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The Governor of Texas
Texas
is the chief executive of the U.S. State
U.S. State
of Texas, the presiding officer over the executive branch of the Government of Texas, and the commander-in-chief of the Texas
Texas
National Guard, the State's militia. The governor has the power to consider bills passed by the Texas
Texas
Legislature, by signing them into law, or vetoing them, and in bills relating to appropriations, the power of a line-item veto. He may convene the legislature, and grant pardons and reprieves,[2] except in cases of impeachment, and upon the permission of the legislature, in cases of treason. The State provides an official residence, the Governor's Mansion in Austin. The incumbent, Greg Abbott, is the forty-eighth governor, of whom two have been women, to serve in the office since Texas' statehood in 1845. When compared to those of other states, the Governorship of Texas
Texas
has been described as one of relative weakness.[3][4] In some respects, it is the Lieutenant Governor of Texas, who presides over the Texas Senate, who possesses greater influence to exercise their prerogatives.[3][4] The governor is inaugurated on the third Tuesday of January every four years along with the Lieutenant Governor, and serves a term of four years. Prior to the present laws, in 1845, the state's first constitution established the office of governor, serving a term of two years, but no more than four years of every six.[5] The 1861 constitution, following secession from the Union, established the first Monday of November following election as the term's start.[6] Following the end of the American Civil War, the 1866 constitution increased term length to four years, limiting overall service to no more than eight years of every twelve, moving the term's start to the first Thursday following organization of the legislature, or "as soon thereafter as practicable."[7] The constitution of 1869, enacted during Reconstruction, removed term limitations,[8] to this day making Texas
Texas
one of fourteen states[9] with no limit on gubernatorial terms. The present constitution of 1876 returned terms to two years,[10] but a 1972 amendment again returned them to four.[11] Since its establishment, only one man has served in excess of eight years as governor: Rick Perry. Perry, the longest-serving governor in state history, assumed the governorship in 2000 upon the exit of George W. Bush, who resigned to take office as the 43rd President
President
of the United States. Perry was re-elected in 2002, 2006, and 2010 serving for 14 years before choosing to retire in 2014. Allan Shivers
Allan Shivers
assumed the governorship upon the death of Beauford Jester in July 1949 and was re-elected in 1950, 1952 and 1954, serving for 7 1/2 years, making him the second longest serving Texas
Texas
governor. Price Daniel
Price Daniel
was elected to the governorship in 1956 and re-elected in 1958 and 1960 before losing his re-election for an unprecedented fourth term in the 1962 Democratic primary, missing the runoff. John Connally was elected in 1962 and re-elected in 1964 and 1966 before choosing to retire in 1968. In the case of a vacancy in the office, the lieutenant governor becomes governor.[12] Prior to a 1999 amendment, the lieutenant governor only acted as governor until the expiration of the term to which he succeeded.[13][14]

Contents

1 Governors of Spanish Texas 2 Governors of Mexican Texas 3 Presidents of the Republic of Texas 4 Governors of Texas 5 Other high offices held 6 Living former governors of Texas 7 Gubernatorial trivia

7.1 Background 7.2 Elections 7.3 Texas
Texas
governors in popular culture

8 See also 9 Notes 10 References

Governors of Spanish Texas[edit] See: List of Texas
Texas
Governors and Presidents Governors of Mexican Texas[edit] See: List of Texas
Texas
Governors and Presidents Presidents of the Republic of Texas[edit] See: President
President
of the Republic of Texas#List of presidents and vice presidents Governors of Texas[edit]

Number of Governors of Texas
Texas
by party affiliation

Party Governors

  Democratic 39

  Republican 7

  Unionist 1

  Independent 1

  Military 1

# Governor Term in office Party Election Prior office Lt. Governor

1

  James Pinckney Henderson March 31, 1808 - June 4, 1858 (Aged 50) February 19, 1846 - December 21, 1847 Democratic 1845 Minister to England and France Republic of Texas (1837-1840)   Albert Clinton Horton

2

  George T. Wood March 12, 1795 - September 3, 1858 (Aged 63) December 21, 1847 – December 21, 1849 Democratic 1847 Texas
Texas
State Senator (1846-1847)   John Alexander Greer

