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The Info List - United States Presidential Election, 1892


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Benjamin Harrison Republican

Elected President Grover Cleveland Democratic

The United States
United States
presidential election of 1892 was the 27th quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 8, 1892. In a re-match of the closely contested 1888 presidential election, former Democratic President Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
defeated incumbent Republican President Benjamin Harrison. Cleveland's victory made him the first and to date only person in American history to be elected to a second, non-consecutive presidential term. Though some Republicans opposed Harrison's re-nomination, Harrison defeated James G. Blaine
James G. Blaine
and William McKinley
William McKinley
on the first presidential ballot of the 1892 Republican National Convention. Cleveland defeated challenges by David B. Hill
David B. Hill
and Horace Boies
Horace Boies
on the first presidential ballot of the 1892 Democratic National Convention, becoming the first Democrat to win his party's presidential nomination in three different elections. The new Populist Party, formed by groups from The Grange, the Farmers' Alliances, and the Knights of Labor, fielded a ticket led by former Congressman James B. Weaver
James B. Weaver
of Iowa. The campaign centered mainly on economic issues, especially the protectionist 1890 McKinley Tariff. Cleveland ran on a platform of lowering the tariff, and he opposed the Republicans' 1890 voting rights proposal. Cleveland was also a proponent of the gold standard, while the Republicans and Populists both supported bimetalism. Cleveland swept the Solid South
Solid South
and won several important swing states, taking a majority of the electoral vote and a plurality of the popular vote. Cleveland was the first person since Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
to win a significant number of electoral votes in three different elections, and only Jackson, Cleveland, and Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
have won the popular vote in three different elections. Weaver won 8.5% of the popular vote and carried several Western states, while John Bidwell of the Prohibition Party
Prohibition Party
won 2.2% of the popular vote. The Democrats would not win another presidential election until 1912.

Contents

1 Nominations

1.1 Republican Party nomination 1.2 Democratic Party nomination 1.3 People's Party nomination

1.3.1 Candidates gallery

1.4 Prohibition Party
Prohibition Party
nomination

1.4.1 Candidates gallery

1.5 Socialist Labor Party Nomination

2 General election

2.1 Campaign 2.2 Results 2.3 Geography of results

2.3.1 Cartographic gallery

2.4 Results by state 2.5 Close states

3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

Nominations[edit] Republican Party nomination[edit] Main article: 1892 Republican National Convention

Republican Party Ticket, 1892

Benjamin Harrison Whitelaw Reid

for President for Vice President

23rd President of the United States (1889–1893) 28th U.S. Ambassador to France (1889–1892)

Campaign

Benjamin Harrison's administration was widely viewed as unsuccessful, and as a result, Thomas C. Platt
Thomas C. Platt
(a political boss in New York) and other disaffected party leaders mounted a dump-Harrison movement coalescing around veteran candidate James G. Blaine
James G. Blaine
from Maine, a favorite of Republican party regulars. Blaine had been the Republican nominee in 1884 when he was beaten by Democrat Grover Cleveland. Privately, Harrison did not want to be re-nominated for the presidency, but he remained opposed to the nomination going to Blaine, who he was convinced intended to run, and thought himself the only candidate capable of preventing such an occurrence. Blaine, however, did not want another fight for the nomination and a re-match against Cleveland at the general election. His health had begun to fail, and three of his children had recently died (Walker and Alice in 1890, and Emmons in 1892). Blaine refused to run actively, but the cryptic nature of his responses to a draft effort fueled speculation that he was not averse to such a movement. For his part, Benjamin Harrison curtly demanded that he either renounce his supporters or resign his position as Secretary of State, with Blaine choosing the latter a scant three days before the National Convention. A boom began to build around the "draft Blaine" effort with supporters hoping to cause a break towards their candidate.[2] Senator John Sherman
John Sherman
from Ohio, who had been the leading candidate for the nomination at the 1888 Republican Convention before Harrison actually won it, was also brought up again as a possible challenger. Like Blaine, however, he was averse to another bitter battle for the nomination and "like the rebels down South, want to be let alone." This inevitably turned attention to Ohio's Governor William McKinley, who was indecisive as to his intentions in spite his ill feelings toward Harrison and popularity among the Republican base. He was not averse to receiving the nomination, but did not expect to win it either. However, should Blaine and Harrison fail to attain the nomination after a number of ballots, he felt he could be brought forth as a harmony candidate. Despite the urging of Republican powerbroker Mark Hanna, McKinley would not openly put himself out as a potential candidate, afraid of offending Harrison and Blaine's supporters, while also feeling that the coming elections would not favor the Republicans.[3] In any case, the president's forces had the nomination locked up by the time delegates met in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on June 7–10, 1892. Richard Thomas from Indiana
Indiana
delivered Harrison's nominating speech. Harrison was nominated on the first ballot with 535.17 votes to 182.83 for Blaine, 182 for McKinley, and the rest scattered. McKinley protested when the Ohio
Ohio
delegation threw its entire vote in his name, despite not being formally nominated, but Joseph Foraker, who headed the delegation, managed to silence him on a point of order.[4] With the ballots counted, many observers were surprised at the strength of the McKinley vote, which almost overtook Blaine. Whitelaw Reid
Whitelaw Reid
from New York, editor of the New York Tribune
New York Tribune
and recent United States
United States
Ambassador to France, was nominated for vice-president. The incumbent Vice President, Levi Morton, was supported by many at the convention, including Reid himself, but he did not wish to serve another term.[4] Harrison also did not want to have Morton on the ticket. Democratic Party nomination[edit] Main article: 1892 Democratic National Convention

