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1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Imperial City of Verdun

Free Imperial City
Free Imperial City
of the Holy Roman Empire

? – 1552

Coat of arms

Capital Verdun

Government Republic

Historical era Middle Ages

 •  Established Uncertain Enter start year

 •  Three Bishoprics     annexed by France   1552 1552

 •  Peace of Westphalia     recognises annexation   1648

Succeeded by

Early modern France

Today part of  France

Verdun
Verdun
(/vɛərˈdʌn, vɜːr-/;[1] French pronunciation: ​[vɛʁ.dœ̃] official name before 1970 Verdun-sur-Meuse) is a small city in the Meuse
Meuse
department in Grand Est in northeastern France. It is an arrondissement of the department. Verdun
Verdun
is the biggest city in Meuse, although the capital of the department is the slightly smaller city of Bar-le-Duc. It is well known for giving its name to a major battle of the First World War.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
(1792) 1.2 Verdun
Verdun
in 1819 1.3 Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
(First World War)

2 Panoramic views 3 Cemetery and memorials 4 Landmarks 5 Notable people 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External links

History[edit] Verdun
Verdun
(Verodunum, a latinisation of a place name meaning "strong fort") was founded by the Gauls. It has been the seat of the bishop of Verdun
Verdun
since the 4th century, with interruptions. The 843 Treaty of Verdun
Verdun
divided Charlemagne's empire into three parts. The city has been famous for dragées or sugared almonds from 1200 onwards; they were distributed at the baptism of French princes.[2] Verdun
Verdun
was part of the middle kingdom of Lotharingia, and in 1374 it became a free imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire. The Bishopric of Verdun
Verdun
formed together with Tull (Toul) and Metz
Metz
the Three Bishoprics, which were annexed by France
France
in 1552 (recognized in 1648 by the Peace of Westphalia). From 1624 to 1636, a large bastioned citadel was constructed on the site of the Abbey of Saint Vanne. In 1670, Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban visited Verdun
Verdun
and drew up an ambitious scheme to fortify the whole city. Although much of his plan was built in the following decades, some of the elements were not completed until after the Napoleonic Wars. Despite the extensive fortifications, Verdun
Verdun
was captured by the Prussians in 1792 during the War of the First Coalition, but abandoned by them after the Battle of Valmy. During the Napoleonic War, the citadel was used to hold British prisoners of war. In the Franco-Prussian War, Verdun
Verdun
was the last French fortress to surrender in 1870. Shortly afterwards, a new system of fortification was begun.[3] This consisted of a mutually supporting ring of 22 polygonal forts up to 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) from the city, and an inner ring of 6 forts.[4]

Bird's-eye view of Verdun
Verdun
in 1638

Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
(1792)[edit] Main article: Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
(1792) The Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
was fought on August 20, 1792 between French Revolutionary forces and a Prussian army. The Prussians were victorious. This therefore opened the path to Paris.[5] Verdun
Verdun
in 1819[edit] Norwich Duff
Norwich Duff
visited Verdun
Verdun
in 1819, shortly after the conclusion of the Napoleonic Wars. He wrote:

Verdun
Verdun
is prettily situated in a valley surrounded by hills. The River Meuse
Meuse
runs through the town and forms several canals and ditches round the town which is fortified and, I believe, by the great Marshal Vauban. The citadel and [surrounds] are a good deal out of repair and [people] were at work on them. Though there is little to see at Verdun, every part of it felt interesting from the number of our countrymen [i.e. British prisoners of war] confined here during the war. Verdun
Verdun
is famous for its sweetmeats, sugar plums, confits etc. which are said to be the best in France. They made us show our passports [here] it being a fortified town.[citation needed]

Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
(First World War)[edit] Main article: Battle of Verdun

Aerial photograph of Fort Douaumont
Fort Douaumont
towards the end of 1916.

