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The UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA is a multi-campus public university system composed of all 16 of North Carolina
North Carolina
's public universities, as well as the NC School of Science and Mathematics , the nation's first public residential high school for gifted students. Commonly referred to as the UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA SYSTEM or the UNC SYSTEM to differentiate it from the original campus in Chapel Hill, the university has a total enrollment of over 183,001 students and confers over 75% of all baccalaureate degrees in North Carolina
North Carolina
in 2008. UNC campuses conferred 43,686 degrees for 2008–2009, the bulk of which were Bachelor's level with 31,055 degrees awarded.

CONTENTS

* 1 History * 2 Legal mandate

* 3 Institutions

* 3.1 Notes

* 4 Affiliates * 5 Presidents * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 Further reading * 9 External links

HISTORY

Founded in 1789, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the oldest public university in the United States . It closed from 1871 to 1875, faced with serious financial and enrollment problems during the Reconstruction era . In 1877, the State of North Carolina began sponsoring additional higher education institutions. Over time the state added a women\'s college (now known as the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Greensboro ), a land-grant university (North Carolina State University ), five historically black institutions ( North Carolina
North Carolina
A the new _Consolidated University of North Carolina_ was created to include the existing campuses of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , North Carolina
North Carolina
State University , and the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Greensboro . The three campuses came under the leadership of just one board and one president. By 1969, three additional campuses had joined the Consolidated University through legislative action: the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Charlotte , the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Asheville , and the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Wilmington .

In 1971, North Carolina
North Carolina
passed legislation bringing into the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
all 16 public institutions that confer bachelor's degrees. This round of consolidation granted each constituent institution a Chancellor and a Board of Trustees
Board of Trustees
. In 1985, the North Carolina
North Carolina
School of Science and Mathematics , a residential high school for gifted students, was declared an affiliated school of the university. In 2007, the high school became a full member of the university.

LEGAL MANDATE

The legal authority and mandate for the University of North Carolina is contained in the State's first Constitution (1776), which provided in Article XLI

_That a school or schools shall be established by the Legislature, for the convenient instruction of youth, . . . and all useful learning shall be duly encouraged, and promoted, in one or more universities,_

The state legislature did not get around to granting a charter for the University until 1789.

Article IX of the current version of the North Carolina
North Carolina
Constitution deals with all forms of public education in the state. Sections 8 and 9 of that article address higher education. Sec. 8. Higher education.

_The General Assembly shall maintain a public system of higher education, comprising The University of North Carolina
North Carolina
and such other institutions of higher education as the General Assembly may deem wise. The General Assembly shall provide for the selection of trustees of The University of North Carolina
North Carolina
and of the other institutions of higher education, in whom shall be vested all the privileges, rights, franchises, and endowments heretofore granted to or conferred upon the trustees of these institutions. The General Assembly may enact laws necessary and expedient for the maintenance and management of The University of North Carolina
North Carolina
and the other public institutions of higher education._

Sec. 9. Benefits of public institutions of higher education.

_The General Assembly shall provide that the benefits of The University of North Carolina
North Carolina
and other public institutions of higher education, as far as practicable, be extended to the people of the State free of expense._

Statutory provisions stipulate the current function and cost to students of the University of North Carolina. UNC Charlotte . The university expanded significantly in the 1960s and 1970s.

INSTITUTIONS

Within its seventeen campuses, UNC houses two medical schools and one teaching hospital, ten nursing programs, two schools of dentistry, one veterinary school and hospital, and a school of pharmacy, as well as a two law schools, 15 schools of education, three schools of engineering, and a school for performing artists. The oldest university, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , first admitted students in 1795. The smallest and newest member is the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics , a residential two-year high school, founded in 1980 and a full member of the University since 2007. The largest university is North Carolina
North Carolina
State University , with 34,340 students as of fall 2012.

While the official names of each campus are determined by the North Carolina General Assembly, abbreviations are determined by the individual school.

