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Heywood Allen (born Allan Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is an American director, writer, actor, comedian, and musician whose career spans more than six decades. He began his career as a comedy writer in the 1950s, writing jokes and scripts for television and publishing several books of short humor pieces. In the early 1960s, Allen began performing as a stand-up comedian, emphasizing monologues rather than traditional jokes. As a comedian, he developed the persona of an insecure, intellectual, fretful nebbish, which he maintains is quite different from his real-life personality.[1] In 2004, Comedy Central ranked Allen fourth on a list of the 100 greatest stand-up comedians,[2][3] while a UK survey ranked Allen as the third greatest comedian.[4] By the mid-1960s, Allen was writing and directing films, first specializing in slapstick comedies before moving into dramatic material influenced by European art cinema during the 1970s, and alternating between comedies and dramas to the present. He is often identified as part of the New Hollywood wave of filmmakers of the mid-1960s to late 1970s.[5] Allen often stars in his films, typically in the persona he developed as a standup. Some of the best-known of his over 50 films are Annie Hall
Annie Hall
(1977), Manhattan
Manhattan
(1979), Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), and Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989). In 2007 he said Stardust Memories
Stardust Memories
(1980), The Purple Rose of Cairo
The Purple Rose of Cairo
(1985), and Match Point
Match Point
(2005) were his best films.[6] Critic Roger Ebert described Allen as "a treasure of the cinema".[7] Allen has received many accolades and honors throughout his career. He has won four Academy Awards: three for Best Original Screenplay and one for Best Director. He also garnered nine British Academy Film Awards. His screenplay for Annie Hall
Annie Hall
was named the funniest screenplay by the Writers Guild of America in its list of the "101 Funniest Screenplays."[8] In 2011, PBS
PBS
televised the film biography Woody Allen: A Documentary on the American Masters
American Masters
TV series.[9]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 Comedy writer 2.2 Stand-up comedian 2.3 Playwright 2.4 Early films 2.5 1980s 2.6 1990s 2.7 2000s 2.8 2010s 2.9 Theatre 2.10 Music

3 Personal life

3.1 Early marriages and relationships 3.2 Mia Farrow 3.3 Soon Yi Previn 3.4 Assault allegation

4 Works

4.1 Theatrical works 4.2 Filmography and awards

5 Works about Allen 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External links

Early life

Allen as a high school senior, 1953

Allen was born Allan Stewart Konigsberg[10] in the Brooklyn
Brooklyn
borough of New York City, New York. He and his sister, Letty (b. 1943), were raised in Midwood, Brooklyn.[11] He is the son of Nettie (née Cherry; November 8, 1906 – January 27, 2002), a bookkeeper at her family's delicatessen, and Martin Konigsberg (December 25, 1900 – January 8, 2001),[12] a jewelry engraver and waiter.[13] His family was Jewish, and his grandparents immigrated to the US from Russia and Austria and spoke Yiddish, Hebrew, and German.[14][15] Both of Allen's parents were born and raised on the Lower East Side
Lower East Side
of Manhattan.[16] His childhood was not particularly happy; his parents did not get along, and he had a rocky relationship with his stern, temperamental mother.[17] Allen spoke German quite a bit in his early years.[18] He would later joke that when he was young he was often sent to inter-faith summer camps. While attending Hebrew
Hebrew
school for eight years, he went to Public School 99 (now the Isaac Asimov
Isaac Asimov
School for Science and Literature)[19] and to Midwood High School, where he graduated in 1953.[20] At that time, he lived in an apartment at 968 East 14th Street.[21] Unlike his comic persona, he was more interested in baseball than school and his strong arms ensured he was first to be picked for a team.[22][23] He impressed students with his extraordinary talent at card and magic tricks.[24] For pay, he wrote jokes (or "gags") for agent David O. Alber, who sold them to newspaper columnists. At the age of 17, he legally changed his name to Heywood Allen[25] and later began to call himself Woody Allen. According to Allen, his first published joke read: " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
says he ate at a restaurant that had O.P.S. prices – over people's salaries."[26] He was then earning more than both parents combined.[22] After high school, he attended New York University, studying communication and film in 1953, before dropping out after failing the course "Motion Picture Production". He later briefly studied film at City College of New York
City College of New York
in 1954, but did not finish the semester.[27] Later, he taught himself, rather than in the classroom.[23] He eventually taught at The New School. He also studied with writing teacher Lajos Egri.[23]p.74 His status before the Selective Service System
Selective Service System
was "4-F", a medical deferment, although he later claimed his actual status was "4-P, hostage".[28][29] Career Comedy writer Allen began writing short jokes when he was 15,[30] and the following year began sending them to various Broadway writers to see if they'd be interested in buying any. He also began going by the name "Woody Allen."[31]:539 One of those writers was Abe Burrows, coauthor of Guys and Dolls, who wrote, "Wow! His stuff was dazzling." Burrows then wrote Allen letters of introduction to Sid Caesar, Phil Silvers, and Peter Lind Hayes, who immediately sent Allen a check for just the jokes Burrows included as samples.[31]:541 As a result of the jokes Allen mailed to various writers, he was invited, then age 19, to join the NBC Writer's Development Program in 1955, followed by a job on The NBC Comedy Hour in Los Angeles. He was later hired as a full-time writer for humorist Herb Shriner, initially earning $25 a week.[26] He began writing scripts for The Ed Sullivan Show, The Tonight Show, specials for Sid Caesar
Sid Caesar
post-Caesar's Hour (1954–1957), and other television shows.[23][32]p.111 By the time he was working for Caesar, he was earning $1,500 a week; with Caesar, he worked alongside Danny Simon, whom Allen credits for helping form his writing style.[26][33] In 1962 alone he estimated that he wrote twenty thousand jokes for various comics.[31]:533 Allen also wrote for the Candid Camera
Candid Camera
television show, and appeared in some episodes.[34][35][36] Along with that show, he wrote jokes for the Buddy Hackett
Buddy Hackett
sitcom Stanley and The Pat Boone
Pat Boone
Chevy Showroom. And in 1958 he cowrote a few Sid Caesar
Sid Caesar
specials with Larry Gelbart.[31]:542 After writing for many of television's leading comedians and comedy shows, Allen was gaining the reputation for being a "genius", says composer Mary Rodgers. When given an assignment for a show he would leave and come back the next day with "reams of paper", according to producer Max Liebman.[31]:542 Similarly, after writing for Bob Hope, Hope called him "half a genius".[31]:542 His daily writing routine could go as long as fifteen hours, and he could focus and write anywhere necessary. Dick Cavett
Dick Cavett
was amazed at Allen's capacity to write: "He can go to a typewriter after breakfast and sit there until the sun sets and his head is pounding, interrupting work only for coffee and a brief walk, and then spend the whole evening working."[31]:551 When Allen wrote for other comedians, they would use eight out of ten of his jokes. When he began performing as a stand-up, he was much more selective, typically using only one out of ten jokes. He estimated that to prepare for a 30-minute show, he spent six months of intensive writing.[31]:551 He enjoyed writing, however, despite the work: "Nothing makes me happier than to tear open a ream of paper. And I can't wait to fill it! I love to do it."[31]:551 Allen started writing short stories and cartoon captions for magazines such as The New Yorker; he was inspired by the tradition of New Yorker humorists S. J. Perelman, George S. Kaufman, Robert Benchley
Robert Benchley
and Max Shulman, whose material he modernized.[37][38][39][40][41] Allen has published four collections of his short pieces and plays.[42][43] These are Getting Even, Without Feathers, Side Effects, and Mere Anarchy. His early comic fiction was heavily influenced by the zany, pun-ridden humour of S.J. Perelman. In 2010, Allen released digital spoken word versions of his four books, in which he reads 73 short story selections from his work and for which he was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album.[44] Stand-up comedian

Allen in the 1960s

From 1960 to 1969, Allen performed as a stand-up comedian to supplement his comedy writing. His contemporaries during those years included Lenny Bruce, Shelley Berman, the team of Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
and Elaine May, and Mort Sahl, his personal favorite. Comedy historian Gerald Nachman notes that Allen, while not the first to do stand-up, would eventually have greater impact than all the others in the 1960s, and would redefine the meaning of stand-up comedy: "He helped turn it into biting, brutally honest satirical commentary on the cultural and psychological tenor of the times."[31]:525 After Allen was taken under the wing of his new manager, Jack Rollins, who had recently discovered Nichols and May, Rollins suggested he perform his written jokes as a stand-up. Allen was resistant at first, but after seeing Mort Sahl
Mort Sahl
on stage, he felt safer to give it a try: "I'd never had the nerve to talk about it before. Then Mort Sahl
Mort Sahl
came along with a whole new style of humor, opening up vistas for people like me."[31]:545 Allen made his professional stage debut at the Blue Angel nightclub in Manhattan
Manhattan
in October 1960, where comedian Shelley Berman introduced him as a young television writer who would perform his own material.[31]:545 His early stand-up shows with his different style of humor were not always well received or understood by his audiences. Unlike other comedians, Allen spoke to his audiences in a gentle and conversational style, often appearing to be searching for words, although his style was well rehearsed. He acted "normal", dressed casually, and made no attempt to project a stage "personality". And he did not improvise: "I put very little premium on improvisation," he told Studs Terkel.[31]:532 His jokes were created from life experiences, and typically presented with a dead serious demeanor which made them funnier: "I don't think my family liked me. They put a live teddy bear in my crib."[31]:533 The subjects of his jokes were rarely topical, political or socially relevant. Unlike Bruce and Sahl, he did not discuss current events such as civil rights, women's rights, the Cold War, or Vietnam. And although he was described as a "classic nebbish", he did not tell Jewish jokes. Comedy screenwriter Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
compared Allen's style to Elaine May: "He just styled himself completely after her," he said.[31]:546 Like Nichols and May, he often made fun of intellectuals. Television talk show host Dick Cavett, who was among the minority who quickly appreciated Allen's unique style, recalls seeing the audience at the Blue Angel mostly ignore Allen's monologue: "I recognized immediately that there was no young comedian in the country in the same class with him for sheer brilliance of jokes, and I resented the fact that the audience was too dumb to realize what they were getting."[31]:550 It was his subdued stage presence, while initially unappreciated, that eventually became one of Allen's strongest traits, explains Nachman: "The utter absence of showbiz veneer and shtick was the best shtick any comedian had ever devised. This uneasy onstage naturalness became a trademark."[31]:530 When he was finally noticed by the media, writers like New York Times' Arthur Gelb would describe Allen's nebbish quality as being "Chaplinesque" and "refreshing". Allen developed an anxious, nervous, and intellectual persona for his stand-up act, a successful move that secured regular gigs for him in nightclubs and on television. Allen brought innovation to the comedy monologue genre and his stand-up comedy would be considered influential.[45] Allen first appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson on November 1, 1963 and over nine years his guest appearances included seventeen in the hosts chair. He subsequently released three LP albums of live nightclub recordings: the self-titled Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1964), Volume 2 (1965), and The Third Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Album (1968) recorded at a fund-raiser for Senator Eugene McCarthy's presidential run.[46] In 1965, Allen had his own TV special in Great Britain called The Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Show. In 1967 he hosted an episode of The Kraft Music Hall where he would intersperse humor with interviews of famous people, including conservative writer William F. Buckley.[47] In 1969 he hosted his first American special for CBS
CBS
television which included a humorous spot with The Rev. Billy Graham.[48][49] He also performed stand-up comedy on other series including The Andy Williams Show
Andy Williams Show
and The Perry Como
Perry Como
Show where he would interact with other guests and occasionally sing.[50] In 1971 Allen hosted one of his final Tonight Shows, which included as guests Bob Hope
Bob Hope
and James Coco.[51] Playwright

Allen with the Broadway cast of Play It Again, Sam (1969).