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Verdun
Verdun
was the site of a major battle, and the longest-lasting, of the First World War.[6] One of the costliest battles in military history, Verdun
Verdun
exemplified the policy of a "war of attrition" pursued by both sides, which led to an enormous loss of life and very large casualty lists.[7] Following the failure of the Schlieffen Plan
Schlieffen Plan
in 1914 and the solidifying of the Western Front,[8] Germany remained on the strategic defensive in the west throughout most of 1915.[9] In the winter of 1915–16, German General Erich von Falkenhayn, the chief of the German General Staff
German General Staff
(1914–1916) made plans for a large offensive on the Western Front that ultimately aimed to break the French Army through the application of firepower at a point that the French had to hold for reasons of national prestige.[10] As Falkenhayn recalled it, his so-called "Christmas memorandum" to Kaiser Willhelm II envisioned a massive but limited attack on a French position 'for the retention of which the French Command would be compelled to throw in every man they have'.[11] Once the French army had bled to death, Britain could be brought down by Germany's submarine blockade and superior military strength. The logic of initiating a battle not to gain territory or a strategic position but simply to create a self-sustaining killing ground—to bleed the French army white—pointed to the grimness of military vision in 1916. Recent scholarship by Holger Afflerbach and others, however, has questioned the veracity of the Christmas memo. No copy has ever surfaced and the only account of it appeared in Falkenhayn's post-war memoir.[12] His army commanders at Verdun, including the German Crown Prince, denied any knowledge of an attrition strategy. It is possible that Falkenhayn did not specifically design the battle to bleed the French army but used this supposed motive after the fact in an attempt to justify the Verdun
Verdun
offensive, despite its failure.

Citadel of Verdun
Verdun
during World War I.

Verdun
Verdun
was the strongest point in pre-war France, ringed by a string of powerful forts, including Douaumont
Douaumont
and Fort Vaux. By 1916, the salient at Verdun
Verdun
jutted into the German lines and lay vulnerable to attack from three sides. The historic city of Verdun
Verdun
had been an oppidum of the Gauls
Gauls
before Roman times and later a key asset in wars against Prussia, and Falkenhayn suspected that the French would throw as many men as necessary into its defence. Ironically, France
France
had substantially weakened Verdun's defences after the outbreak of the war, an oversight that would contribute to the removal of Joseph Joffre from supreme command at the end of 1916. The attack was slated to begin on 12 February, then 16 February, but the snow forced repeated postponements.

The city after the German bombardment, 1916.

Falkenhayn massed artillery to the north and east of Verdun
Verdun
to precede the infantry advance with intensive artillery bombardment. His attack would hit the French positions on the right bank of the Meuse. Although French intelligence had warned of his plans, these warnings were ignored by the French Command and troop levels in the area remained low. Consequently, Verdun
Verdun
was utterly unprepared for the initial bombardment on the morning of 21 February 1916. German infantry attacks followed that afternoon and met tenacious but ultimately inadequate resistance for the first four days. On 25 February the Germans occupied Douaumont. French reinforcements—now under the leadership of General Philippe Pétain—began to arrive and were instantly thrown into "the furnace" (as the battle was called) to slow the German advance, no matter what the cost. Over the next several days, the stubborn defense managed to slow the German advance with a series of bloody counter-attacks. In March, Falkenhayn decided to target the French positions on the left bank of the Meuse
Meuse
as well, broadening the offensive front twofold. Throughout March and April, Cumières-le-Mort-Homme
Cumières-le-Mort-Homme
and Hill 304 were under continuous heavy bombardment and relentless infantry attacks. Meanwhile, Pétain organised repeated, small-scale counter-attacks to slow the German advance. He also ensured that the sole supply road from Bar-le-Duc
Bar-le-Duc
into Verdun
Verdun
remained open. It became known as the Voie Sacrée "Sacred Way" because it continued to carry vital supplies and reinforcements into the Verdun
Verdun
front despite constant artillery fire.

Men of the French 87th Infantry Regiment during the Battle of Verdun, 1916.

German gains continued in June, but slowly and only after increasingly heavy losses on their side. On 7 June, following almost a week of bitter resistance, Fort Vaux
Fort Vaux
fell to the Germans after a murderous hand-to-hand fight inside the fort itself. On 23 June the Germans reached what would become the furthest point of their advance. The line was just in front of Fort Souville, the last stronghold before Verdun
Verdun
itself. Pétain was making plans to evacuate the right bank of the Meuse
Meuse
when the combined Anglo-French offensive on the Somme River was launched on 1 July, partly to relieve pressure on the French, although the first day was the bloodiest in the British Army's history. The Germans could no longer afford to continue their offensive at Verdun
Verdun
when they were needed so desperately on the Somme. At a cost of some 400,000 German casualties and a similar number of French, the attack was finally called off. Germany's intention to bleed France
France
to death had failed. The battle continued, however, from October to the end of the year. French offensives, employing new tactics devised by General Robert Nivelle, regained the forts and territory they had lost earlier. This was the only gleam of hope in an otherwise abysmal landscape. Overall, the battle lasted 11 months. Falkenhayn was replaced by Paul von Hindenburg as Chief of General Staff. General Nivelle was promoted over the head of General Pétain to replace Generalissimo
Generalissimo
Joseph Joffre as French supreme commander, although he was to hold the post for less than six months. Panoramic views[edit]

