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U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
is the national governing body for the sport of figure skating on ice in the United States. It is recognized as such by the United States
United States
Olympic Committee "USOC" under the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act and is the United States
United States
member of the International Skating Union
International Skating Union
("ISU"). Although the name of the organization is “the United States
United States
Figure Skating Association” it is now known as and conducts business under the name “U.S. Figure Skating.” Founded in 1921, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
regulates and governs the sport and defines and maintains the standard of skating proficiency. It specifies the rules for testing, competitions and all other figure skating related activities. U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
promotes interest and participation in the sport by assisting member clubs, skaters, and athletes, appointing officials, organizing competitions, exhibitions, and other figure skating pursuits, and offering a wide variety of programs.[1] Athletes and officials who represent the United States
United States
at international figure skating competitions are selected by U.S. Figure Skating. The Association is a non-profit organization.

Contents

1 History 2 Governance

2.1 Governing Council 2.2 Board of Directors

2.2.1 Presidents

2.3 Committees

2.3.1 Permanent committees

3 Mission statement 4 Operations

4.1 Executive Director 4.2 Departments 4.3 Finance

5 Officials 6 Organization

6.1 Eastern Section 6.2 Midwestern Section 6.3 Pacific Coast Section

7 Types of membership 8 U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
programs 9 Testing

9.1 Standard track levels 9.2 Adult track levels 9.3 Pattern dance 9.4 Synchronized skating

10 Qualifying and international competitions

10.1 Regional competitions 10.2 Sectional competitions 10.3 Championship competitions 10.4 International competitions

11 Sponsors 12 Media 13 Memorial Fund

13.1 Formation and purpose 13.2 RISE

14 See also 15 Footnotes 16 References 17 Further reading 18 External links

18.1 Web Site 18.2 Social media

History[edit]

USFSA Logo (1964–2003).

In 1921 the United States
United States
Figure Skating Association[2][3] was formed and became a member of the International Skating Union.[4] At the time of its formation, the Association was composed of seven (7) charter member clubs including: Beaver Dam Winter Sports Club,[5] The Skating Club of Boston,[6] Chicago Figure Skating Club[7] The Skating Club of New York,[8] Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane Society,[9] Sno Birds of Lake Placid,[10] and Twin City Figure Skating Club (which became the Figure Skating Club of Minneapolis in 1929).[11] Since its inception through 1947, the governance activities of the Association were centered in New York City. The annual Governing Council meetings, as well as the annual Executive Committee meetings, were all held in New York City. In 1949 the Association transferred its offices to Chicago, Illinois. The offices were again moved, this time to Boston, in 1950. In 1979, the Association moved into its current headquarters in Colorado Spring, Colorado. This followed the USOC's move to Colorado Springs a year earlier in July 1978.[12] In the 1930s, the Association made an effort to increase the number of competitive events by creating the three sectional championships, Eastern (1938), Midwestern (1933) and Pacific Coast (1936).[13] In 1959, the Eastern and Pacific Coast Sections expanded their qualifying competitions by adding three Sub-Sectionals Championships each. The Eastern Section created the New England, North Atlantic, and South Atlantic Regions, while the Pacific Coast Section established the Central Pacific, Northwest, and Southwest Pacific Regions. It wasn’t until 1962 that the Midwestern Sectional finally added their regional championships to the qualifying competition cycle.[14] The abbreviated name, "USFSA" was first used in April 1921 and trademarked in 1972.[15] The distinctive shield logo was adopted in 1964[16] and used until 2003 when U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
instituted its current logo.[17] In 2006, the Executive Committee was eliminated.[18] At the same time the Board of Directors was reduced to sixteen members from its previous 29 members. As of May 5, 2007, the Association officially adopted the name "U.S. Figure Skating" and dropped the abbreviated name of "USFSA".[19][20] Governance[edit] U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
is an association of clubs, governed by its members and its elected officers at national, regional and club levels.[21] As of June 2011, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
had 688 member, collegiate, and school-affiliated clubs[22] and a membership of 180,452.[22] Each member club may send delegates to the annual Governing Council meeting. Governing Council[edit] U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
has a representational government. Clubs and individual members appoint delegates. The number of delegates representing a club and the individual members depends on the prior year's paid registered membership. Athlete delegate representation is required to be 20 percent of the prior year's registered delegate and proxy votes. Collectively these delegates meet annually (typically early May) to review, amend and ratify the actions taken by the Board since the prior year's Governing Council. This annual meeting of the appointed delegates is called the Governing Council.[23] Board of Directors[edit] The Board of Directors is charged with the management of the business and affairs of U.S. Figure Skating. It is currently composed of sixteen (16) members including: the president, three (3) vice presidents (one from each section), the secretary, the treasurer, four (4) group coordinators, two (2) coaches, and four (4) athletes.[24] Presidents[edit] Samuel Auxier is the current president of U.S. Figure Skating. He began his term in 2014. The prior presidents are listed below.[25]