In 1966, Allen wrote the play Don't Drink the Water. The play starred Lou Jacobi, Kay Medford, Anita Gillette
Anita Gillette
and Allen's future movie co-star Tony Roberts.[52] A film adaptation of the play, directed by Howard Morris, was released in 1969, starring Jackie Gleason. Because he was not particularly happy with the 1969 film version of his play, in 1994, Allen directed and starred in a second version for television, with Michael J. Fox
Michael J. Fox
and Mayim Bialik.[53] The next play Allen wrote for Broadway was Play It Again, Sam, in which he also starred. The play opened on February 12, 1969, and ran for 453 performances. It featured Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
and Roberts.[54] The play was significant to Keaton's budding career, and she has stated she was in "awe" of Allen even before auditioning for her role, which was the first time she met him.[55] During an interview in 2013, Keaton stated that she "fell in love with him right away," adding, "I wanted to be his girlfriend so I did something about it."[56] After co-starring alongside Allen in the subsequent film version of Play It Again, Sam, she would later co-star in Sleeper, Love and Death, Interiors, Manhattan
Manhattan
and Annie Hall. "He showed me the ropes and I followed his lead. He is the most disciplined person I know. He works very hard," Keaton has stated.[56] "I find the same thing sexy in a man now as I always have: humor. I love it when they are funny. It's to die for."[57] For its March 21, 1969, issue, Life featured Allen on its cover.[58] In 1981, his play The Floating Light Bulb premiered on Broadway and ran for 65 performances.[59] While receiving mixed reviews, it gave an autobiographical insight into Allen's childhood, specifically his fascination with magic tricks. He has written several one-act plays, including Riverside Drive and Old Saybrook exploring well-known Allen themes.[60][61] On October 20, 2011, Allen's one-act play Honeymoon Motel opened as part of a larger piece entitled Relatively Speaking on Broadway, with two other one-act plays, one by Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
and one by Elaine May.[62] Early films His first movie was the Charles K. Feldman production What's New Pussycat? in 1965, for which he wrote the screenplay.[9] He was disappointed with the final product, which inspired him to direct every film that he would later write.[9] Allen's first directorial effort was What's Up, Tiger Lily?
What's Up, Tiger Lily?
(1966, co-written with Mickey Rose), in which an existing Japanese spy movie—Kokusai himitsu keisatsu: Kagi no kagi (1965), "International Secret Police: Key of Keys"—was redubbed in English by Allen and friends with fresh new, comic dialogue. In 1967, Allen played Jimmy Bond in the 007 spoof Casino Royale. Allen directed, starred in, and co-wrote (with Mickey Rose) Take the Money and Run in 1969, which received positive reviews. He later signed a deal with United Artists
United Artists
to produce several films. Those films eventually became Bananas (1971, co-written with Rose), Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (1972), Sleeper (1973), and Love and Death
Love and Death
(1975).[9] Sleeper's was the first of four screenplays co-written by Allen and Marshall Brickman.[63][64] In 1972, Allen wrote and starred in the film version of Play It Again, Sam, directed by Herbert Ross and co-starring Diane Keaton. In 1976, he starred as cashier Howard Prince, in The Front, directed by Martin Ritt. The Front
The Front
was a humorous and poignant account of Hollywood blacklisting during the 1950s; Ritt, screenwriter Walter Bernstein, and three of Allen's cast-mates, Samuel "Zero" Mostel, Herschel Bernardi, and Lloyd Gough, had themselves been blacklisted.

I don't like meeting heroes. There's nobody I want to meet and nobody I want to work with—I'd rather work with Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
than anyone—she's absolutely great, a natural.

Woody Allen, Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
interview (1976)[30]

Then came two of Allen's most popular films. Annie Hall
Annie Hall
won four Academy Awards
Academy Awards
in 1977, including Best Picture, Best Actress in a Leading Role for Diane Keaton, Best Original Screenplay and Best Director for Woody Allen. Annie Hall
Annie Hall
set the standard for modern romantic comedy and ignited a fashion trend with the clothes worn by Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
in the film. In an interview with journalist Katie Couric, Keaton does not deny that Allen wrote the part for her and about her.[65] She also explains that Allen wrote the part based on aspects of her personality at the time:

Of course I recognized myself in the roles [Woody Allen] wrote. I mean, in Annie Hall
Annie Hall
(1977) particularly. I was this sort of novice who had lots of feelings but didn't know how to express herself, and I see that in Annie. I think Woody used a kind of essential quality that he found in me at that time, and I'm glad he did because it worked really well in the movie.[57]

The film is ranked at No. 35 on the American Film Institute's "100 Best Movies" and at No. 4 on the AFI list of "100 Best Comedies." Manhattan
Manhattan
(1979), is a black-and-white film often viewed as an homage to New York City. As in many Allen films, the main protagonists are upper-middle class writers and academics. The love–hate opinion of cerebral persons found in Manhattan
Manhattan
is characteristic of many of Allen's movies, including Crimes and Misdemeanors and Annie Hall. Manhattan
Manhattan
focuses on the complicated relationship between middle-aged Isaac Davis (Allen) with 17-year-old Tracy (Mariel Hemingway), and co-stars Diane Keaton. Keaton, who made eight movies with Allen during her career, tries to explain why his films are unique:

He just has a mind like nobody else. He's bold. He's got a lot of strength, a lot of courage in terms of his work. And that is what it takes to do something really unique. Along with a genius imagination.[65]

Between Annie Hall
Annie Hall
and Manhattan, Allen wrote and directed the dark drama Interiors
Interiors
(1978),[66] in the style of Swedish director Ingmar Bergman, one of Allen's chief influences. Interiors
Interiors
represented a departure from Allen's "early, funny" comedies (a line from 1980's Stardust Memories). 1980s Allen's 1980s films, even the comedies, have somber and philosophical undertones, with their influences being the works of European directors, specifically Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
and Federico Fellini. Stardust Memories was based on 8½, which it parodies, and Wild Strawberries. A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy was adapted from Smiles of a Summer Night. In Hannah and Her Sisters, part of the film's structure and background is borrowed from Fanny and Alexander. Amarcord
Amarcord
inspired Radio Days. September resembles Autumn Sonata. Allen uses many elements from Wild Strawberries. In Crimes and Misdemeanors, Allen references a scene from Wild Strawberries.[67] Stardust Memories
Stardust Memories
(1980) features Sandy Bates, a successful filmmaker played by Allen, who expresses resentment and scorn for his fans. Overcome by the recent death of a friend from illness, the character states, "I don't want to make funny movies any more" and a running gag has various people (including visiting space aliens) telling Bates that they appreciate his films, "especially the early, funny ones."[68] Allen believes this to be one of his best films.[69]

Mia's a good actress who can play many different roles. She has a very good range, and can play serious to comic roles. She's also very photogenic, very beautiful on screen. She's just a good realistic actress... and no matter how strange and daring it is, she does it well.

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1993)[70]

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
(1982) was the first of 13 movies Allen made starring Mia Farrow, who stepped into Diane Keaton's role when Keaton was shooting Reds.[71] He next produced a vividly idiosyncratic tragi-comical parody of documentary, Zelig, in which he starred as a Leonard Zelig, man who has the ability to transform his appearance to that of the people who surround him.[72] Allen has combined tragic and comic elements in such films as Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) and Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), in which he tells two stories that connect at the end. He also made three films about show business: Broadway Danny Rose, in which he plays a New York show business agent, The Purple Rose of Cairo, a movie that shows the importance of the cinema during the Depression through the character of the naive Cecilia, and Radio Days, a film about his childhood in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and the importance of the radio. The film co-starred Farrow in a part Allen wrote specifically for her.[70] The Purple Rose of Cairo
The Purple Rose of Cairo
was named by Time as one of the 100 best films of all time[73] and Allen described it as one of his three best films, along with Stardust Memories
Stardust Memories
and Match Point[74] (Allen defines them as "best" not in terms of quality but because they came closest to his vision). In 1989, Allen teamed with directors Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
to make New York Stories, an anthology film about New Yorkers. Allen's short, Oedipus Wrecks, is about a neurotic lawyer and his critical mother. His short pleased critics, but New York Stories
New York Stories
bombed at the box office.[75][76] 1990s His 1991 film Shadows and Fog
Shadows and Fog
is a black-and-white homage to the German expressionists and features the music of Kurt Weill.[77] Allen then made his critically acclaimed comedy-drama Husbands and Wives (1992), which received two Oscar nominations: Best Supporting Actress for Judy Davis
Judy Davis
and Best Original Screenplay for Allen. His film Manhattan
Manhattan
Murder Mystery (1993) combined suspense with dark comedy and marked the return of Diane Keaton, Alan Alda
Alan Alda
and Anjelica Huston. He returned to lighter movies like Bullets over Broadway
Bullets over Broadway
(1994), which earned an Academy Award
Academy Award
nomination for Best Director, followed by a musical, Everyone Says I Love You
Everyone Says I Love You
(1996). The singing and dancing scenes in Everyone Says I Love You
Everyone Says I Love You
are similar to musicals starring Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
and Ginger Rogers. The comedy Mighty Aphrodite
Mighty Aphrodite
(1995), in which Greek drama plays a large role, won an Academy Award
Academy Award
for Mira Sorvino. Allen's 1999 jazz-based comedy-drama Sweet and Lowdown
Sweet and Lowdown
was nominated for two Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for Sean Penn
Sean Penn
(Best Actor) and Samantha Morton
Samantha Morton
(Best Supporting Actress). In contrast to these lighter movies, Allen veered into darker satire toward the end of the decade with Deconstructing Harry
Deconstructing Harry
(1997) and Celebrity (1998). During this decade, Allen also starred in the television film The Sunshine Boys (1995), based on the Neil Simon
Neil Simon
play of the same name.[78] Allen made one sitcom "appearance" via telephone on the show Just Shoot Me! in a 1997 episode, "My Dinner with Woody", which paid tribute to several of his films. Allen provided the voice of Z in DreamWorks' first animated film, Antz
Antz
(1998), which featured many actors he had worked with; Allen's character was similar to his earlier neurotic roles.[79] 2000s Small Time Crooks
Small Time Crooks
(2000) was Allen's first film with the DreamWorks studio and represented a change in direction: Allen began giving more interviews and made an attempt to return to his slapstick roots. The film is similar to the 1942 film Larceny, Inc. (from a play by S.J. Perelman).[80] Allen never commented on whether this was deliberate or if his film was in any way inspired by it. Small Time Crooks
Small Time Crooks
was a relative financial success, grossing over $17 million domestically but Allen's next four films foundered at the box office, including Allen's most costly film, The Curse of the Jade Scorpion
The Curse of the Jade Scorpion
(with a budget of $26 million). Hollywood Ending, Anything Else, and Melinda and Melinda were given "rotten" ratings from film-review website Rotten Tomatoes and each earned less than $4 million domestically.[81] Some critics claimed that Allen's early 2000s films were subpar and expressed concern that Allen's best years were behind him.[82] Others were less harsh; reviewing the little-liked Melinda and Melinda, Roger Ebert wrote, "I cannot escape the suspicion that if Woody had never made a previous film, if each new one was Woody's Sundance debut, it would get a better reception. His reputation is not a dead shark but an albatross, which with admirable economy Allen has arranged for the critics to carry around their own necks."[83] Woody gave his godson Quincy Rose a small part in Melinda and Melinda.

