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Tate
Tate
is an institution that houses the United Kingdom's national collection of British art, and international modern and contemporary art. It is a network of five art museums: Tate
Tate
Britain, London (until 2000 known as the Tate
Tate
Gallery, founded 1897), Tate Liverpool
Tate Liverpool
(founded 1988), Tate
Tate
St Ives, Cornwall
Cornwall
(founded 1993), Tate
Tate
Contemporary (founded 2001) and Tate
Tate
Modern, London (founded 2000), with a complementary website, Tate
Tate
Online (created 1998). Tate
Tate
is not a government institution, but its main sponsor is the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.[1][2] The name 'Tate' is used also as the operating name for the corporate body, which was established by the Museums and Galleries Act 1992
Museums and Galleries Act 1992
as 'The Board of Trustees of the Tate
Tate
Gallery'. The gallery was founded in 1897, as the National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art. When its role was changed to include the national collection of modern art as well as the national collection of British art, in 1932, it was renamed the Tate
Tate
Gallery after sugar magnate Henry Tate
Henry Tate
of Tate & Lyle, who had laid the foundations for the collection. The Tate Gallery was housed in the current building occupied by Tate
Tate
Britain, which is situated in Millbank, London. In 2000, the Tate
Tate
Gallery transformed itself into the current-day Tate, or the Tate
Tate
Modern, which consists of a federation of four museums: Tate
Tate
Britain, which displays the collection of British art from 1500 to the present day; Tate
Tate
Modern, which is also in London, houses the Tate's collection of British and international modern and contemporary art from 1900 to the present day. Tate Liverpool
Tate Liverpool
has the same purpose as Tate Modern
Tate Modern
but on a smaller scale, and Tate St Ives
Tate St Ives
displays modern and contemporary art by artists who have connections with the area. All four museums share the Tate
Tate
Collection. One of the Tate's most publicised art events is the awarding of the annual Turner Prize, which takes place at Tate Britain.

Contents

1 History and development 2 Tate
Tate
Online 3 Administration and funding 4 Controversies 5 Logo and brand 6 Directors of the Tate 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

History and development[edit]

The original Tate
Tate
Gallery, now renamed ' Tate
Tate
Britain'

The original Tate
Tate
was called the National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art, situated on Millbank, Pimlico, London at the site of the former Millbank
Millbank
Prison. The idea of a National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art was first proposed in the 1820s by Sir John Leicester, Baron de Tabley. It took a step nearer when Robert Vernon gave his collection to the National Gallery
National Gallery
in 1847. A decade later John Sheepshanks gave his collection to the South Kensington Museum
South Kensington Museum
(later the Victoria & Albert Museum), known for years as the National Gallery
National Gallery
of Art (the same title as the Tate
Tate
Gallery had). Forty years later Sir Henry Tate who was a sugar magnate and a major collector of Victorian art, offered to fund the building of the gallery to house British Art on the condition that the State pay for the site and revenue costs. Henry Tate
Tate
also donated his own collection to the gallery. It was initially a collection solely of modern British art, concentrating on the works of modern—that is Victorian era—painters. It was controlled by the National Gallery
National Gallery
until 1954. In 1915, Sir Hugh Lane
Sir Hugh Lane
bequeathed his collection of European modern art to Dublin, but controversially this went to the Tate, which expanded its collection to include foreign art and continued to acquire contemporary art. In 1926 and 1937, the art dealer and patron Joseph Duveen
Joseph Duveen
paid for two major expansions of the gallery building. His father had earlier paid for an extension to house the major part of the Turner Bequest, which in 1987 was transferred to a wing paid for by Sir Charles Clore. Henry Courtauld also endowed Tate
Tate
with a purchase fund. By the mid 20th century, it was fulfilling a dual function of showing the history of British art as well as international modern art. In 1954, the Tate
Tate
Gallery was finally separated from the National Gallery.

Tate Liverpool
Tate Liverpool
opened in 1988.

During the 1950s and 1960s, the visual arts department of the Arts Council of Great Britain funded and organised temporary exhibitions at the Tate
Tate
Gallery including, in 1966, a retrospective of Marcel Duchamp. Later, the Tate
Tate
began organising its own temporary exhibition programme. In 1979 with funding from a Japanese bank a large modern extension was opened that would also house larger income generating exhibitions. In 1987, the Clore Wing opened to house the major part of the Turner bequest and also provided a 200-seat auditorium. (The "Centenary Development," in 2001, provided improved access and public amenities)

Tate St Ives
Tate St Ives
opened in 1993.