Past Presidents

Name Term

St. Peter , Patricia Patricia St. Peter 2009–2014

Hershberger , Ron Ron Hershberger 2005–2009

Foster , Chuck Chuck Foster 2003–2005

Howard , Phyllis Phyllis Howard 2000–2003

Disbrow* , James W. James W. Disbrow* 1998–2000

Stillwell , Morry Morry Stillwell 1995–1998

Ferguson , Claire W. Claire W. Ferguson 1992–1995

Nelson , Dr. Franklin S. Dr. Franklin S. Nelson 1989–1992

Graham Jr. , Dr. Hugh C. Dr. Hugh C. Graham Jr. 1986–1989

Yonekura* , George T. George T. Yonekura* 1983–1986

Iobst Jr.* , Oscar T. Oscar T. Iobst Jr.* 1980–1983

DeMore* , Charles A. Charles A. DeMore* 1976–1980

Wright , Benjamin T. Benjamin T. Wright 1973–1976

LeFevre* , Frederick C. Frederick C. LeFevre* 1970–1973

Cram* , Spencer E. Spencer E. Cram* 1967–1970

Shoemaker* , John R. John R. Shoemaker* 1964–1967

Shumway* , F. Ritter F. Ritter Shumway* 1961–1964

Herbert* , Howard D. Howard D. Herbert* 1958–1961

Brown* , Kenneth L. Kenneth L. Brown* 1955–1958

Kelley* , H. Kendall H. Kendall Kelley* 1952–1955

Keighley* , Harry N. Harry N. Keighley* 1949–1952

Beatty* , Henry M. Henry M. Beatty* 1946–1949

Powell* , Walter S. Walter S. Powell* 1943–1946

Robertson* , Heaton R. Heaton R. Robertson* 1940–1943

Savage* , Joseph K. Joseph K. Savage* 1937–1940

Rotch* , Charles M. Charles M. Rotch* 1935–1937

Badger* , Sherwin C. Sherwin C. Badger* 1934–1935

Rotch* , Charles M. Charles M. Rotch* 1932–1934

Badger* , Sherwin C. Sherwin C. Badger* 1930–1932

Church* , Charles T. Charles T. Church* 1928–1930

Howe* , Henry W. Henry W. Howe* 1925–1928

Weld* , A. Winsor A. Winsor Weld* 1921–1925

* Deceased Committees[edit] Committees, in particular the Permanent Committees, are responsible for proposing and enforcing the rules of the U.S. Figure Skating. Other special committees may undertake other projects, such as nominations and other ad hoc matters. Permanent committees[edit] The following table shows the Association's permanent committees:[26]

Adult Skating Athlete Development Athletes Advisory Audit

Coaches Collegiate Program Compensation Competitions

Dance Ethics Finance Grievance

International International Judges & Officials Judges Membership

Memorial Fund Pairs Parents Program Development

Rules Sanctions and Eligibility Selections Singles

Special
Special
Olympics/Therapeutic Sports Sciences and Medicine State Games Strategic Planning