Allen in 2006

Allen was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001.[84] Match Point
Match Point
(2005) was one of Allen's most successful films of the decade, garnering positive reviews.[85] Set in London, it starred Jonathan Rhys Meyers
Jonathan Rhys Meyers
and Scarlett Johansson. It is markedly darker than Allen's first four films with DreamWorks
DreamWorks
SKG. In Match Point, Allen shifted focus from the intellectual upper class of New York to the moneyed upper class of London. The film earned more than $23 million domestically (more than any of his films in nearly 20 years) and over $62 million in international box office sales.[86] Match Point earned Allen his first Academy Award
Academy Award
nomination since 1998, for Best Writing – Original Screenplay, with directing and writing nominations at the Golden Globes, his first Globe nominations since 1987. In a 2006 interview with Premiere Magazine, Allen stated this was the best film he has ever made.[87] Allen returned to London to film Scoop, which also starred Johansson, Hugh Jackman, Ian McShane, Kevin McNally
Kevin McNally
and Allen himself. The film was released on July 28, 2006, and received mixed reviews. He filmed Cassandra's Dream
Cassandra's Dream
in London. Cassandra's Dream
Cassandra's Dream
was released in November 2007, and stars Colin Farrell, Ewan McGregor
Ewan McGregor
and Tom Wilkinson. After finishing his third London film, Allen headed to Spain. He reached an agreement to film Vicky Cristina Barcelona in Avilés, Barcelona and Oviedo, where shooting started on July 9, 2007. The movie stars Scarlett Johansson, Javier Bardem, Rebecca Hall
Rebecca Hall
and Penélope Cruz.[88][89] Speaking of his experience there, Allen said: "I'm delighted at being able to work with Mediapro and make a film in Spain, a country which has become so special to me." Vicky Cristina Barcelona was well received, winning Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy at the Golden Globe awards. Penélope Cruz
Penélope Cruz
received the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
for her role in the film. Allen has said that he "survives" on the European market. Audiences there tend to be more receptive to his films, particularly in Spain, France and Italy—countries where he has a large audience (joked about in Hollywood Ending). "In the United States things have changed a lot, and it's hard to make good small films now," Allen said in a 2004 interview. "The avaricious studios couldn't care less about good films—if they get a good film they're twice as happy but money-making films are their goal. They only want these $100 million pictures that make $500 million."[90] In April 2008, he began filming Whatever Works,[91] a film focused more toward older audiences, starring Larry David, Patricia Clarkson,[92] and Evan Rachel Wood.[93] Released in 2009 and described as a dark comedy, it follows the story of a botched suicide attempt turned messy love triangle. Whatever Works
Whatever Works
was originally written by Allen in the 1970s, and the character played by David was written for Zero Mostel, who died the year Annie Hall
Annie Hall
came out. 2010s

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival

You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger, filmed in London, stars Antonio Banderas, Josh Brolin, Anthony Hopkins, Anupam Kher, Freida Pinto
Freida Pinto
and Naomi Watts. Filming started in July 2009. It was released theatrically in the US on September 23, 2010, following a Cannes debut in May 2010, and a screening at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 12, 2010. Allen announced that his next film would be titled Midnight in Paris,[94] starring Adrien Brody, Owen Wilson, Marion Cotillard, Rachel McAdams, Kathy Bates, Michael Sheen, Gad Elmaleh
Gad Elmaleh
and Carla Bruni, the First Lady of France at the time of production. The film follows a young engaged couple in Paris who see their lives transformed. It debuted at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival on May 12, 2011. Allen said he wanted to "show the city emotionally," during the press conference. "I just wanted it to be the way I saw Paris – Paris through my eyes," he added.[95] Critically acclaimed, the film was considered by some a mark for his return to form.[96] Midnight in Paris
Midnight in Paris
won the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Original Screenplay and became his highest-grossing film, making $151 million worldwide on a $17 million budget.[97] His next film, To Rome with Love, was a Rome-set comedy released in 2012. The film was structured in four vignettes featuring dialogue in both Italian and English. It marked Allen's return to acting since his last role in Scoop.[98] Blue Jasmine
Blue Jasmine
debuted in July 2013.[99] The film is set in San Francisco and New York, and stars Alec Baldwin, Cate Blanchett, Louis C.K., Andrew Dice Clay, Sally Hawkins, and Peter Sarsgaard.[100] Opening to critical acclaim, the film earned Allen another Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay,[101] and Blanchett went to receive the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Actress.[102] Allen co-starred with John Turturro
John Turturro
in Fading Gigolo, written and directed by Turturro, which premiered in September 2013.[103] In 2013, Allen shot the romantic comedy Magic in the Moonlight
Magic in the Moonlight
in Nice, France. The film, set in the 1920s on the French Riviera,[104] starred Colin Firth
Colin Firth
and Emma Stone, and was released in 2014.[105]

It’s really cool to work with a director who’s done so much, because he knows exactly what he wants. The fact that he does one shot for an entire scene—[and] this could be a scene with eight people and one to two takes—it gives you a level of confidence... he’s very empowering.

Blake Lively, on acting in Café Society[106]

From July through August 2014, Allen filmed the mystery drama Irrational Man in Newport, Rhode Island, with Joaquin Phoenix, Emma Stone, Parker Posey
Parker Posey
and Jamie Blackley.[107] Allen has said that this film, as well as the next three he has planned, have the financing and full support of Sony Pictures Classics.[108] Allen's next film, Café Society, starred an ensemble cast, including Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, and Blake Lively.[109] Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis
was set to co-star, but was replaced by Steve Carell
Steve Carell
during filming.[110] The film is distributed by Amazon Studios, and opened the 2016 Cannes Film Festival on May 11, 2016, marking the third time Allen has opened the festival.[111] On January 14, 2015, it was announced Allen will write and direct a TV series of half-hour episodes for Amazon Studios, marking the first time he has developed a television show. It will be available exclusively on Amazon Prime Instant Video, and Amazon Studios
Amazon Studios
has already ordered a full season. Allen said of the series, "I don't know how I got into this. I have no ideas and I'm not sure where to begin. My guess is that Roy Price [the head of Amazon Studios] will regret this."[112][113][114] At the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, Allen said, in reference to his upcoming Amazon show, "It was a catastrophic mistake. I don't know what I'm doing. I'm floundering. I expect this to be a cosmic embarrassment."[115] On September 30, 2016, Amazon Video debuted Allen's first television series production, titled Crisis in Six Scenes. The series is a comedy which takes place during the 1960s. It focuses on the life of a suburban family after a surprise visitor creates chaos among them. It stars Allen alongside Elaine May
Elaine May
and Miley Cyrus. Cyrus plays the part of a radical hippie fugitive who sells marijuana.[116][117] In September 2016, Allen started filming Wonder Wheel, set in the 1950s in Coney Island, and starring Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
and Justin Timberlake.[118] The film served as the closing night selection at the 55th New York Film Festival
New York Film Festival
on October 15, 2017,[119] and was theatrically released on December 1, 2017,[120] as the first movie self-distributed to theaters by Amazon Studios.[121] His film A Rainy Day in New York, starring Timothée Chalamet, Selena Gomez, Elle Fanning, Jude Law, Diego Luna
Diego Luna
and Liev Schreiber
Liev Schreiber
began production in New York in September 2017.[122] Theatre

Life-size statue of Woody Allen
Woody Allen
in Oviedo, Spain

While best known for his films, Allen has enjoyed a successful career in theatre, starting as early as 1960, when he wrote sketches for the revue From A to Z. His first great success was Don't Drink the Water, which opened in 1968, and ran for 598 performances for almost two years on Broadway. His success continued with Play It Again, Sam, which opened in 1969, starring Allen and Diane Keaton. The show played for 453 performances and was nominated for three Tony Awards, although none of the nominations were for Allen's writing or acting.[123] In the 1970s, Allen wrote a number of one-act plays, most notably God and Death, which were published in his 1975 collection Without Feathers. In 1981, Allen's play The Floating Light Bulb opened on Broadway. The play was a critical success and a commercial flop. Despite two Tony Award
Tony Award
nominations, a Tony win for the acting of Brian Backer (who won the 1981 Theater World Award and a Drama Desk Award for his work), the play only ran for 62 performances.[124] After a long hiatus from the stage, Allen returned to the theatre in 1995, with the one-act Central Park
Central Park
West, an installment in an evening of theatre known as Death Defying Acts that was also made up of new work by David Mamet
David Mamet
and Elaine May.[125] For the next few years, Allen had no direct involvement with the stage, yet notable productions of his work were staged. A production of God was staged at The Bank of Brazil Cultural Center in Rio de Janeiro,[126] and theatrical adaptations of Allen's films Bullets Over Broadway[127] and September[128] were produced in Italy and France, respectively, without Allen's involvement. In 1997, rumors of Allen returning to the theatre to write a starring role for his wife Soon-Yi Previn turned out to be false.[129] In 2003, Allen finally returned to the stage with Writer's Block, an evening of two one-acts—Old Saybrook and Riverside Drive—that played Off-Broadway. The production marked the stage-directing debut for Allen.[130] The production sold out the entire run.[131] Also in 2003, reports of Allen writing the book for a musical based on Bullets Over Broadway surfaced, and it opened in New York in 2014.[132] The musical closed on August 24, 2014, after 156 performances and 33 previews.[133] In 2004, Allen's first full-length play since 1981, A Second Hand Memory,[134] was directed by Allen and enjoyed an extended run Off-Broadway.[131] In June 2007, it was announced that Allen would make two more creative debuts in the theatre, directing a work that he did not write and directing an opera—a reinterpretation of Puccini's Gianni Schicchi
Gianni Schicchi
for the Los Angeles Opera[135]—which debuted at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on September 6, 2008.[136] Commenting on his direction of the opera, Allen said, "I have no idea what I'm doing." His production of the opera opened the Festival of Two Worlds
Festival of Two Worlds
in Spoleto, Italy, in June 2009.[137] In October 2011, Woody Allen's one-act play called Honeymoon Motel premiered as one in a series of one act plays on Broadway titled Relatively Speaking.[138] Also contributing to the plays are Elaine May and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
with John Turturro
John Turturro
directing.[139] It was announced in February 2012 that Allen would adapt Bullets over Broadway
Bullets over Broadway
into a Broadway musical. It opened on April 10, 2014 and closed on August 24, 2014.[140] Music

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
with Jerry Zigmont
Jerry Zigmont
and Simon Wettenhall performing at Vienne Jazz Festival, Vienne, France, September 20, 2003

