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On the evening of April 9, 2017, a revenue passenger was forcibly removed by law enforcement from United Airlines flight 3411 at Chicago-O'Hare, bound for Louisville.[143] United announced that it needed four seats for airline staff on the sold-out flight.[144] When no passengers volunteered after being offered vouchers worth $800, United staff selected four passengers to leave. Three of them did so, but the fourth, a doctor named David Dao, declined as he said that he had patients to treat the following morning. He was pulled from his seat by Chicago Department of Aviation security officers and dragged by his arms down the aisle. Dao sustained a concussion, broken teeth, a broken nose, and other injuries.[145] The incident was captured on smartphone cameras and posted on social media, triggering an angry public backlash. Afterwards, United's then-chief executive officer, Oscar Munoz, described Dao as "disruptive and belligerent", apologized for "re-accommodating" the paying customers, and defended and praised staff for "following established procedures". He was widely criticized as "tone-deaf".[146] Munoz later issued a second statement

Before takeoff on the October 19–20, 1995, overnight flight from Buenos Aires to New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, investment banker Gerard Finneran attempted to pour his own drinks, against airline and federal regulations, when he grew impatient waiting for more. When cabin crew informed him, after takeoff, that they were no longer going to serve him due to his apparent intoxication, Finneran threatened one and pushed another. He then climbed atop a drinks cart, lowered his pants and defecated in full view of staff and other passengers, after which he wiped himself with napkins and smeared them on the walls, tracking excrement around the cabin as he went to the lavatory and locked himself in.[139]

A request to divert to Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in Sa

A request to divert to Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in San Juan, Puerto Rico, was denied as Portuguese president Portuguese president Mário Soares and Argentinian foreign minister Guido di Tella were aboard; the presence of foreign dignitaries on a flight creates extra security risks. Finneran was arrested by the FBI after landing in New York and charged with interfering with a flight crew and threatening a flight attendant. He later pleaded guilty to the latter charge and was fined $5,000 (having previously agreed to reimburse the airline for its cleanup costs and all the other passengers their airfare, which amounted to nearly $50,000) and given two years' probation[140] The incident has been recalled in later years as the worst case of air rage ever.[141][142]

On the evening of April 9, 2017, a revenue passenger was forcibly removed by law enforcement from United Airlines flight 3411 at Chicago-O'Hare, bound for Louisville.[143] United announced that it needed four seats for airline staff on the sold-out flight.[144] When no passengers volunteered after being offered vouchers worth $800, United staff selected four passengers to leave. Three of them did so, but the fourth, a doctor named David Dao, declined as he said that he had patients to treat the following morning. He was pulled from his seat by Chicago Department of Aviation security officers and dragged by his arms down the aisle. Dao sustained a concussion, broken teeth, a broken nose, and other injuries.[145] The incident was captured on smartphone cameras and posted on social media, triggering an angry public backlash. Afterwards, United's then-chief executive officer, Oscar Munoz, described Dao as "disruptive and belligerent", apologized for "re-accommodating" the paying customers, and defended and praised staff for "following established procedures". He was widely criticized as "tone-deaf".[146] Munoz later issued a second statement calling what happened a "truly horrific event" and accepting "full responsibility" for it.[147] After a lawsuit, Dao reached an undisclosed settlement with United and airport police. In the aftermath, United's board of directors decided that Munoz would not become its chairman and that executive compensation would be tied to customer satisfaction.[148] Following this incident, passenger complaints increased by 70 percent.[149]

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