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Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium (/ˈtwɪkənəm/; usually known as Twickenham
Twickenham
or Twickers)[4] is a rugby union stadium in Twickenham, south west London, England. Owned by the governing body of rugby union in England, the Rugby Football Union
Rugby Football Union
(the RFU), the stadium hosts home test matches for the England
England
national rugby union team. Other rugby union games played at the stadium include the Middlesex
Middlesex
Sevens, selected Aviva Premiership
Aviva Premiership
fixtures, selected Anglo-Welsh Cup
Anglo-Welsh Cup
matches, the Varsity Match between the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and selected European Rugby Champions Cup
European Rugby Champions Cup
matches. The RFU headquarters are in the stadium. Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium has also hosted concerts by Rihanna, Iron Maiden, Bryan Adams, Bon Jovi, Genesis, U2, Beyoncé, The Rolling Stones, The Police, Eagles, R.E.M., and Lady Gaga, rugby league's Challenge Cup Finals, and conventions of Jehovah's Witnesses, and it has hosted American football
American football
as part of the NFL
NFL
London
London
Games in 2016 and 2017. Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium is the second largest stadium in the U.K., following Wembley Stadium, and the fourth largest one in Europe.

Contents

1 Overview 2 History 3 Redevelopment 4 Rugby World Cup

4.1 1991 Rugby World Cup 4.2 1999 Rugby World Cup 4.3 2015 Rugby World Cup

5 Other uses

5.1 Concerts 5.2 American football

6 World Rugby Museum 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External links

Overview[edit] Twickenham
Twickenham
is often referred to as the home of rugby union.[5] The stadium, owned and operated by the RFU, hosts rugby union fixtures year round. It is the home of the English rugby union team, who play nearly all their home games at the stadium. Twickenham
Twickenham
hosts England's home Six Nations matches, as well as inbound touring teams from the Southern Hemisphere, usually annually around November. Apart from its relationship with the national team, Twickenham
Twickenham
is the venue for a number of other domestic and international rugby union matches. It hosts the annual London
London
leg of the World Rugby Sevens Series, the Cup (championship) final and third-place match of the annual London
London
leg of the World Rugby Women's Sevens Series, and the domestic Middlesex Sevens competition. It is also the venue for the final of the Aviva Premiership
Aviva Premiership
as well as the season-opening London Double Header, Big Game and an annual fixture hosted by Bath Rugby. Anglo-Welsh Cup, Heineken Cup
Heineken Cup
and Champions Cup finals have also been held here in the past. The stadium is also host to The Varsity Match between Oxford and Cambridge, the English schools' Daily Mail Cup Final and the Army Navy Match
Army Navy Match
which forms the culmination of the annual Inter-Services Competition. History[edit] Sold out Tests against New Zealand and South Africa at Crystal Palace saw the RFU realise the benefit of owning their own ground. Committee member William Williams and treasurer William Cail[6] led the way to purchasing a 10.25 acre (4 hectare) market garden in Twickenham
Twickenham
in 1907 for £5,500 12s 6d. The first stands were constructed the following year. Before the ground was purchased, it was used to grow cabbages, and so Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium is affectionately known as the Cabbage Patch. After further expenditure on roads, the first game, between Harlequins v. Richmond, was played on 2 October 1909, and the first international, England
England
v. Wales, on 15 January 1910. At the time of the English-Welsh game, the stadium had a maximum capacity of 20,000 spectators. During World War I the ground was used for cattle, horse and sheep grazing. King George V unveiled a war memorial in 1921.

Starting An Attack, painting of the England
England
v Wales
Wales
rugby union match at Twickenham
Twickenham
in 1931

In 1926, the first Middlesex Sevens took place at the ground. In 1927 the first Varsity Match took place at Twickenham
Twickenham
for the first time. On 19 March 1938, BBC Television
BBC Television
broadcast the England – Scotland
Scotland
(Calcutta Cup) match from Twickenham, the first time that a rugby match was shown live on television.[7] In 1959, to mark 50 years of the ground, a combined side of England
England
and Wales
Wales
beat Ireland
Ireland
and Scotland
Scotland
by 26 points to 17. Coming into the last match of the 1988 season, against the Irish, England
England
had lost 15 of their previous 23 matches in the Five Nations Championship. The Twickenham
Twickenham
crowd had only seen one solitary England try in the previous two years, and at half-time against Ireland
Ireland
they were 0–3 down. During the second half a remarkable transformation took place and England
England
started playing an expansive game many had doubted they were capable of producing. A 0–3 deficit was turned into a 35–3 win, with England
England
scoring six tries. This day also saw the origins of the adoption of the traditional spiritual Swing Low, Sweet Chariot as a terrace song. In the 35–3 win against Ireland, three of England's tries were scored by Chris Oti, a black player who had made a reputation for himself that season as a speedster on the left wing. A group of boys from the Benedictine
Benedictine
school Douai, following a tradition at their school games, sang Swing Low, Sweet Chariot whenever a try was scored. When Oti scored his second try, amused spectators standing close to the boys joined in, and when Oti scored his hat-trick the song was heard around the ground.[8][9] Since then Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
has been a song to sing at England
England
home games,[10] in the same way that Fields of Athenry is sung in Dublin and Cwm Rhondda
Cwm Rhondda
is sung in Cardiff.

