Xavier University
University
- Athletics". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved January 14, 2016.  ^ Branch, John (March 15, 2010). "At Xavier, Nun Works Out Players' Academic Side". New York Times.  ^ "The Most Valuable College Basketball
Basketball
Teams – Forbes.com". January 2, 2008.  ^ "Xavier Athletics - Xavier Men's Swimming Captures First BIG EAST Championship". Goxavier.com. Retrieved April 9, 2017.  ^ "Xavier Athletics - A BIG Accomplishment For Xavier Men's Swimming". Goxavier.com. February 26, 2014. Retrieved April 9, 2017.  ^ "Xavier Athletics - Men's Swimming Wins Third-Straight BIG EAST Championship". Goxavier.com. Retrieved April 9, 2017.  ^ "Xavier Official Athletic Site – Traditions". Goxavier.cstv.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved August 21, 2010.  ^ "On Campus – College Team Mascots – Blue Blob, – Xavier University". Playboy.com. Archived from the original on October 23, 2010. Retrieved August 21, 2010.  ^ "Google Image Result". Images.google.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010.  ^ "Xavier University
University
Kids Teddy Bears & Toys". Bkstr.com. June 27, 2014. Retrieved January 1, 2016.  ^ "The Xavier Newswire – Front Page – week of October 17, 2007". Xavier.edu. Retrieved August 21, 2010.  ^ "Men for Others". onlineministries.creighton.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Why We Stay…The Changing Role of Women in our Faith Communities, AJC Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Regional Office". www.ajccincinnati.org. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Service Programs". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ " Catholic
Catholic
College Students Find Joy in Spring Break Service Trips". m.ncregister.com. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Xavier University
University
(Cincinnati, Ohio) comes to visit!". Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ President's Service Honor Role, p.20. Accessed 9 May 2016. ^ "Contemplatives in Action". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "The Dater Foundation -Serving Cincinnati-". www.daterfoundation.org. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Rachel Snodgrass Brueggeman Fellows". brueggemanfellows.org. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Xavier University
University
- Center for Faith and Justice - Service and Justice - Internship Opportunities". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "First Year Opportunities". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Xavier University
University
- Center for Faith and Justice - Service and Justice - Post-Graduate Service". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Faculty/Staff". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Alumni". www.xavier.edu. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Cincinnati, OH - Xavier University
University
Post-Grad Service Fair // Alliance for Catholic
Catholic
Education". Alliance for Catholic
Catholic
Education. Retrieved June 21, 2017.  ^ "Biography of Robert L. "Bob" Heleringer". equineregulatorylaw.com. Retrieved February 6, 2016.  ^ Staff. Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey: 1987 edition, p. 243. E. J. Mullin, 1987. Accessed September 13, 2016. "Dennis L. Riley, Dem., Gloucester Township - Mr. Riley was born Sept. 13, 1945, in Ottawa, Ill. He studied at Xavier University
University
and the University
University
of Cincinnati, and received his law degree at the Camden Law School of Rutgers University
University
in 1972, the year of his admission to the bar."

Further reading[edit]

Fortin, Roger Antonio (November 1, 2006). To See Great Wonders: A History
History
of Xavier University, 1831–2006. Scranton, Pennsylvania: University
University
of Scranton Press. ISBN 1-58966-152-4. Retrieved January 11, 2016. 

External links[edit]

Official website Xavier Athletics website

Links to related articles

v t e

Xavier University

Located in: Cincinnati, Ohio

Life

Xavier Newswire Xavier University
University
MBA Program St. Xavier High School (Cincinnati) Edgecliff College Coca-Cola Bottling Plant

Athletics

Xavier Musketeers Men's basketball Women's basketball Men's soccer Baseball Cintas Center J. Page Hayden Field Big East Conference

Founded: 1831

v t e

Association of Jesuit
Jesuit
Colleges and Universities

East

Boston College
Boston College
(MA) Holy Cross (MA) Fairfield (CT) Canisius (NY) Le Moyne (NY) Fordham (NY) Saint Peter's (NJ) Saint Joseph's (PA) Scranton (PA) Loyola Maryland (MD) Georgetown (DC)

