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5,656,004 (2017)[1]

Ranked 2nd nationally[1]

Director Frances Morris

Public transit access Blackfriars

Website tate.org.uk/modern

Tate
Tate
Modern is a modern art gallery located in London. It is Britain's national gallery of international modern art and forms part of the Tate
Tate
group (together with Tate
Tate
Britain, Tate
Tate
Liverpool, Tate
Tate
St Ives and Tate
Tate
Online).[2] It is based in the former Bankside
Bankside
Power Station, in the Bankside
Bankside
area of the London Borough of Southwark. Tate
Tate
holds the national collection of British art from 1900 to the present day and international modern and contemporary art.[3] Tate
Tate
Modern is one of the largest museums of modern and contemporary art in the world. As with the UK's other national galleries and museums, there is no admission charge for access to the collection displays, which take up the majority of the gallery space, while tickets must be purchased for the major temporary exhibitions.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Bankside
Bankside
Power Station 1.2 Initial redevelopment 1.3 Opening and initial reception 1.4 Extension project

1.4.1 The Tanks 1.4.2 The Switch House

2 Galleries 3 Exhibitions

3.1 Collection exhibitions

3.1.1 History of the collection exhibitions

3.2 Temporary exhibitions

3.2.1 The Turbine Hall 3.2.2 Major temporary exhibitions 3.2.3 The Tanks 3.2.4 Project Space 3.2.5 Other areas

4 Other facilities 5 Access and environs

5.1 Transport connections

6 Directors 7 Controversies

7.1 Liberate Tate
Tate
from BP

8 Selections from the permanent collection of paintings 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External links

History[edit] Bankside
Bankside
Power Station[edit] Main article: Bankside
Bankside
Power Station

The Turbine Hall

Tate
Tate
Modern is housed in the former Bankside
Bankside
Power Station, which was originally designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, the architect of Battersea Power Station, and built in two stages between 1947 and 1963. It is directly across the river from St Paul's Cathedral. The power station closed in 1981. Prior to redevelopment, the power station was a 200 m (660 ft) long, steel framed, brick clad building with a substantial central chimney standing 99 m (325 ft). The structure was roughly divided into three main areas each running east-west – the huge main Turbine Hall
Turbine Hall
in the centre, with the boiler house to the north and the switch house to the south. Initial redevelopment[edit] For many years after closure Bankside
Bankside
Power station was at risk of being demolished by developers. Many people campaigned for the building to be saved and put forward suggestions for possible new uses. An application to list the building was refused. In April 1994 the Tate
Tate
Gallery announced that Bankside
Bankside
would be the home for the new Tate
Tate
Modern. In July of the same year, an international competition was launched to select an architect for the new gallery. Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron of Herzog & de Meuron were announced as the winning architects in January 1995. The £134 million conversion to the Tate
Tate
Modern started in June 1995 and completed in January 2000.[4] The most obvious external change was the two-story glass extension on one half of the roof. Much of the original internal structure remained, including the cavernous main turbine hall, which retained the overhead travelling crane. An electrical substation, taking up the Switch House in the southern third of the building, remained on-site and owned by the French power company EDF Energy
EDF Energy
while Tate
Tate
took over the northern Boiler House for Tate
Tate
Modern's main exhibition spaces.

