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Tate
Tate
Britain (known from 1897 to 1932 as the National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art and from 1932 to 2000 as the Tate
Tate
Gallery) is an art museum on Millbank
Millbank
in the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
in London. It is part of the Tate
Tate
network of galleries in England, with Tate
Tate
Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate
Tate
St Ives. It is the oldest gallery in the network, having opened in 1897. It houses a substantial collection of the art of the United Kingdom since Tudor times, and in particular has large holdings of the works of J. M. W. Turner, who bequeathed all his own collection to the nation. It is one of the largest museums in the country.

Contents

1 History 2 Facilities 3 Displays 4 Permanent collection 5 Statue of Millais 6 Transport connections 7 Notes and references 8 External links

History[edit] The gallery is situated on Millbank, on the site of the former Millbank
Millbank
Prison. Construction, undertaken by Higgs and Hill,[3] commenced in 1893, and the gallery opened on 21 July 1897 as the National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art. However, from the start it was commonly known as the Tate
Tate
Gallery, after its founder Sir Henry Tate, and in 1932 it officially adopted that name.[4] Before 2000, the gallery housed and displayed both British and modern collections, but the launch of Tate
Tate
Modern saw Tate's modern collections move there, while the old Millbank
Millbank
gallery became dedicated to the display of historical and contemporary British art. As a consequence, it was renamed Tate
Tate
Britain in March 2000. The front part of the building was designed by Sidney R. J. Smith
Sidney R. J. Smith
with a classical portico and dome behind, and the central sculpture gallery was designed by John Russell Pope. Tate
Tate
Britain includes the Clore Gallery of 1987, designed by James Stirling, which houses work by J. M. W. Turner. The Clore Gallery has been regarded as an important example of Postmodern architecture, especially in the use of contextual irony: each section of the external facade quotes liberally from the building next to it in regard to materials and detailing.[5] Crises during its existence include flood damage to work from the River Thames, and bomb damage during World War II. However, most of the collection was in safe storage elsewhere during the war, and a large Stanley Spencer
Stanley Spencer
painting, deemed too big to move, had a protective brick wall built in front of it. In 1970, the building was given Grade II* listed status.[6] In 2012, Tate
Tate
Britain announced that it had raised the £45 million[7] required to complete a major renovation, largely thanks to a £4.9 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund and £1 million given by Tate
Tate
Members.[8] The museum stayed open throughout the three phases[9] of renovation.[7] Completed in 2013, the newly designed sections were conceived by the architects Caruso St John and included a total of nine new galleries, with reinforced flooring to accommodate heavy sculptures. A second part was unveiled later that year, the centrepiece being the reopening of the building's Thames-facing entrance as well as a new spiral staircase beneath its rotunda.[9] The circular balcony of the rotunda's domed atrium, closed to visitors since the 1920s, was reopened. The gallery also now has a dedicated schools' entrance and reception beneath its entrance steps on Millbank
Millbank
and a new archive gallery for the presentation of temporary displays.[10] Facilities[edit]

Millbank
Millbank
Millennium Pier outside Tate
Tate
Britain, which is linked by a high-speed boat to Tate
Tate
Modern