Synchronized Skating Technical Panel Tests Theatrical Skating

Mission statement[edit] “As the national governing body, the mission of the United States Figure Skating Association is to provide programs to encourage participation and achievement in the sport of figure skating on ice.”[1] Operations[edit] Executive Director[edit] The Executive Director is responsible for the day-to-day operations of U.S. Figure Skating. Mr. David Raith is currently serving in that capacity and has done so since 2005. He is charged with carrying out the policies, programs, and goals of the association as approved by the Board of Directors.[27] Departments[edit] The departments that support U.S. Figure Skating's operations reside at its headquarters in Colorado Spring, CO. These departments are staffed by full-time employees. They administer and manage the association's day-to-day affairs.[28]

Athlete Development Athlete High Performance Events Finance

Information Technology Marketing and Communications Membership Executive Director

Finance[edit] The Association is a non-profit organization.[29] As of June 30, 2011, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
had revenue, support and gains of approximately $24.9 million derived primarily from dues, admissions and activity fees, skating events, sponsorships, broadcast and licensing, publications, grants, and other sources. The association expended approximately $12.9 million on its various programs and services plus an additional $2.4 million on management and general administrative expenses, under which the departments listed under the “Operations – Departments” are included.[30] Officials[edit] Member clubs arrange to hold test sessions and competitions. The competitions are conducted under the supervision and authority of U.S. Figure Skating appointed officials. The member club (for competitions, the club is sometimes call the local organizing committee or “LOC”) is responsible for many of the ancillary functions of the test session or competition (registration, transportation, event monitoring, hospitality, messengers, copying, etc.). For national and international events, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
headquarters staff also provides logistics and event support. The officials are responsible for actually running the test sessions, competitions, and associated individual events. All the officials at test sessions and competitions are unpaid volunteers.[31] Officials receive their appointments from U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
after demonstrating a certain level of proficiency, and in some cases, after trialing or taking written examinations. In most cases, officials are appointed at three (3) levels; regional, sectional, and national.[32] Below is a list of officials at a typical large competition. For the 2012 U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
Championships, 70 officials were assigned along with over 50 alternate officials.[33] The parenthetical number is how many people were assigned to the respective positions. If there is no number, only one person was assigned.

Chief Referee Assistant Referees (3)

Dance Referee Assistant Dance Referees

Chief Accountant Assistant Accountants (3)

Chief Technical Accountant Assistant Technical Accountants (2)

Chief Ice
Ice
Technician Assistant Ice
Ice
Technicians (3)

Chief Music Coordinator Assistant Music Coordinators (4) Music Technician

Chief Announcer Assistant Announcers (3)

Technical Controllers (6) Technical Specialists (8) Data Operators Video Replay Operators

Judges - Singles/Pairs (18) Judges - Dance (9)

Organization[edit] U.S. Figure Skating's members, clubs, and qualifying competitions are divided into three (3) geographical sections, that are further divided into nine (9) regions.[34] Eastern Section[edit]

New England Region North Atlantic Region South Atlantic Region

Connecticut New Jersey Delaware

Maine New York District of Columbia

Massachusetts Pennsylvania1 Florida

New Hampshire

Georgia

Rhode Island

Maryland

Vermont

North Carolina

Pennsylvania2

South Carolina

Virginia

West Virginia

Chattanooga, Tennessee

1Erie, PA 2excluding Erie, PA Midwestern Section[edit]

Eastern Great Lakes Region Upper Great Lakes Region Southwestern Region

Alabama Illinois Arkansas

Indiana Iowa Colorado1

Kentucky Michigan2 Kansas

Michigan3 Minnesota Louisiana

Mississippi Missouri4 Nebraska

Ohio North Dakota New Mexico

Tennessee5 South Dakota Missouri6

Wisconsin Oklahoma

Texas

1excluded for Synchronized only 2Upper Peninsula 3Lower Peninsula 4excluding Kansas City and St. Joseph's 5excluding Chattanooga 6Kansas City and St. Joseph's Pacific Coast Section[edit]