Democratic Party Ticket, 1892

Grover Cleveland Adlai Stevenson

for President for Vice President

22nd President of the United States (1885–1889) Former U.S. Representative for Illinois's 13th (1875–1877 & 1879–1881)

Campaign

By the beginning of 1892, many Americans were ready to return to Cleveland's political policies. Although he was the clear frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination, he was far from the universal choice of the party's supporters; many, such as the journalists Henry Watterson
Henry Watterson
and Charles Dana, thought that if he were to attain the nomination, their party would lose in November, but there were few capable of challenging him effectively. Though he had remained relatively quiet on the issue of silver versus gold, often deferring to bi-metallism, Senate Democrats in January 1891 voted for free coinage of silver. Furious, he sent a letter to Ellery Anderson, who headed the New York Reform Club, to condemn the party's apparent drift towards inflation and agrarian control, the "dangerous and reckless experiment of free, unlimited coinage of silver at our mints." Advisors warned that such statements might alienate potential supporters in the South and West and risk his chances for the nomination, but Cleveland felt that being right on the issue was more important than the nomination. After making his position clear, Cleveland worked to focus his campaign on tariff reform, hoping that the silver issue would dissipate.[5] A challenger emerged in the form of David Hill, former Governor of and incumbent Senator from New York. In favor of bi-metallism and tariff reform, Hill hoped to make inroads with Cleveland's supporters while appealing to those in the South and Midwest that were not keen on nominating Cleveland for a third consecutive time. Hill had begun to run for the position of president unofficially as early as 1890, and he even offered former Postmaster General Donald Dickinson his support for the vice-presidential nomination. He was not able to escape his past association with Tammany Hall, however, which he supported along machine politics, and the lack of confidence in his ability to defeat Cleveland for the nomination kept Hill from attaining the support he needed. By the time of the convention, Cleveland could count on the support of majority of the state Democratic parties, though his native New York remained pledged to Senator Hill.[6] In a narrow first-ballot victory, Cleveland received 617.33 votes, barely 10 more than needed, to 114 for Senator Hill from New York, 103 for Governor Horace Boies
Horace Boies
of Iowa, a populist and former Republican, and the rest scattered. Although the Cleveland forces preferred Isaac P. Gray from Indiana
Indiana
for vice-president, Cleveland directed his own support to the convention favorite, Adlai E. Stevenson from Illinois.[7] As a supporter of using paper greenbacks and free silver to inflate the currency and alleviate economic distress in rural districts, Stevenson balanced the ticket headed by Cleveland, who supported hard-money and the gold standard. At the same time, it was hoped that his nomination would represent a promise not to ignore regulars, and so potentially get Hill and Tammany Hall
Tammany Hall
to support the Democratic ticket to their fullest in the coming election.[8][9] People's Party nomination[edit]

People's Party Ticket, 1892

James B. Weaver James G. Field

for President for Vice President

Former U.S. Representative for Iowa's 6th (1879–1881 & 1885–1889) 13th Attorney General of Virginia (1877–1882)

