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The University of Malaya
University of Malaya
(UM; Malay: Universiti Malaya) is a public research university located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It is the oldest and the most prestigious university in Malaysia. The university's name was abbreviated as Malaya during the pre-independence period. University of Malaya
University of Malaya
has its roots in Singapore
Singapore
with the establishment of King Edward VII
King Edward VII
College of Medicine on 28 September 1905. University Malaya was established on 1949 October in Singapore
Singapore
with the merger of the King Edward VII
King Edward VII
College of Medicine and Raffles College (founded 1929). The growth of the University was very rapid during the first decade of its foundation and this resulted in the setting up of two autonomous Divisions on 15 January 1959, one located in Singapore
Singapore
and the other in Kuala Lumpur. In 1960, the government of the two indicated that the two divisions of the University of Malaya should become autonomous separate national universities, one located in Singapore
Singapore
(later becoming the National University of Singapore) and the other in Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
(retaining the name University of Malaya). Legislation was passed in 1961 and the University of Malaya
University of Malaya
was established on 1 January 1962.[1][4][6][2] Today, it has more than 2,500 faculty members. In 2012, UM was granted autonomy status by the Ministry of Higher Education.[7] Presently, the University is divided into 12 faculties, 2 academies and 3 Centres, namely: Faculty of Law, Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Built Environment, Faculty of Economics and Administration, Faculty of Business and Accountancy, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Languages and Linguistics, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Faculty of Computer Science and Information Technology, Academy of Malay Studies, Academy of Islamic Studies, Cultural Centre, Sports Centre and Centre for Foundation Studies (University of Malaya). In 2017, the QS World University Rankings
QS World University Rankings
has ranked UM at the 112th place in the world, 23th place in Asia, 3rd in Southeast Asia and the top ranked learning institution in Malaysia.[8]

Contents

1 History

1.1 King Edward VII
King Edward VII
Medical College of Medicine 1.2 Raffles College 1.3 University of Malaya
University of Malaya
(1949–1967) 1.4 Coat of Arms

2 Rankings 3 Vice-chancellors 4 Notable alumni 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit] King Edward VII
King Edward VII
Medical College of Medicine[edit] The establishment of the university began with the issue of shortage of medical assistants in Singapore
Singapore
and Penang
Penang
during the late 1890s.[9] The problem was addressed in a report published by the Education Commission in April 1902. In the report, it was stated that the Commission was in favour of establishing a medical school to fulfil the demand for medical assistants in government hospitals. However, such view was not in favour among the European community.[10] Legislation was passed by the Straits Legislative Council in June 1905 under Ordinance No. XV 1905. The school opened on 3 July 1905 and began functioning in September. On 28 September 1905, Sir John officiated the school under the name ‘The Straits and Federated Malay States Government Medical School.’[11] The school was located in the old Female Lunatic Asylum near the Singapore
Singapore
General Hospital at Sepoy Lines off New Bridge Road, where four of the asylum buildings were converted into a medical school. In 1907, a lecture hall and laboratory were added. There were no library and room to keep pathological specimens.[11] In 1905, there were 17 medical students, four students attending the hospital assistant course. Five years later, the enrolments increased to 90 medical students and 30 trainee hospital assistants. The school had only one permanent staff which was the Principal, the teaching staff were employed on a part-time basis. The Principal was Dr Gerald Dudley Freer, who previously served as Senior Colonial Surgeon Resident of Penang.[12][13] The School Council wanted to gain recognition of its Diploma by the General Council of Medical Education in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
to ensure that the Licentiate of Medicine and Surgery Diploma offered by the school would gain worldwide recognition. In 1916, the GCME recognised the Licentiate of Medicine and Surgery Diploma offered by the school. The licentiates were placed on the General Council’s Colonial List of the British Medical Register and were entitled to practise anywhere within the British Empire.[14]

