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Theddlethorpe Gas Terminal (TGT) is a large gas terminal on the Lincolnshire coast on Mablethorpe Road at Theddlethorpe St Helen close to Mablethorpe in East Lindsey in England. It is just off the A1031 and next door to a holiday camp and Mablethorpe Seal Sanctuary (Animal Gardens).

History

From December 1969, there were plans for the terminal proposed by the Gas Council. Planning permission was given in April 1970. It was built in 1972 to receive gas from the Viking gas field from 4 July 1972, being the UK's third main gas terminal when owned by Conoco. The first stage cost around £5 million. A new 86-mile (138 km) 28-inch (710 mm) offshore gas pipeline had to be built for the plant. It was originally called the Viking Gas Terminal, changing to its current name in 1984.

In the early 1990s, a new pipeline was built to the terminal by Kinetica, a company jointly owned by PowerGen and Conoco. The pipeline to Killingholme was opened by Tim Eggar on 21 July 1992.

Operation

The main site is owned by ConocoPhillips, with pipelines to National Grid's National Transmission System, and E.ON's 20-inch (510 mm) Killingholme Pipeline System[1] to both Killingholme A power station and Killingholme B power station, transporting 256,000 m3/h at a pressure of 40-55 bar. 10% of the UK's ever increasing gas requirements come from Theddlethorpe. Around one hundred people work on the site. The 30-inch line from the NTS terminal (Feeder No. 8) is routed to Hatton Lincolnshire where it connects to the 36-inch NTS Wisbech to Scunthorpe line (Feeder No. 7). In 1988, in association with the LOGGS development a second 30-inch line (Feeder No. 17) was laid from the Theddlethorpe terminal to Hatton.

In 2017 ConocoPhillips announced that the Theddlethorpe terminal was to close in 2018.[2]

Offshore pipeline systems[3]

These are in the areas known as the UK Southern Gas Basin or Southern North Sea Basin. This is part of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS). There are four major pipeline systems.

  • Lincolnshire Offshore Gas Gathering System (LOGGS) collects gas from the V-field series of gas fields plus Audrey WD WM & XW, Annabel, Alison KX, Ann XM, Anglia YM YD, Jupiter, Saturn ND, Mimas MN, Tethys TN, Ganymede ZD, Europa EZ, N.W. Bell ZX and Callisto ZM. A 118km 36-inch diameter pipeline transports gas from the LOGGS PP installation to Theddlethorpe, it was commissioned in 1988. The LOGGS installation comprises five bridge-linked platforms PR (riser), PC (compression), PP (production), PA (accommodation) and PD (drilling).
  • Caister Murdoch System (CMS) collects gas from the Boulton BM, Boulton H HM, Caister CM, Cavendish RM, Hawksley EM, Hunter HK, Kelvin TM, Ketch, McAdam MM, Munro MH, Murdoch MD, Schooner and Watt QM gas fields. A 188 km 26-inch pipeline transports gas from the Murdoch installation to Theddlethorpe, it was commissioned in 1993.
  • The Viking field collects gas from the Viking, Victor JM & JD, Victoria SM and Vixen VM fields. The Viking Transportation System (VTS) transports gas from the Viking B complex (bridge-linked platforms BA, BD, BP, BC) via a 26.9 km 16-inch pipeline to the LOGGS complex for onward transmission to Theddlethorpe. The Viking B field originally exported gas via a 10.9 km 24-inch pipeline to the Viking AR platform and thence via a 138 km 28-inch pipeline, commissioned in July 1972, to Theddlethorpe, these lines are now disused.
  • Pickerill field a 66 km 24-inch pipeline transports gas from the Pickerill A installation to Theddlethorpe, it was commissioned in 1992.

Natural gas liquids

Any liquids from the refinery operation get transferred to Phillips 66's (previously ConocoPhillip's when the two companies were one) Humber Refinery next door to the Killingholme Power Station (ICHP), twenty six miles away to the north-west of Theddlethorpe.

Gas fields[3]

Oil and gas fields in the North Sea

Viking

The main field that connects to the terminal is the Viking gas field, via the Viking Transportation System. It is 86 miles (138 km) off the Lincolnshire coast, and is in two sections - Viking A and Viking B. It is 50% owned by ConocoPhillips. It had initial recoverable reserves of 125 billion m3.[4]

Production on the North Viking Field began in July 1972 and South Viking in August 1973 after the North Viking field was discovered in March 1969 and South Viking in December 1968. It was initially operated by Conoco and the National Coal Board, then by ConocoPhillips on behalf of BP (former Britoil), and was jointly owned by both. It is close to the Indefatigable field, and a plan was to use the (nearer) Bacton gas plant instead. Production from the Viking gas field was the main incentive to build the Theddlethorpe site. Offshore installations within the field include Viking AR, the Viking B complex (bridge-linked BA, BD, BP & BC), Viking CD, Viking DD, Viking ED, Viking GD, Viking HD, Viking JD, Viking KD & Viking LD. Other Viking A installations were decommissioned in 1991 and removed in 1994.

