HOME
The Info List - Terah


--- Advertisement ---



Terah
Terah
or Térach (Hebrew: תֶּרַח‬, Ṫéraḥ, "Ibex, wild goat", or "Wanderer; loiterer") is a biblical figure in the Book of Genesis, son of Nahor, son of Serug
Nahor, son of Serug
and father of the Patriarch Abraham, all descendants of Shem's son Arpachshad. Terah
Terah
is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Genesis 11:26-27, Joshua
Joshua
24:2 and 1 Chronicles 1:17–27) and New Testament.[2]

Contents

1 Genesis narrative

1.1 Family tree

2 Terah
Terah
in the Book of Joshua 3 Jewish tradition

3.1 When Terah
Terah
begat Abram 3.2 Terah's occupation 3.3 Leader of the journey 3.4 When Abram leaves Haran

4 Samaritan tradition 5 Christian
Christian
tradition 6 Islamic tradition

6.1 Abraham's advice 6.2 Wreckage of the idols 6.3 Abraham
Abraham
is thrown into the fire 6.4 Shi'ite
Shi'ite
views

6.4.1 Terah
Terah
the father 6.4.2 Terah
Terah
the uncle

7 References

Genesis narrative[edit] Most of what is told about Terah
Terah
is recorded in Genesis 11:26–28. Terah's father was Nahor, son of Serug, descendants of Shem.[v.10] They and many of their ancestors were polytheistic.[3] Regarding his children, Terah
Terah
had three sons: Abram (better known by his later name Abraham), Haran, and Nahor II.[v.26] His daughter Sarai, by a second wife, was also his daughter-in-law, wife of Abram.[4] The entire family, including grandchildren, lived in Ur of the Chaldees.[v.31] One of his grandchildren was Lot, whose father, Haran, had died before the family left Ur.[v.28] Terah's son Abram had an encounter with God, who directed him to take the entire family, leave Ur, and move to the land of Canaan.[5] Terah
Terah
coordinated the journey, intending to go to this new land, but stopped in the city of Haran[v.31] along the way, where he died at the age of 205.[v.32] [6] Family tree[edit]

Terah

Sarah[7]

Abraham

Hagar

Haran

Nahor

Ishmael

Milcah

Lot

Iscah

Ishmaelites

7 sons[8]

Bethuel

1st daughter

2nd daughter

Isaac

Rebecca

Laban

Moabites

Ammonites

Esau

Jacob

Rachel

Bilhah

Edomites

Zilpah

Leah

1. Reuben 2. Simeon 3. Levi 4. Judah 9. Issachar 10. Zebulun Dinah (daughter)

7. Gad 8. Asher

5. Dan 6. Naphtali

11. Joseph 12. Benjamin

Terah
Terah
in the Book of Joshua[edit] In his final speech to the Israelite leaders assembled at Shechem, Joshua
Joshua
recounts the history of God's formation of the Israelite nation, beginning with " Terah
Terah
the father of Abraham
Abraham
and Nahor, [who] lived beyond the Euphrates
Euphrates
River
River
and worshiped other gods."[9] Jewish tradition[edit] When Terah
Terah
begat Abram[edit] Genesis 11:26 states that Terah
Terah
lived 70 years, and he begat Abram, Nachor, and Haran. Rashi[10] comments on the subsequent elaboration on the story of Abraham
Abraham
that Abraham
Abraham
was the gem of the chronology of Genesis 11 which the Torah
Torah
wanted to focus on. In the Jewish tradition, Genesis (11:26) teaches that Terah
Terah
was 70 years old when he begat Abram. The Talmud[11] says that Abraham
Abraham
was 52 years old at year 2000 AM (Anno Mundi), which means that he was born in the year 1948 AM. Rashi[12] explains this based on Abram being born when Terah
Terah
was 70. While it is a given in Jewish tradition that Genesis (11:26) relates that Abram was born when Terach was 70, which is the basis of the current Jewish year, there is yet a question whether Abram was born first as listed, or perhaps last, and is listed first as the wisest similar to Shem, Ham, and Jafeth where Shem
Shem
was the youngest but wisest. Seder Olam Rabbah
Seder Olam Rabbah
holds that Abram was the eldest,[13] but the Talmud[14] leaves the above question open. Terah's occupation[edit] According to rabbinical tradition Terah
Terah
was a wicked (Numbers Rabbah 19:1; 19:33), idolatrous priest ( Midrash HaGadol
Midrash HaGadol
on Genesis 11:28) who manufactured idols (Eliyahu Rabbah 6, and Eliyahu Zuta 25). Abram, in opposition to his father’s idol shop, smashed his father’s idols and chased customers away. Terah
Terah
then brought his unruly son before Nimrod, who threw him into a fiery furnace, yet Abram miraculously escaped ( Genesis Rabba
Genesis Rabba
38:13). The Zohar
Zohar
says that when God
God
saved Abram from the furnace, Terah
Terah
repented ( Zohar
Zohar
Genesis 1:77b) and Rabbi Abba B. Kahana said that God
God
assured Abram that his father Terah
Terah
had a portion in the World to Come ( Genesis Rabbah
Genesis Rabbah
30:4; 30:12). Rabbi
Rabbi
Hiyya relates this account in Genesis Rabba:

Terah
Terah
left Abram to mind the store while he departed. A woman came with a plateful of flour and asked Abram to offer it to the idols. Abram then took a stick, broke the idols, and put the stick in the largest idol’s hand. When Terah
Terah
returned, he demanded that Abram explain what he'd done. Abram told his father that the idols fought among themselves and the largest broke the others with the stick. “Why do you make sport of me?” Terah
Terah
cried, “Do they have any knowledge?” Abram replied, “Listen to what you are saying!”

Leader of the journey[edit] Terah
Terah
is identified as the person who arranged and led the family to embark on a mysterious journey to Canaan. It is shrouded in mystery to Jewish scholars as to why Terah
Terah
began the journey and as to why the journey ended prematurely. It is suggested that he was a man in search of a greater truth that could possibly be found in the familiar[15] land of Canaan, and that it was Abram who picked up the torch to continue his father's quest, that Terah
Terah
himself was unable to achieve.[16] When Abram leaves Haran[edit] In Jewish tradition Abram left Haran before Terah
Terah
died as an expression that he would not be remiss in the Mitzvah, of honoring a parent, by leaving his aging father behind.[17] The significance of Terah
Terah
not reaching Canaan, was a reflection of his character, a man who was unable to go “all the way”. Though on a journey in the right direction, Terah
Terah
fell short at arriving to the divine destination — in contrast to Abram, who did follow through and achieved the divine goal, and was not bound by his father’s idolatrous past. Abram's following God’s command to leave his father, thus absolved him from the Mitzvah of honoring parents, and as Abraham, he would go on to create a new lineage distinct from his ancestors.[18] Samaritan tradition[edit] In the Samaritan Pentateuch
Samaritan Pentateuch
Terah
Terah
dies aged 145 years and Abram leaves Haran after his death.[19] Christian
Christian
tradition[edit] In the Christian
Christian
tradition Abram left Haran after Terah
Terah
died. The Christian
Christian
views of the time of Terah
Terah
come from a passage in the New Testament at Acts 7:2–4 where Stephen said some things that contrast with Jewish Rabbinical views. He said that God
God
appeared to Abraham
Abraham
in Mesopotamia, and directed him to leave the Chaldeans—whereas most Rabbinical commentators see Terah
Terah
as being the one who directed the family to leave Ur Kasdim
Ur Kasdim
from Genesis 11:31: " Terah
Terah
took his son Abram, his daughter-in-law Sarai (his son Abram's wife), and his grandson Lot (his son Haran's child) and left Ur of the Chaldeans to go to the land of Canaan." Stephen asserts that Abram left Haran after Terah
Terah
died.[20] Islamic tradition[edit] In some Islamic sects, Abraham's father is believed to have been a disbelieving man,[21] due to his refusal to listen to the constant advice of his son. In fact, the earliest story involving Abraham
Abraham
in the Quran
Quran
is his discussion with his ab (Arabic: أَب‎, which can mean 'father'). The name given for this man in the Qur'an[22] is 'Āzar' (Arabic: ءازَرُ‎), though Arab
Arab
genealogists related the name of Abraham's father as 'Ṫāraḥ' (Arabic: تَارَح‎).[21][23] Abraham's advice[edit] As a father, Azar required his son's most sincere advice. Ibrahim, after receiving his first revelations from Allah, invited his father to the way of Islam. Abraham
Abraham
explained to him the faults of idolatry,[24] and why he was wrong to worship objects which could neither hear nor see.[25] From the Quran
Quran
74/6, "And [mention, O Muhammad], when Abraham
Abraham
said to his ab Azar: Do you take idols as deities? Indeed, I see you and your people to be in manifest error." Abraham
Abraham