In 1988, an outpost in north west England opened as Tate
Tate
Liverpool. This shows various works of modern art from the Tate
Tate
collection as well as mounting its own temporary exhibitions. In 2007, Tate Liverpool hosted the Turner Prize, the first time this has been held outside London. This was an overture to Liverpool's being the European Capital of Culture 2008. In 1993, another offshoot opened, Tate
Tate
St Ives. It exhibits work by modern British artists, particularly those of the St Ives School. Additionally the Tate
Tate
also manages the Barbara Hepworth Museum
Barbara Hepworth Museum
and Sculpture Garden, which opened in 1980.

Tate Modern
Tate Modern
opened in 2000.

Neither of these two new Tates had a significant effect on the functioning of the original London Tate
Tate
Gallery, whose size was increasingly proving a constraint as the collection grew. It was a logical step to separate the "British" and "Modern" aspects of the collection, and they are now housed in separate buildings in London. The original gallery is now called Tate Britain
Tate Britain
and is the national gallery for British art from 1500 to the present day, as well as some modern British art. Tate
Tate
Modern, in Bankside Power Station
Bankside Power Station
on the south side of the Thames, opened in 2000 and now exhibits the national collection of modern art from 1900 to the present day, including some modern British art. In its first year, the Tate Modern
Tate Modern
was the most popular museum in the world, with 5,250,000 visitors. In the late 2000s, the Tate
Tate
announced a new development project to the south of the existing building. According to the museum: "This new development will transform Tate
Tate
Modern. An iconic new building will be added at the south of the existing gallery. It will create more spaces for displaying the collection, performance and installation art and learning, all allowing visitors to engage more deeply with art, as well as creating more social spaces for visitors to unwind and relax in the gallery."[3] Arts philanthropist John Studzinski donated more than £6 million to the project.[4][4][5] Tate
Tate
Online[edit] Tate
Tate
Online is the Tate's website. Since its launch in 1998, the site has provided information on all four physical Tate
Tate
galleries (Tate Britain, Tate
Tate
St Ives, Tate Liverpool
Tate Liverpool
and Tate
Tate
Modern) under the same domain. Tate
Tate
Online helps visitors prepare and extend visits to the physical sites but also acts as a destination in its own right. Other resources include illustrated information on all works in Tate's Collection of British and Modern international art, structured and informal e-learning opportunities for all visitors, over 600 hours of archived webcast events, all articles from the magazine Tate
Tate
Etc., and a series of bespoke net art commissions. BT was the primary sponsor of Tate
Tate
Online from 2001 to 2009. In addition to providing information about the galleries and organisation, Tate
Tate
Online has been used as a platform for Internet art exhibits, termed Net Art,[6] which are organised as part of Tate's Intermedia Art initiative[7] covering new media art. So far, 13 net art exhibitions have been shown since the initiative started in 2000 including Tate
Tate
in Space[8] (2002) which was nominated in the Interactive Art category for the 2003 BAFTA
BAFTA
Interactive awards. The Tate
Tate
Online Shop[9] sits under the main Tate
Tate
site and offers a wide range of books, prints and products that reflect and support the primary goal of Tate: to promote the knowledge, understanding and enjoyment of art. Profits from the online shop help to support the work of the galleries. Administration and funding[edit] Tate
Tate
receives annual funding from the Department for Culture, Media & Sport. It is administered by a board of trustees, who are responsible for the running of the gallery and appoint the Director (for a period of seven years). Under the Charities Act 1993, the Tate is an exempt charity accountable directly to Government rather than the Charity Commission for financial returns etc. However, the Trustees are still expected to follow the broad responsibilities of charity trustees, and may be subject to Charity Commission oversight on these elements of their activities. Various bodies have been set up to support the Tate
Tate
including Tate Members for the general public, where a yearly fee gives rights such as free entry to charging exhibitions and members rooms. There is also Tate
Tate
Patrons for a higher subscription fee and the Tate
Tate
Foundation. There are a number of corporate sponsors. In addition individual shows are often sponsored. Tate
Tate
now spends around £1 million of its general funds each year on purchasing acquisitions and their related costs. The Outset Contemporary Art Fund was established in 2003, by Tate
Tate
patrons Yana Peel and Candida Gertler. In collaboration with the Frieze Art Fair, the fund buys works from the fair for the Tate's collections. Other funds for acquisitions are raised by Tate
Tate
funding groups such as the Members, the Patrons and the American Patrons of Tate
Tate
and its sub-committees, the North American Acquisitions Committee and Latin American Acquisitions Committee. The American Patrons were renamed in 2013 to reflect their expanding geographical base of support; since 1999, this support group alone has raised more than $100 million.[10] In 2010, a photography acquisitions committee was launched.[11] In 2012, the Tate
Tate
established a South Asian acquisitions committee to collect contemporary and modern art from India and surrounding countries, as well as a committee for works from Russia, Eastern Europe and the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States).[12] Controversies[edit]