Vixen

This field is owned 50:50 by ConocoPhillips Ltd and BP (Britoil plc). Operated by ConocoPhillips. It is 84 miles (135 km) off the Lincolnshire coast. It is transported to the terminal via the Viking Transportation System. Production began in October 2000 and was discovered in May 1999. Part of the V field system and named after the de Havilland Sea Vixen.

Boulton

Owned and run by ConocoPhillips. Subsea wellhead Boulton H HM produces gas via the Watt QW subsea template to Murdoch MD, gas from the Boulton BM installation is transported to the terminal via the Caister-Murdoch System (CMS) via the Murdoch field. It was discovered in November 1984 with production starting in December 1997 and named after Matthew Boulton, a colleague of James Watt.

Caister

It was originally run by Total, and now operated by ConocoPhillips. The Caister installation is designated CM. Gas is transported via the Murdoch field and the Caister Murdoch System (CMS) to the terminal. It was discovered in January 1968 with production starting October 1993 and named after Caister Castle in Norfolk. It was 50% owned by Consort Europe Resources (became part of E.ON Ruhrgas), 21% by GDF Britain Ltd, and 30% by ConocoPhillips. It is now owned 40% by E.ON Ruhrgas UK Caister Ltd, 39% by ConocoPhillips UK Ltd, and 21% by GDF Suez E & P UK Ltd.

Murdoch

The field is 75 miles (121 km) from the Lincolnshire coast. It is run by ConocoPhillips and named the Scottish engineer William Murdoch, a compatriot of James Watt, and who is best known for inventing gas lighting, using coal gas. It was discovered in August 1987 with production starting in October 1993. It was owned 54% by ConocoPhillips, 34% by Tullow Exploration Ltd and 11% by GDF Britain Ltd. It is now owned 59% by ConocoPhillips UK Ltd, 26% by GDF Suez E & P Uk Ltd, and 14% by Tullow Oil SK Ltd. The Murdoch K field is run by Tullow Oil. The Murdoch installation comprises three bridge-linked platforms designated MD, MC and MA. Gas is transported by the Caister Murdoch System to the terminal.

Cavendish

The field is owned by RWE Dea AG of Germany (Operator) and Dana Petroleum. It uses the Caister Murdoch System and was discovered in January 1989. The Cavendish installation has the field designation RM. Named after the British scientist Henry Cavendish who discovered hydrogen.

Saltfleetby

The onshore field was discovered in October 1997 and opened in December 1999. Originally run by Roc Oil of Australia, it is now operated by Wingas (owned by Gazprom) who bought it in December 2004. Named after Saltfleetby.

Schooner

The field opened in October 1996. It is run by Tullow Oil, which it bought from Shell and Esso in 2004. Owned 90% by Tullow Oil SK Ltd, 5% by GDF Britain Ltd, and 5% by E.ON Ruhrgas UK EU Ltd. It uses the Caister Murdoch System and was discovered in December 1986. Named after the schooner boat.

Ketch

The field opened in October 1999 and is run by Tullow Oil, which it bought from Shell in 2004. It uses the Caister Murdoch System. Discovered in November 1984. Named after the ketch boat.

Ann

Discovered in May 1966. Production bengan in October 1993. Uses the LOGGS system. Was owned 85% by Venture Production (North Sea Developments) Ltd and 15% by Roots Gas Ltd (based in Aberdeen), and now owned completely by Venture, who operate the field. It comprises two subsea installations with the field designation Ann A4 and Ann XM.

Audrey

Discovered in March 1976. Production began in October 1988. Uses the LOGGS system. Was jointly owned by Conoco and Centrica, and now owned by Centrica Energy who operate the field. Field is much larger than the neighbouring Ann field. It comprises a subsea installation Audrey WM and two platforms Audrey 1 WD and Audrey 2 XW.

Alison

Discovered in February 1987 with production starting in October 1995. A small field. Was owned 85% by Venture Production (North Sea Developments) Ltd and 15% by Roots Gas Ltd, and now owned by Centrica Energy (who bought Venture Production plc in 2009), who operate it. Alison is a subsea installation with the field designation KX.