Mid West

Creighton (NE) Detroit Mercy (MI) John Carroll (OH) Xavier (OH) Loyola Chicago (IL) Marquette (WI) Rockhurst (MO) Saint Louis (MO)

South

Wheeling Jesuit
Jesuit
(WV) Loyola New Orleans (LA) Spring Hill (AL)

West

Gonzaga (WA) Seattle (WA) Loyola Marymount (CA) San Francisco (CA) Santa Clara (CA) Regis (CO)

Graduate

Berkeley (CA) Weston (MA)

Catholicism
Catholicism
portal

v t e

Big East Conference

Full members

Butler Bulldogs Creighton Bluejays DePaul Blue Demons Georgetown Hoyas Marquette Golden Eagles Providence Friars St. John's Red Storm Seton Hall Pirates Villanova Wildcats Xavier Musketeers

Associate members

Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Bearcats (women's lacrosse; leaving in 2018) Connecticut Huskies
Connecticut Huskies
(field hockey, women's lacrosse; lacrosse leaving in 2018) Denver Pioneers
Denver Pioneers
(men's lacrosse, women's lacrosse) Florida Gators (women's lacrosse; leaving in 2018) Liberty Lady Flames (field hockey) Old Dominion Monarchs (field hockey; women's lacrosse joining in 2018) Quinnipiac Bobcats
Quinnipiac Bobcats
(field hockey) Temple Owls
Temple Owls
(field hockey, women's lacrosse; lacrosse leaving in 2018) Vanderbilt Commodores
Vanderbilt Commodores
(women's lacrosse; leaving in 2018)

History

Big East Conference
Big East Conference
(1979–2013) 2010–13 Big East realignment

v t e

Colleges & Universities in the State of Ohio

Private

Antioch College The Art Academy of Cincinnati Baldwin Wallace University Bluffton University Capital University Case Western Reserve University Cedarville University Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Christian University Cleveland Institute of Art Cleveland Institute of Electronics Cleveland Institute of Music University
University
of Dayton Defiance College Denison University The University
University
of Findlay Hebrew Union College Heidelberg University Hiram College John Carroll University Kenyon College Kettering College of Medical Arts Marietta College Mount St. Joseph University University
University
of Mount Union Muskingum University Myers University University
University
of Northwestern Ohio Notre Dame College Oberlin College Ohio
Ohio
Dominican University Ohio
Ohio
Northern University Ohio
Ohio
Wesleyan University Otterbein College Mount Vernon Nazarene University Ohio
Ohio
College of Podiatric Medicine University
University
of Rio Grande Tiffin University Urbana University Ursuline College Walsh University Wilberforce University Wilmington College Wittenberg University College of Wooster Xavier University

Public

University
University
of Akron Belmont Technical College Bowling Green State University Central Ohio
Ohio
Technical College Central State University Cincinnati
Cincinnati
State Technical and Community College University
University
of Cincinnati Clark State Community College Cleveland State University Columbus State Community College Cuyahoga Community College Eastern Gateway Community College Edison State Community College Hocking College James A. Rhodes State College Kent State University Lakeland Community College Lorain County Community College Marion Technical College Miami University North Central State College Northeast Ohio
Ohio
Medical University Northwest State Community College Ohio
Ohio
State University Ohio
Ohio
University Owens Community College Shawnee State University Sinclair Community College Southern State Community College Stark State College Terra Community College University
University
of Toledo Washington State Community College Wright State University Youngstown State University Zane State College

University
University
System of Ohio

v t e

Roman Catholic
Catholic
Archdiocese of Cincinnati

v t e

Ordinaries of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati

Bishop

Edward Fenwick

Archbishops

John Baptist Purcell William Henry Elder Henry K. Moeller John T. McNicholas Karl Joseph Alter Paul Francis Leibold Joseph Bernardin Daniel Edward Pilarczyk Dennis Marion Schnurr