The interior Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium in 2012

The United Kingdom, Ireland
Ireland
and France
France
shared the hosting of the 1991 Rugby World Cup. Twickenham
Twickenham
was used during pool A England
England
matches. Twickenham
Twickenham
was also host of the 1991 Rugby World Cup
1991 Rugby World Cup
Final in which Australia beat England
England
12-6. For this game, England
England
changed their style of play, opting for the sort of running game that had brought them victory against Ireland
Ireland
in the March 1988 game referred to above. During this match, with the English facing a 12-3 deficit, David Campese reached one-handed for a ball thrown to England
England
winger, Rory Underwood. He dropped it and the ball rolled forward, gifting England a penalty that proved to be the last score of the game. Some have claimed that Campese's action should have been interpreted as a deliberate professional foul, with possible disciplinary action against the Australian player. However, on the same ground in November 1988, Campese had intercepted a similar pass and run the length of the field to score a try.[11] Some of the Welsh-hosted 1999 Rugby World Cup
1999 Rugby World Cup
games were taken to Twickenham. These included three of England's pool B matches, the second round playoff when England
England
defeated Fiji 45 points to 24, and both semi-finals, none of which England
England
were involved in, having made their exit in the quarter-finals at the hands of South Africa. Under the reign of Clive Woodward, the stadium became known as 'Fortress Twickenham', as England
England
enjoyed a run of 19 unbeaten home matches from October 1999, ending with defeat against Ireland
Ireland
in 2004. The IRB Rugby Aid Match was played on 5 March 2005 under the auspices of the International Rugby Board
International Rugby Board
(IRB) to raise money for the United Nations World Food Programme
World Food Programme
to support its work aiding victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Representative sides of the Northern and Southern hemispheres played at Twickenham. The final score was Northern Hemisphere 19 – Southern Hemisphere 54. Redevelopment[edit]

The South Stand before redevelopment

The South Stand during redevelopment

The South Stand after redevelopment

Since the ground was bought by the RFU in 1907, it has gone through a number of redevelopments. In 1921 a stand was built above the northern terrace, with workshops placed underneath. In 1927, there was an extension to the East Stand, bringing the capacity to 12,000. The south terrace was also extended to allow 20,000 spectators. In 1932 a new West Stand was completed, providing offices for the RFU, who made the ground their home. In 1937, Middlesex
Middlesex
County Council approved a scheme submitted by Twickenham
Twickenham
Borough Council to widen Rugby Road due to it being inadequate for traffic. In 1965, the South Terrace was closed due to structural failings. It was found to be cheaper to build a new stand as opposed to repairing the existing one; however, planning permission was refused, due to objection from local residents. Permission was granted in 1978. A period of extensive rebuilding took place during the early 1980s which continued through to the mid-1990s. In 1981 the South Terrace was rebuilt as the South Stand. After being taken down in 1989, an extended North Stand was opened in 1990. After the 1992 five nations, the stadium saw the development of the new East Stand and following that the West Stand. In 1995, the stadium was completed to accommodate 75,000 people in an all-seater environment. The North, East and West stands were all built by Mowlem.[12] Planning permission was sought in 2002 and received in December 2004 for a new South Stand to raise capacity to 82,000, together with a hotel and conference centre, with redevelopment commencing in June 2005. The RFU's revised application to build the new south stand at £80 million was unanimously approved by Richmond Council's planning committee on 2 December. As well as increasing the stadium's capacity to 82,000, the redevelopment introduced a four-star Marriott hotel with 156 rooms and six VIP suites with views over the field, a performing arts complex, a health and leisure club, open a new rugby shop and also increase the current function space. On Sunday 10 July 2005 the south stand was demolished to make way for the new development. The festivities that were planned for the implosion of this end of the stadium were cancelled in the wake of the 7 July terror attacks in the centre of London. The new seating, which had been started by Mowlem, was completed by Carillion
Carillion
on 5 November 2006 in time for the England
England
vs New Zealand game of the 2006 Autumn internationals series, in which England
England
lost in a near-record defeat.[12] Rugby World Cup[edit] Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium has hosted Rugby World Cup
Rugby World Cup
Matches in 1991, 1999 and 2015 with England
England
as hosts in 1991 and 2015 therefore holding the Final. The Stadium also hosted semi finals in 1999 including France victory over favourites New Zealand 43–31 which many regard as the best Rugby match of all time. 1991 Rugby World Cup[edit]