A panoramic view of Verdun
Verdun
in 1917

A panoramic view of Verdun
Verdun
from 2004

Cemetery and memorials[edit] There are many French and German cemeteries throughout the battlefield. The largest is the French National Cemetery and Douaumont Ossuary near Fort Douaumont. Thirteen thousand crosses adorn the field in front of the ossuary, which holds roughly 130,000 unidentified remains brought in from the battlefield. Every year yields more remains, which are often placed inside the ossuary's vaults. Among many revered memorials on the battlefield is the "Bayonet Trench", which marks the location where some dozen bayonets lined up in a row were discovered projecting out of the ground after the war; below each rifle was the body of a French soldier. It has been assumed that these belonged to a group of soldiers who had rested their rifles against the parapet of the trench they were occupying when they were killed during a bombardment, and the men were buried where they lay in the trench and the rifles left untouched. However, this is probably not historically accurate: experts agree that the bayonets were probably affixed to the rifles after the attack, and installed by survivors to memorialize the spot.[13] Nearby, the World War I
World War I
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial is located at Romagne-sous-Montfaucon
Romagne-sous-Montfaucon
to the northwest of Verdun. It is the final resting place for 14,246 American military dead, most of whom died in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. The chapel contains a memorial to the 954 American missing whose remains were never recovered or identified.

Charlemagne
Charlemagne
at the summit of Verdun's Victory Monument

A portion of the battlefield today

The Voie Sacrée
Voie Sacrée
memorial at Nixéville-Blercourt
Nixéville-Blercourt
near Verdun, commemorating the French army's intensive use of the Bar-le-Duc
Bar-le-Duc
to Verdun
Verdun
road during the battle

World War I
World War I
memorial

Landmarks[edit] The Châtel Gate is the only remaining part of the medieval city walls. It leads onto La Roche Square. La Citadelle was built in the 17th Century. It is still in military hands but the underlying tunnels can still be visited. Notre-Dame de Verdun Cathedral
Verdun Cathedral
was consecrated in 1147 but was built on the site of an earlier church. The 12th Century Lion Door on the north side has a lavishly decorated tympanum. The whole building was heavily restored in the 18th Century. The Episcopal Palace was built in the 18th Century by Robert de Cotte and has a fine façade. Part of the building is occupied by the World Peace Centre. The Princerie Museum is located in the former residence of the princes of Verdun. It contains historic work of art from the region. The "Subterrean Citadel" is situated at the entrance of Verdun. It holds 4 km (2 mi) of shafts that used to accommodate soldiers during the war.

Verdun
Verdun
town hall

Verdun
Verdun
Cathedral

Verdun
Verdun
episcopal palace

Notable people[edit]

Giovanni Veneroni, linguist Danielle Mitterrand, First Lady Mark Meadows, United States Congressman from North Carolina, born in Verdun Hervé Revelli, footballer, AS Saint-Étienne's top goalscorer

References[edit]

