The Catholic University of America
   HOME

TheInfoList



OR:

The Catholic University of America (CUA) is a
private Private or privates may refer to: Music * "In Private "In Private" is a song by British singer Dusty Springfield, released as a single on 20 November 1989. It was Springfield's third single in a row to be a chart success, after an absence of ...
Roman Catholic Roman or Romans most often refers to: *Rome , established_title = Founded , established_date = 753 BC , founder = King Romulus (Romulus and Remus, legendary) , image_map = Map of comune of Rome (metropolitan c ...

Roman Catholic
research university A research university or a research-intensive university is a university that is committed to research as a central part of its mission. They are the most important sites at which Knowledge production modes, knowledge production occurs, along ...
in
Washington, D.C. ) , image_skyline = , image_caption = Clockwise from top left: the Washington Monument The Washington Monument is an obelisk shaped building within the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate Geor ...
It is a
pontifical university A pontifical university is an ecclesiastical university established or approved directly by the Holy See The Holy See ( lat, Sancta Sedes, ; it, Santa Sede ), also called the See of Rome, Petrine See or Apostolic See, is the jurisdiction o ...
of the Catholic Church in the United States and the only institution of higher education founded by
U.S. Catholic bishops
U.S. Catholic bishops
. Established in 1887 as a graduate and research center following approval by
Pope Leo XIII Pope Leo XIII ( it, Leone XIII; born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci; 2 March 1810 – 20 July 1903) was the head of the Catholic Church from 20 February 1878 to his death in July 1903. Living until the age of 93, he was the second-old ...

Pope Leo XIII
, the university began offering undergraduate education in 1904. It is classified among "R2: Doctoral Universities – High research activity". Its campus is adjacent to the Brookland neighborhood, known as "Little Rome", which contains 60 Catholic institutions, including
Trinity Washington University Trinity Washington University is a private university, private Catholic university in Washington, D.C. Trinity is a comprehensive university with five schools; the undergraduate College of Arts & Sciences maintains its original mission as a Lib ...
, the
Dominican House of Studies The Dominican House of Studies is a Catholic Church, Catholic institution in Washington, DC, housing both the Priory of the Immaculate Conception, a community of the Dominican Order in the United States#Province of St. Joseph (Eastern), Province of ...
, and Archbishop Carroll High School, as well as the
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is a large Basilicas in the Catholic Church, minor Catholic basilica and national shrine in the United States in Washington, D.C., located at 400 Michigan Avenue Northeast, adjacen ...

Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
. CUA's programs emphasize the
liberal arts Liberal arts education (from Latin "free" and "art or principled practice") is the traditional academic course in Western higher education. ''Liberal arts'' takes the term ''skill, art'' in the sense of a learned skill rather than specifica ...
, professional education, and personal development. The school stays closely connected with the Catholic Church and Catholic organizations. The residential U.S. cardinals put on the
American Cardinals Dinner The American Cardinals Dinner is an annual fundraiser that benefits The Catholic University of America (CUA). Each year, a different U.S. List of the Catholic dioceses of the United States, archdiocese hosts the Cardinals Dinner, a black tie, black ...
each year to raise scholarship funds. The university also has a long history of working with the
Knights of Columbus The Knights of Columbus (K of C) is a global Catholic Church, Catholic Fraternal and service organizations, fraternal service order founded by Michael J. McGivney on March 29, 1882. Membership is limited to practicing Catholic men. It is led b ...
; its law school and basilica have dedications to the involvement and support of the Knights.


History


Founding

At the Second Plenary Council of Baltimore in 1866, the
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is the episcopal conference of the Catholic Church in the United States. Founded in 1966 as the joint National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) and United States Catholic Conference ( ...
first discussed the need for a national Catholic university. At the Third Plenary Council on January 26, 1885, bishops chose the name ''The Catholic University of America'' for the institution. In 1882, Bishop
John Lancaster Spalding John Lancaster Spalding (June 2, 1840 – August 25, 1916) was an American author An author is the writer of a book, article, play, or mostly written work. A broader definition of the word "author" states: "''An author is "the person who ...
went to Rome to obtain
Pope Leo XIII Pope Leo XIII ( it, Leone XIII; born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci; 2 March 1810 – 20 July 1903) was the head of the Catholic Church from 20 February 1878 to his death in July 1903. Living until the age of 93, he was the second-old ...

Pope Leo XIII
's support for the university, also persuading his family friend Mary Gwendoline Caldwell to pledge $300,000 to establish it. On April 10, 1887, pope Leo XIII sent James Cardinal Gibbons a letter granting permission to establish the university. On March 7, 1889, the Pope issued the encyclical ''Magni Nobis'', granting the university its charter and establishing its mission as the instruction of
Catholicism The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptized Catholics Catholic Church by country, worldwide . It is am ...
and
human nature Human nature is a concept that denotes the fundamental dispositions and characteristics—including ways of Thought, thinking, feeling, and agency (philosophy), acting—that Homo sapiens, humans are said to have nature (philosophy), naturally. Th ...
together at the graduate level. By developing new leaders and new knowledge, the university was intended to strengthen and enrich Catholicism in the United States. The university was incorporated in 1887 on of land next to the
Old Soldiers Home An old soldiers' home is a military veterans' retirement home A retirement home – sometimes called an old people's home or old age home, although ''old people's home'' can also refer to a nursing home – is a multi-residence housing fa ...
. President
Grover Cleveland Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837June 24, 1908) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the 22nd and 24th president of the United States from 1885 to 1889 and from 1893 to 1897. Cleveland is the only president in American ...
was in attendance for the laying of the cornerstone of Divinity Hall, now known as
Caldwell Hall Caldwell Hall may refer to: ;In the United States *Caldwell Hall (Catholic University of America), a residence hall *Caldwell Hall (Pine Bluff, Arkansas), listed on the NRHP in Arkansas *Caldwell Hall (Georgia Tech), a residence hall at the Georgi ...
, on May 24, 1888, as were members of Congress and the U.S. Cabinet.