Stage of Tournament Team 1 Score Team 2

Pool A England 12–18 New Zealand

Pool A England 36–6 Italy

Pool A England 37–9 United States
United States
of America

1991 Rugby World Cup
1991 Rugby World Cup
Final England 6–12 Australia

1999 Rugby World Cup[edit]

Stage of Tournament Team 1 Score Team 2

Pool B England 67–7 Italy

Pool B England 16–30 New Zealand

Pool B England 101–10 Tonga

Quarter Final Play Off England 45–24 Fiji

Semi Final Australia 27–21 South Africa

Semi Final France 43–31 New Zealand

2015 Rugby World Cup[edit]

Stage of Tournament Team 1 Score Team 2

Pool A England 35–11 Fiji

Pool A England 25–28 Wales

Pool A England 13–33 Australia

Pool A Australia 15–6 Wales

Pool D France 32–10 Italy

Quarter Final South Africa 23–19 Wales

Quarter Final Australia 35–34 Scotland

Semi Final South Africa 18–20 New Zealand

Semi Final Argentina 15–29 Australia

Rugby World Cup
Rugby World Cup
2015 Final New Zealand 34–17 Australia

Other uses[edit]

An Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
concert in 2008.

Though Twickenham
Twickenham
usually only hosts rugby union fixtures, it has in the past been the venue for a number of other events. In 2000, the ground hosted its first game of rugby league, in which Australia defeated England
England
in the opening game of the 2000 Rugby League World Cup. The Rugby League Challenge Cup
Challenge Cup
Final has also been played at Twickenham
Twickenham
twice, in 2001 and 2006, and was won by St. Helens on both occasions. Due to the construction delays of Wembley, a number of scheduled events at Wembley were moved to Twickenham. The Challenge Cup and the Rolling Stones' A Bigger Bang Tour
A Bigger Bang Tour
concerts were taken to Twickenham.[13] The Stones also played two shows at Twickenham
Twickenham
in August and September 2003, the first of which was used as their stadium concert disc for the 2003 DVD Four Flicks. During 2007 Genesis played at Twickenham
Twickenham
during their reunion tour. The Police
The Police
played at the stadium in September 2007 and Rod Stewart
Rod Stewart
in June. The usual capacity for concerts is anything up to 55,000, as opposed to the 82,000 for rugby.[14] R.E.M.
R.E.M.
performed at Twickenham
Twickenham
in August 2008, while New Jersey rockers Bon Jovi
Bon Jovi
played two gigs at the stadium in June 2008 as part of their Lost Highway Tour, and Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
played there as part of their Somewhere Back in Time World Tour
Somewhere Back in Time World Tour
on 5 July 2008, along with a full supporting bill which included Avenged Sevenfold, Within Temptation and Lauren Harris. Since the mid-1950s it has also hosted the Jehovah's Witnesses
Jehovah's Witnesses
annual convention for the London
London
area. Usually up to 25,000 attend to hear Bible talks. The TV motoring show Top Gear used the pitch for a match of rugby, played using Kia cars.[15] Lady Gaga
Lady Gaga
performed two sold out shows at the stadium during her Born This Way Ball Tour on the 8th and 9 September 2012 with 101,250 people attending for both shows. The first date broke a record for The Fastest Selling-out Stadium Show in UK history when the 50,625 tickets for the first show sold out in 50 seconds. Rihanna
Rihanna
performed two shows at the stadium during her Diamonds World Tour on 15 and 16 June 2013 for 95,971 people for both nights. Concerts[edit]

Date Performer(s) Opening act(s) Tour/Event Attendance Notes

24 August 2003 The Rolling Stones

Licks Tour

20 September 2003

18 June 2005 U2 Doves, Idlewild, Athlete, Ash Vertigo Tour 110,796

19 June 2005

17 June 2006 Eagles

Farewell 1 Tour

20 August 2006 The Rolling Stones Feeder A Bigger Bang 100,540

22 August 2006 The Charlatans

30 June 2007 Rod Stewart

Greatest Hits

8 July 2007 Genesis

Turn It On Again: The Tour

27 June 2008 Bon Jovi Biffy Clyro Lost Highway Tour 92,852

28 June 2008 The Feeling

5 July 2008 Iron Maiden Avenged Sevenfold, Within Temptation, Lauren Harris Somewhere Back in Time World Tour 55,000

30 August 2008 R.E.M.

Accelerate Tour

8 September 2007 The Police Maximo Park, Fiction Plane The Police
The Police
Reunion Tour 104,417

9 September 2007

12 September 2010 Various Artists N/A Help For Heroes Concert

8 September 2012 Lady Gaga The Darkness, Lady Starlight Born This Way Ball 101,250

9 September 2012

1 June 2013 Beyoncé Ellie Goulding, Laura Pausini, Jennifer Lopez, Jessie J, John Legend & Timbaland, among others Sound for Change Live 45,060

15 June 2013 Rihanna David Guetta, GTA Diamonds World Tour 95,971

16 June 2013

8 July 2017 U2 Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds The Joshua Tree Tour 2017 108,894

9 July 2017

American football[edit] Main article: NFL
NFL
International Series On 3 November 2015 it was announced that the RFU and America's National Football League
National Football League
had agreed a three-year deal to host at least three NFL
NFL
London
London
Games. The deal began in October 2016 and gave the opportunity to host an additional two games over the three-year period of the deal.[16] On 23 October 2016 the Los Angeles Rams hosted the New York Giants
New York Giants
at Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium. This was the second of three London
London
Games in 2016, with the others being played at Wembley.[17] The game was televised nationally live in the UK on BBC
BBC
Two. The final two games of the agreement were played in 2017, with matchups announced on 13 December, 2016.[18]

