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CNY 1.55 trillion USD
USD
$233.07 billion PPP $442 billion

Per capita

CNY 145,205 USD
USD
$21,868 PPP $41,487

Growth: 7.5%

HDI (2015) 0.894 - very high[2]

City flower Osmanthus

City tree Camphor laurel

Regional dialect Wu: Suzhou
Suzhou
dialect

License plate prefix 苏E

Website www.suzhou.gov.cn

Suzhou

"Suzhou" in Simplified (top) and Traditional (bottom) Chinese characters

Simplified Chinese 苏州

Traditional Chinese 蘇州

Transcriptions

Standard Mandarin

Hanyu Pinyin Sūzhōu

Wade–Giles Su1-chou1

IPA [sú.ʈʂóu]

Wu

Suzhounese Sou-tseü

Hakka

Romanization Sû-chû

Yue: Cantonese

Yale Romanization Sōu-jāu

IPA [sóu.tsɐ́u]

Jyutping Sou1-zau1

Southern Min

Hokkien
Hokkien
POJ Soo-ciŭ

Suzhou
Suzhou
( Wu Chinese
Wu Chinese
[sou˥ tseu˨˩ ]), formerly romanized as Soochow, is a major city located in southeastern Jiangsu
Jiangsu
Province of East China, about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Shanghai. It is a major economic center and focal point of trade and commerce, and the second largest city in the province, after its capital Nanjing. The city is situated on the lower reaches of the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
and the shores of Lake Tai
Lake Tai
and belongs to the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
Delta region. Administratively, Suzhou
Suzhou
is a prefecture-level city with a population of 4.33 million in its city proper, and a total resident population (as of 2013[update]) of 10.58 million in its administrative area.[3][4] Its urban population grew at an unprecedented rate of 6.5% between 2000 and 2014, which is the highest among cities with more than 5 million people.[5][6] Founded in 514 BC, Suzhou
Suzhou
has over 2,500 years of history, with an abundant display of relics and sites of historical interest. Around AD 100, during the Eastern Han Dynasty, it became one of the ten largest cities in the world mostly due to emigration from Northern China.[7][8] Since the 10th-century Song Dynasty, it has been an important commercial center of China. During the Ming and Qing Dynasty, Suzhou
Suzhou
was a national economic, cultural, and commercial[9] center, as well as the largest non-capital city in the world, until the 1860 Taiping Rebellion.[10] When Li Hongzhang
Li Hongzhang
and Charles George Gordon recaptured the city three years later, Shanghai
Shanghai
had already taken its predominant place in the nation.[11] Since major economic reforms began in 1978, Suzhou
Suzhou
has become one of the fastest growing major cities in the world, with GDP growth rates of about 14% in the past 35 years.[3][12] With high life expectancy and per capita incomes, Suzhou's Human Development Index
Human Development Index
ratings is roughly comparable to a moderately developed country, making it one of the most highly developed and prosperous cities in China.[2] The city's canals, stone bridges, pagodas, and meticulously designed gardens have contributed to its status as one of the top tourist attractions in China. The Classical Gardens of Suzhou
Classical Gardens of Suzhou
were added to the list of the UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Sites in 1997 and 2000. Suzhou is often dubbed the "Venice of the East" or "Venice of China".[13][14][15]

Contents

1 Names 2 History 3 Administrative divisions 4 Geography

4.1 Climate

5 Cityscape and Environment

5.1 Classical Gardens 5.2 Temples 5.3 Canals and historic districts 5.4 Resorts and Natural Reserves 5.5 Skyscrapers 5.6 Pan Gate 5.7 Baodai Bridge 5.8 Tiger Hill 5.9 Pagodas 5.10 Museums

6 Demographics 7 Economy

7.1 Development Zones

7.1.1 Suzhou
Suzhou
Industrial Park 7.1.2 Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
Export Processing Zone 7.1.3 Suzhou
Suzhou
New District