^ "Verdun". Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. ^ A History of Food, Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat, Blackwell Publishing 1992, p.567 ^ "Fortified Places > Fortresses > Verdun". Fortified-places.com. Retrieved 16 September 2017.  ^ "Place Forte de Verdun
Verdun
- Camp retranché de Verdun
Verdun
- 1916". fortiffsere.fr. Retrieved 16 September 2017.  ^ Parker, Geoffrey. 2008. The Cambridge Illustrated History of Warfare. New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 195. ISBN 978-0-521-73806-4. ^ "What caused Verdun
Verdun
to be the longest battle of WW1?". BBC Guides. Retrieved 16 September 2017.  ^ "The Battle of Verdun
Battle of Verdun
- History Learning Site". Historyleaningsite.co.uk. Retrieved 16 September 2017.  ^ "BBC - Standard Grade Bitesize History - The Schlieffen Plan : Revision, Page 3". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 16 September 2017.  ^ "German Defence of the Western Front, September-October 1915". Defenceindepth.co. 25 September 2015. Retrieved 16 September 2017.  ^ Dr. Robert T. Foley. "A New Form of Warfare? : Erich von Falkenhayn's Plan for Victory in 1916" (PDF). Kclpure.kcl.ac.uk. Retrieved 2017-09-16.  ^ "GHDI - Document". Germanhistorydocs.ghi-dc.org. Retrieved 16 September 2017.  ^ Afflerbach, Holger (1 July 2015). "The Purpose of the First World War: War Aims and Military Strategies". Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. Retrieved 16 September 2017 – via Google Books.  ^ Prost, Antoine. Republican Identities in War and Peace: Representations of France
France
in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Edited by Jay Winter. Oxford, New York: Berg, 2002. p.54

Further reading[edit]

Illustrated Michelin Guide to the battlefields " Verdun
Verdun
and the Battles for its Possessions". ISBN 9781843420668.  "The Price of Glory" Verdun
Verdun
1916. ISBN 9780140170412.  Walking Verdun. ISBN 1844158675.  Battlefield Guide VERDUN 1916. ISBN 9780752441481. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Verdun.

Official web site Verdun Tourist Office of Verdun The Battle of Verdun La place forte de Vedun 1870–1918 GPS-Teamproject " Verdun
Verdun
- Somme - 1916" "My visits to the battlefields of Verdun".  "Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog, Dutch/Flemish Forum".  " World War I
World War I
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial". American Battle Monuments Commission. Archived from the original on February 11, 2006. Retrieved January 17, 2006.  "Photo album of old and modern Verdun
Verdun
area". Archived from the original on 2007-05-10.  " Verdun
Verdun
— A Battle of the Great war".  "The old fortifications of Verdun".  The subterranean citadel underneath Verdun

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Holy Roman Empire
by 1792

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D Member of the Décapole H Member of the Hanseatic League S Member or associate of the Swiss Confederacy

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Communes of the Meuse
Meuse
department