3

  Peter Hansborough Bell May 11, 1810 - March 8, 1898 (Aged 87) December 21, 1849 – November 23, 1853 Democratic 1849 Lieutenant colonel of the Second Regiment Texas
Texas
Mounted Volunteers (1845-1949)

1851 [15]   James W. Henderson [16]

4

  James W. Henderson August 15, 1817 - August 30, 1880 (Aged 63) November 23, 1853 – December 21, 1853 Democratic 3rd Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1851-1853) Office vacant

5

  Elisha M. Pease January 3, 1812 - August 26, 1883 (Aged 71) December 21, 1853 – December 21, 1857 Unionist 1853 Texas
Texas
State Senator (1849-1851)   David Catchings Dickson

1855   Hardin Richard Runnels

6

  Hardin R. Runnels August 30, 1820 - December 25, 1873 (Aged 53) December 21, 1857 – December 21, 1859 Democratic 1857 3rd Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1855-1857)   Francis Lubbock

7

  Sam Houston March 2, 1793 - July 26, 1863 (Aged 70) December 21, 1859 – March 16, 1861 Independent 1859 [17] U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
from Texas (1846-1859)   Edward Clark [16]

8

  Edward Clark April 1, 1815 - May 4, 1880 (Aged 65) March 18, 1861 – November 7, 1861 Democratic 7th Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1859-1861) Office vacant

9

  Francis Lubbock October 16, 1815 - June 22, 1905 (Aged 89) November 7, 1861 – November 5, 1863 Democratic 1861 6th Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1857-1859)   John McClannahan Crockett

10

  Pendleton Murrah 1824 or 1826 - August 4, 1865 (Aged about 40) November 5, 1863 – June 17, 1865 Democratic 1863 [18] Texas
Texas
State Representative (1857)   Fletcher Summerfield Stockdale [19]

-

  Fletcher Summerfield Stockdale 1823 or 1825 - February 4, 1890 (Aged about 67) June 11, 1865 – June 16, 1865 Military 9th Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1863-1865) Office vacant

11

  Andrew Jackson Hamilton January 28, 1815 - April 11, 1875 (Aged 60) June 16, 1865 – August 9, 1866 [20] Democratic-Military Texas
Texas
State Senator-Elect (1861)

12

  James W. Throckmorton February 1, 1825 - April 21, 1894 (Aged 69) August 9, 1866 – August 8, 1867 Democratic 1866 [21] Captain of the 6th Texas
Texas
Cavalry Regiment Confederate Army (1861-1863)   George Washington Jones

13

  Elisha M. Pease January 3, 1812 - August 26, 1883 (Aged 71) August 8, 1867 – September 30, 1869 [21][22] Republican 5th Governor of Texas (1853-1857) Office vacant

14

  Edmund J. Davis October 2, 1827 - February 7, 1883 (Aged 55) January 8, 1870 – January 15, 1874 Republican 1869 [23] Brigadier General of the First Texas
Texas
Cavalry Regiment Union Army (1862-1865)

15

  Richard Coke March 18, 1829 - May 14, 1897 (Aged 68) January 15, 1874 – December 1, 1876 Democratic 1873 Associate Justice of the Texas
Texas
Supreme Court (1866-1867)   Richard B. Hubbard [16]

1876 [24]

16

  Richard B. Hubbard November 1, 1832 - July 12, 1901 (Aged 68) December 1, 1876 – January 21, 1879 Democratic 16th Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1874-1876) Office vacant

17

  Oran Milo Roberts July 9, 1815 – May 19, 1898 (Aged 82) January 21, 1879 – January 16, 1883 Democratic 1878 7th Chief Justice of the Texas
Texas
Supreme Court (1874-1879)   Joseph D. Sayers

1880   Leonidas Jefferson Storey

18

  John Ireland January 1, 1827 – March 15, 1896 (Aged 69) January 16, 1883 – January 18, 1887 Democratic 1882 Associate Justice of the Texas
Texas
Supreme Court (1875-1876)   Francis Marion Martin

