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The Info List - Toyota Publica





The Toyota
Toyota
Publica is a small car manufactured by the Japanese automaker Toyota
Toyota
from 1961 to 1978. Conceived as a family car to fulfill the requirements of the Japanese Government's "national car concept", it was the smallest Toyota
Toyota
car during that period and was superseded in that role by the Toyota
Toyota
Starlet, which itself started out as a version of the Publica. It was available as a 2-door vehicle only, but in a selection of body styles, ranging from the base sedan through a station wagon, convertible, coupé and even a coupe utility (pickup), which outlived the other models by a decade, and spawned other models, such as the Toyota
Toyota
Sports 800 or Toyota
Toyota
MiniAce.

Contents

1 Development

1.1 MITI "national car" concept 1.2 From concept to reality

2 P10 series

2.1 Further development of the UP10 series

3 P20 Series 4 P30 Series

4.1 New model, new engine, new image 4.2 Publica SL and Daihatsu
Daihatsu
Consorte 4.3 Facelifts and Starlet 4.4 Toyota
Toyota
1000

5 References 6 External links

Development[edit] MITI "national car" concept[edit] The origins of the Publica can be traced to the "national car" concept of the powerful Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), which was announced in 1955. The concept stipulated for a vehicle fulfilling several requirements, like maximum speed over 100 km/h (62 mph), weight below 400 kg (882 lb), fuel consumption not exceeding 30 km/L (85 mpg‑imp; 71 mpg‑US) at the average speed of 60 km/h (37 mph) on a level road, but also notably the requirement that the car would not break down or require significant repairs for at least 100,000 kilometres (62,000 mi). From concept to reality[edit] Although Eiji Toyoda was initially keen to take advantage of the, at that time innovative, FF concept (front-mounted engine with front-wheel drive), it proved technically too complicated for Toyota engineers to be able to complete within the allotted time, so the decision was made to switch to more conventional FR layout. The Publica was inspired by the successful Citroën 2CV
Citroën 2CV
which also used a 2-cylinder, air-cooled, horizontally opposed engine, with front-wheel drive. In spite of the fact that the government sources announced that significant tax breaks would be made for cars with engine displacements of less than 500 cc, Toyota
Toyota
decided that such a small engine would provide insufficient power on the highways, and increased the planned displacement to 700 cc. The resulting engine was an air-cooled 697 cc ohv 2-cylinder boxer[2] which produced 28 hp (21 kW), and was known internally as the Toyota
Toyota
U engine. Fortunately for Toyota, the tax incentive announcements did actually not materialize; the displacement did classify in the lowest annual road tax bracket, which helped sales. The new car was given a two-door sedan body, which was intended to accommodate four people and a significant amount of luggage in the trunk, thus fulfilling the projected expectations of the customers. The car had a double wishbone suspension in the front and semi-elliptical leaf springs in the rear. While the name "Publica" was chosen with reference to the English phrase "public car", referring to the cars intended attainability and popularity, due to the lack of exact distinction between the "l" and "r" consonants in Japanese the name can be sometimes misinterpreted as something closer to paprika. The name is transliterated as "パブリカ" in Katakana, literally paburika.

P10 series[edit]

P10 Series

Toyota
Toyota
Publica DeLuxe (UP10D)

Overview

Also called Toyota
Toyota
700[3]

Production Jun 1961–1966

Assembly Japan

Designer Tatsuo Hasegawa

Body and chassis

Body style 2-door sedan 3-door station wagon 2-door convertible 2-door coupe utility (pickup)

Layout FR

Powertrain

Engine 697 cc U air-cooled OHV
OHV
H2

Transmission 4-speed manual 2-speed automatic ("Toyoglide")

Dimensions

Wheelbase 2,130 mm (84 in)

Length 3,520 mm (139 in)

Width 1,415 mm (55.7 in)

Height 1,203 mm (47.4 in)

Curb weight 580 kg (1,280 lb)