Growth

When the university first opened on November 13, 1889, the curriculum consisted of lectures in mental and
moral philosophy Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that "involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of morality, right and wrong action (philosophy), behavior".''Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy'' The field of ethics, alo ...
,
English literature English literature is literature written in the English language from United Kingdom, its crown dependencies, the Republic of Ireland, the United States, and the countries of the former British Empire. ''The Encyclopaedia Britannica'' defines En ...
, the
sacred scripture Religious texts, including scripture, are Text (literary theory), texts which various religions consider to be of central importance to their religious tradition. They differ from literature by being a compilation or discussion of beliefs, m ...
s, and the various branches of
theology Theology is the systematic study of the nature of the Divinity, divine and, more broadly, of religious belief. It is taught as an Discipline (academia), academic discipline, typically in universities and seminaries. It occupies itself with the ...
. At the end of the second term, lectures on
canon law Canon law (from grc, κανών, , a 'straight measuring rod, ruler') is a set of ordinances and regulations made by ecclesiastical jurisdiction, ecclesiastical authority (church leadership) for the government of a Christian organization or chur ...
were added. The first students were graduated in 1889. by 1900 CUA was one of the 14 colleges that offered doctorate programs which formed the
Association of American Universities The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of American research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. Founded in 1900, it consists of 63 universities in the United States ...
. In 1904, the university added an
undergraduate Undergraduate education is education conducted after secondary education and before postgraduate education. It typically includes all postsecondary programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry-lev ...
program. The president of the first undergraduate class was Frank Kuntz, whose memoir of that period was published by the
Catholic University of America Press The Catholic University of America Press, also known as CUA Press, is the publishing division of The Catholic University of America. Founded on November 14, 1939, and incorporated on July 16, 1941,Roy J. Deferrari ''Memoirs of the Catholic Univer ...
. The university gives an annual award named for Kuntz. Bishop and Rector Thomas J. Shahan gave a speech to the
Ancient Order of Hibernians The Ancient Order of Hibernians (AOH; ) is an Irish Catholic Irish Catholics are an ethnoreligious group native to Ireland whose members are both Catholic Church, Catholic and Irish people, Irish. They have Irish diaspora, a large diaspora, ...
in 1894 in which he advocated for Irish independence in language, culture, and politics. This resulted in the Hibernians endowing a chair of Gaelic Languages and Literature at the university. Only
Harvard University Harvard University is a Private university, private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1636 as Harvard College and named for its first benefactor, the History of the Puritans in North America, Puritan cler ...
had a similar position at the time, and this attracted the attention of
William Butler Yeats William Butler Yeats (13 June 186528 January 1939) was an Irish poet, dramatist, writer and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature. He was a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival and became a pillar of the Irish lite ...
. During a trip to the United States, Yeats spoke to students in McMahon Hall on February 21, 1904. In a follow-up letter to Shahan, he said: "you have surely a great university and I wish we had its like in Ireland."


Reconstruction and Civil Rights eras

Despite Washington being a Southern and segregated city when the university was founded, it admitted black Catholic men as students. At the time, the only other college in the District to do so was
Howard University Howard University (Howard) is a Private university, private, University charter#Federal, federally chartered historically black research university in Washington, D.C. It is Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, classifie ...
, founded for African-American education after the Civil War. In 1895, Catholic University had three black students, all from DC. "They were simply tested as to their previous education, and this being found satisfactory, no notice whatever was taken of their color. They stand on exactly the same footing as other students of equal intellectual calibre and acquirements", according to Keane. Conaty, speaking to President
William McKinley William McKinley (January 29, 1843September 14, 1901) was the 25th president of the United States, serving from 1897 until Assassination of William McKinley, his assassination in 1901. As a politician he led a realignment that made his Hist ...
during a visit on June 1, 1900, said that the university, "like the Catholic Church ... knows no race line and no color line." This policy was reversed in 1914, with CUA kowtowing to segregationist policies and commencing denial of admissions to Black students.


Interwar period

In 1935, the university's coat of arms was designed by
Pierre de Chaignon la Rose Pierre de Chaignon la Rose (April 23, 1871 – February 21, 1941) was an American heraldist Heraldry is a discipline relating to the design, display and study of armorial bearings (known as armory), as well as related disciplines, such as vexi ...
. A victory parade for the 1936 Orange Bowl champions went up Pennsylvania Avenue on its circular route from Union Station to campus. President
Franklin D. Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt (; ; January 30, 1882April 12, 1945), often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American politician and attorney who served as the 32nd president of the United States The president of the United Stat ...
, "on his way to church, became an unwitting parader, when the march de triumph jammed traffic in front of the White House." In 1938, due to the rise of the antisemitic priest Charles Coughlin and not long after
Kristallnacht () or the Night of Broken Glass, also called the November pogrom(s) (german: Novemberpogrome, ), was a pogrom against Jews carried out by the Nazi Party's Sturmabteilung, (SA) paramilitary and Schutzstaffel, (SS) paramilitary forces along ...
, CUA officials asked
CBS CBS Broadcasting Inc., commonly shortened to CBS, the abbreviation of its former legal name Columbia Broadcasting System, is an American commercial broadcast television Television, sometimes shortened to TV, is a telecommunication m ...
and
NBC The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American English-language commercial Commercial may refer to: * a dose of advertising conveyed through media (such as - for example - radio or television) ** Radio advertisement ** Television ...
to broadcast an event live from the university campus. The broadcast had little effect, participating clerics did not mention Coughlin, and barely mentioned Nazi conduct by name, while offering general support for Jews. The university began admitting Black students again in 1936, following protests from Thomas Wyatt Turner, the Federated Colored Catholics and
NAACP The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is a civil rights organization in the United States, formed in 1909 as an interracial endeavor to advance justice for African Americans by a group including W. E.&nb ...
(both of which Turner co-founded), and the Catholic Interracial Council.
"By 1939, 40 Black students were enrolled at the University, 31 in the School of Arts and Sciences. However, discrimination persisted in extracurricular activities, dining halls, and dorms until the mid-1940s."


Law school

In 1954, Columbus University merged with the law program of CUA to become the
Columbus School of Law The Columbus School of Law, also known as Catholic Law or CUA Law, is the law school of the Catholic University of America, a Private university, private Catholic church, Roman Catholic research university in Washington, D.C. More than 400 Juri ...
at the Catholic University of America, after the
American Bar Association The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary association, voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. Founded in 1878, the ABA's most important stated activities ar ...
in 1951 challenged law schools not affiliated with a university. The CUA law school was the first professional school of the university.


Recent history

The presence of CUA attracted other Catholic institutions to the area, including colleges, religious orders, and national service organizations. Between 1900 and 1940, more than 50 international Catholic institutions rented or owned property in neighboring Brookland. During the post-World War II years, Catholic University had a dramatic expansion in enrollment, thanks to veterans making use of the G.I. Bill to complete college educations. By the early 21st century, the university has over 6,000 students from all 50 states and around the world. In 2018 the university experienced some challenges as administrators worked to reduce a $3.5 million deficit. Some faculty objected to the draft plan and voted "no confidence" in the president and provost. On September 22, 2021, it was announced that John Garvey would be stepping down as President of Catholic University on June 30, 2022.


