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The Uckermark
Uckermark
( German pronunciation (help·info)), a historical region in northeastern Germany, currently[update] straddles the Uckermark
Uckermark
District of Brandenburg
Brandenburg
and the Vorpommern-Greifswald District of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Its traditional capital is Prenzlau.

Contents

1 Geography 2 History

2.1 Early history 2.2 Ukrani, a Polabian tribe 2.3 Pomerania, Ostsiedlung 2.4 Pomerania
Pomerania
and Brandenburg
Brandenburg
struggle for overlordship 2.5 Brandenburg 2.6 Prussia, and Huguenot settlement 2.7 Post-World War II

3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External links

Geography[edit] The region is named after the Uecker
Uecker
River, which is a tributary of the Oder; the name Uckermark
Uckermark
means "March of the Uecker". The river's source is close to Angermünde, from where it runs northward to Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. The Oder
Oder
River, forming the German-Polish border, bounds the region in the east. The western parts of the Lower Oder
Oder
Valley National Park are located in the Uckermark.

View of the Uecker
Uecker
Valley in the Uckermark

History[edit] Early history[edit]

Pechberg Bronze Age
Bronze Age
Megalith
Megalith
tomb near Vossberg

In the Ice Age, glaciers shaped the landscape of the region. A climate change left a hilly area with several lakes formed by the melting ice, and humans started to settle the area. Megalithic-cultures arose, followed by Germanic cultures. Ukrani, a Polabian tribe[edit]

Burgwallinsel Ukrani
Ukrani
burgh isle in Lake Oberuckersee

From the 6th–12th centuries Polabian Slavs
Polabian Slavs
migrating from Eastern Europe moved westward into the later Uckermark. The Slavs settling the terra U(c)kera (Uckerland, later Uckermark) became known as Ukrani (Ukranen, Ukrer, Ukri, Vukraner).[1] Their settlement area was centered around the lakes Oberuckersee
Oberuckersee
and Unteruckersee at the spring of the Uecker
Uecker
River. In this region, burghs with a proto-town suburbium were set up at Drense and on an isle in Lake Oberuckersee (near modern Prenzlau). In 954, Margrave
Margrave
Gero
Gero
of the Saxon Eastern March
Saxon Eastern March
(the marca Geronis), aided by Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
Otto I's son-in-law, Conrad of Lorraine, launched a successful campaign to subdue the Ukrani, who had come in reach of the Empire after the 929 Battle of Lenzen. After the 983 revolt of the Obodrites
Obodrites
and Liutizians, the area became independent again, yet remained under permanent military pressure, especially from Poland
Poland
and the Holy Roman Empire.