List of NFL
NFL
London
London
Games at Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium

Year Date UK Broadcaster Designated Home Score Designated Away Score Attendance Pre-game show

2016 23 October BBC
BBC
[19] Los Angeles Rams 10 New York Giants 17 74,121 Craig David

2017 22 October Sky Sports Los Angeles Rams 33 Arizona Cardinals 0 73,736[20]

29 October BBC Cleveland Browns 16 Minnesota Vikings 33 74,237

World Rugby Museum[edit] The World Rugby Union Museum is a museum located in Twickenham Stadium. The museum covers the whole of the global game, not just English rugby union. It tells the history of the sport, including William Webb Ellis
William Webb Ellis
and Richard Lindon, using interactive display techniques. The museum has a rolling programme of special exhibitions which cover topical issues and offer an opportunity to display some of the obscurer items in the collection. Some unique displays include an English rugby union jersey from the first ever rugby union international in 1871 between England
England
and Scotland, and (until 2005) the William Webb Ellis
William Webb Ellis
Cup which was obtained by England
England
at the 2003 Rugby World Cup. Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium Tours are also available through the Museum and run four times per day (Tuesday to Saturday) and twice on Sundays. It is usually open every day of the week except for Mondays. Except match days when for ticket holders only a special price entry to the museum is available. See also[edit]

Rugby union
Rugby union
in England Sport in London Twickenham
Twickenham
Streaker (other)

References[edit]

^ "The Rugby ground : The Twickenham
Twickenham
Museum". twickenham-museum.org.uk. Archived from the original on 22 June 2011. Retrieved 15 April 2010.  ^ " Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium Address".  ^ " Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium". Rugby Football Union. Retrieved 7 January 2014.  ^ Nicky Campbell Twickers learning from us Scots as petty tyranny crosses border, The Guardian
The Guardian
1 February 2007 ^ RFU press office Home of Rugby to host cycling charity challenge 8 September 2006 ^ "Cail, William". 20thcenturylondon.org.uk. Retrieved 10 December 2011.  ^ "TELEVISION – Monday, March 14 to Saturday, March 19" (PDF). Radio Times. 11 March 1938. Retrieved 21 February 2016.  ^ Oliver Price Blood, mud and aftershave in The Observer Sunday 5 February 2006, Section O is for Oti ^ "The story behind "Swing Low Sweet Chariot" and how it became a rugby anthem". everyhit.com. Retrieved 8 October 2007.  ^ Tom Geoghegan, All you need to know about rugby: Rugby songs and jokes, BBC
BBC
news magazine, 19 October 2007 ^ "1991: Wallabies pip England". BBC. 24 September 2003. Retrieved 19 August 2006.  ^ a b "Steel conversion for Twickenham". New Steel Construction. 1 September 2006. Retrieved 20 January 2018.  ^ "Stadium delay hits Wembley gigs". BBC. 31 March 2006. Retrieved 24 September 2006.  ^ "RFU apply for two additional concerts at Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium in 2007". The Twickenham
Twickenham
Rugby Stadium. Archived from the original on 25 June 2008. Retrieved 21 March 2007.  ^ "Six Nations 2013: Top Gear team play car rugby". BBC
BBC
Sport. BBC. Retrieved 18 February 2013.  ^ " NFL
NFL
action at Twickenham". England
England
Rugby. Rugby Football Union. Retrieved 3 November 2015.  ^ " NFL
NFL
Announces 2016 International Series Games in London". NFL
NFL
UK. National Football League. Retrieved 25 November 2015.  ^ "2017 London
London
games: NFL
NFL
announces which teams will be playing". nfl.com. NFL. Retrieved 13 December 2016.  ^ " New York Giants
New York Giants
vs Los Angeles Rams 10/23/16". NFL. National Football League. Retrieved 16 April 2016.  ^ Doyle, Tom (22 October 2017). " NFL
NFL
London
London
2017: Los Angeles Rams crush Arizona Cardinals 33-0". Evening Standard. Retrieved 22 October 2017. 

Further reading[edit]

Harris, Ed, (2005). Twickenham: The History of the Cathedral of Rugby, Sports Books, (ISBN 1899807292 ) Spragg, Iain, (2010). Twickenham
Twickenham
– 100 Years of Rugby's HQ, Vision Sports Publishing, (ISBN 9781905326761 )

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium.

