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Uzbeks

Uzbeks come from a predominantly Sunni Muslim background, usually of the Hanafi school,[91] but variations exist between northern and southern Uzbeks. According to a 2009 Pew Research Center report, Uzbekistan's population is 96.3% Muslim,[92] around 54% identifies as non-denominational Muslim, 18% as Sunni and 1% as Shia.[93] And ar

Uzbeks come from a predominantly Sunni Muslim background, usually of the Hanafi school,[91] but variations exist between northern and southern Uzbeks. According to a 2009 Pew Research Center report, Uzbekistan's population is 96.3% Muslim,[92] around 54% identifies as non-denominational Muslim, 18% as Sunni and 1% as Shia.[93] And around 11% say they belong to a Sufi order.[93] as The majority of Uzbeks from the former USSR came to practice religion with a more liberal interpretation due to the movement of Jadidism which arose as an indigenous reform movement during the time of Russian imperial rule, while Uzbeks in Afghanistan and other countries to the south have remained more conservative adherents of Islam. However, with Uzbek independence in 1991 came an Islamic revival amongst segments of the population. People living in the area of modern Uzbekistan were first converted to Islam as early as the 8th century, as Arabs conquered the area, displacing the earlier faiths of the region.[94]

A 2015 study estimates some 10,000 Muslim Uzbek converted to Christianity, most of them belonging to some sort of Christianity, most of them belonging to some sort of evangelical or charismatic Protestant community.[95] According to 2009 national census 1,794 Uzbeks in Kazakhstan are Christians.[96] In Russia there is some long-term Uzbek workers converting to Eastern Orthodoxy through missionaries.[97]

The ancient pre-Islamic religion of Uzbekistan-Zoroastrianism survives today and is followed by 7,000 people in Uzbekistan.[98] According to 2009 national census 1,673 Uzbeks in Kazakhstan are Atheists.[96]