Official name (Previous name) OFFICIAL ABBREV. LOCATION Enrollment As of Fall 2013 CARNEGIE CLASSIFICATION FOUNDED NICKNAME JOINED SYSTEM REFERENCES

Appalachian State University (Appalachian State Teacher's College, until 1967) ASU, App State (for athletics) Boone , Watauga County 17,838 Master\'s University 1899 Mountaineers 1972

East Carolina University (East Carolina College, until 1967) ECU, East Carolina (for athletics) Greenville , Pitt County 26,887 Doctoral/Research University 1907 Pirates 1972

Elizabeth City State University (Elizabeth City State College, until 1969) ECSU Elizabeth City , Pasquotank County 2,421 Baccalaureate College 1891 Vikings 1972

Fayetteville State University (Fayetteville State College, until 1969) FSU Fayetteville , Cumberland County 6,179 Master\'s University 1867 Broncos 1972

North Carolina
North Carolina
Agricultural and Technical State University (The Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina, until 1969) NC A">NCCU, NC Central (for athletics) Durham , Durham County 8,093 Master\'s University 1909 Eagles 1972

North Carolina
North Carolina
State University at Raleigh ( North Carolina
North Carolina
State College of Agriculture and Engineering, until 1963) NCSU, NC State or State (for athletics) Raleigh , Wake County 34,009 Doctoral/Research University 1887 Wolfpack 1932

University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Asheville (Asheville-Biltmore College until 1969) UNCA or Asheville Asheville , Buncombe County 3,784 Baccalaureate College 1927 Bulldogs 1969

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (University of North Carolina, until 1963) UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC-CH, North Carolina, or Carolina (for athletics) Chapel Hill , Orange County 29,127 Doctoral/Research University 1789 Tar Heels 1932

University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Charlotte (Charlotte College, until 1965) UNC Charlotte, Charlotte (for athletics) Charlotte , Mecklenburg County 26,571 Doctoral/Research University 1946 49ers 1965

University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Greensboro (The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, until 1963) UNCG Greensboro , Guilford County 18,074 Doctoral/Research University 1891 Spartans 1932

University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Pembroke (Pembroke State University, until 1996) UNCP Pembroke , Robeson County 6,222 Master\'s University 1887 Braves 1972

University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Wilmington (Wilmington College, until 1969) UNCW Wilmington , New Hanover County 13,937 Master\'s University 1947 Seahawks 1969

University of North Carolina
North Carolina
School of the Arts ( North Carolina
North Carolina
School of the Arts, until 2008) UNCSA Winston-Salem , Forsyth County 912 Special
Special
Focus Institution 1963 The Fighting Pickle 1972

Western Carolina University (Western Carolina College, until 1967) WCU, Western Carolina (for athletics) Cullowhee , Jackson County 10,107 Master\'s University 1889 Catamounts 1972

Winston-Salem State University (Winston-Salem Teacher's College, until 1969) WSSU Winston-Salem , Forsyth County 5,399 Baccalaureate College 1892 Rams 1972

North Carolina
North Carolina
School of Science and Mathematics NCSSM Durham , Durham County 680 Residential High School 1980 Unicorns 2007

NOTES

The enrollment numbers are the official headcounts (including all full-time and part-time, undergrad and postgrad students) from University of North Carolina
North Carolina
website: http://www.northcarolina.edu/web/facts.php . This does not include the North Carolina
North Carolina
School of Science and Mathematics, the figure for NCSSM is taken from its own website: http://www.ncssm.edu/about-ncssm/facts.php .

The following universities became four-year institutions after their founding (date each became a four-year institution in parentheses):

* East Carolina University (1920) * North Carolina
North Carolina
Central University (1925) * Winston-Salem State University (1925) * Western Carolina University (1929) * Appalachian State University (1929) * Elizabeth City State University (1937) * University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Pembroke (1939) * Fayetteville State University (1939) * University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Asheville (1963) * University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Charlotte (1963) * University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Wilmington (1963)

With the exception of the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Pembroke and the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
School of the Arts, the institutions that joined the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
in 1972 did so under their current name. As of 1972, all public four-year institutions in North Carolina
North Carolina
are members of the University.

AFFILIATES

NAME LOCATION FOUNDED

North Carolina
North Carolina
Arboretum Asheville , Buncombe County 1989

North Carolina
North Carolina
Center for International Understanding Raleigh , Wake County

North Carolina
North Carolina
Center for Nursing Raleigh , Wake County

North Carolina
North Carolina
State Approving Agency Raleigh , Wake County

North Carolina
North Carolina
State Education Assistance Authority Raleigh , Wake County

UNC Center for Public Television (UNC-TV) Research Triangle Park , Durham County 1955

UNC Faculty Assembly Chapel Hill , Orange County

University of North Carolina
North Carolina
Press Chapel Hill , Orange County 1922

UNC Staff Assembly Chapel Hill , Orange County

PRESIDENTS

For presiding professors of the University of North Carolina
North Carolina
prior to 1804, see Leaders of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill . _ Erskine Boyce Bowles , President of the University of North Carolina from 2006 to 2011.