Abainville Abaucourt-Hautecourt Aincreville Amanty Ambly-sur-Meuse Amel-sur-l'Étang Ancemont Ancerville Andernay Apremont-la-Forêt Arrancy-sur-Crusne Aubréville Aulnois-en-Perthois Autrécourt-sur-Aire Autréville-Saint-Lambert Avillers-Sainte-Croix Avioth Avocourt Azannes-et-Soumazannes Baâlon Badonvilliers-Gérauvilliers Bannoncourt Bantheville Bar-le-Duc Baudignécourt Baudonvilliers Baudrémont Baulny Bazeilles-sur-Othain Bazincourt-sur-Saulx Beauclair Beaufort-en-Argonne Beaulieu-en-Argonne Beaumont-en-Verdunois Beausite Behonne Belleray Belleville-sur-Meuse Belrain Belrupt-en-Verdunois Beney-en-Woëvre Béthelainville Béthincourt Beurey-sur-Saulx Bezonvaux Biencourt-sur-Orge Billy-sous-Mangiennes Bislée Blanzée Boinville-en-Woëvre Boncourt-sur-Meuse Bonnet Bonzée Le Bouchon-sur-Saulx Bouconville-sur-Madt Bouligny Bouquemont Boureuilles Bovée-sur-Barboure Boviolles Brabant-en-Argonne Brabant-le-Roi Brabant-sur-Meuse Brandeville Braquis Bras-sur-Meuse Brauvilliers Bréhéville Breux Brieulles-sur-Meuse Brillon-en-Barrois Brixey-aux-Chanoines Brizeaux Brocourt-en-Argonne Brouennes Broussey-en-Blois Broussey-Raulecourt Bure Burey-en-Vaux Burey-la-Côte Buxières-sous-les-Côtes Buzy-Darmont Cesse Chaillon Chalaines Champneuville Champougny Chanteraine Chardogne Charny-sur-Meuse Charpentry Chassey-Beaupré Châtillon-sous-les-Côtes Chattancourt Chaumont-devant-Damvillers Chaumont-sur-Aire Chauvency-le-Château Chauvency-Saint-Hubert Chauvoncourt Cheppy Chonville-Malaumont Cierges-sous-Montfaucon Le Claon Clermont-en-Argonne Cléry-le-Grand Cléry-le-Petit Combles-en-Barrois Combres-sous-les-Côtes Commercy Consenvoye Contrisson Courcelles-en-Barrois Courcelles-sur-Aire Courouvre Cousances-les-Forges Cousances-lès-Triconville Couvertpuis Couvonges Cuisy Culey Cumières-le-Mort-Homme Cunel Dagonville Dainville-Bertheléville Damloup Dammarie-sur-Saulx Damvillers Dannevoux Delouze-Rosières Delut Demange-aux-Eaux Dieppe-sous-Douaumont Dieue-sur-Meuse Dombasle-en-Argonne Dombras Dommartin-la-Montagne Dommary-Baroncourt Dompcevrin Dompierre-aux-Bois Domremy-la-Canne Doncourt-aux-Templiers Douaumont Doulcon Dugny-sur-Meuse Dun-sur-Meuse Duzey Écouviez Écurey-en-Verdunois Eix Les Éparges Épiez-sur-Meuse Épinonville Érize-la-Brûlée Érize-la-Petite Érize-Saint-Dizier Erneville-aux-Bois Esnes-en-Argonne Étain Éton Étraye Euville Èvres Fains-Véel Flassigny Fleury-devant-Douaumont Foameix-Ornel Fontaines-Saint-Clair Forges-sur-Meuse Foucaucourt-sur-Thabas Fouchères-aux-Bois Frémeréville-sous-les-Côtes Fresnes-au-Mont Fresnes-en-Woëvre Froidos Fromeréville-les-Vallons Fromezey Futeau Génicourt-sur-Meuse Gercourt-et-Drillancourt Géry Gesnes-en-Argonne Geville Gimécourt Gincrey Girauvoisin Givrauval Gondrecourt-le-Château Gouraincourt Goussaincourt Gremilly Grimaucourt-en-Woëvre Grimaucourt-près-Sampigny Guerpont Gussainville Haironville Halles-sous-les-Côtes Han-lès-Juvigny Han-sur-Meuse Hannonville-sous-les-Côtes Harville Haudainville Les Hauts-de-Chée Haudiomont Haumont-près-Samogneux Heippes Hennemont Herbeuville Herméville-en-Woëvre Heudicourt-sous-les-Côtes Hévilliers Horville-en-Ornois Houdelaincourt Inor Ippécourt Iré-le-Sec Les Islettes Jametz Jonville-en-Woëvre Jouy-en-Argonne Julvécourt Juvigny-en-Perthois Juvigny-sur-Loison Kœur-la-Grande Kœur-la-Petite Labeuville Lachalade Lachaussée Lacroix-sur-Meuse Lahaymeix Lahayville Laheycourt Laimont Lamorville Lamouilly Landrecourt-Lempire Laneuville-au-Rupt Laneuville-sur-Meuse Lanhères Latour-en-Woëvre Lavallée Lavincourt Lavoye Lemmes Lérouville Levoncourt Lignières-sur-Aire Ligny-en-Barrois Liny-devant-Dun Lion-devant-Dun Lisle-en-Barrois Lisle-en-Rigault Lissey Loisey Loison Longchamps-sur-Aire Longeaux Longeville-en-Barrois