Campaign

Populist candidates:

James B. Weaver, former U.S. representative from Iowa James H. Kyle, U.S. senator from South Dakota Leonidas L. Polk, former representative from North Carolina Walter Q. Gresham, Appellate judge from Indiana

Candidates gallery[edit]

James B. Weaver from Iowa

Senator James H. Kyle from South Dakota

Leonidas L. Polk from North Carolina (Died June 11, 1892)

Appellate Judge Walter Q. Gresham from Indiana (Declined to be Nominated)

Weaver/Field campaign poster

In 1891, the American farmers' alliances met with delegates from labor and reform groups in Cincinnati, Ohio, to discuss the formation of a new political party. They formed the People's Party, commonly known as the "Populists," a year later in St. Louis, Missouri. Leonidas L. Polk
Leonidas L. Polk
was the initial frontrunner to the presidential nomination. He had been instrumental in the party's formation and held great appeal with its agrarian base, but he unexpectedly died while in Washington, D.C., on June 11. Another candidate mentioned frequently for the nomination was Walter Q. Gresham, an appellate judge who had made a number of rulings against the railroads that made him a favorite of some farmer and labor groups, and it was felt that his rather dignified image would make the Populists appear as more than a minor contender. Both Democrats and Republicans feared his nomination for this reason, and while Gresham toyed with the idea, he ultimately was not ready to make a complete break with the two parties, declining petitions for his nomination right up to and during the Populist Convention. Later he would endorse Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
for the presidency.[10] At the first Populist national convention in Omaha, Nebraska, in July 1892, James B. Weaver
James B. Weaver
from Iowa
Iowa
was nominated for president on the first ballot, now lacking any serious opposition. While his nomination brought with him significant campaigning experience from over several decades, he also had a longer tract of history for which Republicans and Democrats could criticize him, and he also alienated many potential supporters in the South, having participated in Sherman's March to the Sea. James G. Field
James G. Field
from Virginia
Virginia
was nominated for vice-president to try and rectify this problem while also attaining the regional balance often seen in Republican and Democratic tickets.[11] I

Presidential Ballot Vice Presidential Ballot

Ballot 1st

1st

James B. Weaver 995 James G. Field 733

James H. Kyle 265 Ben Stockton Terrell 554

Seymour F. Norton 1

Mann Page 1

Others 1

Source: US President – P Convention. Our Campaigns. (September 7, 2009). Source: US Vice President – P Convention. Our Campaigns. (September 7, 2009). The Populist platform called for nationalization of the telegraph, telephone, and railroads, free coinage of silver, a graduated income tax, and creation of postal savings banks. Prohibition Party
Prohibition Party
nomination[edit] Main article: 1892 Prohibition National Convention Prohibition candidates:

John Bidwell, former U.S. representative from California Gideon T. Stewart, Prohibition Party
Prohibition Party
Chairman from Ohio William Jennings Demorest, magazine publisher from New York

Candidates gallery[edit]

John Bidwell from California

Prohibition Party
Prohibition Party
Chairman Gideon T. Stewart from Ohio

Magazine Publisher William J. Demorest from New York

National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892.

The sixth Prohibition Party
Prohibition Party
National Convention assembled in Music Hall in Cincinnati, Ohio. There were 972 delegates present from all states except Louisiana and South Carolina. Two major stories about the convention loomed before it assembled. In the first place, some members of the national committee sought to merge the Prohibition and Populist Parties. While there appeared a likelihood that the merger would materialize, it was clear that it was not going to happen by the time that the convention convened. Secondly, the southern states sent a number of black delegates. Cincinnati
Cincinnati
hotels refused to serve meals to blacks and whites at the same time, and several hotels refused service to the black delegates altogether. The convention nominated John Bidwell
John Bidwell
from California
California
for president on the first ballot. Prior to the convention, the race was thought to be close between Bidwell and William Jennings Demorest, but the New York delegation became irritated with Demorest and voted for Bidwell 73-7. James B. Cranfill
James B. Cranfill
from Texas
Texas
was nominated for vice-president on the first ballot with 417 votes to 351 for Joshua Levering from Maryland and 45 for others.[12]