Panoramic view from Tate
Tate
Modern balcony

The history of the site as well as information about the conversion was the basis for a 2008 documentary Architects Herzog and de Meuron: Alchemy of Building & Tate
Tate
Modern. This challenging conversion work was carried by Carillion.[4] Opening and initial reception[edit] Tate
Tate
Modern was opened by the Queen on 11 May 2000.[5] Tate
Tate
Modern received 5.25 million visitors in its first year. The previous year the three existing Tate
Tate
galleries had received 2.5 million visitors combined.[6] Extension project[edit] Tate
Tate
Modern had attracted more visitors than originally expected and plans to expand it had been in preparation since 2004. These plans focused on the south west of the building with the intention of providing 5,000m2 of new display space, almost doubling the amount of display space.[7][8] The southern third of the building was retained by the French power company EDF Energy
EDF Energy
as an electrical substation. In 2006, the company released the western half of this holding[9] and plans were made to replace the structure with a tower extension to the museum, initially planned to be completed in 2015. The tower was to be built over the old oil storage tanks, which would be converted to a performance art space. Structural, geotechnical, civil, and façade engineering and environmental consultancy was undertaken by Ramboll
Ramboll
between 2008 and 2016.[10] This project was initially costed at £215 million.[11] Of the money raised, £50 million came from the UK government; £7 million from the London Development Agency; £6 million from philanthropist John Studzinski; and donations from, among others, the Sultanate of Oman and Elisabeth Murdoch.[12] In June 2013, international shipping and property magnate Eyal Ofer pledged £10m to the extension project, making it to 85% of the required funds. Eyal Ofer, chairman of London-based Zodiac Maritime Agencies, said the donation made through his family foundation would enable "an iconic institution to enhance the experience and accessibility of contemporary art".[13] The Tate
Tate
director, Nicholas Serota, praised the donation saying it would help to make Tate
Tate
Modern a "truly twenty-first-century museum".[14] The Tanks[edit] The first phase of the expansion involved the conversion of three large, circular, underground oil tanks originally used by the power station into accessible display spaces and facilities areas. These opened on 18 July 2012 and closed on 28 October 2012[6] as work on the tower building continued directly above. They reopened following the completion of the Switch House extension on 17 June 2016. Two of the Tanks are used to show live performance art and installations while the third provides utility space.[15] Tate describes them as "the world's first museum galleries permanently dedicated to live art".[16] The Switch House[edit]

Exterior of the Switch House

A ten-storey tower, 65 metres high from ground level, was built above the oil tanks.[17] The original western half of the Switch House was demolished to make room for the tower and then rebuilt around it with large gallery spaces and access routes between the main building and the new tower on level 1 (ground level) and level 4. The new galleries on level 4 have natural top lighting. A bridge built across the turbine hall on level 4 to provides an upper access route.[7] The new building opened to the public on 17 June 2016.[18] The design, again by Herzog & de Meuron, has been controversial. It was originally designed with a glass stepped pyramid, but this was amended to incorporate a sloping façade in brick latticework (to match the original power-station building)[19] despite planning consent to the original design having been previously granted by the supervising authority.[20] The extension provides 22,492 square metres of additional gross internal area for display and exhibition spaces, performance spaces, education facilities, offices, catering and retail facilities as well as a car parking and a new external public space.[21] In May 2017 the Switch House was formally renamed the Blavatnik Building, after Anglo-Ukrainian billionaire Sir Leonard Blavatnik, who contributed a "substantial" amount of the £260m cost of the extension. Sir Nicholas Serota
Nicholas Serota
commented "Len Blavatnik's enthusiastic support ensured the successful realisation of the project and I am delighted that the new building now bears his name".[22] Galleries[edit] The collections in Tate
Tate
Modern consist of works of international modern and contemporary art dating from 1900 until today.[23] Levels 2, 3 and 4 contain gallery space. Each of those floors is split into a large east and west wing with at least 11 rooms in each. Space between these wings is also used for smaller galleries on levels 2 and 4. The Boiler House shows art from 1900 to the present day.[15] The Switch House has eleven floors, numbered 0 to 10. Levels 0, 2, 3 and 4 contain gallery space. Level 0 consists of the Tanks, spaces converted from the power station's original fuel oil tanks, while all other levels are housed in the tower extension building constructed above them. The Switch House shows art from 1960 to the present day.[15] The Turbine Hall
Turbine Hall
is a single large space running the whole length of the building between the Boiler House and the Switch House. At six stories tall it represents the full height of the original power station building. It is cut by bridges between the Boiler House and the Switch House on levels 1 and 4 but the space is otherwise undivided. The western end consists of a gentle ramp down from the entrance and provides access to both sides on level 0. The eastern end provides a very large space that can be used to show exceptionally large artworks due its unusual height. Exhibitions[edit] Collection exhibitions[edit]

A gallery at Tate
Tate
Modern.

The main collection displays consist of 8 areas with a named theme or subject. Within each area there are some rooms that change periodically showing different works in keeping with the overall theme or subject. The themes are changed less frequently. There is no admission charge for these areas.[24] As of June 2016 the themed areas were:[15]

Start Display: A three-room display of works by major artists to introduce the basic ideas of modern art. Artist and Society In The Studio Materials and Objects Media Networks Between Object and Architecture Performer and Participant Living Cities

There is also an area dedicated to displaying works from the Artist Rooms collection. History of the collection exhibitions[edit]

Chimney of Tate
Tate
Modern. The Swiss Light at its top was designed by Michael Craig-Martin
Michael Craig-Martin
and the architects Herzog & de Meuron and was sponsored by the Swiss government. It was dismantled in May 2008.