1884   Barnett Gibbs

19

  Lawrence Sullivan "Sul" Ross September 27, 1838 – January 3, 1898 (Aged 59) January 18, 1887 – January 20, 1891 Democratic 1886 Texas
Texas
State Senator (1881-1883)   Thomas Benton Wheeler

1888

20

  Jim Hogg March 24, 1851 – March 3, 1906 (Aged 54) January 20, 1891 – January 15, 1895 Democratic 1890 21st Attorney General of Texas (1887-1891)   George Cassety Pendleton

1892   Martin McNulty Crane

21

  Charles A. Culberson June 10, 1855 – March 19, 1925 (Aged 69) January 15, 1895 – January 17, 1899 Democratic 1894 22nd Attorney General of Texas (1891-1895)   George Taylor Jester

1896

22

  Joseph D. Sayers September 23, 1841 – May 15, 1929 (Aged 87) January 17, 1899 – January 20, 1903 Democratic 1898 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
for Texas' 9th district (1893-1899)   James Browning

1900

23

  S. W. T. Lanham July 4, 1846 – July 29, 1908 (Aged 62) January 20, 1903 – January 15, 1907 Democratic 1902 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
for Texas' 8th district (1897-1903)   George D. Neal

1904

24

  Thomas Mitchell Campbell April 22, 1856 – April 1, 1923 (Aged 66) January 15, 1907 – January 17, 1911 Democratic 1906 General Manager of the Railroad (1892-1897)   Asbury Bascom Davidson

1908

25

  Oscar Branch Colquitt December 16, 1861 – March 8, 1940 (Aged 78) January 17, 1911 – January 19, 1915 Democratic 1910 Texas
Texas
Railroad Commissioner (1903-1911)

1912   William Harding Mayes

26

  James E. "Pa" Ferguson August 31, 1871 – September 21, 1944 (Aged 73) January 19, 1915 – August 25, 1917 Democratic 1914 Local banker (since 1906)   William P. Hobby [25]

1916 [26]

27

  William P. Hobby March 26, 1878 – June 7, 1964 (Aged 86) August 25, 1917 – January 18, 1921 Democratic 24th Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1915-1917) Office vacant

1918   Willard Arnold Johnson

28

  Pat Morris Neff November 26, 1871 – January 20, 1952 (Aged 80) January 18, 1921 – January 20, 1925 Democratic 1920 Texas
Texas
State Representative (1899-1903)   Lynch Davidson

1922   Thomas Whitfield Davidson

29

  Miriam A. "Ma" Ferguson June 13, 1875 – June 25, 1961 (Aged 86) January 20, 1925 – January 18, 1927 Democratic 1924 First Lady of Texas (1915–1917)   Barry Miller

30

  Dan Moody June 1, 1893 – May 22, 1966 (Aged 72) January 18, 1927 – January 20, 1931 Democratic 1926 32nd Attorney General of Texas (1931–1935)

1928

31

  Ross S. Sterling February 11, 1875 – March 25, 1949 (Aged 74) January 20, 1931 – January 17, 1933 Democratic 1930 Chairman of the Texas
Texas
Highway Commission (1930)   Edgar E. Witt

32

  Miriam A. "Ma" Ferguson June 13, 1875 – June 25, 1961 (Aged 86) January 17, 1933 – January 15, 1935 Democratic 1932 29th Governor of Texas (1925-1927)

33

  James Allred March 29, 1899 – September 24, 1959 (Aged 60) January 15, 1935 – January 17, 1939 Democratic 1934 35th Attorney General of Texas (1931–1935)   Walter Frank Woodul

1936

34

  Wilbert Lee "Pappy" O'Daniel March 11, 1890 – May 11, 1969 (Aged 79) January 17, 1939 – August 4, 1941 Democratic 1938 President
President
of the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce (1933-1934)   Coke R. Stevenson [25]

1940 [27]

35

  Coke R. Stevenson March 20, 1888 – June 28, 1975 (Aged 87) August 4, 1941 – January 21, 1947 Democratic 31st Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1939-1941) Office vacant

1942   John Lee Smith

1944

36

  Beauford H. Jester January 12, 1893 – July 11, 1949 (Aged 56) January 21, 1947 – July 11, 1949 Democratic 1946 Member of the Texas
Texas
Railroad Commission (1943-1947)   Allan Shivers [25]