Knights of Columbus

The
Knights of Columbus The Knights of Columbus (K of C) is a global Catholic Church, Catholic Fraternal and service organizations, fraternal service order founded by Michael J. McGivney on March 29, 1882. Membership is limited to practicing Catholic men. It is led b ...
and The Catholic University of America have a history of "a close and supportive relationship" that dates almost to the founding of the university. In 1899 the National Council of the K of C established a Knights of Columbus Chair of American History at the university. More than 10,000 Knights were on hand on April 13, 1904, to present a $55,633.79 check ($1,399,831.80 in 2012 dollars) to endow the chair. In December 1904 Cardinal Gibbons appealed to the Knights for more financial aid to help meet operating costs after some investments went sour. The Order gave nearly $25,000. By 1907 the financial situation of Catholic University had improved but was still shaky. Every Knight was asked to contribute $1 a year for a five-year period, and in December 1913, a $500,000 endowment was established. In 1920 the order contributed $60,000 toward the Catholic University gymnasium and drill hall, which later was adapted for use as the Crough Building housing the School of Architecture. In 2006, the Knights announced an $8,000,000 gift to the university to renovate Keane Hall and rename it as McGivney Hall, after the Knights' founder, Michael J. McGivney. The building, which was vacant, now houses the Washington session of the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family, which was funded by the Knights and established at the
Dominican House of Studies The Dominican House of Studies is a Catholic Church, Catholic institution in Washington, DC, housing both the Priory of the Immaculate Conception, a community of the Dominican Order in the United States#Province of St. Joseph (Eastern), Province of ...
adjacent to the CUA campus in 1988. A $1,000,000 trust was established in August 1965 to fund the Pro Deo and Pro Patria Scholarship, providing twelve undergraduate scholarships annually to the university. In 1989 the Knights voted a $2,000,000 birthday gift to the U.S. bishops on their bicentennial, to be given to Catholic University and used to fund special projects jointly chosen by the university and the Knights. Part of it was used to build the Columbus School of Law.


Papal visits

CUA is the only American university to have been visited by three popes and is one of only two universities to have any visits by a pontiff.
Pope John Paul II Pope John Paul II ( la, Ioannes Paulus II; it, Giovanni Paolo II; pl, Jan Paweł II; born Karol Józef Wojtyła ; 18 May 19202 April 2005) was the head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 1978 until his ...
visited on October 7, 1979. On April 16, 2008,
Pope Benedict XVI Pope Benedict XVI ( la, Benedictus XVI; it, Benedetto XVI; german: link=no, Benedikt XVI.; born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger, , on 16 April 1927) is a retired prelate of the Catholic church who served as the head of the Church and the sovereign ...
gave an address at the campus about Catholic education and academic freedom.
Pope Francis Pope Francis ( la, Franciscus; it, Francesco; es, link=, Francisco; born Jorge Mario Bergoglio, 17 December 1936) is the head of the Catholic Church. He has been the bishop of Rome and sovereign of the Vatican City State since 13 March 2013. ...
visited on September 23, 2015, during his trip to the United States, where he celebrated Mass on the east portico of the
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is a large Basilicas in the Catholic Church, minor Catholic basilica and national shrine in the United States in Washington, D.C., located at 400 Michigan Avenue Northeast, adjacen ...

Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
.


Campus

The CUA campus is in the residential community of Brookland in Northeast Washington; its main entrance is 620 Michigan Ave., NE. The campus is bound by Michigan Avenue to the south, North Capitol Street to the west, Hawaii Avenue to the north, and John McCormick Road to the east. It is three miles (5 km) north of the Capitol building. The tree-lined campus is . Romanesque and modern design dominate among the university's 48 major buildings. Between McMahon and Gibbons halls and alongside the
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is a large Basilicas in the Catholic Church, minor Catholic basilica and national shrine in the United States in Washington, D.C., located at 400 Michigan Avenue Northeast, adjacen ...

Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
runs The Mall, a large strip of grass often used by Ultimate Frisbee players and sunbathers.
Conte Conte may refer to: * Conte (literature), a literary genre * Conte (surname) * Conté, a drawing medium * Conte, Jura, town in France * Conté royal family, a fictional family in Tamora Pierce's Tortallan world * Conte, the title of Count#Northern ...
Circle is in the middle of Centennial Village, a cluster of eight residential houses. The Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center opened in the spring of 2003, bringing student dining services, the campus bookstore, student organization offices, an 800-person ballroom, a convenience store, and more student services under one roof. The John K. Mullen Library completed a $6,000,000 renovation in 2004. The
Columbus School of Law The Columbus School of Law, also known as Catholic Law or CUA Law, is the law school of the Catholic University of America, a Private university, private Catholic church, Roman Catholic research university in Washington, D.C. More than 400 Juri ...
is on the main campus and has a building with mock courtrooms, a library, chapel, classrooms, and offices.
Theological College A seminary, school of theology, theological seminary, or divinity school is an educational institution for educating students (sometimes called ''seminarians'') in scripture Religious texts, including scripture, are Text (literary theory) ...
, the United States' national Catholic seminary, is affiliated with CUA, sending students there for their studies. Also located near campus is the St. John Paul II Seminary, a minor seminary for the
Archdiocese of Washington The Archdiocese of Washington is a Latin Church , native_name_lang = la , image = San Giovanni in Laterano - Rome.jpg , imagewidth = 250px , alt = Façade of the Archbasilica of St. John in Lateran ...
but also serving nearby dioceses and hosting seminarians from dioceses around the country. Students from the minor seminary study for their undergraduate philosophy degrees at the university. Several organizations of
religious life Consecrated life (also known as religious life) is a state of life in the Catholic Church lived by those faithful who are Vocation, called to follow Jesus Christ in a more exacting way. It includes those in Institute of consecrated life, institute ...
also have seminaries nearby—including the Josephites,
Carmelites The Order of the Brothers of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel ( la, Ordo Fratrum Beatissimæ Virginis Mariæ de Monte Carmelo; abbreviated OCarm), known as the Carmelites or sometimes by synecdoche known simply as Carmel, is a Roman Catho ...
,
Franciscans , image = FrancescoCoA PioM.svg , image_size = 200px , caption = A cross, Christ's arm and Saint Francis's arm, a universal symbol of the Franciscans , abbreviation = OFM , predecessor = , ...
,
Oblates of Mary Immaculate The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate (OMI) is a missionary A missionary is a member of a Religious denomination, religious group which is sent into an area in order to promote its faith or provide services to people, such as education, l ...
, and Paulists—all of which send students to CUA. In April 2004, CUA purchased of land from the
Armed Forces Retirement Home The Armed Forces Retirement Home refers to one of two facilities, one in Gulfport, Mississippi Gulfport is the second-largest city in Mississippi after the state capital, Jackson, Mississippi, Jackson. Along with Biloxi, Mississippi, Biloxi, G ...
. It is the largest plot of open space in the District and makes CUA the largest university in D.C. by area. There are no plans for the parcel other than to secure it for future growth. In 2007, CUA unveiled plans to expand its campus by adding three new dormitories to the north side of campus. The first of these, the seven-story Opus Hall, was completed in 2009 in the university's traditional Collegiate Gothic style. It houses 420 upper-class students and is Washington's first LEED-certified dormitory. Opus Hall is the first residential community to house both male and female students since the 2007 adoption of a single-sex dormitory policy. CUA demolished Conaty and Spellman dormitories, which allowed for the development of Monroe Street by Bozzuto contracting. In partnership with the university, Monroe Street Market and the Brookland Arts Walk opened in 2014. A CUA Barnes & Noble bookstore opened on Monroe. New apartments in the development allow older students the opportunity to reside off campus within walking distance of the university. The campus is served by the Brookland-CUA station on the Red Line of the
Washington Metro The Washington Metro (or simply Metro), formally the Metrorail,Google Books search/preview
. Near the campus are the offices of the
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is the episcopal conference of the Catholic Church in the United States. Founded in 1966 as the joint National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) and United States Catholic Conference ( ...
and the Franciscan Monastery of the Holy Land in America.