Allen is a passionate fan of jazz, featured prominently in the soundtracks to his films. He began playing the clarinet as a child and took his stage name from clarinetist Woody Herman.[141] He has performed publicly at least since the late 1960s, notably with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
on the soundtrack of Sleeper.[142] One of his earliest televised performances was on The Dick Cavett
Dick Cavett
Show on October 20, 1971.[143] Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and his New Orleans Jazz Band have been playing each Monday evening at Manhattan's Carlyle Hotel
Carlyle Hotel
for many years[144] (as of 2011,[145] specializing in classic New Orleans jazz from the early twentieth century).[146] He plays songs by Sidney Bechet, George Lewis, Johnny Dodds, Jimmie Noone
Jimmie Noone
and Louis Armstrong.[147] The documentary film Wild Man Blues (directed by Barbara Kopple) documents a 1996 European tour by Allen and his band, as well as his relationship with Previn. The band has released two CDs: The Bunk Project (1993) and the soundtrack of Wild Man Blues (1997). In a 2011 review of a concert by Allen's jazz band, critic Kirk Silsbee of the L.A. Times suggested that Allen should be regarded as a competent musical hobbyist with a sincere appreciation for early jazz: "Allen's clarinet won't make anyone forget Sidney Bechet, Barney Bigard
Barney Bigard
or Evan Christopher. His piping tone and strings of staccato notes can't approximate melodic or lyrical phrasing. Still his earnestness and the obvious regard he has for traditional jazz counts for something."[148] Allen and his band played the Montreal International Jazz Festival
Montreal International Jazz Festival
on two consecutive nights in June 2008.[149] For many years, Allen wanted to make a film about the origins of jazz in New Orleans. The film, tentatively titled American Blues, would follow the vastly different careers of Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong
and Sidney Bechet. Allen stated that the film would cost between $80 and $100 million and is therefore unlikely to be made.[150] Personal life Allen was married three times, to Harlene Rosen (m. 1956–1959), Louise Lasser
Louise Lasser
(m. 1966–1970) and Soon-Yi Previn
Soon-Yi Previn
(m. 1997–present). He also had a 12-year relationship with actor Mia Farrow
Mia Farrow
and relationships with Stacey Nelkin and Diane Keaton. Early marriages and relationships Allen married 17-year-old Harlene Rosen when he was 20 in 1956; the marriage lasted until 1959.[151] Rosen, whom Allen referred to in his standup act as "the Dread Mrs. Allen", sued him for defamation as a result of comments he made during a television appearance shortly after their divorce. In his mid-1960s standup album Standup Comic, Allen said that Rosen had sued him because of a joke he made in an interview. Rosen had been sexually assaulted outside her apartment. According to Allen, the newspapers reported that she had been "violated". In the interview, Allen said, "Knowing my ex-wife, it probably wasn't a moving violation." In an interview on The Dick Cavett Show, Allen repeated his comments and said he had been sued for "$1 million."[152] Allen married Louise Lasser
Louise Lasser
in 1966. They divorced in 1970. Lasser appeared in three Allen films shortly before and after the divorce—Take the Money and Run, Bananas, and Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)—and later briefly appeared in Stardust Memories. In 1969 Allen cast Diane Keaton in his Broadway show, Play It Again, Sam. During the run she and Allen became romantically involved. Although they broke up after a year, she continued to star in his films, including Sleeper as a futuristic poet and Love and Death
Love and Death
as a composite character based on the novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. Annie Hall
Annie Hall
was very important in Allen's and Keaton's careers. It is said that the role was written for her, as Diane Keaton's birth name was Diane Hall. She then starred in Interiors
Interiors
as a poet, followed by Manhattan. In 1987, she had a cameo as a nightclub singer in Radio Days, and she was chosen to replace Mia Farrow in Manhattan
Manhattan
Murder Mystery after Allen and Farrow began having problems with their relationship. As of 2004 Keaton and Allen remained close friends.[153] The film Manhattan
Manhattan
is said by the Los Angeles Times[154] to be widely known to have been based on Allen's romantic relationship with actor Stacey Nelkin. Her bit part in Annie Hall
Annie Hall
ended up on the cutting room floor, and their relationship, although never publicly acknowledged by Allen, reportedly began when she was 17 and a student at New York's Stuyvesant High School.[155][156][157] Nelkin played the role of Rita in Woody Allen's 1994 film, Bullets over Broadway. Mia Farrow Allen and Mia Farrow
Mia Farrow
met in 1979 and began a 12-year relationship in 1980;[158] Farrow starred in 13 of Allen's films from 1982 to 1992.[159] Throughout the relationship they lived in separate apartments on opposite sides of Central Park
Central Park
in Manhattan. Farrow had seven children when they met; there were three biological sons from her marriage to composer André Previn, three adopted girls (two Vietnamese and one Korean, Soon-Yi Previn), and one adopted Korean boy, Moses Farrow.[158] In 1984 she and Allen tried to have a biological child together; Allen agreed to this on the understanding that he need not be involved in the child's care. When the effort to get pregnant failed, Farrow adopted a baby girl, Dylan Farrow, in July 1985. Allen was not involved in the adoption, but when Dylan arrived he assumed a parental role toward her and began spending more time in Farrow's home.[160] On December 19, 1987, Farrow gave birth to Allen's biological child, Satchel Farrow (later known as Ronan Farrow).[161][162] In 1991 Farrow wanted to adopt another child. According to a 1993 custody hearing, Allen told her he would not object to another adoption so long as she would agree to his adoption of Dylan and Moses; that adoption was finalized in December 1991.[160] Eric Lax, Allen's biographer, wrote in The New York Times
The New York Times
in February 1991 that Allen was "there before they [the children] wake up in the morning, he sees them during the day and he helps put them to bed at night".[158] Soon Yi Previn

Soon-Yi Previn
Soon-Yi Previn
and Allen, 2009

In 1978 Farrow and André Previn
André Previn
adopted Soon-Yi Previn, who had been abandoned in the slums of Seoul. At the time of the adoption, her passport said that she was seven; a bone scan in the US reportedly determined that she was between five and seven.[a] Living with Farrow, Soon-Yi is said to have had little contact with Allen until 1990, when she asked to accompany him to a basketball game. They attended more games together and by 1991 had become closer.[160] In September 1991 she began her studies at Drew University
Drew University
in New Jersey.[164] In January 1992, Farrow found nude photographs of 19 or 21 year-old Soon-Yi in Allen's home. Allen, then 57, told Farrow that he had taken them the day before, around two weeks after he first had sex with Soon-Yi.[165] This resulted in a bitter breakup of Farrow's and Allen's relationship; both parties instructed lawyers shortly after the photographs were discovered.[160][163] That summer, Soon-Yi was asked to leave summer camp because she was spending too much time taking calls from a "Mr. Simon", who turned out to be Allen.[164] Allen issued a statement on August 17, 1992, saying that he was in love with Soon-Yi.[166] They were married in Venice on December 23, 1997,[167] and adopted two children, Bechet and Manzie.[168][169] They live in the Carnegie Hill
Carnegie Hill
section of Manhattan's Upper East Side.[170] Assault allegation Main article: Woody Allen
Woody Allen
sexual assault allegation According to court testimony, on August 4, 1992, Allen visited the children at Mia Farrow's home in Bridgewater, Connecticut, while she was out shopping with a friend.[163] The following day, that friend's babysitter told her employer that she had seen Allen behaving inappropriately with Dylan.[171] When Farrow asked Dylan about it, Dylan alleged that Allen had touched Dylan's "private part" while they were alone together in the attic.[163] One woman employed to care for Farrow's children said that for about 20 minutes that afternoon she had not known where Dylan was, while a second said that, at one point, Dylan had been wearing no underwear under her dress.[171] Farrow told Dylan's pediatrician, who informed authorities.[172][173] After being told about the allegation, Allen began proceedings in New York Supreme Court for sole custody of his and Farrow's biological son, Satchel, as well as Dylan and Moses, the two adopted children of Farrow that Allen had adopted as well.[174] He strongly denied the allegation, calling it "an unconscionable and gruesomely damaging manipulation of innocent children for vindictive and self-serving motives".[175] A months-long investigation by the Child Sexual Abuse Clinic of Yale–New Haven Hospital
Yale–New Haven Hospital
concluded that Dylan had not been sexually assaulted.[176] In June 1993 the judge rejected Allen's bid for custody. He said that the Yale–New Haven team's unwillingness to testify in court, except through a deposition, together with the destruction of its notes, had rendered its report "sanitized and, therefore, less credible".[177] In September that year the state prosecutor announced that he would not pursue charges.[178] Works Theatrical works In addition to directing, writing, and acting in films, Allen has written and performed in a number of Broadway theater productions.

Year Title Credit Venue

1960 From A to Z Writer (book) Plymouth Theatre

1966 Don't Drink the Water Writer Coconut Grove Playhouse, Florida

1969 Play It Again, Sam Writer, Performer (Allan Felix) Broadhurst Theatre[179]

1975 God Writer —

1975 Death Writer —

1981 The Floating Light Bulb Writer Vivian Beaumont Theater

1995 Central Park
Central Park
West Writer Variety Arts Theatre

2003 Old Saybrook Writer, Director Atlantic Theatre Company

2003 Riverside Drive Writer, Director Atlantic Theatre Company

2004 A Second Hand Memory Writer, Director Atlantic Theater Company

2011 "Honeymoon Motel" (segment of 3-part anthology play Relatively Speaking) Writer Brooks Atkinson Theatre

2014 Bullets Over Broadway Writer (Book) St. James Theatre

Filmography and awards Main articles: Woody Allen filmography
Woody Allen filmography
and List of awards and nominations received by Woody Allen

Movies directed by Woody Allen
Woody Allen
shown by year and Rotten Tomato Score.

What's New Pussycat?
What's New Pussycat?
(1965) (actor and screenwriter only) What's Up, Tiger Lily?
What's Up, Tiger Lily?
(1966) Casino Royale (1967) (actor only) Take the Money and Run
Take the Money and Run
(1969) Bananas (1971) Play It Again, Sam (1972) (actor and screenwriter only) Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask) (1972) Sleeper (1973) Love and Death
Love and Death
(1975) The Front
The Front
(1976) (actor only) Annie Hall
Annie Hall
(1977) Interiors
Interiors
(1978) Manhattan
Manhattan
(1979) Stardust Memories
Stardust Memories
(1980) A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
(1982) Zelig
Zelig
(1983) Broadway Danny Rose
Broadway Danny Rose
(1984) The Purple Rose of Cairo
The Purple Rose of Cairo
(1985) Meetin' WA (1986) (himself) Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) Radio Days
Radio Days
(1987) September (1987) King Lear (1987) (actor only – uncredited cameo) Another Woman (1988) New York Stories
New York Stories
(1989) Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) Alice (1990) Scenes from a Mall
Scenes from a Mall
(1991) (actor only) Shadows and Fog
Shadows and Fog
(1991) Husbands and Wives
Husbands and Wives
(1992) Manhattan
Manhattan
Murder Mystery (1993) Bullets over Broadway
Bullets over Broadway
(1994) Don't Drink the Water (1994) Mighty Aphrodite
Mighty Aphrodite
(1995) Everyone Says I Love You
Everyone Says I Love You
(1996) Deconstructing Harry
Deconstructing Harry
(1997) Wild Man Blues (1997) (documentary) (himself) The Impostors
The Impostors
(1998) (actor only – uncredited role) Antz
Antz
(1998) (voice) Celebrity (1998) Sweet and Lowdown
Sweet and Lowdown
(1999) Company Man (2000) (actor only – uncredited role) Small Time Crooks
Small Time Crooks
(2000) Picking Up the Pieces (2000) (actor only) The Curse of the Jade Scorpion
The Curse of the Jade Scorpion
(2001) Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2001) (documentary) (himself) Hollywood Ending
Hollywood Ending
(2002) Anything Else
Anything Else
(2003) Melinda and Melinda
Melinda and Melinda
(2005) Match Point
Match Point
(2005) Scoop (2006) Cassandra's Dream
Cassandra's Dream
(2007) Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) Whatever Works
Whatever Works
(2009) You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger
You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger
(2010) Midnight in Paris
Midnight in Paris
(2011) Paris Manhattan
Manhattan
(2012) (actor only) To Rome with Love (2012) Fading Gigolo
Fading Gigolo
(2013) (actor only) Blue Jasmine
Blue Jasmine
(2013) Magic in the Moonlight
Magic in the Moonlight
(2014) Irrational Man (2015) Café Society (2016) Wonder Wheel (2017) A Rainy Day in New York (2018)

Works about Allen Apart from Wild Man Blues, directed by Barbara Kopple, there are other documentaries featuring Woody Allen, including the 2001 cable-television documentary Woody Allen: a Life in Film, directed by Time film critic Richard Schickel, which interlaces interviews of Allen with clips of his films, and Meetin' WA, a short interview of Allen by French director Jean-Luc Godard. In 2011 the PBS
PBS
series American Masters
American Masters
co-produced the documentary Woody Allen: a Documentary, directed by Robert B. Weide.[9] Eric Lax authored the book Woody Allen: A Biography.[180] From 1976 to 1984, Stuart Hample wrote and drew Inside Woody Allen, a comic strip based on Allen's film persona.[181] See also

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
bibliography

Notes

^ Maureen Orth (Vanity Fair, November 1992): "Nobody knows how old Soon-Yi really is. Without ever seeing her, Korean officials put her age down as seven on her passport. A bone scan Mia had done on her in the U.S. put her age at between five and seven. In the family, Soon-Yi is considered to have turned 20 this year [1992], on October 8.[163]