8 Sports 9 Transportation

9.1 Railway 9.2 Highways 9.3 Air transport 9.4 Water transport 9.5 Metro 9.6 Tram 9.7 Bus

10 Culture 11 Notable people 12 Education 13 See also 14 Notes

14.1 Bibliography

15 References 16 External links

Names[edit] During the Zhou, a settlement known as Gusu after nearby Mount Gusu (t 姑蘇山, s 姑苏山, p Gūsūshān) became the capital of the state of Wu. From this role, it also came to be called Wu as well. In 514 BC, King Helü of Wu
King Helü of Wu
established a new capital nearby at Helü City and this grew into the modern city. During the Warring States period, Helü City continued to serve as the local seat of government. From the areas it administered, it became known as Wuxian (lit. "Wu County") and Wujun ("Wu Commandery").[16] Under the Qin, it was known as Kuaiji after its greatly enlarged commandery, which was named for the reputed resting place of Yu the Great
Yu the Great
near modern Shaoxing
Shaoxing
in Zhejiang. The name Suzhou
Suzhou
was first officially used for the city in AD 589 during the Sui dynasty. The character 蘇 or 苏 is a contraction of the mountain and old name Gusu. The sū in its name refers to the mint perilla (shiso). The character 州 originally meant something like a province or county (cf. Guizhou), but often came to be used metonymously for the capital of such a region (cf. Guangzhou, Hangzhou, etc.).[17] Suzhou
Suzhou
is the Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
spelling of the Mandarin pronunciation of the name. Prior to the adoption of pinyin, it was variously romanized as Soo-chow, Suchow, or Su-chow.[18][19] History[edit] Suzhou, the cradle of Wu culture,[20][21] is one of the oldest towns in the Yangtze
Yangtze
Basin. By the Spring and Autumn period
Spring and Autumn period
of the Zhou, local tribes named the Gou Wu
Gou Wu
are recorded living in the area which would become the modern city of Suzhou. These tribes formed villages on the edges of the hills above the wetlands surrounding Lake Tai. Sima Qian's Records of the Grand Historian
Records of the Grand Historian
records traditional accounts that the Zhou lord Taibo established the state of Wu at nearby Wuxi
Wuxi
during the 11th century BC, civilizing the local people and improving their agriculture and mastery of irrigation. The Wu court later moved to Gusu within the area of modern Suzhou. In 514 BC,[22] King Helü of Wu
King Helü of Wu
relocated his court nearby and called the settlement Helü City after himself. His minister Wu Zixu was closely involved with its planning and it was this site that grew into present-day Suzhou. The height of his tower on Gusu Hill (Gusutai) passed into Chinese legend. In 496 BC, King Helü was buried at Tiger Hill. In 473 BC, Wu was defeated and annexed by Yue, a kingdom to its southeast; Yue was annexed in turn by Chu in 306 BC. Remnants of the ancient kingdom include pieces of its 2,500-year-old city wall and the gate through it at Pan Gate. The city was originally laid out according to a symbolic three-by-three grid of nine squares, with the royal palace occupying the central position.[23] During the Warring States
Warring States
period, Suzhou
Suzhou
was the seat of Wu County and Commandery. Following the Qin Empire's conquest of the area in 222 BC, it was made the capital of Kuaiji Commandery, including lands stretching from the south bank of the Yangtze
Yangtze
to the unconquered interior of Minyue in southern Zhejiang. Amid the collapse of the Qin, Kuaiji's governor Yin Tong attempted to organize his own rebellion only to be betrayed and executed by Xiang Liang and his nephew Xiang Yu, who launched their own rebellion from the city. When the Grand Canal was completed, Suzhou
Suzhou
found itself strategically located on a major trade route.[18] In the course of the history of China, it has been a metropolis of industry and commerce on the southeastern coast of China. During the Tang dynasty, the great poet Bai Juyi
Bai Juyi
constructed the Shantang Canal
Shantang Canal
(better known as "Shantang Street") to connect the city with Tiger Hill for tourists. In AD 1035, the Suzhou Confucian Temple
Suzhou Confucian Temple
was founded by famed poet and writer Fan Zhongyan. It became a venue for the imperial civil examinations and then developed into the modern Suzhou High School
Suzhou High School
in the 1910s.