Northwest Pacific Region Central Pacific Region Southwest Pacific Region

Alaska California1 Arizona

Idaho Colorado2 California3

Montana Hawaii Nevada4

Oregon Nevada5

Washington Utah

Wyoming

1all cities north of and including Visalia 2for Synchronized only 3all cities south of Visalia 4Las Vegas 5excluding Las Vegas Types of membership[edit] U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
has nine (9) types of membership:[19]

Clubs which foster figure skating, known as “member clubs”; Individual persons registered with U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
who are members of a member club or a collegiate club; Individual persons who are not home club members of any member club, known as “individual members”; Honorary members; Collegiate club and school-affiliated members; Basic Skills members; Supportive members; Theatre On Ice/Team, and Introductory Members

U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
programs[edit] U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
offers many programs to accommodate a wide range of skill and interest levels.[35]

Adult skating Basic Skills Collegiate National Showcase National Skating Month High School Programs Solo Dance Competition Series Special Olympics
Special Olympics
/ Therapeutic Skating Synchronized skating Test Track Theatre on Ice 6.0

Testing[edit] Testing allows figure skaters to demonstrate that they have achieved a certain level of skating proficiency. Tests progress in increasing difficulty and focus on power, strength, speed, quickness, flow, extension, and edge quality and control.[36] Tests are conducted under the auspices of member clubs and administered during test sessions. Usually, three (3) test judges (the judge panel),[37] of appropriate level, determine the outcome of the tests on a pass / retry basis. Tests up to a certain level may be judged by a single, sufficiently qualified, judge.[37] Some higher level dance tests require judges certified in dance judging to attend. The member club is responsible for reporting the results to U.S. Figure Skating.[38] U.S. Figure appoints test judges at various levels (bronze, silver, and gold) based on trial judging and their judging experience. According to their level, test judges are qualified to determine the outcome of increasingly difficult tests. Test judges are invited by the member club to participate at a given test session. Skaters’ testing levels passed determines at what level they may compete. For qualifying competitions, skaters must pass the free skate test at the level for which they intend to compete. U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
still offers tests in compulsory figures, however, this discipline was last competed at a national championship competition in 1999.[39] Singles and adult skaters must show they are proficient at a given level by passing two (2) tests at each level, moves in the field ("MIF") and free skate ("FS"). Additional test are conducted in the pairs skating, free dance and pattern dance discipline. Each member of a synchronized skating team must pass the appropriate test of single’s competitor. Tests must be completed in the order of increasing difficulty. They may not be taken out of turn.[40] However, a singles skater may take as many moves-in-the-field tests before taking any free skate tests.[41] Once a free skate test is passed, a competitor may only compete at that level at qualifying competitions. There are four (4) test levels specific to adult figure skating.[42] Adult skater must be twenty-one (21) years of age or older.[43] Standard track levels[edit]

Moves in the field Free skate Pairs MIF, FS, Pairs Panel1 Free dance Free dance Panel2

Pre-Preliminary Pre-Preliminary

Bronze3

Preliminary Preliminary

Bronze4

Pre-Juvenile Pre-Juvenile Pre-Juvenile Bronze

Juvenile Juvenile Juvenile Bronze Juvenile Bronze5

Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Silver Intermediate Bronze5

Novice Novice Novice Silver Novice Bronze

Junior Junior Junior Gold Junior Silver

Senior Senior Senior Gold Senior Gold

1The test panel consists of three test judges of these levels or higher, appointed in single/pairs or dance for MIF or in single/pairs for FS. 2The test panel consists of three dance test judges of these levels or higher. 3A single bronze or higher test judge, appointed in single/pairs or dance for MIF or in single/pairs for FS, may also judge this level. 4A single silver or higher test judge, appointed in single/pairs or dance for MIF or in single/pairs for FS, may also judge this level. 5A single silver or higher dance test judge may also judge this level. Adult track levels[edit]