told his father that he had indeed received revelations from God, knowledge which his father did not possess,[26] and told him that belief in Allah
Allah
would grant him immense rewards in both this life and the hereafter. Abraham
Abraham
concluded his preaching by warning Azar of the grave punishment he would face if he did not mend his ways.[27] When Abraham
Abraham
offered his father the guidance and advice of Allah, he rejected it, and threatened to stone him to death.[28] Abraham
Abraham
prayed for his father[29] to be forgiven by God, and although he continued to seek forgiveness, it was only because of a promise that he had made earlier to him. When it became clear that Azar's unrelenting hatred towards monotheism would never be fought, Abraham
Abraham
dissociated himself from him.[30] Wreckage of the idols[edit] The Quran
Quran
states that the people of Abraham
Abraham
were idolaters. When Abraham
Abraham
was a young boy, he decided to finally teach his community a lesson. He said to himself that he had a plan for their idols, whilst they would be gone away.[31] The Qur'an goes on to narrate that Abraham
Abraham
subsequently broke the idols, all except the largest, which he kept intact.[32] When the people returned, they began questioning each other over the wreckage, until some of the people remembered that the youth, Abraham, had spoken of the idols earlier.[33] When Abraham arrived, the people immediately began to question him, asking him whether he had anything to do with the broken idols. Abraham
Abraham
then, in a clever taunt, asked the people as to why they do not ask the largest of the idols, which, they believed, could indeed hear and speak.[34] The people of Abraham
Abraham
were then confounded with shame, and admitted that the idols were incapable of anything.[35] Abraham
Abraham
is thrown into the fire[edit] After the incident of the idol wreckage, the people of Abraham, while having admitted their fault, are said to have ignored Abraham's warning and instead retaliated by throwing him into a fire and exclaiming "protect your gods".[36] Although the natural nature of fire is one of intense heat, God
God
commanded the flame to be cool and peaceful for Abraham.[37] Abraham, as a result, remained unhurt both physically and spiritually, having survived the fire of persecution. The people continued to taunt and persecute him, but to no avail, as the Qur'an says that it was they "that lost most".[38] This means that Abraham
Abraham
came out unharmed and outstanded people. Shi'ite
Shi'ite
views[edit] Terah
Terah
the father[edit] The Twelver
Twelver
Shi'ite
Shi'ite
website Al-Islam.org treats Azar as being Abraham's uncle, not his biological father.[23] To justify this view, it references a passage of the Quran, which mentions that the sons of Ya‘qūb (Arabic: يَـعـقُـوب‎, Jacob) referred to his uncle Ismā‘īl (Arabic: إِسـمَـاعِـيـل‎, Ishmael), father Is-ḥāq (Arabic: إِسـحَـاق‎, Isaac) and grandfather Ibrāhīm (Arabic: إِبـرَاهِـيـم‎, Abraham) as his ābā’ (Arabic: آبَـاء‎):[39] "Were you there to see when death came upon Ya'qub? When he said to his sons, "What will you worship after I am gone?" they replied, "We shall worship your God
God
and the God
God
of your aba’, Ibrahim, Isma'il, and Is-haq, one single God: we devote ourselves to Him.""[39] Therefore, the singular word ab does not always mean progenitor, and can be used for an adopter, uncle, step-father, or caretaker, unlike the word wālid (Arabic: وَالِـد‎, progenitor). Thus, Al-Islam.org denies that Abraham's biological father was 'Azar', and instead agreed with Ibn Kathir
Ibn Kathir
that he was the biblical figure 'Terah',[23] who was nevertheless treated as a polytheist.[9][21] Terah
Terah
the uncle[edit] In contrast to Al-Islam.org,[23] al-Modarresi treated Terah
Terah
as the uncle of Abraham, not his father.[40]:15 References[edit]