Tan Teck Guan Building

In 1910, Dr Robert Donald Keith became the second Principal of the School. The first two years of the five-year course were devoted to pure science studies. Physics, biology and chemistry were taught in the first year, followed by physiology and elementary anatomy in the second year. The remaining three years were attachment to clinical clerkships in medicine, surgery and midwifery, which covered pathology, hygiene and medical jurisprudence. Materia Medica
Materia Medica
was integrated into the fourth year, where practical pharmacy was taught.[15] Students were posted to several hospitals, initially at the Singapore General Hospital. From 1908 onwards, attachments were made to Tan Tock Seng Hospital (for medicine and surgery) and Kandang Kerbau Maternity Hospital (for midwifery).[15] In 1912, the medical school received an endowment of $120,000 from the King Edward VII
King Edward VII
Memorial Fund, started by Dr Lim Boon Keng. Subsequently, on 18 November 1913, the name of the school was changed to the King Edward VII
King Edward VII
School of Medicine.[16] In the first batch of 16 students of 1905, only seven made to the final and graduated in May 1910 while the remaining six students graduated in four months later and others resigned from the school. In 1919, the drop-out rate had risen to 35%, while in 1939 the number of students failed in their final examinations stood at 44%.[14] At this time a hostel was built to accommodate 72 male students from the Federated Malay States. In 1921, the school was elevated in status to college. Between 1920 and 1930, the college went through a series of transformations, by replacing the old teaching staff with a younger generation of professionals and also nine new Chairs were created, the first in Anatomy in 1920, followed by Medicine, Surgery, and Midwifery & Gynaecology in 1922 and Clinical Surgery, Bacteriology, Biology, Bio-Chemistry, and Dental Surgery in 1926. And the tenth Chair for Pathology was created in 1935.[17] In 1923, the college’s new building at Outram Road was commenced. It was completed in November 1925 and officially opened by Sir Laurence Guillemard in February 1926. During the opening ceremony, the College conferred Honorary Diplomas on Sir David James Galloway, Dr Malcolm Watson and Dr Lim Boon Keng.[18] In 1929, Dr George V. Allen the new principal took the helm, succeeding his predecessor Dr MacAlister. Raffles College[edit] The establishment of Raffles College
Raffles College
was a brainchild of Sir Stamford Raffles and Dr Robert Morison. Sir Stamford, the founding father of Singapore, had knowledge of the Malay language
Malay language
and culture, while Morison was a distinguished sinologist missionary. Both men wanted to establish a centre dedicating to the study of Malays and Chinese at tertiary level.[19] On 5 June 1823, a site designated for an education institution had its foundation stone laid by Sir Stamford. Soon after that, Raffles left for England
England
and Morrison left for China, thus the establishment of the school never happened. The school building was revived as an English school named the Raffles Institution.[19] In 1918, Sir William George Maxwell, the Colonial Secretary of the Straits Settlements chaired the Maxwell Committee to review the scheme to commemorate the centenary of the founding of Singapore
Singapore
by Sir Stamford. The committee members were Roland Braddell, A.W. Still, Seah Ling Seah, Dr Lim Boon Keng, Mohammed Yusoff bin Mohammed, N.V. Samy, and Mannesseh Meyer. The working committee headed by H.W. Firmstone recommended the establishment of a college for tertiary education to commemorate the centenary founding of Singapore.[20] On 12 July 1919, the Government decided to undertake the construction of the building with the cost not more than $1,000,000 and would contribute $50,000 as annual recurrent expenditure as soon as the Centenary Committee had collected $2,000,000 for the Raffles College
Raffles College
Endowment Fund. On 31 August 1920, the Committee had achieved the figure, amounting to $2,391,040.[21] On 31 May 1920, Richard Olaf Winstedt was appointed as the Acting Principal of Raffles College. The course offered was a three-year basis. The establishment of the school was seen far more systematic compared to the King Edward VII
King Edward VII
Medical College. The school was situated at a site called the Economic Gardens and was designed by Cyril Farey
Cyril Farey
and Graham Dawbarn. And the construction took place in 1926.[22] On 22 July 1929, Raffles College
Raffles College
was established to promote arts and social sciences at tertiary level for Malayans. The courses offered were divided into Art and Science streams. Four years later, the College Council proposed changes in the curriculum, so that the Diploma could be furthered to a Degree through external examinations in collaboration with universities in England. In 1937, Sir Shenton Thomas
Shenton Thomas
declared the college would have a full-time Principal. The College had its fourth Principal, Alexander Keir, succeeding Frederick Joseph Morten. By 1939 war was waged in Europe, and had put a halt to the development of the college. The war in Europe came to Asia and Singapore
Singapore
was invaded by the Japanese in February 1942. After the war, the school was reopened and W.E. Dyer was Principal. The future of Raffles College
Raffles College
was uncertain, until 1948 when Dr George V. Allen (later Sir) who was formerly the Principal of King Edward VII Medical College posted as the last Principal of Raffles College. The college was amalgamated with the former, for the making of a university for the Malayans. University of Malaya
University of Malaya
(1949–1967)[edit]

