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The voiced alveolar, dental and postalveolar plosives (or stops) are types of consonantal sounds used in many spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents voiced dental, alveolar, and postalveolar plosives is (although the symbol can be used to distinguish the dental plosive, and the postalveolar), and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is d. There are only a few languages which distinguishes dental and alveolar stops, Kota, Toda, Venda being a few of them.

Features

Features of the voiced alveolar stop: * There are three specific variants of : ** Dental, which means it is articulated with either the tip or the blade of the tongue at the upper teeth, termed respectively ''apical'' and ''laminal''. ** Denti-alveolar, which means it is articulated with the blade of the tongue at the alveolar ridge, and the tip of the tongue behind upper teeth. ** Alveolar, which means it is articulated with either the tip or the blade of the tongue at the alveolar ridge, termed respectively ''apical'' and ''laminal''.

Occurrence



Dental or denti-alveolar



Alveolar



Variable



See also

* Index of phonetics articles

Notes



References

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

External links

* {{IPA navigation Category:Alveolar consonants Category:Plosives Category:Central consonants Category:Voiced oral consonants