In the 19th century, there was dispute over the acquisitions made with the Chantrey bequest and accusations that favouritism resulted in the purchase of dull work by Royal Academicians.[citation needed] In 1971, an exhibition by Robert Morris called Bodyspacemotionthings was closed after five days due to health and safety concerns.[13] In 1972, the Tate
Tate
Gallery purchased a work by Carl Andre
Carl Andre
called Equivalent VIII. During a 1976 exhibition of the work, The Times newspaper published an article using the work to complain about institutional waste of taxpayers' money. The article made the piece infamous and it was subjected to ridicule in the media and vandalism. The work is still popularly known as The Bricks, and has entered the British public lexicon.[citation needed] Each year, the Turner Prize
Turner Prize
is held at a Tate
Tate
Gallery (historically at Tate
Tate
Britain) and is awarded to an artist under 50 who is either British or primarily working in Great Britain. It is the subject of great controversy and creates much media attention for contemporary British art, as well as attracting demonstrations.[14] In 1995, it was revealed that the Tate
Tate
had accepted a gift of £20,000 from art fraudster John Drewe. The gallery had given Drewe access to its archives which he then used to forge documents authenticating fake modern paintings that he then sold.[15] In 1998, Sir Nicholas Serota, director of Tate, conceived 'Operation Cobalt', the secret and ultimately successful buyback of two of the Tate's paintings by J.M.W. Turner that had been stolen from a German gallery in 1994. See Frankfurt art theft (1994). In 2006, it was revealed that the Tate
Tate
was the only national-funded museum not to be accredited to the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA), as it did not wish to abide by guidelines that deaccessioned work should first be offered to other museums. The MLA threatened to bar the Tate
Tate
from acquiring works under the Acceptance in Lieu (AIL) scheme, whereby works are given to the nation to settle inheritance tax. A total of 1,800 museums are accredited with the MLA.[16] Tate
Tate
has been criticised for accepting sponsorship from BP. Justice and climate change campaigners including Platform London, Art Not Oil and Liberate Tate have called for a protest against the petrol company's sponsorship of the gallery, including the 2012 Cultural Olympiad.[17]

Logo and brand[edit] The Tate
Tate
logo was designed by international brand consultancy Wolff Olins in 2000 as part of a larger rebranding effort focused around the idea "look again, think again." The museum uses a range of logos that move in and out of focus, "suggesting the dynamic nature of Tate
Tate
– always changing but always recognizable"[18] Variations include a standard logo, a blurred version, a faded version and a halftone version consisting of dots rather than smooth fading.[19] An update on the brand, designed by North, was released in 2016.[20] Directors of the Tate[edit] The head of the Tate
Tate
(formally the National Gallery
National Gallery
of British Art and the Tate
Tate
Gallery) is currently titled the Director. Until 1917, they were styled the Keeper.[21]

Sir Charles Holroyd
Sir Charles Holroyd
(1897 to 1906) D. S. MacColl
D. S. MacColl
(1906 to 1911) Charles Aitken
Charles Aitken
(1911 to 1930) James Bolivar Manson
James Bolivar Manson
(1930 to 1938) Sir John Rothenstein
Sir John Rothenstein
(1938 to 1964) Sir Norman Reid (1964 to 1979) Sir Alan Bowness (1980 to 1988) Sir Nicholas Serota
Nicholas Serota
(1988 to 2017) Maria Balshaw
Maria Balshaw
(2017 to present)[22][23][24]

See also[edit]

Tate
Tate
Etc. Turner Prize Tate
Tate
Publishing Ltd, a publisher of art books associated with the Tate Gallery Tate
Tate
Images, the picture library of Tate
Tate
which licenses images of artwork from Tate's collection, the Unilever Series, Hyundai Commission, Tate
Tate
Archive and internal and external shots of all four Tate
Tate
galleries.