Moves in the field Free skate Pairs MIF, FS, Pairs Panel1 Free dance Free dance Panel2

Adult Pre-Bronze Adult Pre-Bronze

Bronze3 Adult Pre-Bronze Bronze4

Adult Bronze Adult Bronze Adult Bronze Bronze5 Adult Bronze Bronze4

Adult Silver Adult Silver Adult Silver Bronze Adult Silver Bronze

Adult Gold Adult Gold Adult Gold Silver Adult Gold Silver

1The test panel consists of three test judges of these levels or higher, appointed in single/pairs or dance for MIF or in single/pairs for FS. 2The test panel consists of three dance test judges of these levels or higher. 3A single bronze or higher test judge, appointed in single/pairs or dance for MIF or in single/pairs for FS, may also judge this level. 4A single silver or higher dance test judge may also judge this level. 5A single silver or higher test judge, appointed in single/pairs or dance for MIF or in single/pairs for FS, may also judge this level. Pattern dance[edit] The Compulsory dance
Compulsory dance
was renamed pattern dance.[PatDncFN 1][PatDncFN 2] Each level of pattern dance, with the exception of international, consists of three or four individual dances. Preliminary skaters must pass the Dutch Waltz, Canasta Tango, and Rhythm Blues,[44] while gold-level skaters must pass the Viennese Waltz, Westminster Waltz, Quickstep, and Argentine Tango.[45] There are currently ten dances at the international level.[46]

Level Panel ex. Solo1 Panel Solo2

Preliminary, Solo Preliminary Bronze3 Bronze

Pre-Bronze, (Standard, Adult, Masters and Solo) Bronze4 Bronze

Bronze (Standard, Adult, Masters and Solo) Bronze Bronze

Pre-Silver (Standard, Adult, Masters and Solo) Bronze Bronze

Silver (Standard, Adult, Masters and Solo) Silver Silver

Pre-Gold (Standard, Adult, Masters and Solo) Silver Silver

Gold (Standard, Adult, Masters and Solo) Gold Gold

International (Standard, Adult and Masters) Gold

1The test panel consists of three dance test judges of these levels or higher. 2The test panel consists of one or three dance test judges of these levels or higher. 3A single bronze or higher dance test judge may also judge this level. 4A single silver or higher dance test judge may also judge this level. Synchronized skating[edit]

Synchronized skating
Synchronized skating
team the Haydenettes
Haydenettes
in 2006.

Synchronized skating
Synchronized skating
teams are not required to pass any tests as a whole. Each individual team member must have passed the appropriate moves-in-the-field test.[47]

Team Individual

Senior Novice

Junior Intermediate

Novice Juvenile

Intermediate Pre-Juvenile

Juvenile Preliminary

Preliminary (none)

Collegiate Juvenile

Adult Adult Bronze1

Masters (none)

Pre-Juvenile (none)

Open Juvenile Pre-Preliminary

Open Adult (none)

Open Collegiate (none)

1Preliminary moves in the field, dance, or figure is also acceptable. Qualifying and international competitions[edit]

The senior ladies podium at the 2008 U.S. Championships. Gold: Mirai Nagasu; Silver: Rachael Flatt; Bronze: Ashley Wagner; Pewter: Caroline Zhang.

Every year, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
sanctions numerous non-qualifying competitions, shows, and carnivals.[48] In addition, it annually sanctions qualifying regional and sectional competitions,[49] in various disciplines, that lead up to championship competitions. The Association also selects those athletes and officials that represent the United States
United States
at international competitions. Regional competitions[edit] The following regional competitions are held in singles skating:[50]

Singles

New England Regional Figure Skating Championships

North Atlantic Regional Figure Skating Championships

South Atlantic Regional Figure Skating Championships

Eastern Great Lakes Regional Figure Skating Championships

Upper Great Lakes Regional Figure Skating Championships

Southwestern Regional Figure Skating Championships

Northwest Pacific Regional Figure Skating Championships

Central Pacific Regional Figure Skating Championships

Southwest Pacific Regional Figure Skating Championships

Sectional competitions[edit] The following sectional competitions are held in singles, pairs, ice dance, adult, and synchronized skating:[50][51][52]

