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Teton County is a county located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Wyoming. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,294.[1] Its county seat is Jackson.[2] It is east from the Idaho
Idaho
state line. Teton County is part of the Jackson, WY-ID Micropolitan Statistical Area. Teton County contains the Jackson Hole
Jackson Hole
ski area. In addition, the county contains all of Grand Teton National Park
Grand Teton National Park
and 40.4% of Yellowstone National Park's total area, including over 96.6% of its water area (largely in Yellowstone Lake).[3]

Contents

1 History 2 Geography

2.1 Adjacent counties 2.2 National protected areas

3 Demographics

3.1 2000 census 3.2 2010 census

4 Communities

4.1 Town 4.2 Census-designated places 4.3 Unincorporated communities

5 Politics 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

History[edit] Teton County was created February 15, 1921, with land from Lincoln County and organized the following year.[4] The county was named for the Teton Range.[5] The county was created because the inhabitants lived too far away from Kemmerer, the county seat of Lincoln County. The creation of the county required a special act of the Wyoming Legislature, because the area was too poor and had too few people to qualify for county status under the normal requirements. Geography[edit]

Fishing Cone
Fishing Cone
Geyser and Yellowstone Lake.

According to the U.S. Census
Census
Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,216 square miles (10,920 km2), of which 3,995 square miles (10,350 km2) is land and 221 square miles (570 km2) (5.2%) is water.[6] Adjacent counties[edit]

Park County (northeast) Fremont County (east) Sublette County (southeast) Lincoln County (south) Bonneville County, Idaho
Idaho
(southwest) Teton County, Idaho
Idaho
(southwest) Fremont County, Idaho
Idaho
(west) Gallatin County, Montana
Gallatin County, Montana
(northwest)

Teton County, Wyoming
Wyoming
and Teton County, Idaho, are two of twenty-two counties or parishes in the United States
United States
with the same name to border each other across state lines. The others are Big Horn County, Montana and Big Horn County, Wyoming; Bristol County, Massachusetts
Bristol County, Massachusetts
and Bristol County, Rhode Island; Escambia County, Alabama
Escambia County, Alabama
and Escambia County, Florida; Kent County, Delaware
Kent County, Delaware
and Kent County, Maryland; Park County, Montana and Park County, Wyoming; Pike County, Illinois
Pike County, Illinois
and Pike County, Missouri; Sabine County, Texas
Sabine County, Texas
and Sabine Parish, Louisiana; San Juan County, New Mexico
San Juan County, New Mexico
and San Juan County, Utah; Union Parish, Louisiana
Union Parish, Louisiana
and Union County, Arkansas; and Vermilion County, Illinois and Vermillion County, Indiana
Vermillion County, Indiana
(both these counties are named for the Vermilion River, despite their different spellings). National protected areas[edit]

Bridger-Teton National Forest
Bridger-Teton National Forest
(part) Caribou-Targhee National Forest
Caribou-Targhee National Forest
(part) Grand Teton National Park John D. Rockefeller Memorial Parkway National Elk Refuge Shoshone National Forest
Shoshone National Forest
(part) Yellowstone National Park
Yellowstone National Park
(part)

Demographics[edit]

Historical population

Census Pop.

1930 2,003

1940 2,543

27.0%

1950 2,593

2.0%

1960 3,062

18.1%

1970 4,823

57.5%

1980 9,355

94.0%

1990 11,172

19.4%

2000 18,251

63.4%

2010 21,294

16.7%

Est. 2016 23,191 [7] 8.9%

U.S. Decennial Census[8] 1870–2000[9] 2010–2016[1]

2000 census[edit] As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 18,251 people, 7,688 households, and 4,174 families residing in the county. The population density was 5 people per square mile (2/km²). There were 10,267 housing units at an average density of 3 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.59% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 0.53% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 3.93% from other races, and 1.22% from two or more races. 6.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 19.2% were of German, 14.2% English, 11.7% Irish and 6.7% American ancestry. There were 7,688 households out of which 25.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.30% were married couples living together, 5.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.70% were non-families. 27.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.89. Age range in the county was well distributed with 19.90% under the age of 18, 9.80% from 18 to 24, 38.30% from 25 to 44, 25.00% from 45 to 64, and 6.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 114.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 115.50 males. The median income for a household in the county was $54,614, and the median income for a family was $63,916. Males had a median income of $34,570 versus $29,132 for females. The per capita income for the county was $38,260. About 2.80% of families and 6.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.70% of those under age 18 and 4.40% of those age 65 or over. 2010 census[edit] As of the 2010 United States
United States
Census, there were 21,294 people, 8,973 households, and 4,938 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 5.3 inhabitants per square mile (2.0/km2). There were 12,813 housing units at an average density of 3.2 per square mile (1.2/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 88.4% white, 1.1% Asian, 0.5% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 0.1% Pacific islander, 8.1% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 15.0% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 22.2% were German, 14.9% were English, 13.0% were Irish, and 11.1% were American.[13] Of the 8,973 households, 25.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.7% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 45.0% were non-families, and 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.89. The median age was 36.9 years.[11] The median income for a household in the county was $70,271 and the median income for a family was $90,596. Males had a median income of $40,594 versus $36,715 for females. The per capita income for the county was $42,224. About 5.1% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.5% of those under age 18 and 0.8% of those age 65 or over.[14] Communities[edit]

Teton Science Schools, Jackson campus

Town[edit]