Satellite campuses

In 2015 CUA began a partnership with the
Australian Catholic University Australian Catholic University (ACU) is a public university A public university or public college is a university or college that is in state ownership, owned by the state or receives significant government spending, public funds through a ...
to effectively own and operate a second campus in Rome, Italy. It is housed in a former convent and includes a chapel. Before being sent home during the
COVID-19 pandemic The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identif ...
, 35 students were at the campus. In 2020, a partnership with
Pima Community College Pima Community College (PCC) is a Public university, public community college in Pima County, Arizona. It serves the Tucson, Arizona, Tucson metropolitan area with a community college district consisting of five campuses, four education centers, ...
created a satellite campus in
Tucson, Arizona , "(at the) base of the black ill , nicknames = "The Old Pueblo", "Optics Valley", "America's biggest small town" , image_map = , mapsize = 260px , map_caption = Interactive ...
. In 2021, a new site in
Alexandria, Virginia Alexandria is an independent city (United States), independent city in the northern region of the Commonwealth (U.S. state), Commonwealth of Virginia, United States. It lies on the western bank of the Potomac River approximately south of Downto ...
, occupying 18,500 square feet on the second floor of
Catholic Charities USA Catholic Charities is a network of charities with headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia. In 2005, ''Forbes'' magazine ranked it as the fifth largest charity in the United States in terms of total revenue. The organization serves millions of peop ...
's headquarters building was opened to offer a number of noncredit certificate programs.


Green initiatives and sustainability

CUA has environmental sustainability programs, including participation in Earth Day, Casey Trees tree planting, and Campus Beautification Day. CUA's newest building, Opus Hall, is
LEED Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is a Green building certification systems, green building certification program used worldwide. Developed by the non-profit U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), it includes a set of rating ...
-compliant, and the school buys 30% of its electricity from green sources. CUA participated in the 2010 College Sustainability Report Card rating. In 2009, the School of Architecture and Planning introduced a Master of Science program in sustainable design.


Academics

Catholic University has 12 schools: * School of Architecture and Planning *School of Arts and Sciences * Tim and Steph Busch School of Business * School of Canon Law * School of Engineering *
Columbus School of Law The Columbus School of Law, also known as Catholic Law or CUA Law, is the law school of the Catholic University of America, a Private university, private Catholic church, Roman Catholic research university in Washington, D.C. More than 400 Juri ...
* Benjamin T. Rome School of Music, Drama, and Art * Conway School of Nursing *School of Philosophy * Metropolitan School of Professional Studies *National Catholic School of Social Service * School of Theology and Religious Studies It also has 21 research centers and facilities as well as serving as home to the
Catholic University of America Press The Catholic University of America Press, also known as CUA Press, is the publishing division of The Catholic University of America. Founded on November 14, 1939, and incorporated on July 16, 1941,Roy J. Deferrari ''Memoirs of the Catholic Univer ...
, established in 1939. The 12 schools offer
Doctor of Philosophy A Doctor of Philosophy (PhD, Ph.D., or DPhil; Latin: or ') is the most common Academic degree, degree at the highest academic level awarded following a course of study. PhDs are awarded for programs across the whole breadth of academic fields ...
degrees (or appropriate professional degrees) in 66 programs and
Master's Degree A master's degree (from Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic languages, Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally a dialect spoken in the lower Tiber area (then known as Latium) arou ...
s in 103 programs.
Undergraduate Undergraduate education is education conducted after secondary education and before postgraduate education. It typically includes all postsecondary programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry-lev ...
degrees are awarded in 72 programs by six schools:
architecture Architecture is the art and technique of designing and building, as distinguished from the skills associated with construction. It is both the process and the product of sketching, conceiving, planning, designing, and construction, constructin ...
and planning,
arts The arts are a very wide range of human practices of creativity, creative expression, storytelling and culture, cultural participation. They encompass multiple diverse and plural modes of thinking, doing and being, in an extremely broad ran ...
and
sciences Science is a systematic endeavor that Scientific method, builds and organizes knowledge in the form of Testability, testable explanations and predictions about the universe. Science may be as old as the human species, and some of the earli ...
,
engineering Engineering is the use of scientific principles to design and build machines, structures, and other items, including bridges, tunnels, roads, vehicles, and buildings. The discipline of engineering encompasses a broad range of more specializ ...
,
music Music is generally defined as the The arts, art of arranging sound to create some combination of Musical form, form, harmony, melody, rhythm or otherwise Musical expression, expressive content. Exact definition of music, definitions of mu ...
,
nursing Nursing is a profession within the health care sector focused on the care of individuals, families, and communities so they may attain, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life (healthcare), quality of life. Nurses may be diffe ...
, and
philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is the systematized study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about existence, reason, knowledge, values, mind, and language. Such questions are often posed as problems to be studied or resolved. Some ...
. Undergraduates combine a liberal arts
curriculum In education, a curriculum (; plural, : curricula or curriculums) is broadly defined as the totality of student experiences that occur in the educational process. The term often refers specifically to a planned sequence of instruction, or to ...
in arts and sciences with courses in a major field of study. The Metropolitan School provides programs for adults who wish to earn baccalaureate degrees or participate in continuing education and certificate programs on a part-time basis. Catholic University is the only U.S. university with an ecclesiastical faculty of canon law (established by the
Holy See The Holy See ( lat, Sancta Sedes, ; it, Santa Sede ), also called the See of Rome, Petrine See or Apostolic See, is the jurisdiction of the Pope in his role as the bishop of Rome. It includes the apostolic see, apostolic episcopal see of the ...
in 1923) and is one of the few U.S. universities with ecclesiastical faculties of
philosophy Philosophy (from , ) is the systematized study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about existence, reason, knowledge, values, mind, and language. Such questions are often posed as problems to be studied or resolved. Some ...
and sacred theology. Theological College, the university
seminary A seminary, school of theology, theological seminary, or divinity school is an educational institution for educating students (sometimes called ''seminarians'') in scripture, theology, generally to prepare them for ordination to serve as clergy, ...
, prepares men for the priesthood. The School of Theology and Religious Studies is a member of the
Washington Theological Consortium The Washington Theological Consortium is an Ecumenism, ecumenical organization of Christianity, Christian theology, theological schools and interfaith partners located in Washington Metropolitan Area, Washington, DC, Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylv ...
. The Catholic University of America announced on January 8, 2013, the creation of a School of Business and Economics. Previously housed in the School of Arts and Sciences as ''Department of Business and Economics'', the university's board of trustees voted in December 2012 to confirm the creation of the school commencing January 1, 2013, after a three-year process of discernment, evaluation, and planning. In fall 2013, the School of Library and Information Science became a department of the School of Arts and Sciences, giving the university its present composition. Ninety-eight percent of full-time faculty have doctoral or terminal degrees and 68% teach undergraduates. Of the full-time faculty, 59% are Catholic. In 2018, every tenured and tenure track professor of biology received funding from the
National Institutes of Health The National Institutes of Health, commonly referred to as NIH (with each letter pronounced individually), is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and public health research. It was founded in the late 1 ...
, which is "quite rare in any university". CUA was one of the fourteen founding members of the
Association of American Universities The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of American research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. Founded in 1900, it consists of 63 universities in the United States ...
, although it withdrew its membership in 2002, citing a conflict with its mission. In addition, it has been recommended by the Cardinal Newman Society in ''
The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College (also termed as The Newman Guide) is a college evaluation tool published annually by the Cardinal Newman Society to assist students in choosing a Catholic college or university. It includes a list of ...
''. It was described as one of the 25 most underrated colleges in the United States.