References

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review (2004) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
– Qwipster's Movie Reviews". Retrieved January 17, 2008.  ^ Roger Ebert's Movie Yearbook 2007. Google Books. November 1, 2006. ISBN 978-0-7407-6157-7. Retrieved January 9, 2011.  ^ "Book of Members, 1780–2010: Chapter A" (PDF). American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved April 15, 2011.  ^ " Match Point
Match Point
Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved December 30, 2011.  ^ " Box Office Mojo
Box Office Mojo
– People Index". Retrieved January 17, 2008.  ^ Matloff, Jason (February 2006). "Woody Allen's European Vacation". Premiere. Vol. 19 no. 5. pp. 98–101. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. I think it turned out to be the best film I've ever made.  ^ "Woody Allen's Next Star: Penelope Cruz – Celebrity Gossip". Fox News Channel. February 1, 2007. Retrieved January 17, 2008.  ^ Hopewell, John (January 2, 2006). "Spain woos Woody". Variety. Retrieved January 17, 2008.  ^ Garfield, Simon (August 8, 2004). "Why I love London". The Guardian. UK. Retrieved January 17, 2008.  ^ Harris, Mark (May 24, 2009). "Twilight of the Tummlers". New York. Retrieved June 10, 2009.  ^ "Watch out for our Emma in Woody Allen's next movie". Daily Mail. London. March 7, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2008.  ^ "Larry David, Evan Rachel Wood
Evan Rachel Wood
to star in Woody Allen's next movie". Hollywood Insider. Archived from the original on February 18, 2008. Retrieved February 7, 2008.  ^ McNary, Dave (April 22, 2010). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
reveals details of upcoming pic". Variety. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ Bagnetto, Laura Angela (May 12, 2011). "Woody Allen's film featuring Carla Bruni
Carla Bruni
opens Cannes Film Festival". Radio France Internationale. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ Zacharek, Stephanie (May 19, 2011). "Review: Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Returns to Form for Real This Time with Midnight in Paris. Movieline. Retrieved June 18, 2015. ^ "Midnight in Paris". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved January 14, 2017.  ^ Hickman, Angela (May 9, 2011). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
adds himself to the cast of his next picture". National Post. Archived from the original on May 12, 2011. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ Brody, Richard (July 25, 2013). "Woody Allen's 'Blue Jasmine'". The New Yorker. Retrieved June 18, 2015. ^ Kilday, Gregg (June 4, 2012). "Believe It: Woody Allen's Next Movie Features Louis C.K., Andrew Dice Clay". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ " Blue Jasmine
Blue Jasmine
(2013)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved January 27, 2014.  ^ Nominees for the 86th Academy Awards
Academy Awards
Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (August 24, 2012). Retrieved May 22, 2014. ^ Bailey, Cameron (undated). "Fading Gigolo" Archived May 9, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.. Toronto International Film Festival. Retrieved June 18, 2015. ^ Miller, William (August 4, 2013). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
2014 Film Update: More Images from Antibes and Nice, France". The Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Pages. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ Magic in Moonlight. Internet Movie Database. 2014. ^ " Blake Lively
Blake Lively
Talks Working with Woody Allen...", Hamptons, June 29, 2016 ^ Goldstein, Meredith; Shanahan, Mark (July 8, 2014). "Emma Stone stays in Rhode Island
Rhode Island
for Woody Allen
Woody Allen
film". Boston Globe. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ Itzkoff, Dave (July 20, 2014). "A Master of Illusion Endures". The New York Times. Retrieved July 23, 2014.  ^ Fleming Jr., Mike (March 9, 2015). "Jesse Eisenberg, Bruce Willis, Kristen Stewart
Kristen Stewart
To Star In Next Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Pic". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved January 28, 2016.  ^ Jaafar, Ali; Hipes, Patrick (August 28, 2015). "Steve Carell Replacing Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis
In Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Movie". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved January 28, 2016.  ^ Chang, Justin; Keslassy, Elsa (March 29, 2016). "Cannes: Woody Allen's 'Cafe Society' to Open Film Festival". Variety. Retrieved April 3, 2016.  ^ Weinstein, Shelli (January 13, 2015). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
to Create His First Television Series for Amazon". Variety. Archived from the original on January 13, 2015. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ Steel, Emily (January 13, 2015). "Amazon Signs Woody Allen
Woody Allen
to Write and Direct TV Series". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 13, 2015. Retrieved January 13, 2015.  ^ Massa, Annie; Soper, Spencer; Palmeri, Chris (January 13, 2015). "Amazon's Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Hiring Underscores Video Risk". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on January 13, 2015. Retrieved June 18, 2015.  ^ Zeitchik, Steven (May 15, 2015). "Cannes 2015: Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Sings a Bleak Tune". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 18, 2015. ^ " Miley Cyrus
Miley Cyrus
Explains Why She’s in Awe of Woody Allen: 'He’s Never Fake'". Vanity Fair, Sept. 16, 2016 ^ "Watch First Clip From Woody Allen's 'Crisis in Six Scenes' TV Show", Rolling Stone, August 8, 2016 ^ " Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
Joining Woody Allen's Next Film". Retrieved September 15, 2016.  ^ "Woody Allen's Wonder Wheel Will Close NYFF55". Retrieved July 27, 2017.  ^ Lang, Brent (June 12, 2017). "Woody Allen's 'Wonder Wheel' Scores December Release". Variety. Retrieved July 14, 2017.  ^ Lang, Brent (July 27, 2017). "Amazon Moves Into Self-Distribution With Woody Allen's 'Wonder Wheel'". Variety. Retrieved July 27, 2017.  ^ Kilday, Gregg (September 11, 2017). "Diego Luna, Liev Schreiber
Liev Schreiber
Join Woody Allen's New Movie". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 11, 2017.  ^ The Broadway League (March 14, 1970). "Internet Broadway Database: Play It Again, Sam Production Credits". Ibdb. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ The Broadway League. "Internet Broadway Database: The Floating Light Bulb Production Credits". Ibdb.com. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ "Death Defying Acts and No One Shall Be Immune – David Mamet Society". Mamet.eserver.org. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ "Allen's God Shows Up in Rio, Jan. 16". Playbill. January 15, 1998. Archived from the original on February 6, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ "Playbill News: Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Adaptation Debuts at Italian Theater Festival, Aug. 1". Playbill. July 31, 1998. Archived from the original on February 6, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ "Playbill News: Stage Version of Woody Allen's September to Bow in France, Sept. 16". Playbill. September 15, 1999. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ "NY Post: Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Penning Play for Soon-Yi Previn". Playbill. December 31, 1997. Archived from the original on February 6, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ "Playbill News: Woody Allen's Writer's Block, with Neuwirth and Reiser, Opens Off Broadway May 15". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ a b "Playbill News: Two Weeks Added to Woody Allen's New Play, Second Hand Memory, at Off-Bway's Atlantic". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ "Playbill News: Work Continues of Musical Version of Bullets Over Broadway". Playbill. July 17, 2003. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ Gans, Andrew and Hetrick, Adam. "Curtain Comes Down on Woody Allen Musical Bullets Over Broadway " Archived August 26, 2014, at the Wayback Machine. playbill.com, August 24, 2014 ^ "Playbill News: Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Directs His Second Hand Memory, Opening Nov. 22 Off-Broadway". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 27, 2008. Retrieved March 9, 2010.  ^ " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
makes debut at opera". BBC News. September 8, 2008. Retrieved September 8, 2008.  ^ Tommasini, Anthony (September 7, 2008). "Puccini With a Sprinkling of Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Whimsy". The New York Times. Retrieved September 8, 2008.  ^ Itzkoff, Dave (May 7, 2009). "Woody Allen's Puccini Goes to Spoleto". The New York Times. Retrieved April 6, 2010.  ^ Relatively Speaking relativelyspeakingbroadway.com. Retrieved January 4, 2012 ^ Isherwood, Charles (October 20, 2011). "Each Family, Tortured in Its Own Way". The New York Times.  ^ Healy, Patrick (February 23, 2012). "'Bullets Over Broadway' Is Heading There". The New York Times. Retrieved February 28, 2012.  ^ Gonzalez, Victor (September 19, 2011). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and His New Orleans Jazz Band Announce Miami Beach Haunukkah Show". Miami New Times. Retrieved November 5, 2011.  ^ Stafford, Jeff. "Sleeper". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved November 5, 2011.  ^ Galbraith, Stuart, IV (February 21, 2006). "The Dick Cavett
Dick Cavett
Show: Comic Legends DVD Talk
Talk
Review of the DVD Video". dvdtalk.com. Retrieved November 5, 2011. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ^ Olsen, Erik (October 19, 2005). "New York City: Catch Woody Allen
Woody Allen
at the Cafe Carlyle". gadling.com. Retrieved November 5, 2011.  ^ Alcantara, Krisanne (March 3, 2011). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Plays Jazz at the Carlyle Hotel". nearsay.com. Retrieved November 5, 2011.  ^ "New Orleans Trombone, Jerry Zigmont
Jerry Zigmont
– Jazz Trombone, Eddy Davis & His New Orleans Jazz Band featuring Woody Allen, Cafe Carlyle, Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Band". Archived from the original on February 2, 2008. Retrieved January 17, 2008.  ^ Woody Allen
Woody Allen
en concert ce lundi à Monaco Archived October 16, 2015, at the Wayback Machine., Monaco-Matin, December 28, 2014 ^ Silsbee, Kirk (December 30, 2011). "Jazz review: Woody Allen's New Orleans band at Royce Hall". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 26, 2014. ^ "Concert: Woody Allen
Woody Allen
And His New Orleans Jazz Band – Festival International de Jazz de Montreal". Montreal Jazz Festival. Archived from the original on March 31, 2012. Retrieved November 5, 2011.  ^ Lax, Eric; Allen, Woody (2007). Conversations with Woody Allen – His Films, the Movies and Moviemaking. Alfred A. Knopf. pp. 315–316. ISBN 978-1400031498. ^ "Woody Allen: Rabbit Running". Time. July 3, 1972. p. 3. Retrieved August 4, 2009.  ^ "Dick & Woody discuss particle physics". Retrieved November 18, 2013.  ^ Q&A: Diane Keaton. CBS
CBS
News. February 18, 2004. Retrieved February 21, 2006. ^ [dead link] "Stacey Nelkin". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 19, 2010.  ^ Fox, Julian (1996). Woody: Movies from Manhattan. Woodstock, New York: The Overlook Press. pp. 111–112. ISBN 978-0879516925. ^ Baxter, pp. 226, 248, 249, 250, 253, 273–74, 385, 416. ^ Bailey, Peter J. (2001). The Reluctant Film Art of Woody Allen. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky. p. 61. ISBN 978-0813190419. ^ a b c Lax, Eric (February 24, 1991). "Woody and Mia: A New York Story". The New York Times.  ^ "Woody Allen, Mia Farrow
Mia Farrow
family tree". CNN. May 11, 2016.  ^ a b c d Stern, Marlow (10 February 2014). "Inside the Shocking Custody Case Court Documents that Shed Light on the Dylan Farrow-Woody Allen Saga". The Daily Beast.  ^ "Son Born to Mia Farrow
Mia Farrow
And Woody Allen". The New York Times. Associated Press. December 22, 1987.  ^ "Exclusive: Mia Farrow
Mia Farrow
and Eight of Her Children Speak Out on Their Lives, Frank Sinatra, and the Scandals They've Endured". Vanity Fair. October 2, 2013. Archived from the original on October 31, 2013.  ^ a b c d Orth, Maureen (August 5, 2008). "Mia's Story". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on November 1992. Retrieved November 16, 2012.  ^ a b Hoban, Phoebe (September 21, 1992). "Woody and Mia". New York Magazine.  ^ Perez-Pena, Richard (March 23, 1993). "Nude Photographs Are Focus Of Woody Allen's Testimony". The New York Times.  ^ Weber, Bruce (August 18, 1992). "Public Disclosures From the Private Life of Woody Allen". The New York Times.  ^ Collins, Glenn (December 25, 1997). "Mixed Reviews Greet Woody Allen Marriage". The New York Times.  ^ " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Wife Have a Baby Daughter". The New York Times. April 29, 1999.  ^ Shoard, Catherine (August 25, 2016). "Woody Allen: 'There are traumas in life that weaken us. That's what has happened to me'". The Guardian.  ^ Thurman, Judith (November 2008). "Tour Woody Allen's English Country-Style Manhattan
Manhattan
Townhouse". Architectural Digest. ^ a b Marks, Peter (April 10, 1993). "Sitter Questions Allen Actions With Daughter". The New York Times.  ^ Orth, Maureen (7 February 2014). "10 Undeniable Facts About the Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Sexual-Abuse Allegation". Vanity Fair.  ^ Orth, Maureen (November 2013). "Momma Mia!". Vanity Fair.  ^ Weber, Bruce (August 14, 1992). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Files Child-Custody Lawsuit". The New York Times.  ^ Barron, James (August 19, 1992). "Striking Back, Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Denies Child Sex-Abuse Allegation". The New York Times.  ^ Perez-Pena, Richard (March 19, 1993). " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Says Report Clears Him". The New York Times. 

Marks, Peter (April 28, 1993). "Yale Study About Allen Flawed, Expert Testifies". The New York Times. 