Since the Tate
Tate
Modern first opened in 2000, the collections have not been displayed in chronological order but have been arranged thematically into broad groups. Prior to the opening of the Switch House there were four of these groupings at a time, each allocated a wing on levels 3 and 5 (now levels 2 and 4). The initial hanging from 2000 to 2006:[25][26]

History/Memory/Society Nude/Action/Body Landscape/Matter/Environment Still Life/Object/Real Life

The first rehang at Tate
Tate
Modern opened in May 2006.[27][28] It eschewed the thematic groupings in favour of focusing on pivotal moments of twentieth-century art. It also introduced spaces for shorter exhibitions in between the wings. The layout was:

Material Gestures[29] Poetry and Dream[30] Energy and Process[31] States of Flux[32]

In 2012 there was a partial third rehang.[33] The arrangement was:

Poetry and Dream[34] Structure and Clarity[35] Transformed Visions[36] Energy and Process Setting the Scene – A smaller section, located between wings, covering installations with theatrical or fictional themes.[37]

Temporary exhibitions[edit] The Turbine Hall[edit]

Ólafur Elíasson, The Weather Project
The Weather Project
(2004)

Rachel Whiteread, EMBANKMENT (2005)

The Turbine hall, which once housed the electricity generators of the old power station, is five storeys tall with 3,400 square metres of floorspace.[38] It is used to display large specially-commissioned works by contemporary artists, between October and March each year. This series was planned to last the gallery's first five years, but the popularity of the series led to its extension until 2012.[39] The artists who have exhibited commissioned work in the Turbine Hall as part of the Unilever
Unilever
series are:

Date Artist Work(s) Details

May 2000 – November 2000[40] Louise Bourgeois I Do, I Undo, I Redo About

June 2001 – March 2002 Juan Muñoz Double Bind About

October 2002 – April 2003 Anish Kapoor Marsyas About

October 2003 – March 2004 Olafur Eliasson The Weather Project About

October 2004 – May 2005 Bruce Nauman Raw Materials About

October 2005 – May 2006 Rachel Whiteread EMBANKMENT About

October 2006 – April 2007 Carsten Höller Test Site About

October 2007 – April 2008 Doris Salcedo Shibboleth About

October 2008 – April 2009 Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster TH.2058 About

October 2009 – April 2010 Miroslaw Balka How It Is About

October 2010 – April 2011 Ai Weiwei Sunflower Seeds About

October 2011 – March 2012 Tacita Dean Film About

July 2012 – October 2012 Tino Sehgal These associations About

Until 2012, the series was named after its corporate sponsor, Unilever. Between 2000 and 2012, Unilever
Unilever
had provided £4.4m sponsorship in total including a renewal deal of £2.2m for a period of five years agreed in 2008.[41] When the series is not running, the Turbine Hall
Turbine Hall
is used for occasional events and exhibitions. Most recently it has been used to display Damien Hirst's For The Love of God[42] and a sell out show by Kraftwerk
Kraftwerk
in February 2013 which crashed the ticket hotline and website, causing a backlash from the band's fans. In 2013, Tate
Tate
Modern signed a sponsorship deal worth around £5 million with Hyundai
Hyundai
to cover a ten-year program of commissions, then considered the largest amount of money ever provided to an individual gallery or museum in the United Kingdom.[43] The first commission for the Hyundai
Hyundai
series is Mexican artist, Abraham Cruzvillegas.[44] The artists who have exhibited commissioned work in the Turbine Hall as part of the Hyundai
Hyundai
series thus far are:

Date Artist Work(s) Details

13 October 2015 – 3 April 2016[45] Abraham Cruzvillegas Empty Lot About

4 October 2016 – 2 April 2017[46] Philippe Parreno Title TK About

Major temporary exhibitions[edit] Two wings of the Boiler House are used to stage the major temporary exhibitions for which an entry fee is charged. These exhibitions normally run for three or four months. When they were located on a single floor, the two exhibition areas could be combined to host a single exhibition. This was done for the Gilbert and George retrospective due to the size and number of the works.[47] Currently the two wings used are on level 3. It is not known if this arrangement is permanent. Each major exhibition has a dedicated mini-shop selling books and merchandise relevant to the exhibition. A 2014 show of Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse
provided Tate
Tate
Modern with London's best-attended charging exhibition, and with a record 562,622 visitors overall, helped by a nearly five-month-long run.[48] In 2018, Joan Jonas had a retrospective exhibition.[49] The Tanks[edit] The Tanks, located on level 0, are three large underground oil tanks, connecting spaces and side rooms originally used by the power station and refurbished for use by the gallery. One tank is used to display installation and video art specially commissioned for the space while smaller areas are used to show installation and video art from the collection. Project Space[edit] The Project Space (formerly known as the Level 2 Gallery) was a smaller gallery located on the north side of the Boiler House on level 1 which housed exhibitions of contemporary art in collaboration with other international art organisations. Its exhibitions typically ran for 2–3 months and then travelled to the collaborating institution for display there. The space was only accessible by leaving the building and re-entering using a dedicated entrance. It is no longer used as gallery space. Other areas[edit] Works are also sometimes shown in the restaurants and members' rooms. Other locations that have been used in the past include the mezzanine on Level 1 and the north facing exterior of the Boiler House building.[50] Other facilities[edit] In addition to exhibition space there are a number of other facilities:

A large performance space in one of the tanks on level 0 used to show a changing programme of performance works for which there is sometimes an entrance charge. The Starr Auditorium and a seminar room on level 1 which are used to show films and host events for which there is usually an entrance charge. The Clore Education Centre, Clore Information Room and McAulay Studios on level 0 which are facilities for use by visiting educational institutions. One large and several small shops selling books, prints and merchandise. A cafe, an espresso bar, a restaurant and bar and a members' room. Tate
Tate
Modern community garden, co-managed with Bankside
Bankside
Open Spaces Trust

Access and environs[edit]

Tate
Tate
Modern on the opening day of the Millennium Bridge in 2000

The closest station is Blackfriars via its new south entrance. Other nearby stations include Southwark, as well as St Paul's and Mansion House north of the river which can be reached via the Millennium Bridge. The lampposts between Southwark tube station
Southwark tube station
and Tate
Tate
Modern are painted orange to show pedestrian visitors the route. There is also a riverboat pier just outside the gallery called Bankside
Bankside
Pier, with connections to the Docklands and Greenwich
Greenwich
via regular passenger boat services (commuter service) and the Tate
Tate
to Tate
Tate
service, which connects Tate
Tate
Modern with Tate
Tate
Britain. To the west of Tate
Tate
Modern lie the sleek stone and glass Ludgate House, the former headquarters of Express Newspapers
Express Newspapers
and Sampson House, a massive late Brutalist
Brutalist
office building. Transport connections[edit]

Service Station/Stop Lines/Routes served Distance from Tate
Tate
Modern

London Buses
London Buses
Southwark
Southwark
Street / Blackfriars Road RV1 0.2-mile walk[51]

Blackfriars Bridge
Blackfriars Bridge
381, N343, N381 0.2-mile walk[52]

Blackfriars Bridge
Blackfriars Bridge
/ South Side 45, 63, 100, N63, N89 0.2-mile walk[53]

Southwark
Southwark
Bridge / Bankside
Bankside
Pier 344 0.4-mile walk[54]

London Underground
London Underground
Southwark
Southwark

0.4-mile walk[55]

National Rail
National Rail
Blackfriars Thameslink, Southeastern 0.5-mile walk[56]

London Bridge
London Bridge
Thameslink, Southern, Southeastern 0.7-mile walk[57]

London River Services Bankside
Bankside
Pier Commuter Service Tate
Tate
to Tate Westminster to St Katharine's Circular

At the exit of Southwark
Southwark
tube station, orange lamposts direct visitors to Tate
Tate
Modern.