"Sou-tcheou-foo" & other towns of "Kiang-nan" in Du Halde's 1736 Description of China, based on accounts by Jesuit missionaries

In February 1130, the advancing Jin army from the north ransacked the city. This was followed by the Mongol invasion in 1275. In 1356, Suzhou
Suzhou
became the capital of Zhang Shicheng, one of the leaders of the Red Turban Rebellion
Red Turban Rebellion
against the Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
and the self-proclaimed King of Wu. In 1367, Zhang's Nanjing-based rival Zhu Yuanzhang
Zhu Yuanzhang
took the city after a 10-month siege. Zhu – who was soon to proclaim himself the first emperor of the Ming Dynasty
Ming Dynasty
– demolished the royal city in the center of Suzhou's walled city and imposed crushing taxes on the city and prefecture's powerful families.[24] Despite the heavy taxation and the resettlement of some of Suzhou's prominent citizens' to the area of Hongwu's capital at Nanjing, Suzhou
Suzhou
was soon prosperous again. During the early Ming, Suzhou
Suzhou
Prefecture supervised the Yangtze shoals which later became Shanghai's Chongming Island.[25] For centuries the city, with its surroundings as an economic base, represented an extraordinary source of tax revenue.[26] When the shipwrecked Korean official Choe Bu
Choe Bu
had a chance to see much of Eastern China
China
from Zhejiang
Zhejiang
to Liaoning
Liaoning
on his way home in 1488, he described Suzhou
Suzhou
in his travel report as exceeding every other city.[27] Many of the famous private gardens were constructed by the gentry of the Ming and Qing dynasties. The iconoclast Taipings captured the city in 1860, however, and its former buildings and gardens were "almost... a heap of ruins"[18] by the time of their recovery by Charles Gordon's Ever-Victorious Army in November 1863.[19] Nonetheless, by 1880, its population was estimated to have recovered to about 500,000,[18] which remained stable for the next few decades.[19] In the late 19th century, the town was particularly known for its wide range of silks and its Chinese-language publishing industry.[18] The town was first opened to direct foreign trade by the Treaty of Shimonoseki
Treaty of Shimonoseki
ending the First Sino-Japanese War[19] and by the most favored nation clauses of earlier unequal treaties with the Great Powers. The new expatriates opened a European-and-Chinese school in 1900 and the Suzhou
Suzhou
Railway Station, connecting it with Shanghai, opened[19] on July 16, 1906. Just prior to the First World War, there were 7000 silk looms in operation, as well as a cotton mill and a large trade in rice.[19]

Prosperous Suzhou
Prosperous Suzhou
by Xu Yang

As late as the early 20th century, much of the city consisted of islands connected by rivers, creeks, and canals to the surrounding countryside.[19] Prior to their demolition, the city walls ran in a circuit of about 10 miles (16 km) with four large suburbs lying outside.[19] The Japanese invaded in 1937, and many gardens were again devastated by the end of the war. In the early 1950s, restoration was done on the Humble Administrator's Garden
Humble Administrator's Garden
and the Lingering Garden. Administrative divisions[edit] See also: List of administrative divisions of Jiangsu The urban core of Suzhou
Suzhou
is informally called the "Old Town". It is Gusu District. Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
is to the east of the old town, and Suzhou
Suzhou
High & New Technology Development Zone is to the west. In 2000, the original Wu County was divided into two districts including Xiangcheng and Wuzhong. They now form the northern and southern parts of the city of Suzhou.In 2012, the original Wujiang City became Wujiang District of Suzhou
Suzhou
City. Suzhou
Suzhou
is one of the most prosperous cities in China. Its development has a direct correlation with the growth of its satellite cities, including Kunshan, Taicang, Changshu, and Zhangjiagang, which together with the city of Suzhou
Suzhou
form the Suzhou
Suzhou
prefecture. The Suzhou prefecture is home to many high-tech enterprises.