^ Genesis 20:12 "Besides, she really is my sister, the daughter of my father though not of my mother; and she became my wife." ^ Luke 3:34–36 ^ Joshua
Joshua
24:2 ^ Genesis 11:29, Genesis 20:12 ^ Genesis 11:31 ^ The Masoretic Text gives his age at death as 205. The corresponding passage in the Septuagint
Septuagint
does not give Terah's age at death. See Larsson, Gerhard. “The Chronology of the Pentateuch: A Comparison of the MT and LXX.” Journal of Biblical Literature, vol. 102, no. 3, 1983, pp. 401–409. www.jstor.org/stable/3261014. See also the New English Translation of the Septuagint, Genesis 11:32. ^ Genesis 20:12: Sarah
Sarah
was the half–sister of Abraham. ^ Genesis 22:21-22: Uz, Buz, Kemuel, Chesed, Hazo, Pildash, and Jidlaph ^ a b Book of Joshua, 24:2 ^ on Genesis (37:1) ^ Avodah Zara 9A ^ ad loc ^ Seder Olam Rabbah, Chapter 2 ^ Sanhedrin 69B ^ Sforno, Bereishit 12:5 ^ Goldin, Shmuel. Unlocking the Torah
Torah
Text Bereishit, Vol. 1, (ISBN 9652294128, ISBN 978-965-229-412-8), 2010, p. 59, 60 ^ Compare Rashi, Bereishis 11:32 with Bereishis Rabbah 39:7 ^ (Haggadah shel Pesach) – Levene, Osher C. People of the Book, (ISBN 1568714467, ISBN 978-1-56871-446-2), 2004, p. 79-80 ^ https://sites.google.com/site/interlinearpentateuch/online-samaritan-pentateuch-in-english/genesis ^ Acts 7:4 (KJV) ^ a b c Stories of the Prophets, Ibn Kathir, Abraham
Abraham
and his father ^ (6:74) ^ a b c d "Was Azar the Father of Prophet Abraham?". Al-Islam.org. Ahlul Bayt Digital Islamic Library Project. Retrieved 2017-09-12.  ^ Quran 19:44 ^ Quran 19:42 ^ Quran 19:43 ^ Quran 19:45 ^ Quran 19:46 ^ Quran 19:47 ^ Quran 9:114 ^ Quran 21:57 ^ Quran 21:58 ^ Quran 21:60 ^ Quran 21:63 ^ Quran 21:65 ^ Quran 21:68 ^ Quran 21:69 ^ Quran 21:70 ^ a b Quran 2:124–141 ^ Mohammad Taqi al-Modarresi
Mohammad Taqi al-Modarresi
(26 March 2016). The Laws of Islam
Islam
(PDF). Enlight Press. ISBN 978-0994240989. Retrieved 22 December 2017. 

v t e

People and things in the Quran

Characters

Non-humans

Allâh ("The God")

Names of Allah
Allah
found in the Quran

Beings in Paradise

Ghilmān or Wildān Ḥūr

Animals

Related

The baqarah (cow) of Israelites The dhi’b (wolf) that Jacob
Jacob
feared could attack Joseph The fīl (elephant) of the Abyssinians) Ḥimār (Domesticated donkey) The hud-hud (hoopoe) of Solomon The kalb (dog) of the sleepers of the cave The nāqaṫ (she-camel) of Saleh The nūn (fish or whale) of Jonah

Non-related

Ḥimār (Wild ass) Qaswarah
Qaswarah
('Lion', 'Beast of prey' or 'Hunter')

Jinns

‘Ifrîṫ ("Strong one") Mârid ("Rebellious one")

Iblīs the Shayṭān (Devil)

Qarīn

Prophets

Mentioned

Ādam (Adam) Al-Yasa‘ (Elisha) Ayyūb (Job) Dāwūd (David) Dhūl-Kifl (Ezekiel?) Hārūn (Aaron) Hūd (Eber?) Idrīs (Enoch?) Ilyās (Elijah) ‘Imrān (Joachim the father of Maryam) Is-ḥāq (Isaac) Ismā‘īl (Ishmael)