The front entrance is accessible by steps. A side entrance at a lower level has a ramp for wheelchair access. The gallery provides a restaurant and a café, as well as a Friends room, open only to members of the Tate. This membership is open to the public on payment of an annual subscription. As well as administration offices the building complex houses the Prints and Drawings Rooms (in the Clore galleries),[11] as well as the Library[12] and Archive[13] in the Hyman Kreitman Reading Rooms.[14] The restaurant features a mural by Rex Whistler. Tate
Tate
Britain and Tate
Tate
Modern are now connected by a high speed boat along the River Thames, which runs from Millbank
Millbank
Millennium Pier immediately outside Tate
Tate
Britain. The boat is decorated with spots, based on paintings of similar appearance by Damien Hirst. The lighting artwork incorporated in the pier's structure is by Angela Bulloch.[15] Displays[edit] The main display spaces show the permanent collection of historic British art, as well as contemporary work. It has rooms dedicated to works by one artist, such as: Tracey Emin, John Latham, Douglas Gordon, Sam Taylor-Wood, Tacita Dean, Marcus Gheeraerts II, though these, like the rest of the collection, are subject to rotation. The gallery also organises career retrospectives of British artists and temporary major exhibitions of British Art. Every three years the gallery stages a Triennial exhibition in which a guest curator provides an overview of contemporary British Art. The 2003 Tate Triennial was called Days Like These.[16] Art Now is a small changing show of a contemporary artist's work in a dedicated room. Tate
Tate
Britain is the home of the annual and usually controversial Turner Prize
Turner Prize
exhibition, featuring four artists selected by a jury chaired by the director of Tate
Tate
Britain. This is spread out over the year with the four nominees announced in May, the show of their work opened in October and the prize itself given in December. Each stage of the prize generates media coverage, and there have also been a number of demonstrations against the prize, notably since 2000 an annual picket by Stuckist artists. In recent years the exhibition and award ceremony have taken place at locations other than in Tate Britain: for example in Liverpool (2007), Derry-Londonderry (2013), Glasgow (2015) and Hull (2017). Tate
Tate
Britain has attempted to reach out to a different and younger audience with Late at Tate
Tate
Britain on the first Friday of every month, with half-price admission to exhibitions, live music and performance art.[17] Other public involvement has included the display of visitors', as opposed to curators', interpretation of certain artworks. Regular free tours operate on the hour, and at 1.15 pm on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday short 15-minute talks are given on paintings, artists and artistic styles.[18] Permanent collection[edit] Tate
Tate
Britain is the national gallery of British art
British art
from 1500 to the present day. As such, it is the most comprehensive collection of its kind in the world (only the Yale Center for British Art
Yale Center for British Art
can claim similar expansiveness, but with less depth). More recent artists include David Hockney, Peter Blake and Francis Bacon. Works in the permanent Tate
Tate
collection, which may be on display at Tate
Tate
Britain include:

John Constable, Flatford Mill (Scene on a Navigable River) 

William Blake, Satan Smiting Job with Sore Boils 

J. M. W. Turner, Snow Storm – Steam-Boat off a Harbour's Mouth 

Sir John Everett Millais, Ophelia 

Anna Lea Merritt, Love Locked Out 

James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Nocturne: Blue and Gold – Old Battersea Bridge 

David Bomberg, The Mud Bath 

Unknown 17th-century artist: The Cholmondeley Ladies Sir Peter Paul Rubens, Sketch for the Banqueting House Ceiling William Hogarth: The Painter and his Pug Sir Joshua Reynolds: Three Ladies Adorning a Term of hymen George Stubbs: Horse Attacked by a Lion Thomas Gainsborough: Giovanna Baccelli William Blake: Newton J. M. W. Turner: The Golden Bough, Norham Castle, Sunrise John Constable: Flatford Mill John Martin: The Great Day of His Wrath William Dyce: Pegwell Bay, Kent – a Recollection of 5 October 1858 Augustus Egg: Past and Present Richard Dadd, The Fairy Feller's Master-Stroke William Holman Hunt: The Awakening Conscience Dante Gabriel Rossetti: Ecce Ancilla Domini, Beata Beatrix Sir John Everett Millais: Ophelia Henry Wallis: The Death of Chatterton James Abbott McNeill Whistler: Symphony in White, No. 2: The Little White Girl, Nocturne: Blue and Gold – Old Battersea Bridge John William Waterhouse: The Lady of Shalott John Singer Sargent, Ellen Terry as Lady Macbeth Henry Scott Tuke: August Blue Herbert James Draper: The Lament for Icarus David Bomberg: The Mud Bath Mark Gertler: Merry-Go-Round Stanley Spencer: The Resurrection, Cookham Henry Moore: Recumbent Figure 1938 Francis Bacon: Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion

Statue of Millais[edit]

Statue of John Everett Millais
John Everett Millais
by Thomas Brock
Thomas Brock
at Tate
Tate
Britain