Research centers and facilities

According to the
National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent agency of the United States government that supports fundamental research and education Education is a purposeful activity directed at achieving certain aims, such as transmitti ...
, CUA spent $25.5 million on research and development in 2018. Over time, several national Catholic scholarly associations became based at the university, including the
Catholic Biblical Association of America The Catholic Biblical Association of America (CBA) is an American learned society dedicated to the academic study of the Bible. The suggestion to form a permanent association of biblical scholars was made at the beginning of 1936 at a meeting in ...
, publisher of the ''
Catholic Biblical Quarterly The ''Catholic Biblical Quarterly'' is a refereed peer-reviewed theology journal published by the Catholic Biblical Association of America (CBA) (CBA) in January, April, July, and October. It was established in 1939 and its circulation in 2010 w ...
'', and (for many years) the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The university is also home to the
Catholic University of America Press The Catholic University of America Press, also known as CUA Press, is the publishing division of The Catholic University of America. Founded on November 14, 1939, and incorporated on July 16, 1941,Roy J. Deferrari ''Memoirs of the Catholic Univer ...
. Research institutes located here include: *Center for Advanced Training in
Cell Cell most often refers to: * Cell (biology) The cell is the basic structural and functional unit of life forms. Every cell consists of a cytoplasm enclosed within a Cell membrane, membrane, and contains many biomolecules such as proteins, D ...
and
Molecular Biology Molecular biology is the branch of biology that seeks to understand the molecule, molecular basis of biological activity in and between Cell (biology), cells, including biomolecule, biomolecular synthesis, modification, mechanisms, and interact ...
*Center for Advancement of
Catholic Education Catholic education may refer to: * Catholic school, primary education, primary and secondary education organised by the Catholic Church or organisations affiliated with it * Catholic university, private university run by the Catholic Church or orga ...
*Center for American Catholic Studies *Center for Catalan Studies *Center for
Irish Irish may refer to: Common meanings * Someone or something of, from, or related to: ** Ireland Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster Scots dialect, Ulster-Scots: ) is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, in Northwestern Europe ...
Studies *Center for
Medieval In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages or medieval period lasted approximately from the late 5th to the late 15th centuries, similar to the post-classical period of global history. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire ...
and
Byzantine Studies Byzantine studies is an interdisciplinary branch of the humanities that addresses the History of Byzantine Empire, history, Byzantine culture, culture, demography, Byzantine dress, dress, religion/theology, Byzantine art, art, Byzantine literatu ...
*Center for
Pastor A pastor (abbreviated as "Pr" or "Ptr" , or "Ps" ) is the leader of a Christian congregation who also gives advice and counsel to people from the community or congregation. In Lutheranism Lutheranism is one of the largest branches of Protesta ...
al Studies *Center for the Study of
Culture Culture () is an umbrella term which encompasses the social behavior, institutions, and Social norm, norms found in human Society, societies, as well as the knowledge, beliefs, arts, laws, Social norm, customs, capabilities, and habits of the ...
and
Values In ethics and social sciences, value denotes the degree of importance of something or action, with the aim of determining which actions are best to do or what way is best to live (normative ethics in ethics), or to describe the significance of dif ...
*Center for the Study of
Early Christianity Early Christianity Christianity is an Abrahamic religions, Abrahamic Monotheism, monotheistic religion based on the Life of Jesus in the New Testament, life and Teachings of Jesus, teachings of Jesus, Jesus of Nazareth. It is the Major reli ...
*Center for the Study of
Energy In physics, energy (from Ancient Greek: wikt:ἐνέργεια#Ancient_Greek, ἐνέργεια, ''enérgeia'', “activity”) is the physical quantity, quantitative physical property, property that is #Energy transfer, transferred to a phy ...
and Environmental Stewardship *Center for Ward Method Studies *Homecare and Telerehabilitation Technology Center *Institute for
Astrophysics Astrophysics is a science that employs the methods and principles of physics and chemistry Chemistry is the scientific study of the properties and behavior of matter. It is a natural science that covers the elements that make up matt ...
and
Computational Science Computational science, also known as scientific computing or scientific computation (SC), is a field in mathematics that uses advanced computing Computing is any goal-oriented activity requiring, benefiting from, or creating computer, comput ...
s *Institute for Biomolecular Studies *Institute for Christian Oriental Research *Institute for Communications Law Studies * Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies (formerly the Life Cycle Institute) *Institute for
Sacred Music Religious music (also sacred music) is a type of music that is performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence. It may overlap with ritual music, which is music, sacred or not, performed or composed for or as ritual. Relig ...
*Institute for
Social Justice Social justice is justice in terms of the distribution of wealth, Equal opportunity, opportunities, and Social privilege, privileges within a society. In Western Civilization, Western and Culture of Asia, Asian cultures, the concept of social ...
*Institute of
Music Music is generally defined as the The arts, art of arranging sound to create some combination of Musical form, form, harmony, melody, rhythm or otherwise Musical expression, expressive content. Exact definition of music, definitions of mu ...
al Arts *Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music * Vitreous State Laboratory


Libraries

The university offers facilities at John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library, the American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives, as well as separate libraries on the campus for architecture and planning, biology, music, nursing, and physics. A special autonomous library, the Oliveira Lima Library (sometimes referred to as the Ibero-American Library), houses one of the largest collections of rare books on history and literature of
Portuguese Brazilian Portuguese Brazilians ( pt, luso-brasileiros) are Brazilians whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in Portugal Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic ( pt, República Portuguesa, links=yes ), is a Sovereign state, country whos ...
culture outside of Brazil.