Map

Gusu Huqiu Wuzhong Xiangcheng Wujiang Changshu (city) Zhangjiagang (city) Kunshan (city) Taicang (city)

Name Population (2010)[28] Area (km²) Density (per km²)

English Chinese Pinyin

Gusu District 姑苏区 Gūsū Qū 954,455 372 2,565.73

Huqiu District 虎丘区 Hǔqiū Qū 572,313 258 2,218.26

Wuzhong District 吴中区 Wúzhōng Qū 1,158,410 672 1,723.82

Xiangcheng District 相城区 Xiāngchéng Qū 693,576 416 1,667.25

Wujiang District 吴江区 Wújiāng Qū 1,275,090 1,093 1,166.59

Satellite cities (County-level cities)

Changshu 常熟市 Chángshú Shì 1,510,103 1,094 1,380.35

Taicang 太仓市 Tàicāng Shì 712,069 620 1,148.49

Kunshan 昆山市 Kūnshān Shì 1,646,318 865 1,903.25

Zhangjiagang 张家港市 Zhāngjiāgǎng Shì 1,248,414 772 1,617.11

Total 10,465,994 8,488 1,233.03

Not a formal administrative subdivisions – Suzhou
Suzhou
Industrial Park & Suzhou
Suzhou
New District defunct districts – Canglang District, Pingjiang District, & Jinchang
Jinchang
District

Geography[edit] Suzhou
Suzhou
is on the Lake Tai
Lake Tai
Plain south of the Yangtze
Yangtze
River, about 100 km (60 mi) to the west of Shanghai
Shanghai
and just over 200 km (120 mi) east of Nanjing. Climate[edit] Suzhou
Suzhou
has a four-season humid subtropical climate with hot, humid summers and cool, cloudy, damp winters with occasional snowfall ( Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
Cfa). Northwesterly winds blowing from Siberia
Siberia
during winter can cause temperatures to fall below freezing at night, while southerly or southwesterly winds during the summer can push temperatures above 35 °C (95 °F). The hottest temperature recorded since 1951 was at 41.0 °C (106 °F) on 7 August 2013,[29] and the lowest at −9.8 °C (14 °F) on 16 January 1958.[30]

Climate data for Suzhou
Suzhou
(1961-1990)

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Average high °C (°F) 7.7 (45.9) 8.6 (47.5) 12.7 (54.9) 18.6 (65.5) 23.5 (74.3) 27.2 (81) 31.6 (88.9) 31.5 (88.7) 27.2 (81) 22.3 (72.1) 16.7 (62.1) 10.6 (51.1) 19.9 (67.8)

Daily mean °C (°F) 3.7 (38.7) 4.6 (40.3) 8.5 (47.3) 14.2 (57.6) 19.2 (66.6) 23.4 (74.1) 27.8 (82) 27.7 (81.9) 23.6 (74.5) 18.3 (64.9) 12.4 (54.3) 6.1 (43) 15.8 (60.4)

Average low °C (°F) 0.5 (32.9) 1.5 (34.7) 5.1 (41.2) 10.6 (51.1) 15.7 (60.3) 20.3 (68.5) 24.8 (76.6) 24.7 (76.5) 20.5 (68.9) 14.7 (58.5) 8.6 (47.5) 2.4 (36.3) 12.5 (54.5)

Average precipitation mm (inches) 39.0 (1.535) 58.8 (2.315) 81.2 (3.197) 102.3 (4.028) 114.5 (4.508) 152.0 (5.984) 128.2 (5.047) 133.0 (5.236) 155.6 (6.126) 60.5 (2.382) 51.2 (2.016) 34.7 (1.366) 1,111 (43.74)

Average relative humidity (%) 67 75 70 69 69 75 77 68 74 69 65 68 70.5

Mean monthly sunshine hours 136.4 118.7 139.5 153.0 173.6 162.0 232.5 241.8 162.0 161.2 150.0 148.8 1,979.5

Source: 苏州市地方志办公室

Cityscape and Environment[edit]