Loupmont Louppy-le-Château Louppy-sur-Loison Louvemont-Côte-du-Poivre Luzy-Saint-Martin Maizeray Maizey Malancourt Mandres-en-Barrois Mangiennes Manheulles Marchéville-en-Woëvre Marre Marson-sur-Barboure Martincourt-sur-Meuse Marville Maucourt-sur-Orne Maulan Mauvages Maxey-sur-Vaise Mécrin Méligny-le-Grand Méligny-le-Petit Menaucourt Ménil-aux-Bois Ménil-la-Horgne Ménil-sur-Saulx Merles-sur-Loison Milly-sur-Bradon Mogeville Mognéville Moirey-Flabas-Crépion Les Monthairons Montblainville Montbras Mont-devant-Sassey Montfaucon-d'Argonne Montiers-sur-Saulx Montigny-devant-Sassey Montigny-lès-Vaucouleurs Montmédy Montplonne Montsec Montzéville Moranville Morgemoulin Morley Mouilly Moulainville Moulins-Saint-Hubert Moulotte Mouzay Murvaux Muzeray Naives-en-Blois Naives-Rosières Naix-aux-Forges Nançois-le-Grand Nançois-sur-Ornain Nantillois Nant-le-Grand Nant-le-Petit Nantois Nepvant Nettancourt Le Neufour Neuville-en-Verdunois Neuville-lès-Vaucouleurs Neuville-sur-Ornain Neuvilly-en-Argonne Nicey-sur-Aire Nixéville-Blercourt Nonsard-Lamarche Nouillonpont Noyers-Auzécourt Nubécourt Olizy-sur-Chiers Ornes Osches Ourches-sur-Meuse Pagny-la-Blanche-Côte Pagny-sur-Meuse Pareid Parfondrupt Les Paroches Peuvillers Pierrefitte-sur-Aire Pillon Pintheville Pont-sur-Meuse Pouilly-sur-Meuse Pretz-en-Argonne Quincy-Landzécourt Raival Rambluzin-et-Benoite-Vaux Rambucourt Rancourt-sur-Ornain Ranzières Rarécourt Récicourt Récourt-le-Creux Reffroy Regnéville-sur-Meuse Rembercourt-Sommaisne Remennecourt Remoiville Resson Revigny-sur-Ornain Réville-aux-Bois Riaville Ribeaucourt Richecourt Rigny-la-Salle Rigny-Saint-Martin Robert-Espagne Les Roises Romagne-sous-les-Côtes Romagne-sous-Montfaucon Ronvaux Rouvres-en-Woëvre Rouvrois-sur-Meuse Rouvrois-sur-Othain Rumont Rupt-aux-Nonains Rupt-devant-Saint-Mihiel Rupt-en-Woëvre Rupt-sur-Othain Saint-Amand-sur-Ornain Saint-André-en-Barrois Saint-Aubin-sur-Aire Saint-Germain-sur-Meuse Saint-Hilaire-en-Woëvre Saint-Jean-lès-Buzy Saint-Joire Saint-Julien-sous-les-Côtes Saint-Laurent-sur-Othain Saint-Maurice-sous-les-Côtes Saint-Mihiel Saint-Pierrevillers Saint-Remy-la-Calonne Salmagne Samogneux Sampigny Sassey-sur-Meuse Saudrupt Saulmory-et-Villefranche Saulvaux Saulx-lès-Champlon Sauvigny Sauvoy Savonnières-devant-Bar Savonnières-en-Perthois Seigneulles Senon Senoncourt-lès-Maujouy Septsarges Sepvigny Seuil-d'Argonne Seuzey Silmont Sivry-la-Perche Sivry-sur-Meuse Sommedieue Sommeilles Sommelonne Sorbey Sorcy-Saint-Martin Les Souhesmes-Rampont Souilly Spincourt Stainville Stenay Taillancourt Tannois Thierville-sur-Meuse Thillombois Thillot Thonne-la-Long Thonne-le-Thil Thonne-les-Près Thonnelle Tilly-sur-Meuse Trémont-sur-Saulx Trésauvaux Tréveray Les Trois-Domaines Tronville-en-Barrois Troussey Troyon Ugny-sur-Meuse Vacherauville Vadelaincourt Vadonville Val-d'Ornain Valbois Varennes-en-Argonne Varnéville Vassincourt Vaubecourt Vaucouleurs Vaudeville-le-Haut Vaudoncourt Vauquois Vaux-devant-Damloup Vaux-lès-Palameix Vavincourt Velaines Velosnes Verdun Verneuil-Grand Verneuil-Petit Véry Vigneulles-lès-Hattonchâtel Vigneul-sous-Montmédy Vignot Villécloye Ville-devant-Belrain Ville-devant-Chaumont Ville-en-Woëvre Villeroy-sur-Méholle Villers-aux-Vents Villers-devant-Dun Villers-le-Sec Villers-lès-Mangiennes Villers-sous-Pareid Villers-sur-Meuse Ville-sur-Cousances Ville-sur-Saulx Villotte-devant-Louppy Villotte-sur-Aire Vilosnes-Haraumont Vittarville Void-Vacon Vouthon-Bas Vouthon-Haut Waly Warcq Watronville Wavrille Willeroncourt Wiseppe Woël Woimbey Xivray-et-Marvoisin

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 124087015 LCCN: n83068520 GND: 4062709-3 BNF:

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