Singles, Pairs, Ice
Ice
Dance Adult Synchronized

Eastern Sectional Figure Skating Championships Eastern Adult Sectional Figure Skating Championships Eastern Synchronized Skating Sectional Championships

Midwestern Sectional Figure Skating Championships Midwestern Adult Sectional Figure Skating Championships Midwestern Synchronized Skating Sectional Championships

Pacific Coast Sectional Figure Skating Championships Pacific Coast Adult Sectional Figure Skating Championships Pacific Coast Synchronized Skating Sectional Championships

Championship competitions[edit] The following championship competitions are held in singles, pairs, ice dance, synchronized, adult, and collegiate skating:[53]

U.S. Figure Skating Championships* U.S. Synchronized Skating Championships U.S. Adult Figure Skating Championships U.S. Collegiate Figure Skating Championships U.S. Intercollegiate Figure Skating Championships

* Effective September 1, 2012, the U.S. Junior Championships (for Juvenile and Intermediate level competitors) was eliminated and those level are held in conjunction with the U.S. Championships.[54] International competitions[edit] U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
selects the athletes and officials that represent the United States
United States
at international figure skating competitions (Team USA). These competitions include the ISU Junior Grand Prix, Four Continents Figure Skating Championships, the ISU Grand Prix, the World Synchronized Skating Championships, the World Figure Skating Championships, and the Olympic Games.[55] Although the participants for Worlds and the Olympics are most often the top placers at US Nationals, there have been several times when other skaters have been selected due to injuries preventing them from competing at Nationals; Nancy Kerrigan being selected for the 1994 Olympics over 2nd-place finisher Michelle Kwan is one example. Most recently 2014 4th-place finisher Ashley Wagner
Ashley Wagner
was selected over 3rd place Mirai Nagasu ostensibly because of Wagner's more consistent international record; however because of Wagner's many endorsement contracts her selection has raised concerns about the fairness of the process (since U.S. Championships are not used as a straightforward Olympic trials).[56][57] Sponsors[edit] U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
has a number of sponsors, suppliers, and licensees that provide support to the association either financially or by supplying other goods and services. U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
also makes available its logo and sanctioned content, primarily competitions, to various licensees.[58]

Sponsors Suppliers Licensees

Hilton Worldwide[59] United Airlines icenetwork.com

The J.M. Smucker Co. Main Event NBC Sports

Prudential EVC US Bank

Alka-Seltzer Plus Ex3

AT&T[60]

Puffs[61]

Media[edit] Skating magazine is the official publication of U.S. Figure Skating. Established in 1923, 11 issues are published annually.[62] The association also houses the World Figure Skating Museum and Hall of Fame in its headquarters building in Colorado Springs, Colorado. U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
maintains two Internet domains, usfsa.org, established in 1997[63] and usfigureskating.org, established in 2003.[64] In 2005, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
partnered with MLB Advanced Media
MLB Advanced Media
to set up Ice
Ice
Network, LLC. Ice
Ice
Network, LLC is a wholly owned by U.S. Figure Skating.[65] Subscribers to icenetwork.com have access to a wide variety of live and on-demand figure skating competitions, as well as results, photographs, athletes' biographies, and other on-line, multimedia material. U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
also has Facebook, Twitter, and Myspace
Myspace
accounts as well and a YouTube
YouTube
channel and Flickr
Flickr
website. The association has an RSS
RSS
feed and can push alerts and content via text messaging. Memorial Fund[edit] Formation and purpose[edit] On February 15, 1961, the entire United States
United States
figure skating team was killed when Sabena Flight 548
Sabena Flight 548
crashed en route from New York City to Brussels, Belgium.[66] The team was going to participate in the 1961 World Figure Skating Championships in Prague, Czechoslovakia. Among the team members that perished were 18 athletes, seven coaches and managers, three judges and referees, and six team family members.[67] Within one week of the tragedy, the association announced the formation of a memorial fund in honor of the lost team members.[68] "The mission of the Memorial Fund is to provide qualified U.S. Figure Skating members in need of financial aid with monetary assistance to pursue their goals both inside and outside the competitive arena. The fund is committed to awarding skating and academic scholarships to those athletes who have demonstrated excellent competitive results and/or academic achievements, and who have potential in national and international competitions."[69] RISE[edit] In 2009, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
commissioned the production of a full-length feature documentary film commemorating the 50th anniversary of the loss of the 1961 U.S. World Figure Skating Championship team and exalting figure skating in the U.S.[70] The movie, RISE, was produced and directed by the Emmy-award winning company, Lookalike Productions of Englewood, NJ.[71] The film was released on February 17, 2011, for a one-night presentation through NCM Fathom.[72] It was shown again for an encore presentation on March 7, 2011.[73] Proceeds of the movie were used to further the mission of the Memorial Fund.[70] See also[edit]