Dhabih Ullah

Isma'il Ṣādiq al-Wa‘d (Fulfiller of the Promise) Lūṭ (Lot) Ṣāliḥ Shu‘ayb (Jethro, Reuel or Hobab?) Sulaymān ibn Dāwūd ( Solomon
Solomon
son of David) ‘ Uzair
Uzair
(Ezra?) Yaḥyā ibn Zakariyyā ( John the Baptist
John the Baptist
the son of Zechariah) Ya‘qūb (Jacob)

Isrâ’îl (Israel)

Yūnus (Jonah)

Dhūn-Nūn ("He of the Fish
Fish
(or Whale)" or "Owner of the Fish
Fish
(or Whale)") Ṣāḥib al-Ḥūṫ ("Companion of the Whale")

Yūsuf ibn Ya‘qūb ( Joseph
Joseph
son of Jacob) Zakariyyā (Zechariah)

Ulu-l-‘Azm

Muḥammad

Aḥmad Other names and titles of Muhammad

ʿĪsā (Jesus)

Al-Masīḥ (The Messiah) Ibn Maryam (Son of Mary)

Mūsā Kalīmullāh ( Moses
Moses
He who spoke to God) Ibrāhīm Khalīlullāh ( Abraham
Abraham
Friend of God) Nūḥ (Noah)

Debatable ones

Dhūl-Qarnain (Cyrus the Great?) Luqmân Maryam (Mary) Ṭâlûṫ (Saul or Gideon?)

Implied

Irmiyā (Jeremiah) Ṣamû’îl (Samuel) Yūsha‘ ibn Nūn (Joshua, companion and successor of Moses)

People of Prophets

Evil ones

Āzar (possibly Terah) Fir‘awn ( Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of Moses' time) Hāmān Jâlûṫ (Goliath) Qārūn (Korah, cousin of Moses) As-Sāmirī Abî Lahab Slayers of Saleh's she-camel (Qaddar ibn Salif and Musda' ibn Dahr)

Good ones

Adam's immediate relatives

Martyred son Wife

Believer of Ya-Sin Family of Noah

Father Lamech Mother Shamkhah bint Anush or Betenos

Luqman's son People of Aaron and Moses

Believer of Fir'aun Family (Hizbil/Hizqil ibn Sabura) Imra’aṫ Fir‘awn (Âsiyá bint Muzâḥim or Bithiah) Khidr Magicians of the Pharaoh Moses' wife Moses' sister-in-law Mother Sister

People of Abraham

Mother Abiona or Amtelai the daughter of Karnebo Ishmael's mother Isaac's mother

People of Jesus

Disciples (including Peter) Mary's mother Zechariah's wife

People of Joseph

Brothers (including Binyāmin (Benjamin) and Simeon) Egyptians

‘Azîz (Potiphar, Qatafir or Qittin) Malik (King Ar-Rayyân ibn Al-Walîd)) Wife of ‘Azîz (Zulaykhah)

Mother

People of Solomon

Mother Queen of Sheba Vizier

Zayd

Implied or not specified

Abrahah Bal'am/Balaam Barsisa Caleb or Kaleb the companion of Joshua Luqman's son Nebuchadnezzar II Nimrod Rahmah the wife of Ayyub Shaddad

Groups

Mentioned

Aş-ḥāb al-Jannah

People of Paradise People of the Burnt Garden

Aş-ḥāb as-Sabṫ (Companions of the Sabbath) Christian
Christian
apostles

Ḥawāriyyūn (Disciples of Jesus)

Companions of Noah's Ark Aş-ḥāb al-Kahf war-Raqīm (Companions of the Cave and Al-Raqaim? Companions of the Elephant People of al-Ukhdūd People of a township in Surah Ya-Sin People of Yathrib or Medina Qawm Lûṭ (People of Sodom and Gomorrah) Nation of Noah

Tribes, ethnicities or families

A‘rāb (Arabs or Bedouins)

ʿĀd (people of Hud) Companions of the Rass Qawm Ṫubba‘ (People of Tubba')

People of Saba’ or Sheba

Quraysh Thamûd (people of Saleh)

Aṣ-ḥâb al-Ḥijr ("Companions of the Stoneland")