NAME TERM

Rev. Joseph Caldwell 1804–1812

Robert Hett Chapman 1812–1816

Rev. Joseph Caldwell 1816–1835

Elisha Mitchell _ * 1835

David Lowry Swain 1835–1868

Rev. Solomon Pool 1869–1872

Rev. Charles Phillips 1875–1876

Kemp Plummer Battle 1876–1891

George Tayloe Winston 1891–1896

Edwin Anderson Alderman 1896–1900

Francis Preston Venable 1900–1914

Edward Kidder Graham 1914–1918

Marvin Hendrix Stacy 1918–1919

Harry Woodburn Chase 1919–1930

Frank Porter Graham 1930-1949 (_UNC Consolidation in 1931_)

_William Donald Carmichael, Jr._ * 1949–1950

Gordon Gray 1950–1955

_J. Harris Purks_ * 1955–1956

William Clyde Friday 1956–1986 (_acting until 1957_)

Clemmie Spangler 1986–1997

Molly Corbett Broad 1997–2006

Erskine Bowles 2006–2011

Thomas W. Ross 2011–2016

Margaret Spellings 2016–present

An asterisk (*) denotes acting president.

SEE ALSO

* List of colleges and universities in North Carolina
North Carolina
* North Carolina
North Carolina
Community College System

REFERENCES

* ^ _A_ _B_ "UNC Employees" (PDF). UNC System. Retrieved 2010-08-14. * ^ "Facts & Figures". UNC System. Retrieved 2010-08-14. * ^ _A_ _B_ "Facts & Figures". Northcarolina.edu. Retrieved 2010-08-14. * ^ _A_ _B_ "University Facts" . University of North Carolina. 2008-01-10. Archived from the original on 2008-02-13. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "About UNC". UNC General Administration. Retrieved 2011-02-16. * ^ "Facts & Figures". UNC General Administration. Retrieved 2010-08-14. * ^ http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/nc07.asp. Missing or empty title= (help ) * ^ http://www.unc.edu/about/. Missing or empty title= (help ) * ^ "Article IX". _ North Carolina
North Carolina
Constitution_. North Carolina General Assembly. 2006. Retrieved 2008-06-09. * ^ "Chapter 116 - Higher Education". _ North Carolina
North Carolina
General Statutes_. North Carolina
North Carolina
General Assembly. 2006. Retrieved 2008-03-29. * ^ Wootson, Cleve R., Jr. (2002-01-08). "UNC Leaders Want Abbreviation Change". The Daily Tar Heel. Retrieved 2008-06-19. * ^ "Appalachian State University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Appalachian State University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "East Carolina University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "East Carolina University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Elizabeth City State University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Elizabeth City State University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Fayetteville State University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Fayetteville State University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
Agriculture and Technical State University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
Agriculture and Technical State University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
Central University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
Central University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
State University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
State University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Asheville" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Asheville" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Serving UNC students and the community since 1893". The Daily Tar Heel. 2010-07-08. Retrieved 2010-08-14. * ^ Oh, Four Oh Four. Media.www.dailytarheel.com. Retrieved on 2013-07-29. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Chapel Hill" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Chapel Hill" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Charlotte" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Charlotte" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Greensboro" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Greensboro" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ http://www.uncpbraves.com/landing/index. Missing or empty title= (help ) * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Pembroke" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Pembroke" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Wilmington" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "University of North Carolina
North Carolina
at Wilmington" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
School of the Arts" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
School of the Arts" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Western Carolina University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-08. * ^ "Western Carolina University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-08. * ^ "Winston-Salem State University" (PDF). _Institutional Profiles_. University of North Carolina. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ "Winston-Salem State University" (PDF). _Carnegie Classifications_. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-18. * ^ " North Carolina
North Carolina
School of Science and Mathematics". Retrieved 2008-03-29. * ^ "NCSSM Fast Facts". North Carolina
North Carolina
School of Science and Math. Retrieved 2010-08-14.

FURTHER READING

* McGrath, Eileen, and Linda Jacobson. “The Great Depression
Great Depression
and Its Impact on an Emerging Research Library: The University of North Carolina Library, 1929–1941,” _Libraries and the Cultural Record,_ (2011), 46#3 pp 295–320.

EXTERNAL LINKS

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