Suzhou
Suzhou
as viewed from Beisi Pagoda

Pingjiang Road

Changmen at night

The Humble Administrator's Garden

An entrance to the Youyicun Garden

Xuanmiao Temple

A canal in Suzhou

Picture of the Land and Water Gate

View of Panmen Scenic Area and Ruiguang Pagoda

Classical Gardens[edit] Main article: Classical Gardens of Suzhou Suzhou
Suzhou
is famous for its Classical Gardens, collectively a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Humble Administrator's Garden
Humble Administrator's Garden
and Lingering Garden are among the four most famous classical gardens in China. The Canglang Pavilion, Lion Grove Garden, Humble Administrator's Garden and Lingering Garden, respectively representing the garden styles of the Song, Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties, are called the four most famous gardens in Suzhou. Other gardens inscribed on the World Heritage List include the Couple's Retreat Garden, the Garden of Cultivation, and the Retreat and Reflection Garden.

v t e

Classical Gardens of Suzhou

This UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is inscribed as a single property, but composed of 9 separate gardens in Suzhou
Suzhou
Prefecture

Lingering Garden Garden of Cultivation Humble Administrator's Garden Master of the Nets Garden Mountain Villa with Embracing Beauty Canglang Pavilion Lion Grove Garden Couple's Retreat Garden The Retreat & Reflection Garden

Category

Temples[edit]

Hanshan Temple
Hanshan Temple
(Cold Mountain Temple; Chinese: 寒山寺) Xiyuan Temple (Monastery Garden; Chinese: 西园寺) Xuanmiao Temple
Xuanmiao Temple
(Chinese: 玄妙观) . Linyanshan Temple(Chinese:灵岩山寺) . Chongyuan Temple
Chongyuan Temple
(Chinese:重元寺) . TaiPingfang Masjid(Chinese:太平坊清真寺)

Canals and historic districts[edit] Main articles: Pingjiang Road
Pingjiang Road
and Shantang Street Both 800-year-old Pingjiang Road
Pingjiang Road
(平江路) and 1,200-year-old Shantang Street
Shantang Street
(山塘街) are on the list of China's "National Historic and Cultural Streets".[31] Resorts and Natural Reserves[edit] Suzhou
Suzhou
Taihu National Tourism and Vacation Zone (苏州太湖国家旅游度假区) is in the western part of Suzhou, 15 km (9 mi) from the city center.[32][33] Skyscrapers[edit] Main article: List of tallest buildings in Suzhou Gate to the East
Gate to the East
is a 301.8 meter, 74-story skyscraper in Suzhou's central business district, built in 2015 at a cost of 700 million USD and is currently the tallest building in Suzhou.[34] Pan Gate[edit] Pan Gate
Pan Gate
(盘门) is on the southwest corner of the Main Canal or encircling canal of Suzhou. Originally built during the Warring States Period in the state of Wu, historians estimate it to be around 2,500 years old. It is now part of the Pan Gate
Pan Gate
Scenic Area. It is known for the "three landmarks of Pan Gate". They are the Ruiguang Pagoda(Chinese: 瑞光塔), the earliest pagoda in Suzhou
Suzhou
built in 247 BC, the Wu Gate Bridge, the entrance to the gate at that time over the water passage and the highest bridge in Suzhou
Suzhou
at the time, and the Pan Gate. The Ruigang Pagoda
Pagoda
is constructed of brick with wooden platforms and has Buddhist carvings at its base. Baodai Bridge[edit] Baodai Bridge
Baodai Bridge
(Precious Belt Bridge; Chinese: 宝带桥) stretches across the Tantai Lake in the suburbs of Suzhou. To raise money to finance the bridge, the magistrate donated his expensive belt, hence the name. The bridge was first built in 806 A.D. in the Tang Dynasty and has 53 arches with a length of 317 meters. It was made out of stone from Jinshan Mountain and is the longest standing bridge of its kind in China. The bridge was included on the list of national monuments (resolution 5-285) in 2001. Tiger Hill[edit] The Tiger Hill is known for its natural beauty as well as historical sites. The hill is so named because it is said to look like a crouching tiger. Another legend states that a white tiger appeared on the hill to guard it following the burial The hill has been a tourist destination for hundreds, if not thousands, of years, as is evident from the poetry and calligraphy carved into rocks on the hill. Famous Song Dynasty
Song Dynasty
poet, Su Shi
Su Shi
said, "It is a lifelong pity if having visited Suzhou
Suzhou
you did not visit Tiger Hill." Pagodas[edit] Yunyan Pagoda
Yunyan Pagoda
(虎丘塔 or 云岩寺塔), built in 961, is a Chinese pagoda built on Tiger Hill in Suzhou. It has several other names, including the "Leaning Tower of China" (as referred to by historian O.G. Ingles)[35] and the Yunyan Temple Tower. The tower rises to a height of 47 m (154 ft). It is a seven-story octagonal building built with blue bricks. In more than a thousand years the tower has gradually slanted due to forces of nature. Now the top and bottom of the tower vary by 2.32 meters. The entire structure weighs some 7,000,000 kilograms (15,000,000 lb), supported by internal brick columns.[36] However, the tower leans roughly 3 degrees due to the cracking of two supporting columns.[36] Beisi Pagoda(Chinese: 北寺塔) or North Temple Pagoda
Pagoda
is a Chinese pagoda at Bao'en Temple in Suzhou, Jiangsu
Jiangsu
Province, China. It rises nine stories in a height of 76 m (243 ft). It is the tallest Chinese pagoda
Chinese pagoda
south of the Yangtze
Yangtze
river. Twin Pagodas (Chinese:苏州双塔) lie in the Dinghui Temple Lane in the southeastern corner of the city proper of Suzhou. They are artistic and natural as they are close at hand. One of them is called Clarity-Dispensing Pagoda
Pagoda
and the other Beneficence Pagoda
Pagoda
and they are in the same form of building. There are many legends about the one-thousand-year-old pagodas. It is charming that the exquisite and straight Twin Pagoda
Pagoda
look like two inserted writing brushes. There was originally a single-storey house with three rooms just like a writing brush holder with the shadows of the two pagodas reclining on its roof at sunset. To the east of the pagoda is a square five-storeyed bell building built in the Ming Dynasty
Ming Dynasty
which is exactly like a thick ink stick. So there is a saying that "the Twin Pagodas are as writing brushes while the bell building as ink stick". Museums[edit] The city's major museums include the Suzhou Museum
Suzhou Museum
(designed by I. M. Pei), Suzhou
Suzhou
Silk
Silk
Museum, and Suzhou Museum
Suzhou Museum
of Opera
Opera
and Theatre. Demographics[edit]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (August 2015)