Directors[edit] Frances Morris' appointment as director was announced in January 2016.[58]

Lars Nittve (1998–2001) Vicente Todolí (2003–2010) Chris Dercon
Chris Dercon
(2010–2016) Frances Morris (2016–)

Controversies[edit] Liberate Tate
Tate
from BP[edit] Since 2010 there have been 14 protest art performances by the art collective Liberate Tate
Tate
demanding the Tate
Tate
to "disengage from BP as a sponsor, and stop allowing Tate
Tate
to be used to deflect attention away from the devastating impacts that BP has around the world." BP is criticised for operations in relation with Petroleum exploration in the Arctic, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Oil sands
Oil sands
and climate change. The artists involved in the protests are referring to a deal between BP and the Tate: BP pays £224,000 a year to the Tate. The Tate
Tate
presents the brand BP in return. In June 2015 a group of artists occupied Tate
Tate
Modern for 25 hours.[59][60] Selections from the permanent collection of paintings[edit]

Albert Gleizes, 1911, Portrait de Jacques Nayral, oil on canvas, 161.9 x 114 cm. This painting was reproduced in Fantasio: published 15 October 1911, for the occasion of the Salon d'Automne
Salon d'Automne
where it was exhibited the same year.

Georges Braque, 1909–10, La guitare (Mandora, La Mandore), oil on canvas, 71.1 x 55.9 cm

Pablo Picasso, 1909–10, Figure dans un Fauteuil (Seated Nude, Femme nue assise), oil on canvas, 92.1 x 73 cm. This painting from the collection of Wilhelm Uhde
Wilhelm Uhde
was confiscated by the French state and sold at the Hôtel Drouot
Hôtel Drouot
in 1921

Robert Delaunay, 1912, Windows Open Simultaneously (First Part, Third Motif), oil on canvas, 45.7 x 37.5 cm

Juan Gris, 1914, The Sunblind, collage and oil on canvas, 92 × 72.5 cm

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, 1909/1926, Badende bei Moritzburg (Bathers at Moritzburg)

Paul Klee, 1921, Abenteuer eines Fräuleins (A Young Lady's Adventure), watercolor on paper, 43.8 × 30.8 cm

Paul Klee, 1935, Walpurgisnacht (Walpurgian Night)

Robert Delaunay, 1934, Endless Rhythm

See also[edit]

List of museums in London

References[edit]