Pima Community College

In 2019, a partnership with
Pima Community College Pima Community College (PCC) is a Public university, public community college in Pima County, Arizona. It serves the Tucson, Arizona, Tucson metropolitan area with a community college district consisting of five campuses, four education centers, ...
was announced whereby students could earn an associate degree from Pima and a bachelor's degree in business management from Catholic University. Over the course of the program, two-thirds of courses will be taken remotely and one-third will be taken on the Pima campus. Some local business leaders will serve as adjunct professors. Between 20 and 25 students will initially be admitted to the program, which has a total four year cost of $32,000. Catholic University officials recognized that most Hispanics in the United States are Catholics but historically have not had access to Catholic higher education in their areas. According to a university press release, an analysis by Catholic University found that of "the 25 U.S. cities with the largest total increases in the Hispanic population, nine have no Catholic college or university in close proximity." Given this, in 2017, Catholic University began exploring partnerships with existing institutions in the Southwest. Several cities with large populations of Hispanics and Catholics were considered when then-Tucson Mayor
Jonathan Rothschild Jonathan Rothschild (born 1955) is an American lawyer and politician who served as the 41st mayor of Tucson, Arizona from 2011 to 2019. From 2001 to 2011, Rothschild was managing partner at the law firm Mesch Clark Rothschild. Early life and edu ...
heard of Catholic University's desire to open a satellite campus. He called the university's provost and then connected the provost with the bishop.


Academic freedom

The university continues to be under censure by the
American Association of University Professors The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization An organization or organisation ( Commonwealth English; see spelling differences), is an entity—such as a company, an institution, or an association—comp ...
for academic freedom violations and continues to ban certain speakers from campus.


Dismissal of Professor Charles Curran

In 1967, a tenured professor of theology Reverend Charles E. Curran was fired for his views on birth control but was reinstated after a five-day faculty-led strike. In 1986, the Vatican declared that Curran could no longer teach theology at Catholic University after the Curia department in charge of promulgating Catholic doctrine, headed by Josef Ratzinger, decided he was unfit. The areas of dispute included publishing articles that debated theological and ethical views regarding divorce, artificial contraception, masturbation, pre-marital intercourse, and homosexual acts. As noted in the
American Association of University Professors The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization An organization or organisation ( Commonwealth English; see spelling differences), is an entity—such as a company, an institution, or an association—comp ...
report, "Had it not been for the intervention of the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Professor Curran would undoubtedly still be active in the university's Department of Theology, a popular teacher, honored theologian, and respected colleague." Curran's attorneys argued that CUA did not follow proper procedures or its policy statements in handling the case. In response, CUA claimed that the Vatican's actions against Curran trumped any campus-based policy or tenure rules. In 1989, Curran filed suit against Catholic University, claiming unlawfully termination. Curran's case was ultimately dismissed; the court found Catholic University had the right to fire Curran for teaching theology from a viewpoint that contradicted to the school's religion. In 1990, the
American Association of University Professors The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization An organization or organisation ( Commonwealth English; see spelling differences), is an entity—such as a company, an institution, or an association—comp ...
(AAUP) defended Curran and censured Catholic University's administration for failing to adhere to the AAUP's Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure. The AAUP found that "unsatisfactory conditions of academic freedom and tenure have been found to prevail" at The Catholic University of America. , the administration of Catholic University remains on the list of censured institutions. AAUP censure is a purely symbolic designation that does not effect an institution's accreditation or the standing of AAUP members and prospective members on the faculty at a school whose administration remains under censure. The administration of Catholic University has consistently reached out to the AAUP to explore lifting the censure. The two conditions for having the censure removed are inviting Curran, whose license to teach Catholic theology had been suspended by the Vatican, back to campus and changing the university's "Statement on Academic Freedom". President David M. O'Connell refused to do either, stating, "Every American university has a right to govern itself according to its own identity, mission, standards, and procedures." The Vatican's decision regarding Curran's qualifications to teach Catholic theology was made unilaterally and is unlikely to change unless Curran's stances come into compliance with church teachings. The Catholic University of America's bylaws require the school to comply with relevant Vatican policies and designates that the Archbishop of Washington D.C., who is chosen by the Vatican, is ''ex officio'' the school's chancellor. This system makes it extremely unlikely Catholic University will amend the school's charter and come into compliance with the current conditions expressed by the AAUP for lifting their censure of the school's administration.


Speaker policy

The university as a policy does not allow outside guests to speak on campus to any audience if they have previously expressed an opinion on abortion or other serious issues conflicting with the Catholic Church's teaching. Applying this policy in 2004, CUA was criticized for rescinding
Stanley Tucci Stanley Tucci Jr. ( ; born November 11, 1960) is an American actor and filmmaker. Involved in acting from a young age, he made his film debut in John Huston's ''Prizzi's Honor'' (1985), and continued to play a variety of supporting roles in film ...
's invitation for a seminar about Italian cinema, because he had lent past support for
Planned Parenthood The Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc. (PPFA), or simply Planned Parenthood, is a nonprofit organization that provides Reproductive health, reproductive health care in the United States and globally. It is a tax-exempt corporation ...
. The next year, in 2005, the school was criticized for initially rejecting an application for recognition of a student chapter of the NAACP; one of the reasons officials cited in its rejection was the national organization's pro-choice stance. In 2006 the CUA administration barred a student-run on-campus performance of Eve Ensler's ''
The Vagina Monologues ''The Vagina Monologues'' is an episodic play written in 1996 by Eve Ensler which developed and premiered at HERE Arts Center, Off-Off-Broadway Off-off-Broadway theaters are smaller New York City theaters than Broadway theatre, Broadway an ...
''. In 2009, the school made its speaker policy more stringent, prohibiting all candidates for political office from speaking on campus. Representatives of both Democratic and Republican clubs on campus have criticized the decision.