Official Twickenham
Twickenham
site

Preceded by Eden Park Auckland Rugby World Cup Final Venue 1991 Succeeded by Ellis Park Johannesburg

Preceded by Lansdowne Road Dublin Heineken Cup Final Venue 1999–00 Succeeded by Parc des Princes Paris

Preceded by Lansdowne Road Dublin Heineken Cup Final Venue 2003–04 Succeeded by Murrayfield Edinburgh

Preceded by Millennium Stadium Cardiff Heineken Cup Final Venue 2006–07 Succeeded by Millennium Stadium Cardiff

Preceded by Millennium Stadium Cardiff Heineken Cup Final Venue 2011–12 Succeeded by Aviva Stadium Dublin

Preceded by Millennium Stadium Cardiff European Rugby Champions Cup Final Venue 2014–15 Succeeded by Parc Olympique Lyonnais Lyon

Preceded by Eden Park Auckland Rugby World Cup Final Venue 2015 Succeeded by International Stadium Yokohama Yokohama

Links to related articles

v t e

England
England
national rugby union team

Rugby Football Union

History

History Tries

Players

All Players Top Scorers Killed in the World Wars

Home stadiums

Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium

Competitions and trophies

Rugby World Cup Six Nations Championship Triple Crown Grand Slam Calcutta Cup Cook Cup Hillary Shield Old Mutual Wealth Cup Millennium Trophy

Related teams

Sevens England
England
Saxons RFU Championship XV England
England
Counties XV U20s U18s

Matches

World Cup finals

1991 2003 2007

By opponent

Argentina Australia Barbarians France Ireland Italy New Zealand Samoa Scotland South Africa Wales

Results

1871–79 1880–89 1890–99 1900–09 1910–14 1920–29 1930–39 1947–49 1950–59 1960–69 1970–79 1980–89 1990–99 2000–09 2010–19

See also

All Matches Test Series Scotland
Scotland
(1871) England
England
v President's Overseas XV

Tours

Australia

1963 1975 1988 1991 1997 1998 1999 2003 2004 2006 2010 2016

New Zealand

1963 1973 1985 1998 2003 2004 2008 2010 2014

South Africa

1972 1984 1994 1998 2000 2007 2012 2018

Argentina

1981 1990 1997 2002 2013 2017

Romania

1989

South Pacific

1973 1979 1988 1991

North America

1982 1993 2001

Asia

1971 1979

See also

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot

v t e

Challenge Cup

Years

1890–91 · 1891–92 · 1892–93 · 1893–94 · 1894–95 · 1895–96 1897–02 1898–02 1899–02 1900–02

1901–02 1902–02 1903–02 1904–02 1905–02 1906–02 1907–02 1908–02 1909–02 1910–02

1911–02 1912–02 1913–02 1914–02 1915–02 1915–16 1916–17 1917–18 1918–19 1919–20

1920–21 1921–22 1922–23 1923–24 1924–25 1925–26 1926–27 1927–28 1928–29 1929–30

1930–31 1931–32 1932–33 1933–34 1934–35 1935–36 1936–37 1937–38 1938–39 1939–40

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1950–51 1951–52 1952–53 1953–54 1954–55 1955–56 1956–57 1957–58 1958–59 1959–60

1960–61 1961–62 1962–63 1963–64 1964–65 1965–66 1966–67 1967–68 1968–69 1969–70

1970–71 1971–72 1972–73 1973–74 1974–75 1975–76 1976–77 1977–78 1978–79 1979–80

1980–81 1981–82 1982–83 1983–84 1984–85 1985–86 1986–87 1987–88 1988–89 1989–90

1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95 1996–97 1997–98 1998–99 1999–00 2000–01

2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11

2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 2019–20 2020–21

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records

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Teams

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Stadia

Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium Stade de France Stade Vélodrome Aviva Stadium Stadio Olimpico Murrayfield Stadium Principality Stadium

Seasons

Home

1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

Five

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931

Home

1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

Five

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

Six

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019

Head-to-head records

England

France Ireland Italy Scotland Wales

France

England Ireland Italy Scotland Wales

Ireland

England France Italy Scotland Wales

Italy

England France Ireland Scotland Wales

Scotland

England France Ireland Italy Wales

Wales

England France Ireland Italy Scotland

Honours

Auld Alliance Trophy Triple Crown Grand Slam Calcutta Cup Centenary Quaich Giuseppe Garibaldi Trophy Millennium Trophy Wooden Spoon

Championship records Hat-tricks Under 20s Championship Women's Championship

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London
London
Borough of Richmond upon Thames

Districts

Barnes East Sheen Fulwell Ham Hampton Hampton Hill Hampton Wick Kew Mortlake Petersham Richmond St Margarets Strawberry Hill Teddington Twickenham Whitton

Railway stations

Barnes Barnes Bridge Fulwell Hampton Hampton Wick Kew
Kew
Gardens Mortlake North Sheen Richmond St Margarets Strawberry Hill Teddington Twickenham Whitton

River Thames
River Thames
bridges, islands and river services

Bridges Benn's Island Corporation Island Eel Pie Island Glover's Island Platts Eyot Swan Island Tagg's Island Trowlock Island Hammerton's Ferry Hampton Ferry Kew
Kew
Pier Richmond Lock Teddington
Teddington
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Teddington
Lock former Twickenham
Twickenham
Ferry