When the Pre-Raphaelite painter and President of the Royal Academy, John Everett Millais, died in 1896, the Prince of Wales (later to become King Edward VII) chaired a memorial committee, which commissioned a statue of the artist.[19] This was installed at the front of the gallery in the garden on the east side in 1905. On 23 November that year, The Pall Mall Gazette
The Pall Mall Gazette
called it "a breezy statue, representing the man in the characteristic attitude in which we all knew him".[19] In 1953, Tate
Tate
Director, Sir Norman Reid, attempted to have it replaced by Rodin's John the Baptist, and in 1962 again proposed its removal, calling its presence "positively harmful". His efforts were frustrated by the statue's owner, the Ministry of Works. Ownership was transferred from the Ministry to English Heritage
English Heritage
in 1996, and by them in turn to the Tate.[19] In 2000 the statue was removed to the rear of the building.[19] Transport connections[edit]

Service Station/Stop Lines/Routes served Distance from Tate
Tate
Britain

London
London
Buses Tate
Tate
Britain 87

London
London
Underground Pimlico

0.4-mile walk[20]

National Rail
National Rail
Vauxhall South West Trains 0.5-mile walk[21]

London
London
River Services Millbank
Millbank
Millennium Pier Tate
Tate
to Tate 0.2-mile walk[22]

Notes and references[edit]

^ "2017 Visitor Figures". Association of Leading Visitor Attractions. Retrieved 22 March 2018.  ^ Press Release: New Director of Tate
Tate
Britain Appointed, Tate
Tate
online, 29 July 2015. Retrieved 14 July 2016. ^ 'General introduction', Survey of London: volume 26: Lambeth: Southern area (1956), pp. 1–17. Date accessed: 27 March 2010. ^ Tate: History of Tate
Tate
– The gallery at Millbank, London
London
Linked 15 May 2013 ^ "British Architecture", Architectural Design, London, 1982, p.78. ^ Historic England. " Tate
Tate
Gallery (1222913)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 31 August 2016.  ^ a b Sulcas, Roslyn (18 November 2013). " Tate
Tate
Britain Completes Renovation". New York Times. Retrieved 19 November 2013.  ^ " Tate
Tate
Britain hits £45m renovation target". BBC News. 17 May 2012. Retrieved 19 November 2013.  ^ a b Merrick, Jay (18 November 2013). " Tate
Tate
Britain's redesign: It may not be cool but it's restrained, and elegant, and it works". The Independent. Retrieved 19 November 2013.  ^ "'Transformed' Tate
Tate
Britain unveiled". BBC News. 18 November 2013. Retrieved 19 November 2013.  ^ "Prints and Drawings Rooms". Tate. Retrieved 15 August 2010.  ^ "Research services: library", Tate
Tate
online. ^ "Research services:archive", Tate
Tate
online. ^ "Research services: Hyman Kreitman Reading Rooms", Tate
Tate
online. ^ " Millbank
Millbank
Pier web site". Millbankpier.co.uk. 22 May 2003. Retrieved 15 August 2010.  ^ "Days Like These", Tate
Tate
online. ^ "events education", Tate
Tate
online. ^ Tate
Tate
Britain, LondonBoard.co.uk, Accessed 8 February 2012. ^ a b c d Birchall, Heather. "Sir Thomas Brock
Thomas Brock
1847–1922", Tate online, February 2002. Retrieved 5 April 2008. ^ "Walking directions to ''' Tate
Tate
Britain''' from '''Pimlico tube station'''". Maps.google.co.uk. 1 January 1970. Retrieved 15 August 2010.  ^ "Walking directions to ''' Tate
Tate
Britain''' from '''Vauxhall station'''". Maps.google.co.uk. Retrieved 15 August 2010.  ^ "Walking directions to ''' Tate
Tate
Britain''' from ''' Millbank
Millbank
Millenium Pier'''". Maps.google.co.uk. Retrieved 8 April 2011. 

External links[edit]

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Tate
Britain.

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WorldCat Identities VIAF: 138978031 LCCN: nr00020808 ISNI: 0000 0001 2314 7871 GND: 10012396-X SELIBR: 265480 SUDOC: 068890052 BNF: cb13607897q (data) ULAN: 500266826 NLA: 42891327

Coordinates: 51°29′27″N 0°07′38″W / 51.490833°N 0.127222°W / 51

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