The evolution of the University of Malaya

In 1938 the government appointed a commission under the chairmanship of Sir William H. McLean to study the higher education potential and progress in Malaya. The Commission concluded that Malaya was not ready to have a university, and that a university college would be more suitable. In 1939, the Higher Education in the British Colonies appointed a Commission led by Justice Asquith to further study the matter. The Commission shared the same opinion as the former McLean Commission. In 1946, Dr Raymond Priestley, the Vice-Chancellor
Vice-Chancellor
of Birmingham University was invited by the British Malaya Government to continue the review of setting up a University for Malaya. The Priestly Commission shared the same opinion as the McLean Commission, which was to form a university college first. In 1947, the Secretary of State for the Colonies appointed Sir Alexander Carr-Saunders to chair a commission to study the development of tertiary education in Malaya. Initially, the Carr-Saunders Commission shared the same opinion as the McLean Commission. However, after the report was completed (but not yet summited to the Secretary of State), Sir Alexander listened to the thoughts of the Alumni Association of the King Edward VII
King Edward VII
College and also the Medical College Students Union. He was impressed with the ideas of the President of the Students Union, Dr K. Shamugaratnam. In 1948, the Carr-Saunders Commission supported the establishment of a university for the Malayans. As a result, the institution named the University of Malaya
University of Malaya
was chartered under the Carr-Saunders Commission in 1949. The formation of the University of Malaya
University of Malaya
on 8 October 1949 in Singapore
Singapore
came from the merger of King Edward VII
King Edward VII
College of Medicine and Raffles College, which had been established in 1905 and 1929, respectively. In Carr-Saunders Commission’s report in 1949, it was stated that "the university shall act as a single medium of mingle for enhancing the understanding among the multi-ethnics and religions in the back than Malaya. The University too should be modelled after the tertiary educations in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain in term of academic system and administration structure". The Carr-Saunders Commission postulates “the principle that all children who show the necessary capacity should enjoy an equal chance of reaching the University; and, in particular, that no able child should be handicapped in climbing the educational ladder by race, religion, rural domicile, or lack of means.” In 1959, the university was divided into two autonomous campuses, one in Singapore
Singapore
and the other in Kuala Lumpur. In 1961, the governments of Malaysia
Malaysia
and Singapore
Singapore
passed the legislation to make the university a national university. As a result of such desire, on 1 January 1962 the University of Malaya
University of Malaya
in Kuala Lumpur
Kuala Lumpur
was permanently located on a 309 hectare land and remained with the name. However, the campus in Singapore
Singapore
became the University of Singapore
Singapore
(today the National University of Singapore). On 16 June 1962, the university celebrated the installation of its first Chancellor, Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia's first Prime Minister. The first Vice-Chancellor
Vice-Chancellor
was former Dean, Sir Alexander Oppenheim, the world-renowned mathematician who formulated the Oppenheim conjecture in 1929. When Oppenheim left in 1965 with no successor in sight, Rayson Huang who later went on to become the first Asian Vice-Chancellor
Vice-Chancellor
of the University of Hong Kong,[23] was asked to take over as the Acting Vice-Chancellor. He served in that capacity for 12 months but declined reappointment to return to academic pursuits.[24] Chin Fung Kee, an authority in geotechnical engineering,[25] replaced Huang as Acting Vice-Chancellor
Vice-Chancellor
until the university filling the position in 1967 by the appointment of James H.E. Griffiths. A distinguished physicist and a fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, Griffiths was also the former head of Clarendon Laboratory
Clarendon Laboratory
of Oxford University and one of the discoverers of ferromagnetic resonance. Coat of Arms[edit] The University of Malaya’s Coat of Arms
Coat of Arms
was designed under a Council established in 1961,chaired by Tan Sri Y.C. Foo. The members of the committee involved in the design were the Chairman of the Council, Y.C. Foo, Professor A. Oppenheim (the Vice-Chancellor) and Professor Ungku Aziz
Ungku Aziz
(later Regius Professor). The Coat of Arms
Coat of Arms
was officially chartered in April 1962 by Tunku Abdul Rahman, the university’s first Chancellor.[26] The Coat of Arms
Coat of Arms
is divided into two parts, namely the Chief (upper part) and the Base (the remainder). The Chief is a bundle of seventeen strips of the leaves of Borassus flabellifer or the Palmrya palm. These strips were used as printed material for ancient books by the Malays, long before paper was invented. On the centre of these seventeen strips is the university’s motto ‘Ilmu Puncha Kemajuan’. The motto consists of ‘Ilmu’ derived from Arabic, ‘Puncha’ from Sanskrit, and ‘Kemajuan’ from Malay. These words mean knowledge is the source of progress.[26] In the centre of the emblem is a Hibiscus rosa-sinensis species encircled by three Malayan tigers. The tigers symbolise the three main races in Malaysia
Malaysia
(Malays, Chinese and Indians), who work hand-in-hand to protect the nation and uphold the duty to serve the country.[26] Rankings[edit] University of Malaya
University of Malaya
has been ranked among top 500 universities in the world according to reputed ranking publisher such as QS, ARWU, US News & World Report in the last few years. In 2015 it has been ranked 54th in Engineering & Technology in QS world ranking.U.S. News & World Report ranked University of Malaya
University of Malaya
57th best university in the world in engineering by its subject ranking.