Catholicism
Catholicism
portal

v t e

Churches in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati

Cathedral

Saint Peter in Chains Cathedral

Parishes

Cincinnati Church of the Annunciation Immaculata Church Old St. Mary's Church St. Francis De Sales Church Saint Francis Seraph Church St. Francis Xavier
Francis Xavier
Church St. Lawrence Church St. Pius X Church St. Rose Church

Dayton Holy Cross Church Sacred Heart Church St. Adalbert Church St. Mary's Church

Springfield St. Joseph's Church St. Raphael's Church

Other Immaculate Conception Church, Botkins St. Aloysius Church, Carthagena Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church, Cassella Immaculate Conception Church, Celina Precious Blood Church, Chickasaw Our Lady of Victory (Cincinnati) St. Joseph's Church, Egypt Holy Family Church, Frenchtown St. John's Church, Fryburg St. Patrick's Church, Glynwood St. John the Baptist Church, Maria Stein Sacred Heart Church, McCartyville St. Michael's Church, Mechanicsburg St. Augustine's Church, Minster St. Louis Church, North Star St. Nicholas Church, Osgood St. Anthony's Church, Padua St. Remy's Church, Russia St. Henry's Church, St. Henry Holy Rosary Church, St. Marys St. Rose's Church, St. Rose St. Sebastian's Church, Sebastian St. Joseph's Church, Wapakoneta

Former parishes

All Saints Church, Cincinnati Holy Trinity Church, Cincinnati St. Augustine Church, Cincinnati St. George's Church, Cincinnati St. Michael the Archangel Church, Cincinnati St. Paul Church, Cincinnati St. Philomena's Church, Cincinnati St. Patrick's Church, St. Patrick

Shrine

Shrine of the Holy Relics

v t e

Education in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati

Higher education

Chatfield College University
University
of Dayton Edgecliff College Mount St. Joseph University Xavier University

Seminary

Athenaeum of Ohio
Ohio
– Mount St. Mary's Seminary of the West

High schools

Cincinnati DePaul Cristo Rey High School Elder High School La Salle High School McAuley High School Archbishop
Archbishop
McNicholas High School Mother of Mercy High School Purcell Marian High School Seton High School St. Ursula Academy St. Xavier High School Summit Country Day School Ursuline Academy

Dayton Carroll High School Chaminade-Julienne High School

Other Archbishop
Archbishop
Alter High School, Kettering Father Stephen T. Badin High School, Hamilton Catholic
Catholic
Central School, Springfield Bishop Fenwick High School, Franklin Lehman Catholic
Catholic
High School, Sidney Moeller High School, Kenwood Mount Notre Dame High School, Reading Royalmont Academy, Mason Roger Bacon High School, St. Bernard St. Rita School for the Deaf, Evendale

v t e

Clergy of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati

Auxiliary bishops

Sylvester Horton Rosecrans Joseph H. Albers George John Rehring Paul Francis Leibold Edward A. McCarthy Nicholas Elko Daniel Edward Pilarczyk James Henry Garland Carl K. Moeddel Joseph R. Binzer

Priests

John Martin Henni Edward Fitzgerald Clarence George Issenmann Henry Damian Juncker Joshua Maria Young John Baptist Lamy James Frederick Wood John Henry Luers Caspar Henry Borgess Richard Gilmour John Quinlan Augustus Toebbe Joseph Gregory Dwenger Henry Richter Francis Beckman Urban John Vehr Francis Augustine Thill Anthony John King Mussio John Joseph Kaising Robert Daniel Conlon Michael William Warfel

Miscellany

The Catholic
Catholic
Telegraph Der Wahrheitsfreund Former St. Charles Seminary Gruenwald Convent Minster Elementary School St. John Cemetery, Cincinnati New St. Joseph Cemetery, Cincinnati Old St. Joseph's Cemetery, Cincinnati

Catholicism
Catholicism
portal Cincinnati
Cincinnati
portal

Coordinates: 39°08′55″N 84°28′41″W / 39.14868°N 84.47799°W / 39.14868; -84.47799

Authority control

ISNI: 0

.