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Umamah bint Abu al-'As bin al-Rabi' (Arabic: أمامة بنت ابو العاص بن الربيع) was a granddaughter of the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and Khadija bint Khuwaylid
Khadija bint Khuwaylid
.She is numbered among his companions.

Contents

1 Biography 2 See also 3 External links 4 References

Biography[edit] She was the daughter of Abu al-As ibn al-Rabi' and of Muhammad's eldest daughter Zaynab.[1][2].She had one sibling Ali ibn Zainab .Her maternal aunts include Ruqayyah bint Muhammad, Umm Kulthum bint Muhammad
Muhammad
and Fatimah. When she was a small child, Muhammad
Muhammad
used to carry her on his shoulder while he prayed. He used to put her down to prostrate and then pick her up again as he rose.[1] Muhammad
Muhammad
once promised to give an onyx necklace to "her whom I love best." His wives expected him to give it to Aisha, but he presented it to Umamah. On a different occasion, he gave her a gold ring that had arrived from the Emperor of Abyssinia.[1] Some time after Fatimah
Fatimah
died in 632, Umamah married Ali.[1][2] They had one son, Muhammad
Muhammad
"the Middle",[3] who died young.[4] Ali
Ali
was killed in 661, and Muawiyah I proposed to Umamah. She consulted al-Mughira ibn Nawfal ibn al-Harith about this. He said that she should not marry "the son of the liver-eater (Hind bint Utbah)" and offered to deal with the problem for her. When she agreed, he said, "I will marry you myself."[1] This marriage produced one son, Yahya.[4] Umamah accompanied al-Mughirah into exile at al-Safri. She died there[4] in 670 (50 AH).[5] See also[edit]

Hassan ibn Ali Hussain ibn Ali

External links[edit]

Hilal ibn Ali The Tribe of Quraish

References[edit]

^ a b c d e Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir vol. 8. Translated by Bewley, A. (1995). The Women of Madina, pp. 27-28, 163-164. London: Ta-Ha Publishers. ^ a b Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by Landau-Tasseron, E. (1998). Volume 39: Biographies of the Prophet's Companions and Their Successors, pp. 13, 162. Albany: State University of New York Press. ^ Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir vol. 3. Translated by Bewley, A. (2013). The Companions of Badr, p. 12. London: Ta-Ha Publishers. ^ a b c Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Jarir al-Tabari. Tarikh al-Rusul wa'l-Muluk. Translated by Blankinship, K. Y. (1993). Volume 11: The Challenge to the Empires, p. 71 footnote 406. Albany: State University of New York Press. ^ Lammens, H. (1912). Fatima et les Filles de Mahomet, p. 127. Rome: Sumptibus Pontificii Instituti Biblici.

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Islam
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