Presidential Ballot

Ballot 1st

John Bidwell 590

Gideon T. Stewart 179

William Jennings Demorest 139

H. Clay Bascom 3

Source: US President – P Convention. Our Campaigns. (May 9, 2010). Socialist Labor Party Nomination[edit] The first Socialist Labor Party National Convention assembled in New York City and, despite running on a platform that called for the abolition of the positions of president and vice-president, decided to nominate candidates for those positions: Simon Wing
Simon Wing
from Massachusetts for president and Charles Matchett
Charles Matchett
from New York for vice-president. They were on the ballot in five states: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.[13] General election[edit] Campaign[edit] Main article: Grover Cleveland
Grover Cleveland
Presidential campaign, 1892

Cleveland/Stevenson poster.

The tariff issue dominated this rather lackluster campaign. Harrison defended the protectionist McKinley Tariff
McKinley Tariff
passed during his term. For his part, Cleveland assured voters that he opposed absolute free trade and would continue his campaign for a reduction in the tariff. Cleveland also denounced the Lodge Bill, a voting rights bill that sought to protect the rights of African American voters in the South.[14] William McKinley
William McKinley
campaigned extensively for Harrison, setting the stage for his own run four years later. The campaign took a somber turn when, in October, First Lady Caroline Harrison died. Despite the ill health that had plagued Mrs. Harrison since her youth and had worsened in the last decade, she often accompanied Mr. Harrison on official travels. On one such trip, to California
California
in the spring of 1891, she caught a cold. It quickly deepened into her chest, and she was eventually diagnosed with tuberculosis. A summer in the Adirondack Mountains
Adirondack Mountains
failed to restore her to health. An invalid the last six months of her life, she died in the White House on October 25, 1892, just two weeks before the national election. As a result, all of the candidates ceased campaigning. Results[edit]

Results by county explicitly indicating the percentage for the winning candidate. Shades of blue are for Cleveland (Democratic), shades of red are for Harrison (Republican), and shades of green are for Weaver (Populist).