^ Marks, Peter (June 8, 1993). "Allen Loses to Farrow in Bitter Custody Battle". The New York Times.  ^ Henneberger, Melinda (September 25, 1993). "Connecticut Prosecutor Won't File
File
Charges Against Woody Allen". The New York Times.  ^ " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
Biography (1935–)". filmreference.com. Retrieved February 28, 2008.  ^ Lax, Eric (1991). Woody Allen: a biography. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. ISBN 978-0-394-58349-5. OCLC 22662351.  ^ Hample, Stuart (October 19, 2009). "How I turned Woody Allen
Woody Allen
into a comic strip". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 14, 2014. Retrieved April 13, 2016. 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Woody Allen.

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Woody Allen

Official website Woody Allen
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on IMDb Woody Allen
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at AllMovie Woody Allen
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at the TCM Movie Database Woody Allen
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at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
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on National Public Radio June 15, 2009 Woody Allen
Woody Allen
at the Internet Off-Broadway Database Appearances on C-SPAN Works by or about Woody Allen
Woody Allen
in libraries ( WorldCat
WorldCat
catalog) " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
collected news and commentary". The Guardian.  " Woody Allen
Woody Allen
collected news and commentary". The New York Times. 

v t e

Woody Allen

Filmography Bibliography Awards and nominations

Feature films

What's Up, Tiger Lily?
What's Up, Tiger Lily?
(1966) Take the Money and Run
Take the Money and Run
(1969) Bananas (1971) Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask) (1972) Sleeper (1973) Love and Death
Love and Death
(1975) Annie Hall
Annie Hall
(1977) Interiors
Interiors
(1978) Manhattan
Manhattan
(1979) Stardust Memories
Stardust Memories
(1980) A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy
(1982) Zelig
Zelig
(1983) Broadway Danny Rose
Broadway Danny Rose
(1984) The Purple Rose of Cairo
The Purple Rose of Cairo
(1985) Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) Radio Days
Radio Days
(1987) September (1987) Another Woman (1988) New York Stories
New York Stories
(segment "Oedipus Wrecks", 1989) Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) Alice (1990) Shadows and Fog
Shadows and Fog
(1991) Husbands and Wives
Husbands and Wives
(1992) Manhattan
Manhattan
Murder Mystery (1993) Bullets over Broadway
Bullets over Broadway
(1994) Don't Drink the Water (1994) Mighty Aphrodite
Mighty Aphrodite
(1995) Everyone Says I Love You
Everyone Says I Love You
(1996) Deconstructing Harry
Deconstructing Harry
(1997) Celebrity (1998) Sweet and Lowdown
Sweet and Lowdown
(1999) Small Time Crooks
Small Time Crooks
(2000) The Curse of the Jade Scorpion
The Curse of the Jade Scorpion
(2001) Hollywood Ending
Hollywood Ending
(2002) Anything Else
Anything Else
(2003) Melinda and Melinda
Melinda and Melinda
(2004) Match Point
Match Point
(2005) Scoop (2006) Cassandra's Dream
Cassandra's Dream
(2007) Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) Whatever Works
Whatever Works
(2009) You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger
You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger
(2010) Midnight in Paris
Midnight in Paris
(2011) To Rome with Love (2012) Blue Jasmine
Blue Jasmine
(2013) Magic in the Moonlight
Magic in the Moonlight
(2014) Irrational Man (2015) Café Society (2016) Wonder Wheel (2017) A Rainy Day in New York (2018)

Short films

Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story (1971) Sounds from a Town I Love (2001)

Television series

Crisis in Six Scenes
Crisis in Six Scenes
(2016)

Theatre

From A to Z
From A to Z
(1960) Don't Drink the Water (1966) Play It Again, Sam (1969) God (1975) Death (1975) The Floating Light Bulb (1981) Honeymoon Motel (2011) Bullets Over Broadway (2014)

Short story collections

Getting Even (1971) Without Feathers
Without Feathers
(1975) Side Effects (1980) Mere Anarchy
Mere Anarchy
(2007)

Related articles

Inside Woody Allen Meetin' WA Wild Man Blues

Awards for Woody Allen

v t e

Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Director

1927–1950

Frank Borzage
Frank Borzage
(1927) Lewis Milestone
Lewis Milestone
(1928) Frank Lloyd
Frank Lloyd
(1929) Lewis Milestone
Lewis Milestone
(1930) Norman Taurog
Norman Taurog
(1931) Frank Borzage
Frank Borzage
(1932) Frank Lloyd
Frank Lloyd
(1933) Frank Capra
Frank Capra
(1934) John Ford
John Ford
(1935) Frank Capra
Frank Capra
(1936) Leo McCarey (1937) Frank Capra
Frank Capra
(1938) Victor Fleming
Victor Fleming
(1939) John Ford
John Ford
(1940) John Ford
John Ford
(1941) William Wyler
William Wyler
(1942) Michael Curtiz
Michael Curtiz
(1943) Leo McCarey (1944) Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1945) William Wyler
William Wyler
(1946) Elia Kazan
Elia Kazan
(1947) John Huston
John Huston
(1948) Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1949) Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1950)

1951–1975

George Stevens
George Stevens
(1951) John Ford
John Ford
(1952) Fred Zinnemann
Fred Zinnemann
(1953) Elia Kazan
Elia Kazan
(1954) Delbert Mann
Delbert Mann
(1955) George Stevens
George Stevens
(1956) David Lean
David Lean
(1957) Vincente Minnelli
Vincente Minnelli
(1958) William Wyler
William Wyler
(1959) Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1960) Jerome Robbins
Jerome Robbins
and Robert Wise
Robert Wise
(1961) David Lean
David Lean
(1962) Tony Richardson
Tony Richardson
(1963) George Cukor
George Cukor
(1964) Robert Wise
Robert Wise
(1965) Fred Zinnemann
Fred Zinnemann
(1966) Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
(1967) Carol Reed
Carol Reed
(1968) John Schlesinger
John Schlesinger
(1969) Franklin J. Schaffner
Franklin J. Schaffner
(1970) William Friedkin
William Friedkin
(1971) Bob Fosse
Bob Fosse
(1972) George Roy Hill (1973) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
(1974) Miloš Forman
Miloš Forman
(1975)

1976–2000

John G. Avildsen
John G. Avildsen
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1977) Michael Cimino
Michael Cimino
(1978) Robert Benton (1979) Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1981) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1982) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(1983) Miloš Forman
Miloš Forman
(1984) Sydney Pollack
Sydney Pollack
(1985) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1986) Bernardo Bertolucci
Bernardo Bertolucci
(1987) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1988) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1989) Kevin Costner
Kevin Costner
(1990) Jonathan Demme
Jonathan Demme
(1991) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(1992) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1993) Robert Zemeckis
Robert Zemeckis
(1994) Mel Gibson
Mel Gibson
(1995) Anthony Minghella
Anthony Minghella
(1996) James Cameron
James Cameron
(1997) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1998) Sam Mendes
Sam Mendes
(1999) Steven Soderbergh
Steven Soderbergh
(2000)

2001–present

Ron Howard
Ron Howard
(2001) Roman Polanski
Roman Polanski
(2002) Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2003) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(2004) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2005) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2007) Danny Boyle
Danny Boyle
(2008) Kathryn Bigelow
Kathryn Bigelow
(2009) Tom Hooper
Tom Hooper
(2010) Michel Hazanavicius
Michel Hazanavicius
(2011) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2012) Alfonso Cuarón
Alfonso Cuarón
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu (2014) Alejandro G. Iñárritu (2015) Damien Chazelle
Damien Chazelle
(2016) Guillermo del Toro
Guillermo del Toro
(2017)

v t e

Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Original Screenplay

1940–1960

Preston Sturges
Preston Sturges
(1940) Herman J. Mankiewicz
Herman J. Mankiewicz
and Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(1941) Michael Kanin
Michael Kanin
and Ring Lardner Jr.
Ring Lardner Jr.
(1942) Norman Krasna (1943) Lamar Trotti (1944) Richard Schweizer (1945) Muriel Box and Sydney Box (1946) Sidney Sheldon (1947) No award (1948) Robert Pirosh (1949) Charles Brackett, D. M. Marshman Jr. and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1950) Alan Jay Lerner
Alan Jay Lerner
(1951) T. E. B. Clarke (1952) Charles Brackett, Richard L. Breen and Walter Reisch (1953) Budd Schulberg
Budd Schulberg
(1954) Sonya Levien and William Ludwig (1955) Albert Lamorisse
Albert Lamorisse
(1956) George Wells (1957) Nathan E. Douglas and Harold Jacob Smith (1958) Clarence Greene, Maurice Richlin, Russell Rouse and Stanley Shapiro (1959) I. A. L. Diamond and Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1960)

1961–1980

William Inge
William Inge
(1961) Ennio de Concini, Pietro Germi, and Alfredo Giannetti (1962) James Webb (1963) Peter Stone and Frank Tarloff (1964) Frederic Raphael (1965) Claude Lelouch
Claude Lelouch
and Pierre Uytterhoeven (1966) William Rose (1967) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1968) William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) David S. Ward
David S. Ward
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Robert C. Jones, Waldo Salt, and Nancy Dowd (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980)

1981–2000

Colin Welland (1981) John Briley (1982) Horton Foote (1983) Robert Benton (1984) William Kelley, Pamela Wallace and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ronald Bass and Barry Morrow (1988) Tom Schulman (1989) Bruce Joel Rubin (1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
(1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(1996) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
and Matt Damon
Matt Damon
(1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Cameron Crowe
Cameron Crowe
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Pedro Almodóvar
Pedro Almodóvar
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Pierre Bismuth, Michel Gondry
Michel Gondry
and Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) David Seidler (2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., and Armando Bo (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

v t e

BAFTA Award for Best Direction

Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
(1968) John Schlesinger
John Schlesinger
(1969) George Roy Hill (1970) John Schlesinger
John Schlesinger
(1971) Bob Fosse
Bob Fosse
(1972) François Truffaut
François Truffaut
(1973) Roman Polanski
Roman Polanski
(1974) Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick
(1975) Miloš Forman
Miloš Forman
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1977) Alan Parker
Alan Parker
(1978) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
(1979) Akira Kurosawa
Akira Kurosawa
(1980) Louis Malle
Louis Malle
(1981) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1982) Bill Forsyth
Bill Forsyth
(1983) Wim Wenders
Wim Wenders
(1984) no award (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1987) Louis Malle
Louis Malle
(1988) Kenneth Branagh
Kenneth Branagh
(1989) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(1990) Alan Parker
Alan Parker
(1991) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
(1992) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1993) Mike Newell (1994) Michael Radford
Michael Radford
(1995) Joel Coen (1996) Baz Luhrmann
Baz Luhrmann
(1997) Peter Weir
Peter Weir
(1998) Pedro Almodóvar
Pedro Almodóvar
(1999) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2000) Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2001) Roman Polanski
Roman Polanski
(2002) Peter Weir
Peter Weir
(2003) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2004) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2005) Paul Greengrass
Paul Greengrass
(2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2007) Danny Boyle
Danny Boyle
(2008) Kathryn Bigelow
Kathryn Bigelow
(2009) David Fincher
David Fincher
(2010) Michel Hazanavicius
Michel Hazanavicius
(2011) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
(2012) Alfonso Cuarón
Alfonso Cuarón
(2013) Richard Linklater
Richard Linklater
(2014) Alejandro G. Iñárritu (2015) Damien Chazelle
Damien Chazelle
(2016) Guillermo del Toro
Guillermo del Toro
(2017)

v t e

BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay

Calder Willingham and Buck Henry
Buck Henry
(1968) Waldo Salt (1969) William Goldman
William Goldman
(1970) Harold Pinter
Harold Pinter
(1971) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
/ Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
and Peter Bogdanovich
Peter Bogdanovich
(1972) Luis Buñuel
Luis Buñuel
and Jean-Claude Carrière
Jean-Claude Carrière
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Robert Getchell (1975) Alan Parker
Alan Parker
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Alvin Sargent (1978) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1979) Jerzy Kosiński
Jerzy Kosiński
(1980) Bill Forsyth
Bill Forsyth
(1981) Costa-Gavras
Costa-Gavras
and Donald E. Stewart (1982)