The new car was given the internal designation of "UP10" and the market name of "Publica" and was sold through a new dealer network, separate from the previous "Toyota" and "Toyopet" dealerships, called Toyota
Toyota
Publica Store (later renamed as Toyota
Toyota
Corolla Store). Sales began in June 1961, with the basic price of ¥389,000. Initially, the car was very basic, lacking even such basic options like a radio or even a heater. This limited its appeal to the consumers, which were perceiving the automobile as an aspirational good and expected it to exude a much more luxurious impression. The former Central Motors
Central Motors
produced the Publica convertible from October 1963.[4] Further development of the UP10 series[edit] In 1962, a 2-door station wagon version was added, and a derivative model, Toyota
Toyota
Sports 800 (marketed initially as "Publica Sport") debuted at the Tokyo Motor Show. In 1963 Toyota
Toyota
added a new Deluxe trim level, denoted internally as "type UP10D", which featured such "luxuries" as reclining seats, Combustion heater or radio, as well as some chrome decors (the previous base model was now called Standard). With the appearance of the Deluxe, demand finally picked up, and when the convertible model was added the same year, sales of the Publica finally reached the target level of 3000–4000 monthly. In February 1964, a coupe utility (pickup) model joined the lineup, and in September the engine got a power boost to 32 hp (24 kW), while the Deluxe trim level was also made available for the wagon version.

Toyota
Toyota
Publica DeLuxe (UP10D) rear view

P20 Series[edit]

P20 Series

Toyota
Toyota
Publica 800 DeLuxe (UP20D)

Overview

Production 1966–Apr 1969

Assembly

Japan South Korea: Incheon[5]

Body and chassis

Body style 2-door sedan 3-door station wagon 2-door convertible 2-door detachable top 2-door coupe utility (pickup)

Layout FR

Related Toyota
Toyota
MiniAce

Powertrain

Engine 790 cc 2U air-cooled OHV
OHV
H2

Transmission 4-speed manual 2-speed automatic ("Toyoglide")

Dimensions

Wheelbase 2,130 mm (84 in)

Length 3,520 mm (139 in)

Width 1,415 mm (55.7 in)

Height 1,203 mm (47.4 in)

Curb weight 580 kg (1,280 lb)

In 1966, Toyota
Toyota
launched the revised Publica range, designated UP20. The engine displacement was increased from 697 cc[2] to 790 cc, and claimed power output from 35 hp to 36 hp (the engine was now called 2U) while the convertible received the 45 hp (34 kW) twin carburetor engine from the Sports 800. Since October that year, the dealers were operating under the " Toyota
Toyota
Publica" (rather than just "Publica") brand, and the base price was reduced to ¥359,000 for 1967 - as the US dollar stood at about ¥360 at that time, Toyota
Toyota
marketed the Publica as the "1000 dollar car". The Publica dealerships were later renamed " Toyota
Toyota
Corolla Store" after the popularity of the Corolla won out over the Publica as an affordable, small car. In 1966, Toyota
Toyota
also launched the Toyota
Toyota
MiniAce cab over van, based on the UB20 Publica, as well as moved the production of the wagon version to Hino Motors
Hino Motors
in 1968, after the company was taken over by Toyota. 1968 also saw the launch of Publica Super version, which came with the engine of the Sports 800. The P20 Publica was replaced by the all-new P30 series in April 1969. The former Central Motors
Central Motors
produced the Publica convertible until December 1968.[4] Sales of the P10 and P20 Publicas:[6]

Year Production Year Production

1961 8,187 1965 43,437

1962 18,933 1966 48,415

1963 28,181 1967 42,197

1964 42,218 1968 37,262

Toyota
Toyota
Publica 800 Truck (UP26)

Toyota
Toyota
Publica 800 Convertible
Convertible
(UP20S)

Toyota
Toyota
Publica 800 Van
Van
DeLuxe (UP26V-D)

Toyota
Toyota
Publica 800 Van
Van
DeLuxe (UP26V-D) rear view

P30 Series[edit]

P30 Series

KP50 Publica sedan

Overview

Also called Toyota
Toyota
1000 Toyota
Toyota
1000 Copain Toyota
Toyota
Osaka (Belgium) Toyota
Toyota
Timangi (Finland)

Production April 1969 – 1978

Assembly Japan

Body and chassis

Body style 2-door sedan 2-door coupe utility (pickup) 3-door wagon/van

Layout FR

Powertrain

Engine 790 cc 2U air-cooled OHV
OHV
H2 993 cc 2K I4 1,077 cc K I4 1,166 cc 3K I4 1,290 cc 4K-J I4 (late pickups)

Transmission 4/5-speed manual 2-speed automatic "Toyoglide"

Dimensions

Wheelbase 2,160 mm (85 in)

Length 3,645 mm (143.5 in) 3,705 mm (145.9 in) (van)[7] 3,865 mm (152.2 in) (pickup)[7]

Width 1,450–1,490 mm (57–59 in)

Height 1,380 mm (54 in)