The population of Suzhou
Suzhou
is predominantly Han Chinese. The official language of broadcast, instruction, etc. is Mandarin Chinese, although many speak a local dialect known as Suzhounese, a member of the Wu language family. In addition to American and European expatriates, there is a large Korean community in Suzhou. The Industrial Bank of Korea (IBK) estimated that there were 15,000 Koreans
Koreans
in the municipality in 2014. That year 850 Korean companies operated in Suzhou, and the Koreans
Koreans
made up the largest number of students at the Suzhou
Suzhou
Singapore International School.[37]

Brief SuZhou Population by the end of year 2015[38]

Region Total Population 总户籍人口 (person) Resident population 常住人口 (10 000person)

Whole Municipality 6670124 1061.60

Urban Area 3412564 549.21

Gusu District 734362 95.20

Wuzhong District 631602 112.12

Xiangcheng District 405400 72.87

New & Hi-tech Zone, Huqiu District 363713 59.08

Industrial Park 459535 80.26

Wujiang District 817952 126.68

Cities at County Level 3257560 -

ChangShu 1068211 151.01

ZhangJiagang 922757 125.31

KunShan 787031 165.12

TaiCang 479561 70.95

Economy[edit] Suzhou's economy is based primarily on its large manufacturing sector—China's second largest—including iron and steel, IT and electronic equipment, and textile products. The city's service sector is notably well-developed, primarily owing to tourism, which brought in a total of RMB 152 billion of revenue in 2013. Suzhou's overall GDP exceeded RMB 1.3 trillion in 2013 (up 9.6 percent from the year previous).[39] The city is also one of China's foremost destinations for foreign investment, based on its relative proximity to Shanghai
Shanghai
and comparatively low operating costs. The municipal government has enacted various measures to encourage FDI in a number of manufacturing (e.g. pharmaceutical, electronic goods, automobile) and service (e.g. banking, logistics, research services) sectors. Included among these measures is a preferential tax policy for limited partnership venture capital enterprises in the Suzhou
Suzhou
Industrial Park.[39] Development Zones[edit] Suzhou
Suzhou
Industrial Park[edit]