v t e

BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay

Paul D. Zimmerman (1983) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) David Leland (1987) Shawn Slovo (1988) Nora Ephron
Nora Ephron
(1989) Giuseppe Tornatore
Giuseppe Tornatore
(1990) Anthony Minghella
Anthony Minghella
(1991) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1992) Harold Ramis
Harold Ramis
and Danny Rubin
Danny Rubin
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
(1995) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(1996) Gary Oldman
Gary Oldman
(1997) Andrew Niccol
Andrew Niccol
(1998) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(1999) Cameron Crowe
Cameron Crowe
(2000) Jean-Pierre Jeunet
Jean-Pierre Jeunet
and Guillaume Laurant (2001) Pedro Almodóvar
Pedro Almodóvar
(2002) Tom McCarthy (2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Martin McDonagh
Martin McDonagh
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) David Seidler (2010) Michel Hazanavicius
Michel Hazanavicius
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell
David O. Russell
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Hugo Guinness (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Martin McDonagh
Martin McDonagh
(2017)

v t e

BAFTA Fellowship recipients

1971–2000

Alfred Hitchcock
Alfred Hitchcock
(1971) Freddie Young (1972) Grace Wyndham Goldie (1973) David Lean
David Lean
(1974) Jacques Cousteau
Jacques Cousteau
(1975) Charlie Chaplin
Charlie Chaplin
(1976) Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
(1976) Denis Forman (1977) Fred Zinnemann
Fred Zinnemann
(1978) Lew Grade
Lew Grade
(1979) Huw Wheldon
Huw Wheldon
(1979) David Attenborough
David Attenborough
(1980) John Huston
John Huston
(1980) Abel Gance
Abel Gance
(1981) Michael Powell
Michael Powell
& Emeric Pressburger
Emeric Pressburger
(1981) Andrzej Wajda
Andrzej Wajda
(1982) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1983) Hugh Greene (1984) Sam Spiegel
Sam Spiegel
(1984) Jeremy Isaacs (1985) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1986) Federico Fellini
Federico Fellini
(1987) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1988) Alec Guinness
Alec Guinness
(1989) Paul Fox (1990) Louis Malle
Louis Malle
(1991) John Gielgud
John Gielgud
(1992) David Plowright (1992) Sydney Samuelson (1993) Colin Young (1993) Michael Grade
Michael Grade
(1994) Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1995) Jeanne Moreau
Jeanne Moreau
(1996) Ronald Neame
Ronald Neame
(1996) John Schlesinger
John Schlesinger
(1996) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1996) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1997) Steven Bochco
Steven Bochco
(1997) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(1997) Oswald Morris (1997) Harold Pinter
Harold Pinter
(1997) David Rose (1997) Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1998) Bill Cotton
Bill Cotton
(1998) Eric Morecambe
Eric Morecambe
& Ernie Wise
Ernie Wise
(1999) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1999) Michael Caine
Michael Caine
(2000) Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick
(2000) Peter Bazalgette
Peter Bazalgette
(2000)

2001–present

Albert Finney
Albert Finney
(2001) John Thaw
John Thaw
(2001) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(2001) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(2002) Merchant Ivory Productions (2002) Andrew Davies (2002) John Mills
John Mills
(2002) Saul Zaentz
Saul Zaentz
(2003) David Jason (2003) John Boorman
John Boorman
(2004) Roger Graef (2004) John Barry (2005) David Frost
David Frost
(2005) David Puttnam
David Puttnam
(2006) Ken Loach
Ken Loach
(2006) Anne V. Coates (2007) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(2007) Will Wright (2007) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(2008) Bruce Forsyth
Bruce Forsyth
(2008) Dawn French
Dawn French
& Jennifer Saunders
Jennifer Saunders
(2009) Terry Gilliam
Terry Gilliam
(2009) Nolan Bushnell
Nolan Bushnell
(2009) Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(2010) Shigeru Miyamoto
Shigeru Miyamoto
(2010) Melvyn Bragg
Melvyn Bragg
(2010) Christopher Lee
Christopher Lee
(2011) Peter Molyneux
Peter Molyneux
(2011) Trevor McDonald (2011) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(2012) Rolf Harris
Rolf Harris
(2012) Alan Parker
Alan Parker
(2013) Gabe Newell
Gabe Newell
(2013) Michael Palin
Michael Palin
(2013) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2014) Rockstar Games
Rockstar Games
(2014) Julie Walters
Julie Walters
(2014) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2015) David Braben (2015) Jon Snow (2015) Sidney Poitier
Sidney Poitier
(2016) John Carmack
John Carmack
(2016) Ray Galton & Alan Simpson (2016) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(2017) Joanna Lumley
Joanna Lumley
(2017) Ridley Scott
Ridley Scott
(2018)

v t e

Cecil B. DeMille
Cecil B. DeMille
Award

Cecil B. DeMille
Cecil B. DeMille
(1952) Walt Disney
Walt Disney
(1953) Darryl F. Zanuck
Darryl F. Zanuck
(1954) Jean Hersholt
Jean Hersholt
(1955) Jack L. Warner
Jack L. Warner
(1956) Mervyn LeRoy
Mervyn LeRoy
(1957) Buddy Adler (1958) Maurice Chevalier
Maurice Chevalier
(1959) Bing Crosby
Bing Crosby
(1960) Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
(1961) Judy Garland
Judy Garland
(1962) Bob Hope
Bob Hope
(1963) Joseph E. Levine
Joseph E. Levine
(1964) James Stewart
James Stewart
(1965) John Wayne
John Wayne
(1966) Charlton Heston
Charlton Heston
(1967) Kirk Douglas
Kirk Douglas
(1968) Gregory Peck
Gregory Peck
(1969) Joan Crawford
Joan Crawford
(1970) Frank Sinatra
Frank Sinatra
(1971) Alfred Hitchcock
Alfred Hitchcock
(1972) Samuel Goldwyn
Samuel Goldwyn
(1973) Bette Davis
Bette Davis
(1974) Hal B. Wallis
Hal B. Wallis
(1975) Walter Mirisch (1977) Red Skelton
Red Skelton
(1978) Lucille Ball
Lucille Ball
(1979) Henry Fonda
Henry Fonda
(1980) Gene Kelly
Gene Kelly
(1981) Sidney Poitier
Sidney Poitier
(1982) Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
(1983) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
(1984) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1985) Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
(1986) Anthony Quinn
Anthony Quinn
(1987) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(1988) Doris Day
Doris Day
(1989) Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
(1990) Jack Lemmon
Jack Lemmon
(1991) Robert Mitchum
Robert Mitchum
(1992) Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
(1993) Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(1994) Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
(1995) Sean Connery
Sean Connery
(1996) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1997) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1998) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
(1999) Barbra Streisand
Barbra Streisand
(2000) Al Pacino
Al Pacino
(2001) Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
(2002) Gene Hackman
Gene Hackman
(2003) Michael Douglas
Michael Douglas
(2004) Robin Williams
Robin Williams
(2005) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(2006) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(2007) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(2009) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(2010) Robert De Niro
Robert De Niro
(2011) Morgan Freeman
Morgan Freeman
(2012) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(2013) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2014) George Clooney
George Clooney
(2015) Denzel Washington
Denzel Washington
(2016) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2017) Oprah Winfrey
Oprah Winfrey
(2018)

v t e

David di Donatello
David di Donatello
Award for Best Foreign Actor

Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
(1957) Marlon Brando
Marlon Brando
/ Charles Laughton
Charles Laughton
(1958) Jean Gabin
Jean Gabin
(1959) Cary Grant
Cary Grant
(1960) Charlton Heston
Charlton Heston
(1961) Anthony Perkins
Anthony Perkins
/ Spencer Tracy
Spencer Tracy
(1962) Gregory Peck
Gregory Peck
(1963) Fredric March
Fredric March
/ Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(1964) Rex Harrison
Rex Harrison
(1965) Richard Burton
Richard Burton
(1966) Richard Burton
Richard Burton
/ Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(1967) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
/ Spencer Tracy
Spencer Tracy
(1968) Rod Steiger
Rod Steiger
(1969) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
/ Peter O'Toole
Peter O'Toole
(1970) Ryan O'Neal
Ryan O'Neal
(1971) Chaim Topol
Chaim Topol
(1972) Yves Montand
Yves Montand
/ Laurence Olivier
Laurence Olivier
(1973) Al Pacino
Al Pacino
/ Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(1974) Burt Lancaster
Burt Lancaster
/ Jack Lemmon
Jack Lemmon
/ Walter Matthau
Walter Matthau
(1975) Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
/ Philippe Noiret
Philippe Noiret
(1976) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
/ Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
(1977) Richard Dreyfuss
Richard Dreyfuss
(1978) Richard Gere
Richard Gere
/ Michel Serrault
Michel Serrault
(1979) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
/ Jack Lemmon
Jack Lemmon
(1980) Burt Lancaster
Burt Lancaster
(1981) Klaus Maria Brandauer
Klaus Maria Brandauer
(1982) Paul Newman
Paul Newman
(1983) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) Tom Hulce
Tom Hulce
(1985) William Hurt
William Hurt
(1986) Dexter Gordon
Dexter Gordon
(1987) Michael Douglas
Michael Douglas
(1988) Dustin Hoffman
Dustin Hoffman
(1989) Philippe Noiret
Philippe Noiret
(1990) Jeremy Irons
Jeremy Irons
(1991) John Turturro
John Turturro
(1992) Daniel Auteuil
Daniel Auteuil
(1993) Anthony Hopkins
Anthony Hopkins
(1994) John Travolta
John Travolta
(1995) Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel
(1996)

v t e

Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directing – Feature Film

1948–1975

Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1948) Robert Rossen
Robert Rossen
(1949) Joseph L. Mankiewicz
Joseph L. Mankiewicz
(1950) George Stevens
George Stevens
(1951) John Ford
John Ford
(1952) Fred Zinnemann
Fred Zinnemann
(1953) Elia Kazan
Elia Kazan
(1954) Delbert Mann
Delbert Mann
(1955) George Stevens
George Stevens
(1956) David Lean
David Lean
(1957) Vincente Minnelli
Vincente Minnelli
(1958) William Wyler
William Wyler
(1959) Billy Wilder
Billy Wilder
(1960) Jerome Robbins
Jerome Robbins
and Robert Wise
Robert Wise
(1961) David Lean
David Lean
(1962) Tony Richardson
Tony Richardson
(1963) George Cukor
George Cukor
(1964) Robert Wise
Robert Wise
(1965) Fred Zinnemann
Fred Zinnemann
(1966) Mike Nichols
Mike Nichols
(1967) Anthony Harvey (1968) John Schlesinger
John Schlesinger
(1969) Franklin J. Schaffner
Franklin J. Schaffner
(1970) William Friedkin
William Friedkin
(1971) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
(1972) George Roy Hill (1973) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
(1974) Miloš Forman
Miloš Forman
(1975)

1976–2000

John G. Avildsen
John G. Avildsen
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1977) Michael Cimino
Michael Cimino
(1978) Robert Benton (1979) Robert Redford
Robert Redford
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1981) Richard Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
(1982) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(1983) Miloš Forman
Miloš Forman
(1984) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1985) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1986) Bernardo Bertolucci
Bernardo Bertolucci
(1987) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1988) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1989) Kevin Costner
Kevin Costner
(1990) Jonathan Demme
Jonathan Demme
(1991) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(1992) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1993) Robert Zemeckis
Robert Zemeckis
(1994) Ron Howard
Ron Howard
(1995) Anthony Minghella
Anthony Minghella
(1996) James Cameron
James Cameron
(1997) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1998) Sam Mendes
Sam Mendes
(1999) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2000)

2001–present

Ron Howard
Ron Howard
(2001) Rob Marshall
Rob Marshall
(2002) Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2003) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(2004) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2005) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2007) Danny Boyle
Danny Boyle
(2008) Kathryn Bigelow
Kathryn Bigelow
(2009) Tom Hooper
Tom Hooper
(2010) Michel Hazanavicius
Michel Hazanavicius
(2011) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
(2012) Alfonso Cuarón
Alfonso Cuarón
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu (2014) Alejandro G. Iñárritu (2015) Damien Chazelle
Damien Chazelle
(2016) Guillermo del Toro
Guillermo del Toro
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay

Robert Bolt (1965) Robert Bolt (1966) Stirling Silliphant (1967) Stirling Silliphant (1968) Bridget Boland, John Hale and Richard Sokolove (1969) Erich Segal
Erich Segal
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1972) William Peter Blatty
William Peter Blatty
(1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
and Lawrence Hauben (1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1977) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1978) Robert Benton (1979) William Peter Blatty
William Peter Blatty
(1980) Ernest Thompson
Ernest Thompson
(1981) John Briley (1982) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(1983) Peter Shaffer (1984) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1985) Robert Bolt (1986) Bernardo Bertolucci, Mark Peploe and Enzon Ungari (1987) Naomi Foner (1988) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
and Ron Kovic
Ron Kovic
(1989) Michael Blake (1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1992) Steven Zaillian (1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(1994) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1995) Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (1996) Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck
and Matt Damon
Matt Damon
(1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Stephen Gaghan
Stephen Gaghan
(2000) Akiva Goldsman
Akiva Goldsman
(2001) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
and Diana Ossana (2005) Peter Morgan (2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2007) Simon Beaufoy (2008) Jason Reitman
Jason Reitman
and Sheldon Turner (2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., and Armando Bo (2014) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2015) Damien Chazelle
Damien Chazelle
(2016) Martin McDonagh
Martin McDonagh
(2017)

v t e

Independent Spirit Award for Best Screenplay

Horton Foote (1985) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1986) Neal Jimenez (1987) Ramon Menendez and Tom Musca (1988) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
and Daniel Yost (1989) Charles Burnett (1990) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
(1991) Neal Jimenez (1992) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
and Frank Barhydt (1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Christopher McQuarrie
Christopher McQuarrie
(1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(1996) Kevin Smith
Kevin Smith
(1997) Don Roos
Don Roos
(1998) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2001) Mike White (2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Dan Futterman (2005) Jason Reitman
Jason Reitman
(2006) Tamara Jenkins
Tamara Jenkins
(2007) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2008) Scott Neustadter
Scott Neustadter
and Michael H. Weber (2009) Stuart Blumberg and Lisa Cholodenko (2010) Alexander Payne, Jim Rash, and Nat Faxon
Nat Faxon
(2011) David O. Russell
David O. Russell
(2012) John Ridley
John Ridley
(2013) Dan Gilroy
Dan Gilroy
(2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
(2017)

v t e

London Film Critics' Circle Award for Director of the Year

Nicolas Roeg
Nicolas Roeg
(1980) Andrzej Wajda
Andrzej Wajda
(1981) Costa-Gavras
Costa-Gavras
(1982) Andrzej Wajda
Andrzej Wajda
(1983) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1984) Roland Joffé
Roland Joffé
(1985) Akira Kurosawa
Akira Kurosawa
(1986) Stanley Kubrick
Stanley Kubrick
(1987) John Huston
John Huston
(1988) Terence Davies (1989) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1990) Ridley Scott
Ridley Scott
(1991) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
(1992) James Ivory
James Ivory
(1993) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1994) Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(1995) Joel Coen (1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
(1997) Peter Weir
Peter Weir
(1998) Sam Mendes
Sam Mendes
(1999) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2000) Alejandro González Iñárritu
Alejandro González Iñárritu
(2001) Phillip Noyce
Phillip Noyce
(2002) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(2003) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(2004) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2005) Paul Greengrass
Paul Greengrass
(2006) Paul Thomas Anderson
Paul Thomas Anderson
(2007) David Fincher
David Fincher
(2008) Kathryn Bigelow
Kathryn Bigelow
(2009) David Fincher
David Fincher
(2010) Michel Hazanavicius
Michel Hazanavicius
(2011) Ang Lee
Ang Lee
(2012) Alfonso Cuarón
Alfonso Cuarón
(2013) Richard Linklater
Richard Linklater
(2014) George Miller (2015) László Nemes
László Nemes
(2016) Sean Baker (2017)

v t e

London Film Critics' Circle Award for Screenwriter of the Year

Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1980) Colin Welland (1981) Costa-Gavras
Costa-Gavras
and Donald E. Stewart (1982) Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
(1983) Philip Kaufman
Philip Kaufman
(1984) Alan Bennett
Alan Bennett
(1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) Alan Bennett
Alan Bennett
(1987) David Mamet
David Mamet
(1988) Christopher Hampton
Christopher Hampton
(1989) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1990) David Mamet
David Mamet
(1991) Michael Tolkin
Michael Tolkin
(1992) Harold Ramis
Harold Ramis
and Danny Rubin
Danny Rubin
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(1994) Paul Attanasio
Paul Attanasio
(1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Andrew Niccol
Andrew Niccol
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2000) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2001) Andrew Bovell (2002) John Collee
John Collee
and Peter Weir
Peter Weir
(2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Peter Morgan (2006) Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck
Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck
(2007) Simon Beaufoy (2008) Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, and Tony Roche (2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Asghar Farhadi
Asghar Farhadi
(2011) Michael Haneke
Michael Haneke
(2012) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
(2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Martin McDonagh
Martin McDonagh
(2017)

v t e

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Director

Michelangelo Antonioni
Michelangelo Antonioni
(1966) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1967) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1968) François Truffaut
François Truffaut
(1969) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1970) Bernardo Bertolucci
Bernardo Bertolucci
(1971) Luis Buñuel
Luis Buñuel
(1972) François Truffaut
François Truffaut
(1973) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
(1974) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
(1975) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(1976) Luis Buñuel
Luis Buñuel
(1977) Terrence Malick
Terrence Malick
(1978) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
/ Robert Benton (1979) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(1980) Louis Malle
Louis Malle
(1981) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1982) Paolo Taviani and Vittorio Taviani (1983) Robert Bresson (1984) John Huston
John Huston
(1985) David Lynch
David Lynch
(1986) John Boorman
John Boorman
(1987) Philip Kaufman
Philip Kaufman
(1988) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
(1989) Martin Scorsese
Martin Scorsese
(1990) David Cronenberg
David Cronenberg
(1991) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(1992) Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
(1994) Mike Figgis
Mike Figgis
(1995) Lars von Trier
Lars von Trier
(1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
(1997) Steven Soderbergh
Steven Soderbergh
(1998) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(1999) Steven Soderbergh
Steven Soderbergh
(2000) Robert Altman
Robert Altman
(2001) Roman Polanski
Roman Polanski
(2002) Clint Eastwood
Clint Eastwood
(2003) Zhang Yimou
Zhang Yimou
(2004) David Cronenberg
David Cronenberg
(2005) Paul Greengrass
Paul Greengrass
(2006) Paul Thomas Anderson
Paul Thomas Anderson
(2007) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2008) Kathryn Bigelow
Kathryn Bigelow
(2009) David Fincher
David Fincher
(2010) Terrence Malick
Terrence Malick
(2011) Michael Haneke
Michael Haneke
(2012) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2013) Richard Linklater
Richard Linklater
(2014) Todd Haynes
Todd Haynes
(2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
(2016) Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
(2017)

v t e

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Screenplay

1967–2000

David Newman and Robert Benton (1967) John Cassavetes
John Cassavetes
(1968) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Éric Rohmer
Éric Rohmer
(1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1972) George Lucas, Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck (1973) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Alain Tanner
Alain Tanner
and John Berger
John Berger
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
(1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) John Guare
John Guare
(1981) Murray Schisgal and Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1982) Bill Forsyth
Bill Forsyth
(1983) Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel and Bruce Jay Friedman (1984) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1985) Hanif Kureishi
Hanif Kureishi
(1986) John Boorman
John Boorman
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
and Daniel Yost (1989) Charles Burnett (1990) David Cronenberg
David Cronenberg
(1991) David Webb Peoples (1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Amy Heckerling (1995) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Scott Frank (1998) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Ronald Harwood (2002) Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Noah Baumbach
Noah Baumbach
(2005) Peter Morgan (2006) Tamara Jenkins
Tamara Jenkins
(2007) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2008) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Asghar Farhadi
Asghar Farhadi
(2011) Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
(2012) Richard Linklater, Ethan Hawke, and Julie Delpy
Julie Delpy
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
(2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
(2017)

v t e

Nebula Award for Best Script/Ray Bradbury Award

Nebula Award for Best Script

Soylent Green
Soylent Green
– Stanley R. Greenberg (1973) Sleeper – Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1974) Young Frankenstein
Young Frankenstein
Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
and Gene Wilder
Gene Wilder
(1975) Star Wars – George Lucas
George Lucas
(1977) The Sixth Sense M. Night Shyamalan
M. Night Shyamalan
(1999) Galaxy Quest
Galaxy Quest
– David Howard and Robert Gordon (2000) Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
James Schamus, Kuo Jung Tsai, and Hui-Ling Wang (2001) The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring – Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2002) The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers – Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Stephen Sinclair, and Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2003) The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King – Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Peter Jackson
Peter Jackson
(2004) Serenity – Joss Whedon
Joss Whedon
(2005) Howl's Moving Castle – Hayao Miyazaki, Cindy Davis Hewitt, and Donald H. Hewitt (2006) Pan's Labyrinth
Pan's Labyrinth
Guillermo del Toro
Guillermo del Toro
(2007) WALL-E
WALL-E
– Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon, and Pete Docter
Pete Docter
(2008)

Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation

Terminator 2: Judgment Day – James Cameron
James Cameron
(1992) Babylon 5 J. Michael Straczynski
J. Michael Straczynski
(1999) 2000X
2000X
– Tales of the Next Millennia – Yuri Rasovsky and Harlan Ellison (2001) Joss Whedon
Joss Whedon
(2008) District 9
District 9
Neill Blomkamp
Neill Blomkamp
and Terri Tatchell
Terri Tatchell
(2009) Inception
Inception
Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Doctor Who: "The Doctor's Wife" – Richard Clark and Neil Gaiman (2011) Beasts of the Southern Wild – Benh Zeitlin, Lucy Alibar (2012) Gravity – Alfonso Cuarón
Alfonso Cuarón
and Jonás Cuarón (2013) Guardians of the Galaxy – James Gunn
James Gunn
and Nicole Perlman (2014) Mad Max: Fury Road – George Miller, Brendan McCarthy, and Nico Lathouris (2015) Arrival – Eric Heisserer (2016)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay

Original Drama (1969–1983, retired)

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) Steve Shagan (1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Arthur Laurents
Arthur Laurents
(1977) Nancy Dowd, Robert C. Jones and Waldo Salt (1978) Mike Gray, T. S. Cook and James Bridges (1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
and Trevor Griffiths (1981) Melissa Mathison
Melissa Mathison
(1982) Horton Foote (1983)

Original Comedy (1969–1983, retired)

Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Peter Bogdanovich, Buck Henry, David Newman and Robert Benton (1972) Melvin Frank and Jack Rose (1973) Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
and Alan Uger (1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Bill Lancaster
Bill Lancaster
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Sheldon Keller (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Nancy Meyers, Harvey Miller and Charles Shyer
Charles Shyer
(1980) Steve Gordon (1981) Don McGuire, Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Murray Schisgal (1982) Lawrence Kasdan
Lawrence Kasdan
and Barbara Benedek (1983)

Original Screenplay (1984–present)

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) William Kelley and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1989) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(1994) Randall Wallace (1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen
Ethan Coen
(1996) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
and Mark Andrus (1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Michael Moore
Michael Moore
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Hugo Guinness (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat
WorldCat
Identities VIAF: 59077912 LCCN: n79090269 ISNI: 0000 0001 2134 7589 GND: 118502077 SELIBR: 207594 SUDOC: 027272699 BNF: cb11888505c (data) ULAN: 500273600 MusicBrainz: f7476fda-687e-4d11-a02e-cfb88558867d NLA: 35308903 NDL: 00431312 NKC: jn19981000084 ICCU: ITICCUCFIV00724 BNE: XX1154054 CiNii: DA01341

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