Curb weight 665 kg (1,466 lb)

New model, new engine, new image[edit]

The badge of the Toyota
Toyota
Publica van

In April 1969, a whole new generation of the Publica was launched.[8] The car was effectively now a scaled down version of the Corolla, sitting on a shortened Corolla wheel-base.[9] While the air-cooled 790 cc 2U engine was retained in the cheapest domestic market versions, the cornerstone of the lineup was now the new K-series four-cylinder, water-cooled 993 cc engine (designated 2K) with 58 PS (43 kW), a lower-displacement version of the 1,077 cc engine used in the contemporary Toyota
Toyota
Corolla. The Publica 800 has 40 PS (29 kW) and a top speed of only 120 km/h (75 mph), while the 1100 SL could reach 155 km/h (96 mph).[6] The 800 and 1000 were available with Standard or Deluxe equipment, both in Sedan and Van
Van
bodystyles. The Van
Van
was somewhat slower, with claimed top speeds of 115 and 135 km/h (71 and 84 mph) for the respective versions.[6] Originally a two-door sedan and a three-door wagon (called Van
Van
in Japan, as it was intended for commercial use) were available.[6] The pickup version, added in October 1969, was now officially known as "pickup". The pickup was originally only available with the 1 liter engine, although the 1.2 was made available after the January 1972 facelift.[10] The situation in the Japanese market changed, as demand developed rapidly, partially fuelled by the post-WWII baby boomers coming of age and gaining their driver's licenses. Having the Corolla firmly established as the family car offering, Toyota
Toyota
did not market the Publica as the "popular car" anymore, but rather as an entry-level vehicle for first-time young buyers. Many of the commercial iterations of the Publica were built by Hino Motors at their Hamura plant, beginning in 1970. Daihatsu
Daihatsu
also built Publicas, starting in September 1969.[8] In 1969, the Publica dealerships were renamed " Toyota
Toyota
Corolla" dealerships. Publica SL and Daihatsu
Daihatsu
Consorte[edit]

Toyota
Toyota
Publica SL, original design

The most powerful version was the Publica SL, which featured the 73 PS (54 kW) 1.1 L K-B twin carburetor engine also offered in the Corolla SL.[8] In September, after only half a year, this engine was replaced by the 1.2 L 3K-B unit in both the Corolla and Publica SL's.[8] At the same time, the Toyoglide automatic transmission became available in 1 litre Publicas. As Toyota
Toyota
had just started its relationship with Daihatsu, in 1969 the latter launched the Daihatsu
Daihatsu
Consorte, which was essentially a mildly restyled P30 Publica. It was, however, powered initially by Daihatsu's own 1.0-litre "FE" engine, which had already seen service in the previous Daihatsu
Daihatsu
model, the Compagno. Facelifts and Starlet[edit] 1970 saw minor changes to the range, including a new instrument panel, and a new High Deluxe version featuring the single-carburetor version of the 1.2 L engine and front disc brakes. A more substantial facelift took place in January 1972, when the KP30 Publica was given new front and rear fascias and a new "semi-fastback" style.[8] The U-engine model was dropped at this time, as the boxer unit could not clear emission standards anymore. 1973 saw the introduction of the Toyota
Toyota
Publica Starlet (designation KP40), a coupé version of the facelifted Publica. The last new version of the sedan was the KP50, a sedan version which featured the de-smogged 3K-U engine with 64 PS (47 kW). In June 1976 a five-speed transmission became available in the P50, the first Publica to be thus equipped.[11] The facelifted sedan continued in production until January 1978, when it was replaced by the KP60, marketed as the Toyota
Toyota
Starlet. The Van
Van
was built until June 1979, while the Publica pickup was not withdrawn until August 1988. Later pickups were fitted with the desmogged 1,166 cc 3K-HJ (from November 1975) and then the 1,290 cc 4K-J engines (from June 1979), although export versions retained the 1-litre 2K engine. The pickup also received a five-speed gearbox from August 1985.[10]

Models

UP30: 790 cc (2U-C/2U-B) sedan KP30: 993 cc (2K) sedan KP30-S: 1,077 cc (K-B) sedan, 1969.04-1969.09 KP31: 1,166 cc (3K/3K-B) sedan UP36V: 790 cc (2U-C) van KP36/V: 993 cc (2K) pickup/van KP37/V: 1,166 cc (3K) pickup/van KP38: 1,166 cc (3K-HJ) pickup, emissions controls for commercial vehicle KP39: 1,290 cc (4K-J) pickup KP50: 1,166 cc (3K-U) sedan, emissions controlled engine (1976.01-1978.01)