Ajam Ar- Rûm (literally "The Romans") Banî Isrâ’îl (Children of Israel) Mu’ṫafikāṫ (The overthrown cities of Sodom and Gomorrah) People of Ibrahim People of Ilyas People of Nuh People of Shuaib

Ahl Madyan People of Madyan) Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
("Companions of the Wood")

Qawm Yûnus (People of Jonah) Ya'juj and Ma'juj/Gog and Magog Ahl al-Bayṫ ("People of the Household")

Household of Abraham

Brothers of Yūsuf Daughters of Abraham's nephew Lot (Ritha, Za'ura, et al.) Progeny of Imran Household of Moses Household of Muhammad ibn Abdullah ibn Abdul-Muttalib ibn Hashim

Daughters of Muhammad Wives of Muhammad

Household of Salih

People of Fir'aun Current Ummah of Islam
Islam
(Ummah of Muhammad)

Aṣ-ḥāb Muḥammad (Companions of Muhammad)

Muhajirun (Emigrants) Anṣār Muslims of Medina
Medina
who helped Muhammad and his Meccan followers, literally 'Helpers')

People of Mecca

Umm Jamil (wife of Abu Lahab)

Children of Ayyub Dead son of Sulaiman Qabil/Cain (son of Adam) Wali'ah or Wa'ilah/Waala (wife of Nuh) Walihah or Wahilah (wife of Lut) Ya’jūj wa Ma’jūj (Gog and Magog) Yam or Kan'an (son of Nuh)

Implicitly mentioned

Amalek Ahl al-Suffa (People of the Verandah) Banu Nadir Banu Qaynuqa Banu Qurayza Iranian people Umayyad Dynasty Aus & Khazraj People of Quba

Religious groups

Ahl al-dhimmah (Dhimmi) Kâfirûn (Infidels) Zoroastrians Munāfiqūn (Hypocrites) Muslims People of the Book (Ahl al-Kiṫāb)

Naṣārā (Christian(s) or People of the Injil)

Ruhban ( Christian
Christian
monks) Qissis ( Christian
Christian
priest)

Yahūd (Jews)

Ahbār (Jewish scholars) Rabbani/Rabbi

Sabians

Polytheists

Meccan polytheists at the time of Muhammad Mesopotamian polytheists at the time of Abraham
Abraham
and Lot

Locations

Mentioned

Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
("The Land The Blessed")

Al-Arḍ Al-Muqaddasah ("The Land The Holy")

In the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
(excluding Madyan)

Al-Aḥqāf ("The Sandy Plains," or "the Wind-curved Sand-hills")

Iram dhāṫ al-‘Imād (Iram of the Pillars)

Al-Madīnah (formerly Yathrib) ‘Arafāṫ Al-Ḥijr (Hegra) Badr Ḥunayn Makkah (Mecca)

Bakkah Ka‘bah (Kaaba) Maqām Ibrāhīm (Station of Abraham) Safa and Marwah

Saba’ (Sheba)

‘Arim Saba’ (Dam of Sheba)

Rass

Jahannam
Jahannam
(Hell) Jannah
Jannah
(Paradise, literally 'Garden') In Mesopotamia:

Al-Jūdiyy

Munzalanm-Mubārakan ("Place-of-Landing Blessed")

Bābil (Babylon) Qaryaṫ Yūnus ("Township of Jonah," that is Nineveh)

Door of Hittah Madyan (Midian) Majma' al-Bahrain Miṣr (Mainland Egypt) Salsabîl (A river in Paradise) Sinai Region or Tīh Desert

Al-Wād Al-Muqaddas Ṭuwan (The Holy Valley of Tuwa)

Al-Wādil-Ayman (The valley on the 'righthand' side of the Valley of Tuwa and Mount Sinai)

Mount Sinai
Mount Sinai
or Mount Tabor

Implied

Antioch

Antakya

Arabia Ayla Barrier of Dhul-Qarnayn Bayt al-Muqaddas
Bayt al-Muqaddas
& 'Ariha Bilād ar-Rāfidayn (Mesopotamia) Canaan Cave of Seven Sleepers Dār al-Nadwa Al-Ḥijāz (literally "The Barrier")