The margin in the popular vote for Cleveland was 400,000, the largest since Grant’s re-election in 1872.[15] The Democrats won the presidency and both houses of Congress for the first time since 1856. President Harrison's re-election bid was a decisive loss in both the popular and electoral count, unlike President Cleveland's re-election bid four years earlier, in which he won the popular vote, but lost the electoral vote. Cleveland was the third of only five presidents to win re-election with a smaller percentage of the popular vote than in previous elections, although in the two prior such incidents — James Madison in 1812 and Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
in 1832 — not all states held popular elections. Ironically, Cleveland saw his popular support decrease not only from his electoral win in 1884, but also from his electoral loss in 1888. A similar vote decrease would happen again for Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
in 1940 and 1944 and Barack Obama
Barack Obama
in 2012. At the county level, the Democratic candidate fared much better than the Republican candidate. The Republicans’ vote was not nearly as widespread as the Democrats. In 1892, it was still a sectionally based party mainly situated in the East, Midwest, and West and was barely visible south of the Mason–Dixon line. In the South the party was holding on in only a few counties. In East Tennessee
East Tennessee
and tidewater Virginia, the vote at the county level showed some strength, but it barely existed in Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas.[16] In a continuation of its collapse there during the 1890 Congressional elections, the Republican Party even struggled in its Midwestern strongholds, where general electoral troubles from economic woes were acutely exacerbated by the promotion of temperance laws and, in Wisconsin and Illinois, the aggressive support of state politicians for English-only compulsory education laws. Such policies, which particularly in the case of the latter were associated with an upwelling of nativist and anti-Catholic attitudes amongst their supporters, resulted in the defection of large sections of immigrant communities, especially Germans, to the Democratic Party. Cleveland carried Wisconsin and Illinois
Illinois
with their 36 combined electoral votes, a Democratic victory not seen in those states since 1852[17] and 1856[18] respectively, and which would not be repeated until Woodrow Wilson’s election in 1912. While not as dramatic a loss as in 1890, it would take until the next election cycle for more moderate Republican leaders to pick up the pieces left by the reformist crusaders and bring alienated immigrants back to the fold.[19] Of the 2,683 counties making returns, Cleveland won in 1,389 (51.77%), Harrison carried 1,017 (37.91%), while Weaver placed first in 276 (10.29%). One county (0.04%) split evenly between Cleveland and Harrison. Populist James B. Weaver, calling for free coinage of silver and an inflationary monetary policy, received such strong support in the West that he become the only third-party nominee between 1860 and 1912 to carry a single state. The Democratic Party did not have a presidential ticket on the ballot in the states of Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, North Dakota, or Wyoming, and Weaver won the first four of these states.[20] Weaver also performed well in the South as he won counties in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Texas. Populists did best in Alabama, where electoral chicanery probably carried the day for the Democrats.[15] The Prohibition ticket received 270,879, or 2.2% nationwide. It was the largest total vote and highest percentage of the vote received by any Prohibition Party
Prohibition Party
national ticket. Wyoming, having attained statehood two years earlier, became the first state to allow women to vote in a presidential election since 1804. (Women in New Jersey had the right to vote under the state's original constitution, but this right was rescinded in 1807.) Wyoming was also one of six states (along with North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Washington, and Idaho) participating in their first presidential election. This was the most new states voting since the first election. The election witnessed many states splitting their electoral votes. Electors from the state of Michigan were selected using the congressional district method (the winner in each congressional district wins one electoral vote, the winner of the state wins two electoral votes). This resulted in a split between the Republican and Democratic electors: nine for Harrison and five for Cleveland.[21] In Oregon, the direct election of presidential electors combined with the fact that one Weaver elector was endorsed by the Democratic Party and elected as a Fusionist, resulted in a split between the Republican and Populist electors: three for Harrison and one for Weaver.[21] In California, the direct election of presidential electors combined with the close race resulted in a split between the Republican and Democratic electors: eight for Cleveland and one for Harrison.[21] In Ohio, the direct election of presidential electors combined with the close race resulted in a split between the Republican and Democratic of electors: 22 for Harrison and one for Cleveland.[21] In North Dakota, two electors from the Democratic-Populist Fusion ticket won and one Republican Elector won. This created a split delegation of electors: one for Weaver, one for Harrison, and one for Cleveland.[21] This was the first occasion in which incumbent presidents were defeated in two consecutive elections. This would not happen again until 1980. This was the last election in which the Democrats won California
California
until 1916 (although it voted against the Republicans by supporting the Progressive Party in 1912), the last in which the Democrats won Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, New Jersey, New York, West Virginia[22] and Wisconsin[17] until 1912, the last in which the Democrats won a majority of electoral votes in Maryland until 1904, and the last in which the Republicans won Montana until 1904. The election was also the last in which the Democrats didn't win Colorado and Nevada until 1904.

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral vote Running mate

Count Percentage Vice-presidential candidate Home state Electoral vote

Grover Cleveland Democratic New York 5,553,898 46.02% 277 Adlai E. Stevenson Illinois 277

Benjamin Harrison
Benjamin Harrison
(Incumbent) Republican Indiana 5,190,819 43.01% 145 Whitelaw Reid New York 145

James B. Weaver Populist Iowa 1,026,595 8.51% 22 James G. Field Virginia 22

John Bidwell Prohibition California 270,879 2.24% 0 James Cranfill Texas 0

Simon Wing Socialist Labor Massachusetts 21,173 0.18% 0 Charles Matchett New York 0

Other 4,673 0.04% — Other —

Total 12,068,037 100% 444

444

Needed to win 223

223

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. "1892 Presidential Election Results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved July 27, 2005.  Source (Electoral Vote): "Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996". National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved July 31, 2005. 

Popular vote

Cleveland

46.02%

Harrison

43.01%

Weaver

8.51%

Bidwell

2.24%

Others

0.21%

Electoral vote

Cleveland

62.39%

Harrison

32.66%

Weaver

4.95%

Geography of results[edit]

Results by county, shaded according to winning candidate's percentage of the vote

Cartographic gallery[edit]

Map of presidential election results by county

Map of Democratic presidential election results by county

Map of Republican presidential election results by county

Map of Populist presidential election results by county

Map of "Other" presidential election results by county

Cartogram
Cartogram
of presidential election results by county

Cartogram
Cartogram
of Democratic presidential election results by county

Cartogram
Cartogram
of Republican presidential election results by county

Cartogram
Cartogram
of Populist presidential election results by county

Cartogram
Cartogram
of "other" presidential election results by county

Results by state[edit] Source: Data from Walter Dean Burnham, Presidential ballots, 1836–1892 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1955) pp 247-57.[23]