1948 [28]

37

  Allan Shivers October 5, 1907 – January 14, 1985 (Aged 77) July 11, 1949 – January 15, 1957 Democratic 33rd Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1947-1949) Office vacant

1950   Ben Ramsey

1952

1954

38

  Price Daniel October 10, 1910 – August 25, 1988 (Aged 77) January 15, 1957 – January 15, 1963 Democratic 1956 U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
from Texas (1953-1957)

1958

1960

Office vacant

39

  John Connally February 27, 1917 – June 15, 1993 (Aged 76) January 15, 1963 – January 21, 1969 Democratic 1962 56th United States Secretary of the Navy (1961)   Preston Smith

1964

1966

40

  Preston Smith March 8, 1912 – October 18, 2003 (Aged 91) January 21, 1969 – January 16, 1973 Democratic 1968 35th Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1963-1969)   Ben Barnes

1970

41

  Dolph Briscoe April 23, 1923 – June 27, 2010 (Aged 87) January 16, 1973 – January 16, 1979 Democratic 1972 Texas
Texas
State Representative (1949-1957)   William P. Hobby
William P. Hobby
Jr.

1974

42

  Bill Clements April 13, 1917 – May 29, 2011 (Aged 94) January 16, 1979 – January 18, 1983 Republican 1978 15th United States Deputy Secretary of Defense (1973-1977)

43

  Mark White March 17, 1940 – August 5, 2017 (Aged 77) January 18, 1983 – January 20, 1987 Democratic 1982 46th Attorney General of Texas (1979-1983)

44

  Bill Clements April 13, 1917 – May 29, 2011 (Aged 94) January 20, 1987 – January 15, 1991 Republican 1986 42nd Governor of Texas (1979-1983)

45

  Ann Richards September 1, 1933 – September 13, 2006 (Aged 73) January 15, 1991 – January 17, 1995 Democratic 1990 Treasurer of Texas (1983-1991)   Bob Bullock

46

  George W. Bush July 6, 1946 (Age 71) January 17, 1995 – December 21, 2000 Republican 1994 Managing General Partner of the Texas
Texas
Rangers (1989-1994)

1998 [29]   Rick Perry

47

  Rick Perry March 4, 1950 (Age 68) December 21, 2000 – January 20, 2015 Republican 39th Lieutenant Governor of Texas (1999-2000)   Bill Ratliff

2002   David Dewhurst

2006

2010

48

  Greg Abbott November 13, 1957 (Age 60) January 20, 2015 – Incumbent Republican 2014 [30] 50th Attorney General of Texas (2002-2015)   Dan Patrick

Other high offices held[edit]

Governor Gubernatorial Term Other high offices held

James Pinckney Henderson 1846–1847 U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
(1857–1858)

Peter Hansborough Bell 1849–1853 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
(1853–1857)

Sam Houston 1859–1861 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
from Tennessee
Tennessee
(1823–1827), Governor of Tennessee
Tennessee
(1827–1829), President
President
of Texas
Texas
(1836–1838, 1841–1844), U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
(1846–1859)

Andrew Jackson Hamilton 1865–1866 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
(1859–1861)

James W. Throckmorton 1866–1867 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
(1875–1879, 1883–1887)

Richard Coke 1874–1876 U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
(1877–1895)

Richard B. Hubbard 1876–1879 Minister to Japan (1885–1889)

Charles Allen Culberson 1895–1899 U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
(1899–1923)

Joseph D. Sayers 1899–1903 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
(1885–1893, 1893–1899)

S. W. T. Lanham 1903–1907 U.S. Representative
U.S. Representative
(1883–1893, 1897–1903)

W. Lee O'Daniel 1939–1941 U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
(1941–1949)

Price Daniel 1957–1963 U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
(1953–1957)

John Connally 1963–1969 U.S. Secretary of the Navy
U.S. Secretary of the Navy
(1961), U.S. Secretary of the Treasury (1971–1972)

Bill Clements 1979–1983 1987–1991 U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense
U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense
(1973–1977)

George W. Bush 1995–2000 43rd President of the United States
President of the United States
(2001–2009)

