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Tofu, also known as bean curd is a food prepared by coagulating soy milk and then pressing the resulting curds into solid white blocks of varying softness; it can be silken, soft, firm, or extra firm. Beyond these broad categories, there are many varieties of tofu. It has a subtle flavor, so it can be used in savory and sweet dishes. It is often seasoned or marinated to suit the dish and its flavors, and due to its spongy texture it absorbs flavors well.[1]

Nutritionally, tofu is low in calories, while containing a relatively large amount of protein. It is high in iron, and can have a high calcium or magnesium content depending on the coagulants (e.g. calcium chloride, calcium sulfate, magnesium sulfate) used in manufacturing.

Tofu originated in China and has been consumed within China for over 2,000 years. It is also a traditional component of other cuisines such as Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Singapore and Thailand.[2][3] In Western cooking it is sometimes treated as a meat substitute.

Southeast AsiaCrumbled tofu and mashed broccoli salad

Southeast Asia

Indonesia

In Indonesia,

In Indonesia, tofu is called tahu, a loanword from the Hokkien Chinese pronunciation of tofu (tāu-hū, 豆腐). In Indonesian markets tofu is usually available in two forms: tahu putih or common white firm tofu; and tahu goreng or fried tofu that has developed a brown skin. Tahu yun yi or tahu Bandung is yellow tofu colored with turmeric.

A common cooking technique in many parts of East and Southeast Asia involves deep frying tofu in vegetable oil, sunflower oil, or canola oil. In Indonesia, it is usually fried in palm oil. Although pre-fried tofu is often sold cold, it is seldom eaten directly and requires additional cooking.

Popular Indonesian tofu dishes includes tahu gejrot