^ a b "2017 Visitor Figures". Association of Leading Visitor Attractions. Retrieved 22 March 2018.  ^ "History and development Tate
Tate
On-line". Tate
Tate
Etc. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ "About". Tate
Tate
Etc. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ a b " Tate
Tate
Modern builders Carillion
Carillion
win £400m Battersea Power Station contract". Your local Guardian. 23 May 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2013.  ^ "2000: Sneak preview of new Tate
Tate
Modern". BBC. Retrieved 15 June 2016.  ^ a b " Tate
Tate
Modern. Nought to Sixteen. A History". Art Review. 2016.  ^ a b Tate
Tate
Guide, August–September 2012 ^ "Vision". Tate
Tate
Etc. Retrieved 15 August 2012.  ^ Riding, Alan (26 July 2006). " Tate
Tate
Modern Announces Plans for an Annex". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 July 2006.  ^ " Tate
Tate
Modern extension". Retrieved 22 February 2017.  ^ Tate
Tate
Modern's chaotic pyramid, The Times, 26 July 2006. Retrieved 26 July 2006. ^ Farah Nayeri (20 April 2012), Murdoch’s Daughter Elisabeth Gives Tate
Tate
at Least $1.6 MlnBloomberg. ^ Pickford, James (2 July 2013). " Eyal Ofer
Eyal Ofer
donates £10m to Tate Modern extension". Financial Times. Retrieved 12 January 2014.  ^ Mark Brown, arts correspondent (2 July 2013). " Tate
Tate
Modern receives £10m gift from Israeli shipping magnate Eyal Ofer
Eyal Ofer
Art and design". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 12 January 2014.  ^ a b c d Tate
Tate
Modern Visitor Map June 2016 ^ "The Tanks: Art in Action". Tate
Tate
Etc. Archived from the original on 4 January 2013. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ "Environmental Statement non-technical summary". Tate
Tate
Etc. Retrieved 25 September 2014.  ^ "The new Tate
Tate
Modern opening weekend – Special
Special
Event at Tate Modern". Tate
Tate
Etc. Retrieved 18 June 2016.  ^ " Tate
Tate
Modern extension redesigned". Worldarchitecturenews.com. 18 July 2008. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ " Tate
Tate
Modern extension, Bankside" (PDF). Greater London Authority. Retrieved 25 September 2014.  ^ " Tate
Tate
Modern extension by Herzog & de Meuron architects". Inexhibit. Retrieved 25 September 2014.  ^ Hannah Ellis-Petersen. " Tate
Tate
Modern names extension after billionaire Len Blavatnik Art and design". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 June 2017.  ^ " Tate
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Modern". Retrieved 22 January 2016.  ^ Tate. " Tate
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Modern".  ^ " Tate
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Modern: Collection 2000 – Tate".  ^ " Tate
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Modern: Collection 2003 – Tate".  ^ " Tate
Tate
Modern launches first major rehang of its Collection with the support of UBS – Tate".  ^ Foundation, Internet Memory. "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] UK Government Web Archive – The National Archives". Archived from the original on 2008-03-16.  ^ Foundation, Internet Memory. "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] UK Government Web Archive – The National Archives". Archived from the original on 2008-03-16.  ^ Foundation, Internet Memory. "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] UK Government Web Archive – The National Archives". Archived from the original on 2008-03-16.  ^ Foundation, Internet Memory. "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] UK Government Web Archive – The National Archives". Archived from the original on 2010-01-04.  ^ Foundation, Internet Memory. "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] UK Government Web Archive – The National Archives". Archived from the original on 2008-09-26.  ^ "Collection Displays". Tate
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Etc. 10 April 2012. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ Foundation, Internet Memory. "[ARCHIVED CONTENT] UK Government Web Archive – The National Archives". Archived from the original on 2011-08-01.  ^ "Structure and Clarity". Tate
Tate
Etc. Archived from the original on 4 January 2013. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ "Transformed Visions". Tate
Tate
Etc. 23 July 2012. Retrieved 15 August 2012.  ^ "Setting the Scene". Tate
Tate
Etc. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ Brooks, Xan (7 October 2005). "Profile: Rachel Whiteread". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 20 April 2006.  ^ " Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster Chosen for Tate
Tate
Modern's Turbine Hall". Retrieved 16 September 2008.  ^ "The Unilever
Unilever
Series". Tate
Tate
Etc. Retrieved 8 January 2013.  ^ Gareth Harris (14 August 2012), Tate
Tate
seeks new sponsor for Turbine Hall commissions The Art Newspaper. ^ "Damien Hirst's iconic For the Love of God to be shown in Tate Modern's Turbine Hall". Tate
Tate
Etc. 21 November 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2012.  ^ xMartin Bailey (20 January 2014), Tate
Tate
signs £5m sponsorship with Hyundai
Hyundai
The Art Newspaper. ^ " Hyundai
Hyundai
Commission 2015: Abraham Cruzvillegas". Retrieved 23 January 2015.  ^ " Hyundai
Hyundai
Commission 2015". Tate
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Etc. Retrieved 9 January 2016.  ^ " Hyundai
Hyundai
Commission 2016". Tate
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Etc. Retrieved 9 January 2016.  ^ "Gilbert & George – Tate". Retrieved 22 January 2016.  ^ Javier Pes and Emily Sharpe (2 April 2015), Visitor figures 2014: the world goes dotty over Yayoi Kusama The Art Newspaper. ^ " Joan Jonas review – post-internet confusion before the internet". The Guardian. 13 March 2018. Retrieved 18 March 2018.  ^ "Street Art – Tate". Retrieved 22 January 2016.  ^ Google
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(28 February 2012). "Walking directions to Tate
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Southwark
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(28 February 2012). "Walking directions to Tate
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Blackfriars Bridge
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(28 February 2012). "Walking directions to Tate
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Bridge / Bankside
Bankside
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Tate
Modern". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 January 2016.  ^ The Guardian, Climate activists leave Tate
Tate
Modern after all-night protest against BP ^ '’Liberate Tate'’

Further reading[edit]

Larsen, Reif (July 18, 2017). "The Tate
Tate
Modern and the Battle for London's Soul". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. 

Temporary Exhibitions at Tate
Tate
Modern – 2008 to 2016, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5766570.v1

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tate
Tate
Modern.

