USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center
   HOME

TheInfoList



OR:

The USC-Lockheed Martin Quantum Computing Center (QCC) is a joint scientific research effort between
Lockheed Martin The Lockheed Martin Corporation is an American aerospace, arms, defense, information security, and technology corporation with worldwide interests. It was formed by the merger Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) are business transactions i ...
Corporation and the University of Southern California (USC). The QCC is housed at the Information Sciences Institute (ISI), a computer science and engineering research unit of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, and is jointly operated by ISI and Lockheed Martin. USC faculty, ISI researchers and students are performing basic and applied research into quantum computing, and are collaborating with researchers around the world. The QCC uses a D-Wave Two quantum annealing system, manufactured by
D-Wave Systems D-Wave Systems Inc. is a Canadian quantum computing Quantum computing is a type of computation whose operations can harness the phenomena of quantum mechanics, such as quantum superposition, superposition, Wave interference#Quantum interfere ...
, Inc. The QCC is the first organization outside of D-Wave to operate the system. The second system is installed at
NASA The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA ) is an independent agencies of the United States government, independent agency of the US federal government responsible for the civil List of government space agencies, space program ...
Ames Research Center The Ames Research Center (ARC), also known as NASA Ames, is a major NASA research center at Moffett Federal Airfield in California's Silicon Valley. It was founded in 1939 as the second National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) laborat ...
, and is operated jointly by NASA and Google. The systems must be kept extremely cold and electromagnetically well-shielded to operate with the longest possible coherence time.


Purpose

Quantum information processing, also called
quantum computing Quantum computing is a type of computation whose operations can harness the phenomena of quantum mechanics, such as quantum superposition, superposition, Wave interference#Quantum interference, interference, and quantum entanglement, entanglement ...
, theoretically is known to offer dramatic speed-ups and more complete answers for some combinatorial computing problems.
Quantum annealing Quantum annealing (QA) is an optimization process for finding the global minimum of a given objective function over a given set of candidate solutions (candidate states), by a process using quantum fluctuations. Quantum annealing is used mainl ...
is a branch of quantum computing whose advantages over classical computing are actively being investigated. In quantum annealing, problems are encoded into the lowest energy state of a physical quantum system. Applications currently under study at the QCC include big data analysis, verification and validation of cyber-physical systems, pattern identification and classification, and optimization and machine learning, any of which may support breakthroughs in multiple industries and government. USC and ISI researchers, as well as Lockheed Martin engineers, seek to develop methods to benchmark quantum annealers, and perform tests of quantumness. These include the study of quantum entanglement and, more generally, the performance of quantum annealing experiments. Researchers also are working to manage
quantum decoherence Quantum decoherence is the loss of Coherence (physics)#Quantum coherence, quantum coherence. In quantum mechanics, particles such as electrons are described by a wave function, a mathematical representation of the quantum state of a system; a p ...
, the phenomenon that degrades the performance of quantum information processors when quantum states are forced out of
quantum superposition Quantum superposition is a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics. It states that, much like waves in Superposition principle#Wave superposition, classical physics, any two (or more) quantum states can be added together ("superposed") an ...
. Decoherence can reduce quantum functionality to that of a classical computer, and can be counteracted using
quantum error correction Quantum error correction (QEC) is used in Quantum computer, quantum computing to protect quantum information from errors due to decoherence and other quantum noise. Quantum error correction is theorised as essential to achieve Quantum threshold the ...
. QCC researchers and their collaborators have developed methods to counteract decoherence in quantum annealers by combining quantum error correction with energy penalties that suppress decoherence into a single quantum annealing correction method.


History

The QCC was launched in November, 2011 under the leadership of Scientific and Technical Director Daniel Lidar, a USC professor of electrical engineering, chemistry and physics; Operational Director Robert F. Lucas, director of ISI’s Computational Systems and Technology division; and Ned Allen and Greg Tallant of Lockheed Martin. The QCC began with a 128-qubit D-Wave One, which was replaced in March 2013 with the 512-qubit D-Wave Two.


Research

Research initially focused on testing whether the D-Wave is in fact a quantum system, and has expanded to benchmarking the D-Wave against classical algorithms, and various applications, including
quantum machine learning Quantum machine learning is the integration of quantum algorithms within machine learning programs. The most common use of the term refers to machine learning algorithms for the analysis of classical data executed on a quantum computer, i.e. quan ...
. Lockheed Martin researchers have focused on the application of adiabatic quantum computing to the problem of verification and validation of control systems and other tasks with similar mathematical structure, such as the design of special wave forms for RF applications with minimal side-lobes.


People

The team includes more than a dozen USC faculty members, ISI researchers, postdoctoral and graduate students, and more than 100 Lockheed Martin users.


Location

USC is located in downtown
Los Angeles Los Angeles ( ; es, Los Ángeles, link=no , ), often referred to by its initials L.A., is the largest city in the state of California California is a U.S. state, state in the Western United States, located along the West Coast of ...
. ISI is located in
Marina del Rey, California Marina del Rey (Spanish language, Spanish for "Marina of the King") is an unincorporated area, unincorporated seaside community in Los Angeles County, California, with an eponymous harbor that is a major boating and water recreation destination ...
. Lockheed Martin headquarters is located in
Bethesda, Maryland Bethesda () is an unincorporated area, unincorporated, census-designated place in southern Montgomery County, Maryland, Montgomery County, Maryland. It is located just northwest of Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a local church, the Bethe ...
. D-Wave is located in Burnaby,
British Columbia British Columbia (commonly abbreviated as BC) is the westernmost Provinces and territories of Canada, province of Canada, situated between the Pacific Ocean and the Rocky Mountains. It has a diverse geography, with rugged landscapes that include ...
,
Canada Canada is a country in North America. Its Provinces and territories of Canada, ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering over , making it the world ...
.


References


External links

* * * {{authority control Centers of the University of Southern California Computer science institutes in the United States Lockheed Martin Quantum information science Research institutes in California Research institutes established in 2011 2011 establishments in California Science and technology in Greater Los Angeles