Other rivers and streams

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Sports venues

Athletic Ground, Richmond Barn Elms Playing Fields The Championship Course Cricket clubs and grounds Golf clubs and courses Hampton Pool The Lensbury Pools on the Park Royal Tennis Court, Hampton Court Teddington
Teddington
Pools and Fitness Centre Thames Young Mariners Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium Twickenham
Twickenham
Stoop former Ranelagh Club former Richmond Ice Rink

Events

Annual sports events Hampton Court Palace
Hampton Court Palace
Festival Hampton Court Palace
Hampton Court Palace
Flower Show IRB Rugby Aid Match

Breweries and pubs

Britannia, Richmond The Bull's Head The Crown, Twickenham Dysart Arms The Fox, Twickenham The George, Twickenham Hare and Hounds, Sheen Jolly Coopers, Hampton Old Ship, Richmond Park Hotel, Teddington Richmond Brewery Stores Sun Inn, Barnes Twickenham
Twickenham
Fine Ales Watney Combe & Reid White Cross, Richmond The White Swan, Twickenham‎

Theatres, cinemas and music venues

The Bull's Head Crawdaddy Club The Exchange Olympic Studios Orange Tree Theatre Puppet Theatre Barge Richmond Theatre TwickFolk Wathen Hall former Eel Pie Island
Eel Pie Island
Hotel

Film and recording studios

Astoria The Boathouse, Twickenham Eel Pie Studios Olympic Studios Teddington
Teddington
Studios Twickenham
Twickenham
Film Studios

Media and publishing

Richmond and Twickenham
Twickenham
Times former Gaydar Radio former Hogarth Press

Historical royal palaces

Hampton Court Palace Kew
Kew
Palace Richmond Palace

Other places of interest

123 Mortlake
Mortlake
High Street 14 The Terrace, Barnes 18 Station Road, Barnes 70 Barnes High Street Asgill House Brinsworth House Bushy House Chapel House Chapel in the Wood Clarence House Diana Fountain, Bushy Park Doughty House Douglas House Downe House East Sheen
East Sheen
Filling Station Fulwell bus garage Garrick's Temple to Shakespeare Garrick's Villa Grove House, Hampton Ham House Hampton Youth Project Harrods
Harrods
Furniture Depository Hogarth House The Homestead, Barnes King's Observatory Kneller Hall Langham House Langham House Close Latchmere House Lichfield Court Marble Hill House Montrose House The Naked Ladies National Physical Laboratory Normansfield Theatre The Old Court House Ormeley Lodge Parkleys The Pavilion, Hampton Court Pembroke Lodge Pope's Urn Pope's Grotto Poppy Factory The Queen's Beasts Royal Military School of Music Royal Star and Garter Home St Leonard's Court Strawberry Hill House Stud House Sudbrook House and Park The Terrace, Barnes Thatched House Lodge University Boat Race Stones Victoria Working Men's Club West Hall, Kew White Lodge The Wick Wick House Yelverton Lodge York House

History

Adana Printing Machines Admiralty Research Laboratory Alcott House Ashe baronets Barnes rail crash Camp Griffiss Cross Deep House GHQ Liaison Regiment Hampton Court Conference Kew
Kew
Letters Mortlake
Mortlake
Tapestry Works Mount Ararat, Richmond Murder of Amélie Delagrange Murder of Julia Martha Thomas Petersham Hole Pocock baronets Pope's villa Radnor House Richmond Flyers Richmond, Petersham and Ham Open Spaces Act 1902 Ringway 2 Sheen Priory Star and Garter Hotel, Richmond Towpath murders Treaty of Hampton Court (1562) Twickenham
Twickenham
Park Vandeput baronets Warren-Lambert Wigan baronets

Parliamentary constituencies

Richmond Park Twickenham former Richmond and Barnes former Richmond (Surrey)

Other topics

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Parks, open spaces and nature reserves in the London
London
Borough of Richmond upon Thames

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World Rugby Sevens Series

Seasons

1999–2000 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18

2017–18 tournaments

Dubai South Africa Australia New Zealand USA Canada Hong Kong Singapore London France

Former tournaments

Argentina China Fiji Japan Malaysia Scotland Uruguay Wales

Current stadiums

The Sevens Cape Town Stadium Allianz Stadium Waikato Stadium Sam Boyd Stadium BC Place Hong Kong Stadium Singapore National Stadium Twickenham Stade Jean-Bouin

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Venues of the 1991 Rugby World Cup

Cardiff
Cardiff
Arms Park (Cardiff) Cross Green
Cross Green
(Otley) Kingsholm (Gloucester) Lansdowne Road
Lansdowne Road
(Dublin) Murrayfield (Edinburgh) Parc des Princes
Parc des Princes
(Paris) Parc Municipal des Sports (Brive) Pontypool Park
Pontypool Park
(Pontypool) Ravenhill (Belfast) Sardis Road
Sardis Road
(Pontypridd) Stade de la Méditerranée (Béziers) Stade Armandie
Stade Armandie
(Agen) Stade Jean Dauger (Bayonne) Stade Ernest-Wallon
Stade Ernest-Wallon
(Toulouse) Stade Lesdiguières
Stade Lesdiguières
(Grenoble) Lille Métropole Stadium (Villeneuve d'Ascq) Stradey Park
Stradey Park
(Llanelli) Twickenham
Twickenham
(London) Welford Road (Leicester)