Rick Perry 2000–2015 United States Secretary of Energy

Living former governors of Texas[edit] Currently, there are two living former governors of Texas. The most recent death of a former governor was that of Mark White (1983–1987), who died on August 5, 2017. The most recently serving governor of Texas
Texas
who has died is Ann Richards
Ann Richards
(1991–1995, born 1933), who died on September 13, 2006. Pictured in order of service:

George W. Bush (1995–2000) (1946-07-06) July 6, 1946 (age 71)

Rick Perry (2000–2015) (1950-03-04) March 4, 1950 (age 68)

Gubernatorial trivia[edit]

Along with the Seal of Office, the governor of Texas
Texas
also has a flag. It is not in common use.

Background[edit] Texas
Texas
has had two female governors: Miriam A. "Ma" Ferguson and Ann Richards. Ferguson was one of the first two women elected governor of a U.S. state
U.S. state
(on November 4, 1924), along with Nellie Tayloe Ross
Nellie Tayloe Ross
of Wyoming. Ross was inaugurated on January 5, 1925, while Ferguson was inaugurated on January 20, so Ross is considered the first female state governor. Ferguson was the wife of former governor Jim "Pa" Ferguson, while Richards was elected "in her own right," being neither the spouse nor widow of a governor. Texas
Texas
governors have been born in fourteen states: Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. Baylor University
Baylor University
is the most common alma mater of Texas
Texas
governors, with five of them - Lawrence Sullivan Ross, Pat Morris Neff, Price Daniel, Mark White, and Ann Richards
Ann Richards
- considered alumni (though Ross attended but never completed a degree). To date, Coke Stevenson
Coke Stevenson
is the most recent governor who never attended college, and Bill Clements
Bill Clements
is the most recent who attended college but did not graduate. Elections[edit] Three governors have served non-consecutive terms: Elisha M. Pease, Miriam A. Ferguson, and Bill Clements. As was the case in most Southern states, Texas
Texas
did not elect any Republican governor from the end of Reconstruction until the late twentieth century. Bill Clements was the state's first Republican governor since Edmund J. Davis
Edmund J. Davis
left office in 1874, 105 years earlier. Dolph Briscoe
Dolph Briscoe
was the last governor to be elected to a two-year term, in 1972; he was also the first to be elected to a four-year term, in 1974, since the post-Reconstruction period when two-year terms had first been established. Rick Perry, who ascended to the governorship on December 21, 2000 upon the resignation of then-Governor George W. Bush, won full four-year terms in 2002, 2006 and 2010. Texas
Texas
governors in popular culture[edit] W. Lee "Pappy" O'Daniel served as the inspiration for the fictional, but similarly named, Mississippi
Mississippi
Governor Menelaus "Pappy" O'Daniel, in the film O Brother, Where Art Thou? Ann Richards
Ann Richards
had a cameo appearance on an episode of the animated comedy series King of the Hill, in which she has a brief romance with Bill Dauterive after he takes the fall for mooning her in the elevator of an Austin hotel (Hank actually mooned her because he thought his friends were going to be mooning the people in the elevator but they set him up). See also[edit]

Texas
Texas
portal

List of Texas
Texas
Governors and Presidents List of Presidents of the Republic of Texas List of Lieutenant Governors of Texas

Notes[edit]