Jackson (county seat)

Census-designated places[edit]

Alta Hoback Kelly Moose Wilson Road Rafter J Ranch South Park Teton Village Wilson

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Colter Bay Moran Moose West Thumb

Politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[15]

Year Republican Democratic Third Parties

2016 31.1% 3,921 57.9% 7,314 11.0% 1,392

2012 42.4% 4,858 54.2% 6,213 3.4% 393

2008 37.1% 4,565 60.7% 7,472 2.3% 279

2004 45.1% 5,124 52.6% 5,972 2.3% 263

2000 52.3% 5,454 38.5% 4,019 9.2% 958

1996 43.5% 3,918 44.9% 4,042 11.5% 1,038

1992 34.1% 2,854 37.2% 3,120 28.7% 2,408

1988 61.0% 3,616 37.4% 2,217 1.6% 93

1984 67.9% 3,487 30.5% 1,565 1.7% 87

1980 57.6% 3,004 26.1% 1,361 16.3% 847

1976 67.4% 2,667 30.4% 1,204 2.2% 86

1972 70.0% 2,182 26.0% 810 4.0% 124

1968 69.3% 1,419 22.5% 461 8.3% 169

1964 52.8% 1,081 47.2% 968

1960 66.5% 1,158 33.5% 583

1956 77.7% 1,089 22.3% 312

1952 78.6% 1,166 21.4% 317

1948 55.8% 719 43.1% 556 1.1% 14

1944 56.1% 637 43.9% 499

1940 46.1% 623 53.8% 728 0.2% 2

1936 37.1% 501 58.8% 795 4.1% 56

1932 36.4% 406 62.7% 699 0.9% 10

1928 64.3% 495 35.1% 270 0.7% 5

1924 54.6% 342 27.6% 173 17.7% 111

Previously a staunchly Republican county, which produced Governor and U.S. Senator
U.S. Senator
Clifford Hansen, Teton has become the most Democratic county in Wyoming, which is one of the most Republican states in the nation. The only Republican presidential candidate since 1992 to win Teton County was George W. Bush
George W. Bush
in 2000. In the 2008 election, Barack Obama carried Teton County by a 23.6 percentage point margin over John McCain, with McCain winning statewide by a 32.2 percentage point margin over Obama, his widest margin in any state. Albany County, which includes the University of Wyoming
Wyoming
at Laramie, was the only other county in the state to have backed Obama. In 2004, Teton was the only Wyoming
Wyoming
county won by John F. Kerry
John F. Kerry
over George W. Bush.[16] In the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
beat Donald Trump
Donald Trump
by 60.1%–32.2%.[17] The county has, however, voted at times for Republican candidates for the governorship and United States
United States
Senate. The state's current Republican governor, Matt Mead, was born and reared in Teton County, as was his mother, Mary Mead, Clifford Hansen's daughter and the 1990 Republican gubernatorial nominee. See also[edit]

National Register of Historic Places listings in Teton County, Wyoming

References[edit]

^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved January 25, 2014.  ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.  ^ "American FactFinder". United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved 2008-04-30.  ^ Long, John H., ed. (2004). "Wyoming: Individual County Chronologies". Wyoming
Wyoming
Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. Retrieved August 19, 2015.  ^ Urbanek, Mae (1988). Wyoming
Wyoming
Place Names. Missoula, MT: Mountain Press Publishing Company. ISBN 0-87842-204-8.  ^ "2010 Census
Census
Gazetteer Files". United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 18, 2015.  ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.  ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved August 18, 2015.  ^ "Historical Decennial Census
Census
Population for Wyoming
Wyoming
Counties, Cities, and Towns". Wyoming
Wyoming
Department of Administration & Information, Division of Economic Analysis. Retrieved January 25, 2014.  ^ "American FactFinder". United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.  ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States
United States
Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.  ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.  ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.  ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-12.  ^ Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas; 2016 Presidential General Election Results – Wyoming: Teton County (and earlier years) ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 19, 2016.  ^ "2016 election results: Wyoming". www.cnn.com. Retrieved November 26, 2016. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Teton County, Wyoming.

Places adjacent to Teton County, Wyoming

Gallatin County, Montana Park County

Fremont County, Idaho

Teton County, Wyoming

Fremont County

Teton County, Idaho
Idaho
and Bonneville County, Idaho Lincoln County Sublette County

v t e

Municipalities and communities of Teton County, Wyoming, United States

County seat: Jackson

Town

Jackson

CDPs

Alta Hoback Kelly Moose Wilson Road Rafter J Ranch South Park Teton Village Wilson

Unincorporated communities

Moose Moran West Thumb

v t e

 State of Wyoming

Cheyenne (capital)

Topics

Bibliography Governors Delegations History People State symbols Radio stations

Seal of Wyoming

Society

Crime Demographics Economy Education Politics

Regions

Black Hills Grand Teton Great Basin Powder River Country Red Desert Yellowstone

Cities

Buffalo Casper Cheyenne Cody Douglas Evanston Gillette Green River Jackson Lander Laramie Powell Rawlins Riverton Rock Springs Sheridan Torrington Worland

Counties

Albany Big Horn Campbell Carbon Converse Crook Fremont Goshen Hot Springs Johnson Laramie Lincoln Natrona Niobrara Park Platte Sheridan Sublette Sweetwater Teton Uinta Washakie Weston

Coordinates: 43°55′N 110°34′W / 43.92°N 110.57°W / 43

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