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Venues of the 1999 Rugby World Cup

Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
(Cardiff) Stade de France
Stade de France
(Saint-Denis) Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium (London) Murrayfield Stadium
Murrayfield Stadium
(Edinburgh) Hampden Park
Hampden Park
(Glasgow) Lansdowne Road
Lansdowne Road
(Dublin) Stade Félix Bollaert
Stade Félix Bollaert
(Lens) Parc Lescure (Bordeaux) McAlpine Stadium (Huddersfield) Stade de Toulouse
Toulouse
(Toulouse) Stade de la Méditerranée (Béziers) Ashton Gate (Bristol) Welford Road Stadium
Welford Road Stadium
(Leicester) Racecourse Ground
Racecourse Ground
(Wrexham) Thomond Park
Thomond Park
(Limerick) Ravenhill Stadium
Ravenhill Stadium
(Belfast) Stradey Park
Stradey Park
(Llanelli) Netherdale
Netherdale
(Galashiels)

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European Rugby Champions Cup: Final venues

Heineken Cup
Heineken Cup
era

Cardiff
Cardiff
Arms Park (1996) Cardiff
Cardiff
Arms Park (1997) Parc Lescure (1998) Lansdowne Road
Lansdowne Road
(1999) Twickenham
Twickenham
(2000) Parc des Princes
Parc des Princes
(2001) Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
(2002) Lansdowne Road
Lansdowne Road
(2003) Twickenham
Twickenham
(2004) Murrayfield (2005) Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
(2006) Twickenham
Twickenham
(2007) Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
(2008) Murrayfield (2009) Stade de France
Stade de France
(2010) Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
(2011) Twickenham
Twickenham
(2012) Aviva Stadium
Aviva Stadium
(2013) Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
(2014)

Champions Cup era

Twickenham
Twickenham
(2015) Parc Olympique Lyonnais
Parc Olympique Lyonnais
(2016) Murrayfield (2017) San Mamés (2018) St James' Park
St James' Park
(2019)

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2000 Rugby League World Cup
2000 Rugby League World Cup
venues

England

Auto Quest Stadium Craven Park Derwent Park Gateshead International Stadium Headingley Kingsholm Stadium Knowsley Road Madejski Stadium McAlpine Stadium Old Trafford Reebok Stadium The Boulevard The Jungle Twickenham Vicarage Road

France

Charlety Stadium Stade d'Albert Domec Stadium de Toulouse Stadium Municipal
Stadium Municipal
d'Albi

Wales

Millennium Stadium Racecourse Ground Stradey Park

Ireland

Tolka Park Windsor Park

Scotland

Firhill Stadium Tynecastle

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Venues for the 2015 Rugby World Cup

Brighton
Brighton
Community Stadium (Brighton) City of Manchester Stadium
City of Manchester Stadium
(Manchester) Elland Road
Elland Road
(Leeds) Kingsholm (Gloucester) King Power Stadium
King Power Stadium
(Leicester) Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
(Cardiff) Olympic Stadium (London) Sandy Park
Sandy Park
(Exeter) St James' Park
St James' Park
(Newcastle upon Tyne) Stadium mk
Stadium mk
(Milton Keynes) Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium (London) Villa Park
Villa Park
(Birmingham) Wembley Stadium
Wembley Stadium
(London)

v t e

Rugby World Cup
Rugby World Cup
Final venues

Eden Park
Eden Park
(Australia/New Zealand 1987) Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium ( England
England
1991) Ellis Park (South Africa 1995) Millennium Stadium
Millennium Stadium
( Wales
Wales
1999) Telstra Stadium (Australia 2003) Stade de France
Stade de France
( France
France
2007) Eden Park
Eden Park
(New Zealand 2011) Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium ( England
England
2015) International Stadium Yokohama
International Stadium Yokohama
(Japan 2019)

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Current stadiums of the National Football League

American Football Conference

East

Gillette Stadium Hard Rock Stadium MetLife Stadium1 New Era Field

North

FirstEnergy Stadium Heinz Field M&T Bank Stadium Paul Brown Stadium

South

Lucas Oil Stadium Nissan Stadium NRG Stadium TIAA Bank Field

West

Arrowhead Stadium Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum Sports Authority Field at Mile High StubHub Center

National Football Conference

East

AT&T Stadium FedExField Lincoln Financial Field MetLife Stadium1

North

Ford Field Lambeau Field Soldier Field U.S. Bank Stadium

South

Bank of America Stadium Mercedes-Benz Stadium Mercedes-Benz Superdome Raymond James Stadium

West

CenturyLink Field Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Levi's Stadium University of Phoenix Stadium

Hall of Fame Game

Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium

International Series

Wembley Stadium Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium Estadio Azteca

1 Both the New York Giants
New York Giants
(NFC) and the New York Jets
New York Jets
(AFC) share the same venue.

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London
London
landmarks

Buildings and structures

Bridges

Albert Bridge Blackfriars Bridge Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges Lambeth Bridge London
London
Bridge Millennium Footbridge Southwark Bridge Tower Bridge Vauxhall Bridge Waterloo Bridge Westminster Bridge

