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Loyalist victory, military defeat of the rebels and restored order.

Belligerents

Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg Tenentismo

  • Soldiers mutineers (Army and Navy)
  • Armed civilians
  • Guerrilha in Prestes column

Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg First Brazilian Republic

Commanders and leaders Gen. Isidoro Dias Lopes
Col. Joaquim Fernandes Távora 
Mjr. Miguel Costa
Cpt. Luís Carlos Prestes
Cpt. Euclides Hermes da Fonseca
Antônio de Siqueira Campos
Lt. Eduardo Gomes
Lt. Nílton Prado 
Lt. Ribeiro Junior
Lt. Juarez Távora Epitácio Pessoa
Artur Bernardes
Washington Luís
Carlos de Campos
César do Rego Monteiro
Gen. Setembrino de Carvalho
Gen. Abílio Noronha
Gen. João de Deus Barreto
Col. Fernando PrestesStrength 301 in Copacabana Fort revolt
3,500 in Paulist Revolt 1924
1,500 in Prestes Column
Unknown number of military mutineers in the rest of the country.

3,000 loyalist, artillery, aviation and ships in Copacabana Fort revolt
14,000 loyalist, artillery and aviation in Paulist Revolt 1924

Approximately 100,000 loyal soldiers were mobilized to suppress the rebellion throughout the countryCasualties and losses Large number of human and material losses

Tenentism (Portuguese: tenentismo) was a political philosophy of junior army officers (Portuguese: tenentes, IPA: [teˈnẽtʃis], lieutenants) who contributed significantly to the Brazilian Revolution of 1930.

Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg Tenentismo

  • Soldiers mutineers (Army and Navy)
  • Armed civilians
  • Guerrilha in Prestes column

Flag of Brazil (1889–1960).svgFlag of Brazil (1889–1960).svg First Brazilian Republic

  • Coat of arms of the Brazilian Army.svgCopacabana Fort revolt
    14,000 loyalist, artillery and aviation in Paulist Revolt 1924

    Approximately 100,000 loyal soldiers were mobilized to suppress the rebellion throughout the countryCasualties and losses Large number of human and material losses

    Tenentism (Portuguese: tenentismo) was a political philosophy of junior army officers (Portuguese: tenentes, IPA: [teˈnẽtʃis], lieutenants) who contributed significantly to the Brazilian Revolution of 1930.

    Background

    The first decades of the 20th century saw marked economic and social change in Brazil. With manufacturing on the rise, the central government — dominated by the coffee oligarchs and the old order of café com leite and coronelismo — came under threat from the political aspirations of new urban groups: professionals, government and white-collar workers, merchants, bankers, and industrialists. In parallel, growing prosperity encouraged a rapid rise of a new working class of Southern and Eastern European immigrants who contributed to the growth of trade unionism, anarchism, and socialism.[1] In the post-World War I period, Brazil saw its first wave of general strikes and the establishment of the Communist Party in 1922.[2]

    A new class of army junior officers (Portuguese: tenente) had emerged who were trained to European standards and believed themselves superior to their senior officers. In addition, various senior officers had become identified with the government and political structure, a source of criticism from the tenentes.[3]

    Meanwhile, the divergence of interests between the coffee oligarchs and the burgeoning, dynamic urban sectors was intensifying. According to Latin American historian Benjamin Keen, the task of transforming society "fell to the rapidly growing urban bourgeois groups, and especially to the middle class, which began to voice even more strongly its discontent with the rule of the corrupt rural oligarchies".[4] In contrast, despite a wave of general strikes in the post-war years, the labour movement remained small and weak,[5] lacking ties to the peasantry, who constituted the overwhelming majority of

    Tenentism (Portuguese: tenentismo) was a political philosophy of junior army officers (Portuguese: tenentes, IPA: [teˈnẽtʃis], lieutenants) who contributed significantly to the Brazilian Revolution of 1930.