References[edit]

^ Tate
Tate
Trustee, gov.uk ^ Funding, Tate ^ "The Tate Modern
Tate Modern
Project - Tate".  ^ a b "Donation provides cornerstone for new Transforming Tate
Tate
Modern development". Tate
Tate
Modern. 22 May 2007. ^ Nayeri, Farah. "Blackstone’s Studzinski to Give Tate
Tate
$1.57 Million More". Bloomberg. 31 July 2012. ^ "Intermedia Art Archive: Net Art by Date - Tate".  ^ Intermedia Art Tate ^ Tate
Tate
in Space Tate ^ " Tate
Tate
Online Shop".  ^ Adrian Dannatt (11 May 2013), Starry night for Tate
Tate
in New York The Art Newspaper. ^ Mark Brown (11 May 2010), Tate Modern
Tate Modern
marks 10th birthday by expanding collection The Guardian. ^ Gareth Harris and Georgina Adam (12 October 2012), Tate
Tate
to launch two new acquisitions committees Archived 26 October 2012 at the Wayback Machine. The Art Newspaper. ^ Tate
Tate
Modern's Turbine Hall recreates a 1971 art sensation The Guardian, 6 April 2009 ^ Chappet, Marie-Claire (20 October 2011). "The Turner Prize's most controversial moments". The Telegraph.  ^ Carter, R. G. (2007). Tainted archives: Art, archives, and authenticity. Archivaria, 63, 75. ^ " Tate
Tate
Is Not a Museum", The Art Newspaper, 14 August 2006. Retrieved from the Internet Archive, 14 March 2010.[1] ^ Needham, Alex (13 December 2011). " Tate
Tate
may not renew BP sponsorship deal after environmental protests". The Guardian.  ^ " Tate
Tate
- Wolff Olins".  ^ "How effective are the Tate
Tate
logos? - Logo Design Love". 6 May 2008.  ^ LLC, UnderConsideration. "Brand New: New Logo and Identity for Tate by North".  ^ "History of Tate: Directors of Tate". Tate.org.uk. Retrieved 27 April 2016.  ^ Brown, Mark; Pidd, Helen (11 January 2017). " Tate
Tate
to name Maria Balshaw as new director to succeed Serota". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 11 January 2017.  ^ "Maria Balshaw: Manchester gallery boss to be Tate's first female director". BBC. 17 January 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2017.  ^ Mark Brown (17 January 2017). "Maria Balshaw's Tate
Tate
appointment confirmed by prime minister". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tate.

Tate
Tate
Online 65,000 works from the Tate
Tate
Collection online, information on Tate's exhibitions and events programmes, and online learning resources Tate
Tate
etc. Magazine Tate
Tate
online shop Classic, modern and contemporary design products for adults and children, including items produced exclusively by Tate
Tate
and items represented in its collection. Turner Worldwide - an ongoing online cataloguing of J.M.W. Turner's work around the world Turner Collection Online The online catalogue of Tate's collection of nearly 300 oil paintings and 30,000 works on paper by J.M.W. Turner Tate
Tate
Public Records Tate's own historical records Tate
Tate
Podcasts Audio and video podcasts from Tate Tate
Tate
in Space Turner Museum Tate
Tate
Channel Filmed artist talks and interviews, studio visits, and exhibitions

v t e

Tate

Galleries

Tate
Tate
Britain Tate
Tate
Liverpool Tate
Tate
Modern Tate
Tate
St Ives Barbara Hepworth Museum

Directors

Sir Charles Holroyd
Sir Charles Holroyd
(Keeper) D. S. MacColl
D. S. MacColl
(Keeper) Charles Aitken J. B. Manson Sir John Rothenstein Sir Norman Reid Sir Alan Bowness Sir Nicholas Serota Maria Balshaw
Maria Balshaw
(2017-present)

Benefactors

Sir Henry Tate Sir Hugh Lane Sir Joseph Duveen, Bt. Sir Charles Clore Outset Contemporary Art Fund

Exhibitions

Turner Prize

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

List of Turner Prize
Turner Prize
winners and nominees The Weather Project Embankment Test Site Shibboleth