Entertainment venues

Cinemas

Empire, Leicester
Leicester
Square BFI IMAX Odeon, Leicester
Leicester
Square

Football stadia

Wembley Stadium
Wembley Stadium
(national stadium) Craven Cottage
Craven Cottage
(Fulham) The Den
The Den
(Millwall) Emirates Stadium
Emirates Stadium
(Arsenal) Loftus Road
Loftus Road
(Queens Park Rangers) London
London
Stadium (West Ham United) Selhurst Park
Selhurst Park
(Crystal Palace) Stamford Bridge (Chelsea) The Valley (Charlton Athletic) White Hart Lane
White Hart Lane
(Tottenham Hotspur)

Other major sports venues

All England
England
Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club The Championship Course
The Championship Course
(rowing) Crystal Palace National Sports Centre Lord's
Lord's
(cricket) Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park The Oval
The Oval
(cricket) Twickenham
Twickenham
Stadium (rugby)

Theatres

Adelphi Apollo Victoria Coliseum Criterion Dominion Lyceum Old Vic Palladium Royal National Theatre Royal Opera House Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Royal, Drury Lane Theatre Royal Haymarket Vaudeville

Other

Alexandra Palace Brixton Academy ExCeL Hammersmith Apollo O2 Arena Royal Albert Hall Royal Festival Hall Wembley Arena

Government

10 Downing Street Admiralty Arch Bank of England City Hall County Hall Guildhall Horse Guards Mansion House National Archives Old Bailey Palace of Westminster Royal Courts of Justice Scotland
Scotland
Yard SIS Building

Museums and galleries

British Museum Cutty Sark Golden Hinde HMS Belfast Imperial War Museum Madame Tussauds Museum of London National Gallery National Maritime Museum Natural History Museum Royal Academy of Arts Royal Observatory Science Museum Tate Britain Tate Modern Tower of London Victoria and Albert Museum

Places of worship

All Hallows-by-the-Tower BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir Bevis Marks Synagogue Methodist Central Hall Regent's Park
Regent's Park
Mosque St Martin-in-the-Fields St Mary-le-Bow St Paul's Cathedral Southwark Cathedral Westminster Abbey Westminster Cathedral

Retailing

Shops

Fortnum & Mason Hamleys Harrods Liberty Peter Jones Selfridges

Shopping centres and markets

Borough Market Brent Cross Burlington Arcade Kensington Arcade Leadenhall Market The Mall Wood Green One New Change Petticoat Lane Market Royal Exchange Westfield London Westfield Stratford City

Royal buildings

Partly occupied by the Royal Family

Buckingham Palace Clarence House Kensington Palace St James's Palace

Unoccupied

Banqueting House Hampton Court Palace Kew
Kew
Palace The Queen's Gallery Royal Mews, Buckingham Palace

Skyscrapers

Broadgate Tower 1 Canada Square 8 Canada Square 25 Canada Square 1 Churchill Place 20 Fenchurch Street Heron Tower Leadenhall Building The Shard St George Wharf Tower 30 St Mary Axe Tower 42

Structures

Albert Memorial ArcelorMittal Orbit Big Ben Cleopatra's Needle Crystal Palace transmitting station London
London
Eye London
London
Wall Marble Arch The Monument Nelson's Column Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain
Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain
("Eros") Thames Barrier Wellington Arch

Transport

City Airport Heathrow Airport Charing Cross station Clapham Junction station Euston station King's Cross station Liverpool Street station London
London
Bridge station Paddington station St Pancras station Stratford station Victoria station Waterloo station Victoria Coach Station Emirates Air Line cable car

Other

Barbican Estate Battersea Power Station British Library BT Tower Kew
Kew
Gardens Lambeth Palace Lloyd's building London
London
Zoo Oxo Tower St Bartholomew's Hospital Smithfield Market Somerset House

Parks

Royal Parks

Bushy Park Green Park Greenwich Park Hampton Court Park Hyde Park Kensington Gardens Regent's Park Richmond Park St. James's Park

Other

Battersea Park Burgess Park Clapham Common College Green Epping Forest Finsbury Park Gunnersbury Park Hampstead Heath Holland Park Mitcham Common Osterley Park Trent Park Victoria Park Wandsworth Common Wimbledon Common

Squares and public spaces

Covent Garden Horse Guards Parade Leicester
Leicester
Square Oxford Circus Parliament Square Piccadilly
Piccadilly
Circus Sloane Square Trafalgar Square

Streets

Aldwych Baker Street Bishopsgate Bond Street Carnaby Street Chancery Lane Charing Cross Road Cheapside Cornhill Denmark Street Fenchurch Street Fleet Street Haymarket Jermyn Street Kensington High Street King's Road Lombard Street The Mall Oxford Street Park Lane Piccadilly Portobello Road Regent Street Shaftesbury Avenue Sloane Street Strand Tottenham Court Road Victoria Embankme

.