^ "CSG Releases 2013 Governor Salaries". The Council of State Governments. June 25, 2013. Retrieved November 23, 2014.  ^ Upon recommendation of the Board of Pardons and Paroles ^ a b Suellentrop, Chip (2000-01-05). "Is George W. Bush
George W. Bush
a "Weak" Governor?". Slate Magazine - Explainer. Retrieved 2010-01-25.  ^ a b Ivins, Molly; Lou Dubose (2000). Shrub: The Short But Happy Political Life of George W. Bush. New York: Vintage Books. pp. xii–xiii. ISBN 0-375-75714-7.  ^ 1845 Const. Art V sec 4 ^ 1861 Const. art V sec 12 ^ 1866 Const. art V sec 4 ^ 1869 Const. Art IV sec 4 ^ Executive Branch Archived 2011-06-29 at the Wayback Machine. retrieved 23-October-2008 ^ TX Const. Art IV sec 4 ^ Texas
Texas
Politics - The Executive Branch Archived 2009-02-11 at the Wayback Machine.. Texaspolitics.laits.utexas.edu. Retrieved on 2013-07-15. ^ TX Const. art IV sec 16 graf d ^ Under the 1861 constitution, law provided that the lieutenant governor would be "styled Governor of the State of Texas" in case of vacancy. ^ 1861 Const art V sec 12 ^ Resigned to take an elected seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. ^ a b c As lieutenant governor, filled an unexpired term ^ Evicted from office due to his refusal to swear an oath to the Confederate States of America. ^ Fled Austin as it fell to Union forces. ^ NGA says he was Lt. Gov who served as Gov after Murrah fled Texas. ^ Provisional military governor. ^ a b James Throckmorton was removed from office by General Philip Sheridan, and Elisha Pease installed in his place. ^ Resigned due to disagreements with General Joseph Reynolds. ^ Elected in a special election held under military direction. ^ Resigned to take an elected seat in the U.S. Senate. ^ a b c As lieutenant governor, filled unexpired term, and was subsequently elected in their own right. ^ Resigned due to the legislature bringing impeachment proceedings against him. ^ Resigned after winning the Democratic primary for a U.S. Senate seat; he won the election. ^ Died in office. ^ Resigned to be U.S. President. ^ Governor Abbott's first term expires on January 15, 2019; he is not term limited.

References[edit]

General

Legislative Reference Library of Texas
Texas
-- Governors of Texas Governor (of Texas) from the Handbook of Texas
Texas
Online The Handbook of Texas
Texas
Online: Texas
Texas
History Quiz -- Presidents and Governors of Texas Explanation of the strengths of governors

Constitutions

1876 Constitution, as amended (Current) 1876 Constitution 1869 Constitution 1866 Constitution 1861 Constitution 1845 Constitution

v t e

Current statewide political officials of Texas

U.S. Senators

John Cornyn Ted Cruz

State government

Greg Abbott, Governor Dan Patrick, Lieutenant Governor & President
President
of the Senate Rolando Pablos, Secretary of State (appointed) Ken Paxton, Attorney General Glenn Hegar, Comptroller (Treasurer equivalent) George P. Bush, Land Commissioner Sid Miller, Agriculture Commissioner Christi Craddick, Ryan Sitton, Wayne Christian, Railroad Commissioners

Senate

Juan Hinojosa, President
President
pro tempore

In the Texas
Texas
Senate, there are no majority or minority leaders.

House

Joe Straus, Speaker Dennis Bonnen, Speaker pro tempore

In the Texas
Texas
House, there are no majority or minority leaders.

Supreme Court (civil)

Nathan Hecht, Chief Justice Debra Lehrmann John P. Devine Paul W. Green Jeff Brown Jeffrey S. Boyd Phil Johnson Eva Guzman Jimmy Blacklock, Associate Justices

Texas
Texas
Court of Criminal Appeals

Sharon Keller, Presiding Judge Mary Lou Keel Bert Richardson Kevin Patrick Yeary Scott Walker Michael Keasler Barbara Hervey Elsa Alcala David Newell

v t e

Chief executives of the United States

Federal

President
President
of the United States

State governors (current list)

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California

list

Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii

list

Idaho Illinois

list

Indiana

list

Iowa

list

Kansas Kentucky

list

Louisiana Maine

list

Maryland

list

Massachusetts Michigan

list

Minnesota

list

Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska

list

Nevada New Hampshire

list

New Jersey

list

New Mexico

list

New York

list

North Carolina

list

North Dakota

list

Ohio Oklahoma

list

Oregon

list

Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina

list

South Dakota

list

Tennessee

list

Texas

list

Utah Vermont

list

Virginia

list

Washington West Virginia Wisconsin

list

Wyoming

Territorial (current list)

American Samoa District of Columbia Guam Northern Mariana Islands Puerto Rico United States Virgin Islands