University rankings

Global

ARWU
ARWU
World[27] 401-500

Times World[29] 351-400

USNWR World[30] 301

QS World[28] 114

Regional

Times Asia[32] 59

QS Asia[31] 24

Year Rank Valuer

2011 401-500 Academic Ranking of World Universities

2012 401-500 Academic Ranking of World Universities

2012 156 QS World University Rankings

2013 401-500 Academic Ranking of World Universities

2013 167 QS World University Rankings

2014 301-400 Academic Ranking of World Universities

2014 151 QS World University Rankings

2015 301-400[33] Academic Ranking of World Universities

2015 146[34] QS World University Rankings

2016 401-500[35] Academic Ranking of World Universities

2017 114[36] QS World University Rankings

Vice-chancellors[edit] Main article: List of vice-chancellors of the University of Malaya

Rimba Ilmu
Rimba Ilmu
building, University of Malaya

Notable alumni[edit] University of Malaya
University of Malaya
has produced many notable alumni, including two Prime Ministers of Malaysia
Malaysia
that have contributed significantly towards the development of Malaysia
Malaysia
and abroad.

Notable University of Malaya
University of Malaya
Alumni

Mahathir Mohamad, 4th Prime Minister of Malaysia, Leader of Opposition

Anwar Ibrahim, 7th Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia, Former Leader of Opposition

Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, 5th Prime Minister of Malaysia