Black Stone
Black Stone
(Al-Ḥajar al-Aswad) & Al-Hijr of Isma'il Cave of Hira
Hira
& Ghar al-Thawr (Cave of the Bull) Ta'if

Hudaybiyyah Jordan River Nile
Nile
River Palestine River Paradise
Paradise
of Shaddad

Religious locations

Bay'a (Church) Mihrab Monastery Masjid (Mosque, literally "Place of Prostration")

Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
("The Monument the Sacred") Al-Masjid Al-Aqṣā (Al-Aqsa Mosque, literally "The Place-of-Prostration The Farthest") Al-Masjid Al-Ḥarām (The Sacred Mosque
Mosque
of Mecca) Masjid al-Dirar A Mosque
Mosque
in the area of Medina, possibly:

Masjid Qubâ’ (Quba Mosque) The Prophet's Mosque

Salat (Synagogue)

Plant
Plant
matter

Fruits

Ḥabb dhul-‘aṣf (Corn of the husk) Rummān (Pomegranate) Ṫīn (Fig) Ukul khamṭ (Bitter fruit or food of Sheba) Zayṫūn (Olive) In Paradise

Forbidden fruit of Adam

Bushes, trees or plants

Plants of Sheba

Athl (Tamarisk) Sidr (lote-tree)

Līnah (Tender palm tree) Nakhl (date palm) Rayḥān (Scented plant) Sidraṫ al-Munṫahā Zaqqūm

Texts

Al-Injîl (The Gospel
Gospel
of Jesus) Al-Qur’ân (The Book of Muhammad) Ṣuḥuf-i Ibrâhîm (Scroll(s) of Abraham) Aṫ-Ṫawrâṫ (The Torah)

Ṣuḥuf-i-Mûsâ (Scroll(s) of Moses) Tablets of Stone

Az-Zabûr (The Psalms
Psalms
of David) Umm al-Kiṫâb ("Mother of the Book(s)")

Objects of people or beings

Heavenly Food of Christian
Christian
Apostles Noah's Ark Staff of Musa Ṫābūṫ as-Sakīnah (Casket of Shekhinah) Throne of Bilqis Trumpet of Israfil

Mentioned idols (cult images)

'Ansāb Idols of Israelites:

Baal The ‘ijl (golden calf statue) of Israelites

Idols of Noah's people:

Nasr Suwā‘ Wadd Yaghūth Ya‘ūq

Idols of Quraysh:

Al-Lāṫ Al-‘Uzzá Manāṫ

Jibṫ and Ṭâghûṫ

Celestial bodies

Maṣābīḥ (literally 'lamps'):

Al-Qamar (The Moon) Kawâkib (Planets)

Al-Arḍ (The Earth)

Nujūm (Stars)

Ash-Shams (The Sun)

Liquids

Mā’ ( Water
Water
or fluid)

Nahr (River) Yamm ( River
River
or sea)

Sharâb (Drink)

Events

Battle of al-Aḥzāb ("the Confederates") Battle of Badr Battle of Hunayn Battle of Khaybar Battle of Tabouk Battle of Uhud Conquest of Mecca Incident of Ifk Laylat al-Mabit Mubahala Sayl al-‘Arim
Sayl al-‘Arim
(Flood of the Great Dam of Marib
Marib
in Sheba) The Farewell Pilgrimage
The Farewell Pilgrimage
(Hujja al-Wada') Treaty of Hudaybiyyah Umrah al-Qaza Yawm al-Dār

Implied

Event of Ghadir Khumm

Note: The names are sorted alphabetically. Standard form: Islamic name / Biblical name (title or relationship)

v t e

Adam
Adam
to David
David
according to the Bible

Creation to Flood

Adam Seth Enos Kenan Mahalalel Jared Enoch Methuselah Lamech Noah Shem

Cain line

Adam Cain Enoch Irad Mehujael Methusael Lamech Tubal-cain

Patriarchs after Flood

Arpachshad Cainan Shelah Eber Peleg Reu Serug Nahor Terah Abraham Isaac Jacob

Tribe
Tribe
of Judah to Kingdom

Judah Perez Hezron Ram Amminadab Nahshon Salmon Boaz Obed Jesse David

Names in italics only appear in the Greek

.