Official website ' Tate
Tate
Modern: a Year of Sweet Success' by Esther Leslie, in Radical Philosophy The buildings of Bankside
Bankside
Power Station( Tate
Tate
Modern) and Battersea Power Station compared Inside Bankside
Bankside
Power Station with Antony Gormley 1991 on YouTube Extension project description

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Apsley House Chiswick House Down House Eltham Palace Jewel Tower Kenwood House
Kenwood House
(Iveagh Bequest) London Wall Marble Hill House Ranger's House
Ranger's House
(Wernher Collection) Winchester Palace

The London Museums of Health & Medicine (selected)

Florence Nightingale Museum Foundling Museum Freud Museum Museum of the Order of St John Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret Wellcome Collection

Other

Arsenal Football Club Museum Bank of England
Bank of England
Museum Barbican Art Gallery Benjamin Franklin House Bruce Castle Charles Dickens Museum David Zwirner Gallery Dennis Severs' House Design Museum Dr Johnson's House Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art Fashion and Textile Museum Flowers Gallery Garden Museum Guildhall Art Gallery Handel & Hendrix in London Hayward Gallery Hogarth's House Institute of Contemporary Arts Leighton House Museum London Museum of Water & Steam Marlborough Gallery Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising Museum of Croydon Museum of Immigration and Diversity Museum of Richmond Orleans House
Orleans House
Gallery The Redfern Gallery Royal Academy of Music Museum Saatchi Gallery Serpentine Galleries Sherlock Holmes Museum Two Temple Place Twickenham Museum Whitechapel Gallery White Cube William Morris Gallery Victoria Miro Gallery

Category

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London Borough of Southwark

Districts

Bankside Bermondsey Borough/Southwark Camberwell Crystal Palace Denmark Hill Dulwich Dulwich
Dulwich
Village East Dulwich Elephant and Castle Herne Hill Honor Oak Newington Nunhead Peckham Peckham
Peckham
Rye Rotherhithe South Bank South Bermondsey Surrey Quays Sydenham Hill Upper Norwood Walworth West Dulwich

Attractions

Bankside
Bankside
Gallery Bramah Tea and Coffee Museum Brunel Museum City Hall The Clink Cuming Museum Dulwich
Dulwich
Picture Gallery Fire Brigade Museum Globe Theatre Greenwood Theatre Hay's Galleria Herne Hill
Herne Hill
Stadium House of Dreams Museum HMS Belfast Imperial War Museum Livesey Museum for Children London Dungeon Mandela Way T-34 Tank Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret The Old Vic OXO Tower Pumphouse Educational Museum Purdy Hicks Gallery Rose Theatre Sam Wanamaker Playhouse The Shard South Bank South London Gallery Southwark
Southwark
Cathedral Tate
Tate
Modern Unicorn Theatre Winchester Palace

Markets

Borough East Street

Bridges and tunnels

Blackfriars Bridge Blackfriars Railway Bridge Cannon Street Railway Bridge London Bridge Millennium Bridge Rotherhithe
Rotherhithe
Tunnel Southwark
Southwark
Bridge Tower Bridge Waterloo Bridge

Parks and open spaces

Belair Park Bermondsey
Bermondsey
Spa Gardens Brimmington Park Burgess Park Dickens Square Park Dulwich
Dulwich
Park Faraday Gardens Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park Little Dorrit Park Newington Gardens Southwark
Southwark
Park Tabard Park

Constituencies

Camberwell
Camberwell
and Peckham North Southwark
Southwark
and Bermondsey Dulwich
Dulwich
and West Norwood

Tube and rail stations

Bermondsey Borough Canada Water Denmark Hill Elephant and Castle Kennington London Bridge Nunhead Queens Road Peckham Peckham
Peckham
Rye Rotherhithe South Bermondsey Southwark Surrey Quays Sydenham Hill West Dulwich

Other topics

Council Grade I and II* listed buildings People Public art Schools

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London landmarks

Buildings and structures

Bridges

Albert Bridge Blackfriars Bridge Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges Lambeth Bridge London Bridge Millennium Footbridge Southwark
Southwark
Bridge Tower Bridge Vauxhall Bridge Waterloo Bridge Westminster Bridge

Entertainment venues

Cinemas

Empire, Leicester Square BFI IMAX Odeon, Leicester Square

Football stadia

Wembley Stadium
Wembley Stadium
(national stadium) Craven Cottage
Craven Cottage
(Fulham) The Den
The Den
(Millwall) Emirates Stadium
Emirates Stadium
(Arsenal) Loftus Road
Loftus Road
(Queens Park Rangers) London Stadium
London Stadium
(West Ham United) Selhurst Park
Selhurst Park
(Crystal Palace) Stamford Bridge (Chelsea) The Valley (Charlton Athletic) White Hart Lane
White Hart Lane
(Tottenham Hotspur)