Sabena Flight 548

Footnotes[edit]

^ In June 2010, the ISU replaced the name "compulsory dance" with "pattern dance". p.2, Section I.1.1.b), "ISU Communication 1621", International Skating Union, (accessed July 19, 2011). ^ U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
also adopted the name "pattern dance" in 2011. p.32, "2011–12 Tests Book", U.S. Figure Skating, (accessed July 19, 2011).

References[edit]

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(accessed August 25, 2011). ^ "Moves in the Field Tests, TR21.01, 2011–12 TESTS BOOK, U.S. Figure Skating (accessed August 25, 2011). ^ "TR19.02, p. 6", 2011–12 TESTS BOOK, U.S. Figure Skating
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(accessed August 26, 2011). ^ "TR2.01 A., p. 2", 2011–12 TESTS BOOK, U.S. Figure Skating (accessed August 26, 2011). ^ "Preliminary Pattern Dance Test, TR49.01, 2011–12 TESTS BOOK, U.S. Figure Skating (accessed August 25, 2011). ^ "Gold Pattern Dance Test, TR49.07, 2011–12 TESTS BOOK, U.S. Figure Skating (accessed August 25, 2011). ^ "International Pattern Dance Test, TR49.08, 2011–12 TESTS BOOK, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
(accessed August 25, 2011). ^ "Technical Requirements, Sections 7200-7520", THE 2013 OFFICIAL U.S. FIGURE SKATING RULEBOOK, U.S. Figure Skating, (accessed July 30, 2012) ^ "p. 94, SR 1.02 Sanctions", THE 2013 OFFICIAL U.S. FIGURE SKATING RULEBOOK, U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
(accessed July 30, 2012). ^ "p. 144, 2000 Qualifying Competitions - Sanctions", THE 2013 OFFICIAL U.S. FIGURE SKATING RULEBOOK, U.S. Figure Skating
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(accessed July 30, 2012). ^ a b " U.S. Figure Skating
U.S. Figure Skating
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(accessed August 25, 2011). ^ "Synchronized Skating", U.S. Figure Skating
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Further reading[edit]

Wright, Benjamin T. (1996). Skating In America (1921–1996) The 75th Anniversary History of the United States
United States
Figure Skating Association. Colorado Spring, Colorado: The United States
United States
Figure Skating Association.  Swift, E.M. (February 21, 2011). "'The Day The Music Stopped': Fifty years ago, a fiery plane crash destroyed an entire generation of U.S. figure skaters and some of the sport's most celebrated coaches, including a grande dame whose influence is still felt today". Sports Illustrated. Time Inc. Retrieved 2011-02-21. 

External links[edit] Web Site[edit]

U.S. Figure Skating RISE - Can the end of one dream give rise to another?

Social media[edit]

U.S. Figure Skating's Facebook
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