States won by Cleveland/Stevenson

States won by Harrison/Reid

States won by Weaver/Field

Grover Cleveland Democratic Benjamin Harrison Republican James Weaver Populist John Bidwell Prohibition Simon Wing Socialist Labor Margin State Total

State electoral votes # % electoral votes # % electoral votes # % electoral votes # % electoral votes # % electoral votes # % #

Alabama 11 138,135 59.40 11 9,184 3.95 - 84,984 36.55 - 240 0.10 - - - - 53,151 22.86 232,543 AL

Arkansas 8 87,834 59.30 8 47,072 31.78 - 11,831 7.99 - 113 0.08 - - - - 40,762 27.52 148,117 AR

California 9 118,174 43.83 8 118,027 43.78 1 25,311 9.39 - 8,096 3.00 - - - - 147 0.05 269,609 CA

Colorado 4 - - - 38,620 41.13 - 53,584 57.07 4 1,687 1.80 - - - - -14,964 -15.94 93,891 CO

Connecticut 6 82,395 50.06 6 77,032 46.80 - 809 0.49 - 4,026 2.45 - 333 0.20 - 5,363 3.26 164,595 CT

Delaware 3 18,581 49.90 3 18,077 48.55 - - - - 564 1.51 - - - - 504 1.35 37,235 DE

Florida 4 30,153 85.01 4 - - - 4,843 13.65 - 475 1.34 - - - - 25,310 71.35 35,471 FL

Georgia 13 129,446 58.01 13 48,408 21.70 - 41,939 18.80 - 988 0.44 - - - - 81,038 36.32 223,126 GA

Idaho 3 - - - 8,599 44.31 - 10,520 54.21 3 288 1.48 - - - - -1,921 -9.90 19,407 ID

Illinois 24 426,281 48.79 24 399,288 45.70 - 22,207 2.54 - 25,871 2.96 - - - - 26,993 3.09 873,647 IL

Indiana 15 262,740 47.46 15 255,615 46.17 - 22,208 4.01 - 13,050 2.36 - - - - 7,125 1.29 553,613 IN

Iowa 13 196,367 44.31 - 219,795 49.60 13 20,595 4.65 - 6,402 1.44 - - - - -23,428 -5.29 443,159 IA

Kansas 10 - - - 157,241 48.40 - 163,111 50.20 10 4,553 1.40 - - - - -5,870 -1.81 324,905 KS

Kentucky 13 175,461 51.48 13 135,462 39.74 - 23,500 6.89 - 6,441 1.89 - - - - 39,999 11.73 340,864 KY

Louisiana 8 87,926 76.53 8 26,963 23.47 - - - - - - - - - - 60,963 53.06 114,889 LA

Maine 6 48,049 41.26 - 62,936 54.05 6 2,396 2.06 - 3,066 2.63 - - - - -14,887 -12.78 116,451 ME

Maryland 8 113,866 53.39 8 92,736 43.48 - 796 0.37 - 5,877 2.76 - - - - 21,130 9.91 213,275 MD

Massachusetts 15 176,813 45.22 - 202,814 51.87 15 3,210 0.82 - 7,539 1.93 - 649 0.17 - -26,001 -6.65 391,028 MA

Michigan 14 201,624 43.26 5 222,708 47.79 9 19,931 4.28 - 20,857 4.48 - - - - -21,084 -4.52 466,045 MI

Minnesota 9 100,920 37.76 - 122,823 45.96 9 29,313 10.97 - 14,182 5.31 - - - - -21,903 -8.20 267,238 MN

Mississippi 9 40,030 76.22 9 1,398 2.66 - 10,118 19.27 - 973 1.85 - - - - 29,912 56.95 52,519 MS

Missouri 17 268,400 49.56 17 227,646 42.03 - 41,204 7.61 - 4,333 0.80 - - - - 40,754 7.52 541,583 MO

Montana 3 17,690 39.79 - 18,871 42.44 3 7,338 16.50 - 562 1.26 - - - - -1,181 -2.66 44,461 MT

Nebraska 8 24,943 12.46 - 87,213 43.56 8 83,134 41.53 - 4,902 2.45 - - - - -4,079 -2.04 200,192 NE