Other major sports venues

All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club The Championship Course
The Championship Course
(rowing) Crystal Palace National Sports Centre Lord's
Lord's
(cricket) Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park The Oval
The Oval
(cricket) Twickenham Stadium
Twickenham Stadium
(rugby)

Theatres

Adelphi Apollo Victoria Coliseum Criterion Dominion Lyceum Old Vic Palladium Royal National Theatre Royal Opera House Shakespeare's Globe Theatre Royal, Drury Lane Theatre Royal Haymarket Vaudeville

Other

Alexandra Palace Brixton Academy ExCeL Hammersmith Apollo O2 Arena Royal Albert Hall Royal Festival Hall Wembley Arena

Government

10 Downing Street Admiralty Arch Bank of England City Hall County Hall Guildhall Horse Guards Mansion House National Archives Old Bailey Palace of Westminster Royal Courts of Justice Scotland Yard SIS Building

Museums and galleries

British Museum Cutty Sark Golden Hinde HMS Belfast Imperial War Museum Madame Tussauds Museum of London National Gallery National Maritime Museum Natural History Museum Royal Academy of Arts Royal Observatory Science Museum Tate
Tate
Britain Tate
Tate
Modern Tower of London Victoria and Albert Museum

Places of worship

All Hallows-by-the-Tower BAPS Shri Swaminarayan Mandir Bevis Marks Synagogue Methodist Central Hall Regent's Park
Regent's Park
Mosque St Martin-in-the-Fields St Mary-le-Bow St Paul's Cathedral Southwark
Southwark
Cathedral Westminster Abbey Westminster Cathedral

Retailing

Shops

Fortnum & Mason Hamleys Harrods Liberty Peter Jones Selfridges

Shopping centres and markets

Borough Market Brent Cross Burlington Arcade Kensington Arcade Leadenhall Market The Mall Wood Green One New Change Petticoat Lane Market Royal Exchange Westfield London Westfield Stratford City

Royal buildings

Partly occupied by the Royal Family

Buckingham Palace Clarence House Kensington Palace St James's Palace

Unoccupied

Banqueting House Hampton Court Palace Kew Palace The Queen's Gallery Royal Mews, Buckingham Palace

Skyscrapers

Broadgate Tower 1 Canada Square 8 Canada Square 25 Canada Square 1 Churchill Place 20 Fenchurch Street Heron Tower Leadenhall Building The Shard St George Wharf Tower 30 St Mary Axe Tower 42

Structures

Albert Memorial ArcelorMittal Orbit Big Ben Cleopatra's Needle Crystal Palace transmitting station London Eye London Wall Marble Arch The Monument Nelson's Column Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain
Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain
("Eros") Thames Barrier Wellington Arch

Transport

City Airport Heathrow Airport Charing Cross station Clapham Junction station Euston station King's Cross station Liverpool Street station London Bridge
London Bridge
station Paddington station St Pancras station Stratford station Victoria station Waterloo station Victoria Coach Station Emirates Air Line cable car

Other

Barbican Estate Battersea Power Station British Library BT Tower Kew Gardens Lambeth Palace Lloyd's building London Zoo Oxo Tower St Bartholomew's Hospital Smithfield Market Somerset House

Parks

Royal Parks

Bushy Park Green Park Greenwich
Greenwich
Park Hampton Court Park Hyde Park Kensington Gardens Regent's Park Richmond Park St. James's Park

Other

Battersea Park Burgess Park Clapham Common College Green Epping Forest Finsbury Park Gunnersbury Park Hampstead Heath Holland Park Mitcham Common Osterley Park Trent Park Victoria Park Wandsworth Common Wimbledon Common

Squares and public spaces

Covent Garden Horse Guards Parade Leicester Square Oxford Circus Parliament Square Piccadilly
Piccadilly
Circus Sloane Square Trafalgar Square

Streets

Aldwych Baker Street Bishopsgate Bond Street Carnaby Street Chancery Lane Charing Cross Road Cheapside Cornhill Denmark Street Fenchurch Street Fleet Street Haymarket Jermyn Street Kensington High Street King's Road Lombard Street The Mall Oxford Street Park Lane Piccadilly Portobello Road Regent Street Shaftesbury Avenue Sloane Street Strand Tottenham Court Road Victoria Embankment Whitehall

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 158340263 LCCN: nr00020575 ISNI: 0000 0001 2375 5359 GND: 5514913-3 SUDOC: 055317065 BNF:

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