Demographics

The student population in 2019 was 5,059. Approximately 91% of undergraduates receive some form of financial aid. There are slightly more female students at 53%, and a 1:7 faculty to student ratio. 83.8% of full-time faculty have a terminal degree.


Student life

There are over 100 registered student clubs and organizations at CUA for a wide variety of interests including athletics, academics, social, Greek life, service, political and religious. Annual events include week-long Homecoming celebrations, the Mr. CUA competition, and several dances including the Beaux Arts Ball, the Mistletoe Ball, and the Athletes Ball. In addition to radio station WCUA, other campus media outlets include ''The Crosier'', a scholarly publication concerning Catholic social teaching, ''The Tower'', the campus' independent weekly newspaper, and ''CRUX'', a literary magazine. Although Catholic University states that it does not have any Greek life on campus, it has three Greek social organizations and one Greek service organization. Catholic University Greek life includes
Alpha Delta Gamma Alpha (uppercase , lowercase ; grc, ἄλφα, ', or ell, άλφα, álfa) is the first letter Letter, letters, or literature may refer to: Characters typeface * Letter (alphabet), a character representing one or more of the sounds used ...
the national Catholic social fraternity–Kappa chapter and Kappa Tau Gamma the local Christian social-service sorority. Although not officially recognized by the university, the Sigma-Psi chapter of the
Kappa Sigma Kappa Sigma (), commonly known as Kappa Sig, is an American collegiate social fraternity founded at the University of Virginia in 1869. Kappa Sigma is one of the five largest international fraternities with currently 318 active chapters and co ...
fraternity received an official charter in 2014. The members are all students of the university and are active on and around the campus. The national service fraternity,
Alpha Phi Omega Alpha Phi Omega (), commonly known as APO, but also A-Phi-O and A-Phi-Q, is a Mixed-sex education, coeducational Service fraternities and sororities, service Fraternities and sororities, fraternity. It is the largest collegiate fraternity in th ...
, has a chapter (Zeta Mu) on campus as well. Former Phi Kappa Theta DC Omega chapter is inactive. The CUA Student Association is the university's undergraduate student government. It includes the General Assembly, an advocacy body, and the Student Fee Allocation Board which serves as the steward of the Student Activity and Club Sports Fee. The graduate student government is a separate entity and was not affected by the changes during the 2006–2007 academic year.


Music and drama

The music and drama programs, as part of a class, stage productions each semester, performances ranging from Broadway productions to plays and operas. Catholic University students also participate in a Symphony orchestra and choral groups, including
a cappella ''A cappella'' (, also , ; ) music is a performance by a singer or a singing group without Musical instrument, instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. The term ''a cappella'' was originally intended to differ ...
groups Take Note, RedLine, and the Washingtones. There have been several songs associated with the university over the years. The most recent fight song, written by Steve Schatz, was adopted in 2002. The original fight song, "The Flying Cardinals", dates back to before the 1930s. There are two alma maters, considered to be the university's official songs. The first, "Hail CUA" was set to music composed by
Victor Herbert Victor August Herbert (February 1, 1859 – May 26, 1924) was an American composer, cellist The cello ( ; plural ''celli'' or ''cellos'') or violoncello ( ; ) is a Bow (music), bowed (sometimes pizzicato, plucked and occasionally col legno, ...
and was adopted in 1920. The other, Guardians of Truth by Fr. Thomas McLean, actually came in 2nd place in the 1920 competition but was widely adopted in the ensuing years. Albert Von Tilzer, composer of ''
Take Me Out to the Ball Game "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" is a 1908 Tin Pan Alley Tin Pan Alley was a collection of History of music publishing, music publishers and songwriters in New York City that dominated the American popular music, popular music of the United ...
'', wrote two songs for the university, ''We're Rooting For You'' and ''CU Will Shine Tonight''. The earliest sports song, ''Through the Town'', dates from 1916. ''Drink a Highball'' was a popular song during
Prohibition Prohibition is the act or practice of forbidding something by law; more particularly the term refers to the banning of the manufacturing, manufacture, storage (whether in barrels or in bottles), transportation, sale, possession, and consumption ...
. In honor of the university's 125th anniversary, an hour-long nostalgic musical revue was performed.


Campus ministry and religious life

84% of undergraduates and 59% of graduate students self-identify as Catholic. The campus ministry has two groups of ''student'' ministers: the "resident ministers" who live in residence halls and focus primarily on upperclassmen and the "house members", who focus on freshmen. The Friday Night Planning Committee works with the house members to plan activities for Friday nights that are alcohol-free. Campus ministry also coordinates university liturgies, plans and runs retreats, and operates the online Prayernet.


Athletics

Catholic (CUA) athletic teams are called the Cardinals. The university is a member of the Division III of the
National Collegiate Athletic Association The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a nonprofit organization A nonprofit organization (NPO) or non-profit organisation, also known as a non-business entity, not-for-profit organization, or nonprofit institution, is ...
(NCAA), primarily competing in the
Landmark Conference The Landmark Conference is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association, NCAA's NCAA Division III, Division III. Member institutions are located in the eastern United States in the states of Ma ...
for most of its sports since the 2007–08 academic year. They are also associate members of the
New England Women's and Men's Athletic Conference The New England Women's and Men's Athletic Conference (NEWMAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a nonprofit organization that regulates student athlet ...
for football, and the
Mid-Atlantic Rowing Conference The Mid-Atlantic Rowing Conference (MARC) is a men's and women's College rowing (United States), intercollegiate rowing conference. History The Mid-Atlantic Rowing Conference was established in January 2009 by nine charter member schools: Bryn Ma ...
for rowing. The team colors are
red Red is the color at the long wavelength end of the visible spectrum of light, next to orange and opposite violet. It has a dominant wavelength of approximately 625–740 nanometre 330px, Different lengths as in respect to the molecula ...
(PMS 1805) and
black Black is a color which results from the absence or complete Absorption (electromagnetic radiation), absorption of visible spectrum, visible light. It is an achromatic color, without hue, like white and grey. It is often used symbolically or fi ...
. The first recorded football game was played against Mount Saint Mary's College on November 28, 1895, but records indicate earlier track and field events. The university beat the
University of Mississippi The University of Mississippi (Epithet, byname Ole Miss) is a Public university, public research university that is located adjacent to Oxford, Mississippi, and has a University of Mississippi Medical Center, medical center in Jackson, Mississi ...
at the second
Orange Bowl The Orange Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Miami metropolitan area. It has been played annually since 1935 Orange Bowl, January 1, 1935, making it, along with the Sugar Bowl and the Sun Bowl, the second-oldes ...
in 1936, 20–19. They also tied the Arizona State Teachers College at Tempe (now Arizona State University) in the 1940 Sun Bowl. The basketball Cardinals played in the 1944 NCAA basketball tournament, finishing as the Eastern Fourth Place team in the eight-team era of the tournament. They lost to runner-up
Dartmouth College Dartmouth College (; ) is a Private university, private research university in Hanover, New Hampshire. Established in 1769 by Eleazar Wheelock, it is one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. Although founded t ...
63-38 in the regional semifinals, and
Temple University Temple University (Temple or TU) is a public university, public Commonwealth System of Higher Education, state-related research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was founded in 1884 by the Baptists, Baptist minister Russell Conwell an ...
55-35 in the regional consolation game. CUA competes in 25
NCAA Division III NCAA Division III (D-III) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-III consists of athletic programs at colleges and university, universities that choose not to offer athletic scholarships ...
intercollegiate varsity sports: Men's sports include baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, lacrosse, rowing, soccer, swimming & diving, tennis and track & field (indoor and outdoor); while women's sports include basketball, cross country, field hockey, golf, lacrosse, rowing, soccer, softball, swimming & diving, tennis, track & field (indoor and outdoor) and volleyball.