Nevada 3 714 6.56 - 2,811 25.84 - 7,264 66.78 3 89 0.82 - - - - -4,453 -40.94 10,878 NV

New Hampshire 4 42,081 47.11 - 45,658 51.11 4 293 0.33 - 1,297 1.45 - - - - -3,577 -4.00 89,329 NH

New Jersey 10 171,066 50.67 10 156,101 46.24 - 985 0.29 - 8,134 2.41 - 1,337 0.40 - 14,965 4.43 337,623 NJ

New York 36 654,868 48.99 36 609,350 45.58 - 16,429 1.23 - 38,190 2.86 - 17,956 1.34 - 45,518 3.41 1,336,793 NY

North Carolina 11 132,951 47.44 11 100,346 35.80 - 44,336 15.82 - 2,637 0.94 - - - - 32,605 11.63 280,270 NC

North Dakota 3 0 0.00 1 17,519 48.50 1 17,700 49.01 1 899 2.49 - - - - -181 -0.50 36,118 ND

Ohio 23 404,115 47.53 1 405,187 47.66 22 14,850 1.75 - 26,012 3.06 - - - - -1,072 -0.13 850,164 OH

Oregon 4 14,243 18.15 - 35,002 44.59 3 26,965 34.35 1 2,281 2.91 - - - - -8,037 -10.24 78,491 OR

Pennsylvania 32 452,264 45.09 - 516,011 51.45 32 8,714 0.87 - 25,123 2.50 - 898 0.09 - -63,747 -6.36 1,003,010 PA

Rhode Island 4 24,336 45.75 - 26,975 50.71 4 228 0.43 - 1,654 3.11 - - - - -2,639 -4.96 53,196 RI

South Carolina 9 54,680 77.56 9 13,345 18.93 - 2,407 3.41 - - - - - - - 41,335 58.63 70,504 SC

South Dakota 4 9,081 12.88 - 34,888 49.48 4 26,544 37.64 - - - - - - - -8,344 -11.83 70,513 SD

Tennessee 12 136,468 51.36 12 100,537 37.83 - 23,918 9.00 - 4,809 1.81 - - - - 35,931 13.52 265,732 TN

Texas 15 239,148 56.65 15 81,144 19.22 - 99,688 23.61 - 2,165 0.51 - - - - 139,460 33.04 422,145 TX

Vermont 4 16,325 29.26 - 37,992 68.09 4 44 0.08 - 1,424 2.55 - - - - -21,667 -38.83 55,796 VT

Virginia 12 164,136 56.17 12 113,098 38.70 - 12,275 4.20 - 2,729 0.93 - - - - 51,038 17.46 292,238 VA

Washington 4 29,802 33.88 - 36,460 41.45 4 19,165 21.79 - 2,542 2.89 - - - - -6,658 -7.57 87,969 WA

West Virginia 6 84,467 49.37 6 80,292 46.93 - 4,167 2.44 - 2,153 1.26 - - - - 4,175 2.44 171,079 WV

Wisconsin 12 177,325 47.72 12 171,101 46.05 - 10,019 2.70 - 13,136 3.54 - - - - 6,224 1.68 371,581 WI

Wyoming 3 - - - 8,454 50.52 3 7,722 46.14 - 530 3.17 - - - - -732 -4.37 16,735 WY

TOTALS: 444 5,553,898 46.02 277 5,190,799 43.01 145 1,026,595 8.51 22 270,889 2.24 - 21,173 0.18 - 363,099 3.01 12,068,027 US

Close states[edit] Margin of victory less than 5% (193 electoral votes):

California, 0.05% Ohio, 0.13% North Dakota, 0.50% Indiana, 1.29% Delaware, 1.35% Wisconsin, 1.68% Kansas, 1.81% Nebraska, 2.04% West Virginia, 2.44% Montana, 2.66% Illinois, 3.09% Connecticut, 3.26% New York, 3.41% New Hampshire, 4.00% Wyoming, 4.37% New Jersey, 4.43% Michigan, 4.52% Rhode Island, 4.96%

Margin of victory between 5% and 10% (101 electoral votes):