Defunct

Pre-state territories Panama Canal Zone Cuba Philippine Islands (until 1935) Philippine Commonwealth (until 1946) Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands

v t e

Governors and Lieutenant Governors of Texas

Governors

J. P. Henderson Wood Bell J. W. Henderson Pease Runnels Houston Clark Lubbock Murrah Hamilton Throckmorton Pease Davis Coke Hubbard Roberts Ireland Ross Hogg Culberson Sayers Lanham Campbell Colquitt J. Ferguson Hobby Neff M. Ferguson Moody Sterling M. Ferguson Allred O'Daniel Stevenson Jester Shivers Daniel Connally Smith Briscoe Clements White Clements Richards Bush Perry Abbott

Lieutenant Governors

Horton Greer Henderson Dickson Runnels Lubbock Clark Crockett Stockdale Jones J. W. Flanagan Campbell D. W. Flanagan Fountain Pickett Hubbard Sayers Storey Martin Gibbs Wheeler Pendleton Crane Jester Browning Neal A. B. Davidson Mayes Hobby Sr. Johnson L. Davidson T. W. Davidson Miller Witt Woodul Stevenson J. L. Smith Shivers Ramsey P. Smith Barnes Hobby Jr. Bullock Perry Ratliff Dewhurst Patrick

v t e

Texas
Texas
state agencies

Executive

Dept. of Agriculture Alcoholic Beverage Commission Animal Health Commission Dept. of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services Attorney General School for the Blind and Visually Impaired Brazos River Authority State Cemetery Comptroller of Public Accounts School for the Deaf Board of Dental Examiners Commission on Environmental Quality Education Agency Employees Retirement System Ethics Commission Facilities Commission Dept. of Family and Protective Services Film Commission Forest Service Office of the Governor Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority Health and Human Services Commission Dept. of State Health Services Higher Education Coordinating Board Historical Commission Dept. of Housing and Community Affairs Dept. of Information Resources Dept. of Insurance Commission on Jail Standards General Land Office Library and Archives Commission Dept. of Licensing and Regulation Lottery Commission Lower Colorado River Authority Dept. of Motor Vehicles Dept. of Parks and Wildlife Preservation Board Dept. of Public Safety Railroad Commission Real Estate Commission Residential Construction Commission Soil and Water Conservation Board Teacher Retirement System Texas
Texas
A&M University System Dept. of Transportation Trinity River Authority University of Houston
Houston
System University of North Texas
Texas
System University of Texas
Texas
System Texas
Texas
State University System Texas
Texas
Tech University System Workforce Commission Juvenile Justice Department

Legislative

House of Representatives Senate

Judicial

Courts of Appeals Court of Criminal Appeals Dept. of Criminal Justice State Bar Supreme Court

v t e

 State of Texas

Austin (capital)

Topics

Architecture Climate Cuisine Geography Government Healthcare History Languages Law Literature Media

Newspapers Radio TV

National Historic Landmarks Recorded Texas
Texas
Historic Landmarks National Register of Historic Places Sites Sports Symbols Texans Tourist attractions Transportation

Seal of Texas

Society

Culture Crime Demographics Economy Education Gambling Politics

Regions

Ark‑La‑Tex Big Bend Blackland Prairies Brazos Valley Central Texas Coastal Bend Concho Valley Cross Timbers Deep East Texas East Texas Edwards Plateau Golden Triangle Hill Country Llano Estacado Northeast Texas North Texas Osage Plains Panhandle Permian Basin Piney Woods Rio Grande Valley Southeast Texas South Plains South Texas Texoma Trans-Pecos West Texas

Metropolitan areas

Abilene Amarillo Austin–Round Rock Beaumont–Port Arthur Brownsville–Harlingen College Station–Bryan Corpus Christi Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington El Paso Houston–The Woodlands–Sugar Land Killeen–Temple Laredo Longview Lubbock McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Midland Odessa San Angelo San Antonio–New Braunfels Sherman–Denison Texarkana Tyler Victoria Waco Wichita Falls

Counties

See: List of counties in Texas

v t e

Years in Texas
Texas
(1845–present)

Pre-1845 1845 1846 1847 1848 1849 1850 1851 1852 1853 1854 1855 1856 1857 1858 1859 1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 1875 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900

1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 20

.