Non-varsity sports

Students field club teams in sports including
cheerleading Cheerleading is an activity in which the participants (called cheerleaders) cheer for their team as a form of encouragement. It can range from chanting slogans to intense Physical exercise, physical activity. It can be performed to motivate sp ...
,
ice hockey Ice hockey (or simply hockey) is a team sport played on ice skates, usually on an Ice rink, ice skating rink with Ice hockey rink, lines and markings specific to the sport. It belongs to a family of sports called hockey. In ice hockey, two o ...
, rugby,
sailing Sailing employs the wind—acting on sails, wingsails or kites—to propel a craft on the surface of the ''water'' (sailing ship, sailboat, raft, Windsurfing, windsurfer, or Kitesurfing, kitesurfer), on ''ice'' (iceboat) or on ''land'' (Land s ...
and
lacrosse Lacrosse is a team sport played with a lacrosse stick and a lacrosse ball. It is the oldest organized Sports in North America, sport in North America, with its origins with the Indigenous_peoples_of_the_Americas#North_America, indigenous peop ...
. *The
ice hockey Ice hockey (or simply hockey) is a team sport played on ice skates, usually on an Ice rink, ice skating rink with Ice hockey rink, lines and markings specific to the sport. It belongs to a family of sports called hockey. In ice hockey, two o ...
team competes in the Delaware Valley Collegiate Hockey Conference (DVCHC) of the ACHA and plays at the Fort Dupont Ice Arena in Washington, D.C. The team won the Mason-Dixon Collegiate Hockey Association (MDCHA) Championship in 2009, the Blue Ridge Hockey Conference (BRHC) Championship in 2015, and the DVCHC Patriot Division Championship in 2019. *The men's club
lacrosse Lacrosse is a team sport played with a lacrosse stick and a lacrosse ball. It is the oldest organized Sports in North America, sport in North America, with its origins with the Indigenous_peoples_of_the_Americas#North_America, indigenous peop ...
team competes in Division 2 of the Chesapeake Conference in the
National College Lacrosse League The National College Lacrosse League is a men's lacrosse league comprising mostly Eastern United States college lacrosse clubs (non-varsity). The NCLL is recognized by US Lacrosse as one of the three primary areas of collegiate lacrosse; the other ...
. The team has secured the NCLL Division 2 National Championship for 2015, 2016, and 2017. *The men's rugby team competes in the Potomac Rugby Conference of the NSCRO. *The women's rugby team competes in the Capital Rugby Union of the NSCRO. *The
sailing Sailing employs the wind—acting on sails, wingsails or kites—to propel a craft on the surface of the ''water'' (sailing ship, sailboat, raft, Windsurfing, windsurfer, or Kitesurfing, kitesurfer), on ''ice'' (iceboat) or on ''land'' (Land s ...
team competes in the Middle Atlantic Intercollegiate Sailing Association of the ICSA.


Notable alumni and faculty

There are many notable alumni of The Catholic University of America, particularly in the arts, in the
Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptized Catholics Catholic Church by country, worldwide . It is am ...
and in public service. Graduates include cardinals,
bishop A bishop is an ordained clergy member who is entrusted with a position of Episcopal polity, authority and oversight in a religious institution. In Christianity, bishops are normally responsible for the governance of dioceses. The role or offic ...
s,
priest A priest is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deity, deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in p ...
s, and
nun A nun is a woman who vows to dedicate her life to religious service, typically living under vows of Evangelical counsels, poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery or convent.''The Oxford English Dictionary'', vol. X, pa ...
s. CUA's current total of alumni exceeds 83,000, including 12 living cardinals. In 1942, Catholic University became the first university to award a doctorate in geology to an
African American African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans and Afro-Americans) are an Race and ethnicity in the United States, ethnic group consisting of Americans with partial or total ancestry from sub-Saharan Africa. The term "African American ...
, Marguerite Williams.


University rectors and presidents

# Bishop John J. Keane (1887–1896) # Bishop Thomas J. Conaty (1896–1903) # Bishop Denis J. O'Connell (1903–1909) # Bishop Thomas J. Shahan (1909–1927) # Bishop James Hugh Ryan (1928–1935) # Bishop Joseph M. Corrigan (1936–1942) # Bishop Patrick J. McCormick (1943–1953) # Bishop Bryan J. McEntegart (1953–1957) # Bishop William J. McDonald (1957–1967, last Rector) # Clarence C. Walton (1969–1978, first President) # Edmund D. Pellegrino (1978–1982) # William J. Byron (1982–1992) # Patrick Ellis (1992–1998) # Bishop David M. O'Connell (1998–2010) # John H. Garvey (2010–2022) # Peter Kilpatrick (2022–present)


Board of trustees

CUA was founded by the nation's bishops, and they continue to have a presence on the board of trustees. There are 48 elected members, and the bylaws stipulate that 24 must be clerics, 18 of which must be members of the bishops' conference. Of the 51 total trustees (including the university president), 24 are
bishop A bishop is an ordained clergy member who is entrusted with a position of Episcopal polity, authority and oversight in a religious institution. In Christianity, bishops are normally responsible for the governance of dioceses. The role or offic ...
s (including seven cardinals). In addition, there are one
religious sister A religious sister (abbreviated ''Sr.'' or Sist.) in the Catholic Church The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the List of Christian denominations by number of members, largest Christian church, with 1.3  ...
and two
priests A priest is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deity, deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in p ...
.


References


External links

*
Official athletics website
{{Authority control 1887 establishments in Washington, D.C. Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities Catholic Church in Washington, D.C. Catholic universities and colleges in Washington, D.C. Educational institutions established in 1887 Pontifical universities Pope Leo XIII Private universities and colleges in Washington, D.C.