Zeti Akhtar Aziz, 7th Governor of Central Bank of Malaysia

Syed Amin Aljeffri Amani Williams Hunt Abdullah Sudirman Arshad Azalina Othman Said Abdul Khalid Ibrahim Mohamed Khaled Nordin Anwar Ibrahim Abdullah Ahmad Badawi Mahathir Mohamad Musa Hitam Mohd Khalil Yaakob Adnan Yaakob Ungku Aziz Husam Musa Mohamad Hassan Muhyiddin Yassin Daniel Dorall Fadzilah Kamsah Khasnor Johan Lee Hong Susan Lim Lim Hock Siew Mohd Sidek Hassan Ramon Navaratnam Ong Pang Boon S. R. Nathan Rex Shelley Gary Yap Mohd Shafei Abdullah Zeti Akhtar Aziz Woon Khe Wei Vivian Hoo Kah Mun Rynn Lim Victor Gu Nga Kor Ming Ngeh Koo Ham Teresa Kok Edwin Thumboo Satwant Singh Dhaliwal Rafidah Aziz Ahmad Shabery Cheek Sivarasa Rasiah Aznil Nawawi Shirley Geok-lin Lim Bryan Nickson Lomas Razali Ismail Abdul Gani Patail Md Hashim bin Hussein Chuah Hean Teik Faiz Khaleed Azmi Mohd Ali Jamil Khir Baharom Abbas Mollataghi Dinsman

See also[edit]

University of Malaya
University of Malaya
Botanical Gardens Rimba Ilmu University Malaya Medical Centre Centre for Foundation Studies (University of Malaya) National University of Singapore

References[edit]

^ a b humans.txt. "Our History". www.um.edu.my. Retrieved 25 September 2017.  ^ a b " University of Malaya
University of Malaya
- The oldest university in Malaysia
Malaysia
- MALAYSIA CENTRAL - Information Directory". malaysiacentral.com. 6 June 2008. Retrieved 25 September 2017.  ^ "Universiti Malaya (UM) Top Universities". Quacquarelli Symonds(QS). Retrieved 7 March 2017.  ^ a b c humans.txt. "UM Fact Sheet". www.um.edu.my. Retrieved 25 September 2017.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 26 January 2005. Retrieved 16 April 2010.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 20 June 2016. Retrieved 18 April 2017.  ^ AMINUDDIN, MOHSIN. "UM set for autonomy". The Star. Retrieved 10 February 2012.  ^ "Universiti Malaya (UM)". QS Top Universities. Retrieved 8 June 2017.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "Early Medical Education". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. pp. 1–2. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "The Foundation". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya
University of Malaya
Press. pp. 3–4. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ a b Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "The Quest for Recognition". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. p. 6. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "The Quest for Recognition". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. pp. 6–9. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Cheah, Jin Seng; TM Ho; BY Ng (July 2005). "The First Graduates in 1910". Annals Academy of Medicine (PDF). 6. 34. Singapore: National University of Singapore. pp. 19C.  ^ a b Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "Students: The Trail-Blazers". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. p. 10. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ a b Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "The Quest for Recognition". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. p. 7. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "Students: The Trail-Blazers". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. pp. 11–12. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "Consolidation". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya
University of Malaya
Press. pp. 12–14. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "Consolidation". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya
University of Malaya
Press. p. 14. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ a b Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "Raffles College: Background". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. p. 23. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "The Maxwell Committee". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. p. 25. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "The Maxwell Committee". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. p. 26. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "The Maxwell Committee". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. p. 27. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ University of Hong Kong: A Liftime of Memories – Dr Rayson Huang Book Launch (retrieved 11 June 2008) ^ Huang, Rayson (2000). "A New University in a New Country". A Lifetime in Academia: An Autobiography by Rayson Huang. Hong Kong, China: Hong Kong University Press. pp. 81–83. ISBN 962-209-518-6.  ^ Southeast Asian Geotechnical Society: A Brief History of the SEAGS ^ a b c Khoo, Kay Kim (2005). "Coat of Arms". 100 Years: The University of Malaya. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: University of Malaya Press. pp. ii. ISBN 983-100-323-3.  ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities
Academic Ranking of World Universities
2017 ^ QS World University Rankings
QS World University Rankings
2018 ^ World University Rankings 2018 ^ [1] ^ QS Asian University Rankings
QS Asian University Rankings
2018 ^ [2] ^ "University of Malaya". ShanghaiRanking Consultancy. Retrieved 16 September 2015.  ^ "Universiti Malaya". Quacquarelli Symonds. Retrieved 16 September 2015.  ^ "University of Malaya". ShanghaiRanking Consultancy. Retrieved 15 August 2016.  ^ "Universiti Malaya". Quacquarelli Symonds. Retrieved 8 June 2017. 

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