Iowa, 5.29% Pennsylvania, 6.36% Massachusetts, 6.65% Missouri, 7.52% Washington, 7.57% Minnesota, 8.20% Idaho, 9.90% Maryland, 9.91%

See also[edit]

United States
United States
House of Representatives elections, 1892 United States
United States
Senate elections, 1892 American election campaigns in the 19th century History of the United States
United States
(1865–1918) History of the United States
United States
Democratic Party History of the United States
United States
Republican Party Second inauguration of Grover Cleveland

References[edit]

^ "Voter Turnout in Presidential Elections". The American Presidency Project. UC Santa Barbara.  ^ History of American Presidential Elections, Volume II, Pgs 1706–1708 ^ History of American Presidential Elections, Volume II, Pgs 1706–1707 ^ a b History of American Presidential Elections, Volume II, Pgs 1716 ^ History of American Presidential Elections, Volume II, Pg 1710–1711 ^ History of American Presidential Elections, Volume II, Pg 1711–1714 ^ William DeGregorio, The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Gramercy 1997 ^ "VP Adlai Stevenson". Senate.gov. Retrieved 2016-08-18.  ^ History of American Presidential Elections, Volume II, p. 1719–1720 ^ History of American Presidential Elections Volume II 1848–1896; Schlesinger; Pgs 1721–1722 ^ History of American Presidential Elections Volume II 1848–1896; Schlesinger; Pgs 1722–1723 ^ "US President – PRB Convention Race – Jun 29, 1892". Our Campaigns. February 24, 2008. Retrieved November 18, 2013.  ^ "US President – SLP Convention Race – Aug 28, 1892". Our Campaigns. January 28, 2006. Retrieved November 18, 2013.  ^ Sig Synnestvedt, The White Response to Black Emancipation: Second-class Citizenship in the United States
United States
Since Reconstruction. (1972). p 41. ^ a b Charles W. Calhoun (ed.), The Gilded Age: Perspectives on the Origins of Modern America. Blue Ridge Summit, PA: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2006; pg. 295. ^ Presidential Elections, 1789–2008: County, State, and National Mapping of Election Data, Donald R. Deskins, Jr., Hanes Walton, Jr., and Sherman C. Puckett, pg. 250 ^ a b Counting the Votes; Wisconsin ^ Counting the Votes; Illinois ^ Jensen, Richard J.
Jensen, Richard J.
The Winning of the Midwest: Social and Political Conflict, 1888–1896, ch. 4: Iowa, Wet or Dry? & ch. 5: Education, the Tariff, and the Melting Pot. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1971. pp. 89-153. ^ Nathan Fine, Farmer and Labor Parties in the United States, 1828–1928. New York: Rand School of Social Science, 1928; pg. 79. ^ a b c d e [1] ^ Counting the Votes; West Virginia ^ "1892 Presidential General Election Data – National". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 7, 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

Faulkner, Harold U. (1959). Politics, Reform and Expansion, 1890–1900. New York: Harper.  Jensen, Richard (1971). The Winning of the Midwest: Social and Political Conflict, 1888–1896. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-39825-0.  Josephson, Matthew (1938). The Politicos: 1865–1896. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co.  Keller, Morton (1977). Affairs of State: Public Life in Late Nineteenth Century America. Cambridge: Belknap Press. ISBN 0-674-00721-2.  Kleppner, Paul (1979). The Third Electoral System 1853–1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina
North Carolina
Press. ISBN 0-8078-1328-1.  Knoles, George H. (1942). The Presidential Campaign and Election of 1892. Stanford: Stanford University Press.  Morgan, H. Wayne (1969). From Hayes to McKinley: National Party Politics, 1877–1896. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.  Nevins, Allan. Grover Cleveland: A Study in Courage (1932) Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, the major resource on Cleveland. Oberholtzer, Ellis Paxson. A History of the United States
United States
since the Civil War. Volume V, 1888–1901 (1937). pp 169-244 Rhodes, James Ford (1920). History of the United States
United States
from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896. 8. New York: Macmillan. 

External links[edit]

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United States
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presidential election of 1892 at Encyclopædia Britannica Presidential Election of 1892: A Resource Guide from the Library of Congress 1892 popular vote by counties 1892 State-by-state Popular vote Overview of 1892 Democratic National Convention How close was the 1892 election? — Michael Sheppard, Massachusetts
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