View of the Uecker
Uecker
Valley in the Uckermark

Pomerania, Ostsiedlung[edit] In 1172 Pomeranian dukes, vassals of the Duchy of Saxony, later of the Holy Roman Empire, controlled the area. In the course of the medieval Ostsiedlung, the Ukrani
Ukrani
were Christianized and Germanized by Saxons, who founded monasteries, castles, and towns; the Slavic heritage is reflected in the many regional towns whose names end with "-ow" and "-in". The early centers of the territory were the Seehausen (Gramzow) Premonstratensian
Premonstratensian
monastery and the city of Prenzlau, developed and granted German town law
German town law
by Barnim I, Duke of Pomerania, in 1234. Both the central city and the central monastery were set up beside the former Ukrani
Ukrani
central burghs. Pomerania
Pomerania
and Brandenburg
Brandenburg
struggle for overlordship[edit] The Margraviate of Brandenburg, holding claims on the Duchy of Pomerania, expanded north since the 1230s, taking her chances while the House of Pomerania
House of Pomerania
was weakened. In the 1250 Treaty of Landin, Barnim I conceded the Uckermark
Uckermark
to John I and Otto III, Ascanian Margraves of Brandenburg. After the extinction of the Ascanians, the Pomeranian dukes reacquired a few border regions. Mecklenburg
Mecklenburg
advanced into the Uckermark, but lost her gains in a 1323 war with Brandenburg. In the Pomeranian- Brandenburg
Brandenburg
War from 1329–33, Pomerania
Pomerania
was able to defeat Brandenburg
Brandenburg
at Kremmer Damm. In the following years, control of the Uckermark
Uckermark
was disputed by Brandenburg, Mecklenburg, and Pomerania. Brandenburg[edit] The first Peace of Prenzlau
Prenzlau
of 3 May 1448 established Brandenburg's control over most of the territory, except for the northern Pasewalk and Torgelow
Torgelow
region, which was to remain in Pomerania
Pomerania
and is not considered to be a part of Uckermark
Uckermark
anymore. Though another Brandenburgian-Pomeranian war was fought in the area in the 1460s, Brandenburg's possession of most of the Uckermark
Uckermark
was confirmed again in a second Peace of Prenzlau
Prenzlau
on 30 July 1472, which was renewed on 26 June 1479. Prussia, and Huguenot settlement[edit] The Uckermark
Uckermark
became part of Brandenburg-Prussia
Brandenburg-Prussia
in 1618, but was ravaged during the Thirty Years' War. Frederick William, the Great Elector, invited large numbers of French Huguenots
Huguenots
to resettle the Uckermark
Uckermark
and his other territories by announcing the Edict of Potsdam. These Huguenots
Huguenots
helped to develop the economy and culture of the Uckermark. In 1701 the territory became part of the Kingdom of Prussia. In 1815 after the Napoleonic Wars, the Uckermark
Uckermark
became part of the Prussian Province of Brandenburg. Previously divided into the administrative units Uckerkreis and Stolpirischer Kreis, in 1817 a third district was created in the area, the district Angermünde, and the other two districts were renamed to Prenzlau
Prenzlau
and Templin. Post-World War II[edit] The Uckermark
Uckermark
was a battleground during World War II, with many of its towns being severely damaged. As part of East Germany
Germany
after the war, the Uckermark
Uckermark
was divided between Bezirk Neubrandenburg
Bezirk Neubrandenburg
and Bezirk Frankfurt (Oder). With German reunification
German reunification
in 1990, most of the Uckermark
Uckermark
voted to become part of the restored state of Brandenburg, with the exception of the small Strasburg region becoming part of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. See also[edit]

History of Pomerania

Notes[edit]

^ Materna, p. 29

References[edit]

Ingo Materna. Brandenburgische Geschichte. Akademie Verlag. Berlin. 1995.

External links[edit]

Hugenotten-Uckermark.de

v t e

Geography of Pomerania

Regions

Current

Western Pomerania West Pomeranian Voivodeship Pomerelia

Kashubia Pomorskie

Pomerania
Pomerania
euroregion

Former

Farther Pomerania Circipania Lauenburg and Bütow Land Lands of Schlawe and Stolp

Administration

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern West Pomeranian Voivodeship Pomeranian Voivodeship Złotów County

Towns

Lists

List of towns in Vorpommern List of towns in Farther Pomerania List of placenames in the Province of Pomerania

A–H I–P Q–Z

Largest

>100,000

Tricity

Gdańsk Gdynia Sopot

Szczecin Koszalin

>50,000

Słupsk Stargard Stralsund Greifswald

Islands

Greifswalder Oie Hiddensee Rügen Ummanz Usedom Vilm Wolin

Peninsulae

Fischland-Darß-Zingst Jasmund Hela Mönchgut Wittow

Rivers

Dziwna Grabowa Ina Łeba Oder Parsęta Peene Peenestrom Randow Recknitz Rega Ryck Słupia Świna Tollense Trebel Uecker Vistula Wieprza

Lakes

Lake Dąbie Lake Gardno Kummerower See Lake Łebsko Lake Miedwie

Bays, lagoons

Bay of Gdańsk Bay of Greifswald Bay of Pomerania Szczecin
Szczecin
Lagoon

National parks

Western Pomerania
Pomerania
Lagoon Area National Park Jasmund
Jasmund
National Park Lower Oder
Oder
Valley National Park Wolin
Wolin
National Park Słowiński National Park

v t e

History of Pomerania

10,000 BC – 600 AD 600–1100 1100–1300 1300–1500 1500–1806 1806–1933 1933–1945 1945–present