Anglia

Discovered in December 1985, with production starting in November 1991. Was owned 55% by CalEnergy Gas (UK) Ltd, 32% by Consort North Sea Ltd, 12% by Highland Energy Ltd. Now owned 25% by Dana Petroleum (since September 2006), 12% by RWE Dea UK SNS Ltd, 30% by GDF Suez E & P UK Ltd, and 30% by First Oil. Was operated by CalEnergy and then operated by GDF Suez until 2011 since when it has been run by Ithaca Energy - Ithaca Energy (UK) Ltd. Uses the LOGGS system. It comprises the subsea installation Anglia YM and platform YD.

Pickerill

Discovered in December 1984 with production starting in August 1992. Originally run by ARCO and now run by Perenco. Was owned 43% by ARCO British Ltd, 23% by AGIP (UK) Ltd, 23% by Superior Oil (UK) Ltd and 10% by Marubeni Oil & Gas (UK) Ltd. Now owned 95% by Perenco UK Ltd and 5% by Marubeni.

Topaz

The field began operations in November 2009. It is run by RWE Dea. Named after the topaz mineral of aluminium.

Kelvin

Operated by ConocoPhillips and uses the Caister-Murdoch system. Discovered in September 2005 with production starting in November 2007. Owned 50% by ConocoPhillips (UK) Ltd, 27% by GDF Suez E & P UK Ltd, and 22% by Tullow Oil SK Ltd. The Kelvin platform has the field designation Kelvin TM. Named after William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin.

Rita

Operated by E.ON Ruhrgas UK North Sea Ltd. Production began in March 2009 and discovered in May 1996. Owned 74% by E.ON Ruhrgas UK Caister Ltd and 26% by GDF Suez E & P UK Ltd. Gas is transported via the Hunter field.

Jupiter area

These fields are Ganymede ZD (discovered June 1989 with production starting October 1995), Sinope (discovered January 1991 with production starting October 1999), Callisto ZM (discovered February 1990 with production starting October 1995), Europa EZ (discovered September 1972 with production starting October 1999) and NW Bell ZX (discovered in 1994 and production began in August 1999). They use the LOGGS pipeline via Ganymede ZD, being operated by ConocoPhillips. It is named after the moons of Jupiter. They were owned 20% by ConocoPhillips, 30% by Statoil and 50% by Superior Oil Company (now owned by Esso).

Saturn area

These fields are Saturn (discovered December 1987 with production starting in September 2005), Mimas (discovered in May 1989 with production starting in June 2007), Hyperion, Atlas, Rhea (all three operating as one from September 2005 and discovered in January 1991) and Tethys (discovered in February 1991 with production starting in February 2007). The platforms have the field designations Saturn ND, Mimas MN and Tethys TN. They use the LOGGS pipeline. The fields are named after the moons of Saturn. Owned by ConocoPhillips, RWE Dea AG, and by Venture North Sea Gas Ltd. Operated by ConocoPhillips.

V fields

These fields are Vulcan (discovered April 1983 with production starting October 1988), South Valiant & North Valiant (discovered in July 1970 and January 1971 with production starting for both in October 1988), Vanguard (discovered December 1982 with production starting October 1988), Victor (discovered May 1972 with production starting September 1984) Vampire (discovered in January 1994 with production starting October 1999), Viscount and Valkyrie. They use the LOGGS pipeline via the Viking platform. It is mostly jointly owned by ConocoPhillips and BP (former Britoil). Named after aircraft - the Avro Vulcan, Vickers Valiant, Handley Page Victor, Vickers Viscount, XB-70 Valkyrie, and de Havilland Vampire. The V field project was officially opened by Margaret Thatcher on 1 September 1988, when she visited the terminal. In the LOGGS system, the accommodation platform is separate from the production platform. The V-field comprises the following installations: North Valliant 1 PD (bridge-linked to LOGGS), North Valliant 2 SP, South Valiant TD, Vanguard QD, Victor JD and subsea Victor JM, Vulcan RD UR, Vampire/Valkyrie OD, and Viscount VO.

Juliet

This field is operated by GDF SUEZ and production started beginning of January 2014, with the west well.[5] Production at the east well should start during first quarter 2014. Juliet was discovered by GDF SUEZ in block 47/14b in December 2008.
The production is sent via pipeline to the Pickerill platform (see above), and from there to the Theddlethorpe Gas Terminal.

Seen from the south

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.eon-uk.com/generation/pipelines.aspx E.ON UK
  2. ^ "'Upstream' News". 
  3. ^ a b "Map of ConocoPhillips Southern North Sea Gas Operations". 
  4. ^ Cassidy, Richard (1979). Gas: Natural Energy. London: Frederick Muller Limited. p. 54. 
  5. ^ http://www.offshore-mag.com/articles/2014/01/gdf-suez-turns-on-taps-at-juliet-in-north-sea.html Juliet production start in Off-shore mag

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