Other

Frankfurt Art Theft Tate
Tate
Etc. Purchase of The Upper Room

v t e

Museums and galleries in London

List of museums in London

National museums

British Library British Museum Geffrye Museum Horniman Museum National Army Museum National Gallery National Portrait Gallery Natural History Museum Royal Air Force Museum Sir John Soane's Museum Wallace Collection

Imperial War Museums

Churchill War Rooms HMS Belfast Imperial War Museum
Imperial War Museum
London

Royal Museums Greenwich

Cutty Sark National Maritime Museum Queen's House Royal Observatory

Science Museum Group

Science Museum

Tate

Tate
Tate
Britain Tate
Tate
Modern

Victoria and Albert Museum

V&A Museum of Childhood

Designated collections

Courtauld Gallery Dulwich Picture Gallery Firepower – The Royal Artillery Museum Hunterian Museum Jewish Museum Library and Museum of Freemasonry London Transport Museum Museum of Domestic Design and Architecture Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology Royal Academy
Royal Academy
of Arts

Museum of London

Museum of London
Museum of London
Docklands

Royal Collection Trust

Queen's Gallery Royal Mews

Historic Royal Palaces

Banqueting House, Whitehall Hampton Court Palace Kensington Palace Kew Palace Tower of London

National Trust

2 Willow Road 575 Wandsworth Road Blewcoat School Carlyle's House Eastbury Manor House Fenton House George Inn Lindsey House

restricted

Morden Hall Park Osterley Park Rainham Hall Red House Roman Baths Sutton House

English Heritage

Apsley House Chiswick House Down House Eltham Palace Jewel Tower Kenwood House
Kenwood House
(Iveagh Bequest) London Wall Marble Hill House Ranger's House
Ranger's House
(Wernher Collection) Winchester Palace

The London Museums of Health & Medicine (selected)

Florence Nightingale Museum Foundling Museum Freud Museum Museum of the Order of St John Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret Wellcome Collection

Other

Arsenal Football Club Museum Bank of England Museum Barbican Art Gallery Benjamin Franklin House Bruce Castle Charles Dickens Museum David Zwirner Gallery Dennis Severs' House Design Museum Dr Johnson's House Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art Fashion and Textile Museum Flowers Gallery Garden Museum Guildhall Art Gallery Handel & Hendrix in London Hayward Gallery Hogarth's House Institute of Contemporary Arts Leighton House Museum London Museum of Water & Steam Marlborough Gallery Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising Museum of Croydon Museum of Immigration and Diversity Museum of Richmond Orleans House
Orleans House
Gallery The Redfern Gallery Royal Academy
Royal Academy
of Music Museum Saatchi Gallery Serpentine Galleries Sherlock Holmes Museum Two Temple Place Twickenham Museum Whitechapel Gallery White Cube William Morris Gallery Victoria Miro Gallery

Category

v t e

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
of the United Kingdom

Headquarters: 100 Parliament Street, London, SW1A 2BQ

Executive agencies

The Royal Parks The National Archives

Non-departmental public bodies

Advisory

Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art
Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art
and Objects of Cultural Interest Theatres Trust Treasure Valuation Committee

Executive

Arts Council England British Film Institute British Library British Museum Equality and Human Rights Commission Gambling Commission Geffrye Museum Historic England Horniman Museum Horserace Betting Levy Board Imperial War Museum Information Commissioner's Office National Gallery National Heritage Memorial Fund National Maritime Museum National Museums Liverpool National Portrait Gallery Natural History Museum Royal Armouries Science Museum Group Sir John Soane's Museum Sport England Sports Grounds Safety Authority Tate UK Anti-Doping UK Sport Victoria and Albert Museum VisitBritain VisitEngland Wallace Collection

Tribunal

Horserace Betting Levy Appeal Tribunal

Public corporations

BBC

BBC
BBC
Trust

Channel Four Television Corporation Historic Royal Palaces Ofcom S4C

S4C
S4C
Authority

Ministers

Secretary of State

Matt Hancock

Minister of State

Minister of State for Digital and Culture: Margot James

Under-Secretaries of State

Sport and Civil Society: Tracey Crouch Arts, Heritage and Tourism: John Glen Ceremonials, First World War commemorations and DCMS Business in the Lords: Lord Ashton of Hy

.