Administrative

Western Pomerania Farther Pomerania (before 1945)

Billung March Northern March Principality of Rügen Duchy of Pomerania

House of Pomerania List of Dukes Cammin Gützkow Schlawe-Stolp Lauenburg-Bütow Partitions Pomerania-Stolp

Swedish Pomerania Brandenburgian Pomerania
Pomerania
(Draheim) Province of Pomerania
Pomerania
1815–1945

Neumark Köslin Region Stettin Region Stralsund
Stralsund
Region Posen-West Prussia
Posen-West Prussia
Region List of placenames

Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Zachodniopomorskie (after 1945)

Szczecin
Szczecin
Voivodeship Koszalin
Koszalin
Voivodeship Słupsk
Słupsk
Voivodeship West Pomeranian Voivodeship

Pomerelia
Pomerelia
(Kashubia)

Medieval duchies (Samborides) State of the Teutonic Order Royal Prussia
Royal Prussia
( Pomeranian Voivodeship
Pomeranian Voivodeship
1466–1772) Free City of Danzig
Free City of Danzig
1807–1814 West Prussia Pomeranian Voivodeship
Pomeranian Voivodeship
1919–1939 (Polish Corridor) Free City of Danzig
Free City of Danzig
1920–1939 Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia Pomeranian Voivodeship

Ecclesiastical

Roman Catholic

Historical

Conversion of Pomerania Diocese of Kolberg (Congress of Gniezno) Diocese of Cammin Diocese of Culm Diocese of Roskilde Diocese of Włocławek (Leslau) Prelature of Schneidemühl

Extant

Archdiocese of Berlin Archdiocese of Szczecin-Kamień Diocese of Koszalin-Kołobrzeg Diocese of Pelplin

Protestant

Protestant Reformation Evangelical Lutheran Church in Northern Germany Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Poland Pentecostal Church in Poland Evangelical State Church in Prussia
Evangelical State Church in Prussia
(extinct) Pomeranian Evangelical Church
Pomeranian Evangelical Church
(extinct)

Demography

Archaeological cultures

Hamburg Maglemosian Ertebølle-Ellerbek Linear Pottery Funnelbeaker Havelland Corded Ware Comb Ceramic Nordic Bronze Age Lusatian Jastorf Pomeranian Oksywie Wielbark Gustow Dębczyn (Denzin)

Peoples

Gepids Goths Lemovii Rugii Vidivarii Vistula
Vistula
Veneti Slavic Pomeranians Prissani Rani Ukrani Veleti Lutici Velunzani German Pomeranians Kashubians Poles Slovincians

Major demographic events

Migration Period Ostsiedlung WWII flight and expulsion of Germans Post-WWII settlement of Poles
Poles
and Ukrainians

Languages and dialects

West Germanic

Low German

Low Prussian Central Pomeranian Mecklenburgisch-Vorpommersch East Pomeranian West Pomeranian

Standard German

West Slavic

Polabian Polish Pomeranian

Kashubian Slovincian

Treaties

1200–1500

Kremmen (1236) Landin (1250) Kępno (1282) Soldin (1309) Templin (1317) Stralsund
Stralsund
(1354) Stralsund
Stralsund
(1370) Thorn (1411) Soldin (1466) Thorn (1466) Prenzlau
Prenzlau
(1448 / 1472 / 1479) Pyritz (1493)

1500–1700

Grimnitz (1529) Stettin (1570) Franzburg (1627) Stettin (1630) Westphalia (1648) Stettin (1653) Labiau (1656) Wehlau and Bromberg (1657) Oliva (1660) Saint-Germain-en-Laye (1679) Lund (1679)

1700–present

Stockholm (1719 / 1720) Frederiksborg (1720) Kiel (1814) Vienna (1815) Versailles (1919) Potsdam (1945)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 235031303 LCCN: sh85139243 GND: 4061353-7 BNF:

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