HOME
        TheInfoList






Wine (recursive backronym for Wine Is Not an Emulator) is a free and open-source compatibility layer that aims to allow application software and recursive backronym for Wine Is Not an Emulator) is a free and open-source compatibility layer that aims to allow application software and computer games developed for Microsoft Windows to run on Unix-like operating systems. Wine also provides a software library, known as "Winelib", against which developers can compile Windows applications to help port them to Unix-like systems.[8]

Wine provides its compatibility layer for Windows runtime system (also called runtime environment) which translates Windows system calls into POSIX-compliant system calls,[9] recreating the directory structure of Windows, and providing alternative implementations of Windows system libraries,[10] system services through wineserver[11] and various other components (such as Internet Explorer, the Windows Registry Editor,[12] and msiexec[13]). Wine is predominantly written using black-box testing reverse-engineering, to avoid copyright issues.[14]

The selection of "Wine is Not an Emulator" as the name of the Wine Project was the result of a naming discussion in August 1993[15] and credited to David Niemi. There is some confusion caused by an early FAQ using Windows Emulator[16] and other invalid sources that appear after the Wine Project name being set. No code emulation or virtualization occurs when running a Windows application under Wine.[17] "Emulation" usually would refer to execution of compiled code intended for one processor (such as x86) by interpreting/recompiling software running on a different processor (such as PowerPC). While the name sometimes appears in the forms WINE and wine, the project developers have agreed to standardize on the form Wine.[18]

Wine is primarily developed for Linux and macOS,[19] and there are, as of July 2020, well-maintained packages available for both platforms.[20]

In a 2007 survey by desktoplinux.com of 38,500 Linux desktop users, 31.5% of respondents reported using Wine to run Windows applications.[21] This plurality was larger than all x86 virtualization programs combined, as well as larger than the 27.9% who reported not running Windows applications.[22]

However, OS/2 had many problems with end user acceptance. Perhaps the most serious was that most computers sold already came with DOS and Windows, and many people didn't bother to evaluate OS/2 on its merits due to already having an operating system. "Bundling" of DOS and Win

However, OS/2 had many problems with end user acceptance. Perhaps the most serious was that most computers sold already came with DOS and Windows, and many people didn't bother to evaluate OS/2 on its merits due to already having an operating system. "Bundling" of DOS and Windows and the chilling effect this had on the operating system market frequently came up in United States v. Microsoft Corporation.

The Wine pr

The Wine project itself responds to the specific complaint of "encouraging" the continued development for the Windows API on one of its wiki pages:

For most people there remain a handful of programs locking them in to Windows. It's obvious there will never be a Microsoft Office ported to Linux, however older versions of programs like TurboTax won't be ported either. Similarly, there are tens of thousands of games and internal corporate applications which will never be ported. If you want to use Linux and rely on any legacy Windows application, something like Wine is essential... Wine makes Linux more useful and allows for millions of users to switch who couldn't otherwise. This greatly raises Linux marketshare, drawing more commercial and community developers to Linux.[115]

Also, the Wine Wiki page claims that Wine can help break the Also, the Wine Wiki page claims that Wine can help break the chicken-and-egg problem for Linux on the desktop:[116]

Linux gaming on the platform.[117][118]

Microsoft has not made public statements about Wine. However, the Windows Update software will block updates to Microsoft applications running in Wine. On 16 February 2005, Ivan Leo Puoti discovered that Microsoft had started checking the Windows Registry for the Wine configuration key and would block the Windows Update for any component.[119] As Puoti noted: "It's also the first time Microsoft acknowledges the existence of Wine."

See also