Toyota
Toyota
1000[edit] The P30 Publica with the 993 cc 2K engine was known as the Toyota 1000 in most markets outside Japan. With a DIN rating, the engine had 45 PS (33 kW) in export trim.[11] The Toyota
Toyota
1000 continued to be the only offering smaller than the Corolla in most export markets even after the Publica replacement (the P40 Toyota
Toyota
Starlet) was introduced for Japan
Japan
in 1973. Branded as the Toyota
Toyota
1000, the car was launched on the West German
West German
market, at the time Europe's largest national auto-market, in the fourth quarter of 1974.[12] It had an unusually lavish list of included features that included radial tyres, front headrests, tinted windows, a heated rear window and even a radio.[12] In some European markets such as Switzerland and the Netherlands, it was marketed with the additional name "Copain". In Belgium
Belgium
it was sold as the " Toyota
Toyota
Osaka" for a while. The pickup version was sold in Finland
Finland
as the Toyota
Toyota
Timangi.[13] The Toyota
Toyota
1000 sedans and wagons were replaced by the P60 Starlet in 1978 but the Toyota
Toyota
1000 pick-up continued to be sold next to the Starlet sedans and wagons.[14] The Toyota
Toyota
1000 range included a two-door sedan, a three-door wagon, and a two-door coupe utility (pickup). In South Africa, the Toyota
Toyota
1000 range also included a pick-up with the 1,166 cc 3K engine.[14]

1978 Toyota
Toyota
1000 wagon (KP36V, Europe) 

Facelifted Toyota
Toyota
1000 (KP30, Europe) 

Toyota
Toyota
Publica 1300 Pickup (KP39) 

References[edit]

^ "매거진 > 자동차교실 > 새나라자동차에서 GM-대우까지 격동의 40년을 돌아본다" [40 years of turbulent GM-Daewoo history] (in Korean). Carlife.net. 2001-11-13. Retrieved 2012-10-28.  ^ a b Smith, Maurice A (1966-07-22). "From the land of the rising sun". Autocar: 186–188.  ^ " Toyota
Toyota
1965". Classic Car Catalogue. Retrieved 2014-11-22.  ^ a b "Affiliates ( Toyota
Toyota
wholly-owned subsidiaries)- Toyota
Toyota
Motor East Japan, Inc". Toyota
Toyota
Motor Corporation. 2012. Retrieved 2014-07-21.  ^ Sochurek, Howard (March 1969). "South Korea: Success Story in Asia". National Geographic Magazine. 135 (3): 310.  ^ a b c d "News from Toyota" (PDF) (Press release) (in Japanese). Japan: Toyota. 1969-04-01. Retrieved 2013-11-21.  ^ a b 愛される車づくり。トヨタはあすにいどみます。 [Lovable car manufacture. Toyota
Toyota
dares to defy tomorrow.] (catalog) (in Japanese), Toyota
Toyota
Motor Co., 1972, p. 2  ^ a b c d e "75 Years of TOYOTA Vehicle Lineage Publica". Toyota. Retrieved 2013-11-21.  ^ Bulmer, Charles (1969-04-12). "News: New Publica range". Motor. 3486: 56.  ^ a b "75 Years of TOYOTA Vehicle Lineage Publica Truck". Toyota. Retrieved 2013-11-21.  ^ a b Hajek, Alexander. " Toyota
Toyota
1000, Copain, Publica". Toyota
Toyota
Oldies. Retrieved 2013-01-14.  External link in work= (help) ^ a b "Modelle und Preise: Toyota
Toyota
1000 kommt im Herbst" [Models and prices: Toyota
Toyota
1000 comes in the autumn]. Auto Motor u. Sport. Germany. 13: 28. 1974-06-22. CS1 maint: Date and year (link) ^ "Autoverottajan ja veronmaksajien kilpajuoksu". Retrieved 2017-12-02.  ^ a b Toyota
Toyota
Vehicle Identification Manual, Toyota
Toyota
Motor Corporation, Overseas Parts Department, Catalog No.97913-84, 1984

This article incorporates text translated from the corresponding Japanese article as of 25 September 2006.

External links[edit]

Toyota
Toyota
Publica(1st generation)Gazoo.com (Japanese) Toyota
Toyota
Publica(2nd generation)Gazoo.com (Japanese)

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Toyota
Toyota
Publica.

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