Nightscape of Suzhou's Jinji Lake

The Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
(SIP) is the largest cooperative project between the Chinese and Singaporean governments. It is beside Jinji Lake, which lies to the east of the Suzhou
Suzhou
Old City. On 26 February 1994, Vice Premier Li Lanqing
Li Lanqing
and Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew represented China
China
and Singapore respectively in signing the Agreement to jointly develop Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
(originally called the Singapore Industrial Park). The project officially commenced on 12 May in the same year. SIP has a jurisdiction area of 288 km2, of which, the China-Singapore cooperation area covers 80 km2 with a planned residential population of 1.2 million.[40] SIP is home to the Suzhou
Suzhou
Dushu Lake Science and Education Innovation District, an area of universities and higher education institutions, including Soochow University
Soochow University
(苏州大学) and Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (西交利物浦大学).

Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
(SIP) - West Bank of Jin Ji Lake

Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
Export Processing Zone[edit] The Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
Export Processing Zone was approved to be established by the government in April 2000, with a planning area of 2.9 km2. It is in Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
set up by China
China
and Singapore. Inside the Export Processing Zone, all the infrastructures are of high standard.[41] Suzhou
Suzhou
New District[edit] The Suzhou New District was established in 1990. In November 1992, the zone was approved to be the national-level hi-tech industrial zone. By the end of 2007, foreign-invested companies had a registered capital worth of US$13 billion, of which US$6.8 billion was paid in. SND hosts now more than 1,500 foreign companies. Some 40 Fortune 500 companies set up 67 projects in the district.[42] Sports[edit] Suzhou Dongwu
Suzhou Dongwu
currently play in China
China
League Two, the third division of Chinese football. The 13,000 seat Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
Sports Arena will be one of the venues for the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup.[43] Transportation[edit]

CRH in Suzhou
Suzhou
Railway Station

Canal of Pingjiang

Railway[edit] Suzhou
Suzhou
is on the Shanghai- Nanjing
Nanjing
corridor which carries three parallel railways. Suzhou
Suzhou
Railway Station, near the city center, is among the busiest passenger stations in China. It is served by the Beijing– Shanghai
Shanghai
Railway (mostly "conventional" trains to points throughout China) and the Shanghai- Nanjing
Nanjing
Intercity Railway (high-speed D- and G-series trains providing frequent service primarily between Shanghai
Shanghai
and Nanjing). It takes only 25 minutes to reach Shanghai
Shanghai
Railway Station on the fastest G-series trains and less than 2 hours to Nanjing. The Suzhou
Suzhou
North Railway Station, a few kilometers to the north, is on the Beijing– Shanghai
Shanghai
High-Speed Railway (opened 2011), served by high-speed trains to Beijing, Qingdao, etc. Other stations on the Beijing– Shanghai
Shanghai
Railway and the Shanghai- Nanjing
Nanjing
Intercity Railway serve other points in the same corridor within Suzhou
Suzhou
Prefecture-level city, such as Kunshan. In and between Suzhou
Suzhou
and South KunShan station, Suzhou
Suzhou
Industrial Park Railway Station now also becomes an important station for people visiting and living in the areas. The northern part of the city, including such county-level cities as Zhangjiagang, Changshu
Changshu
and Taicang, presently has no rail service. However, plans exist for a cross-river railway from Nantong
Nantong
to the Shanghai
Shanghai
metropolitan area (the Shanghai– Nantong
Nantong
Railway), which will run through most of these county-level cities. Construction work is expected to start in 2013 and to take five and a half years.[44] Highways[edit] The Nanjing- Shanghai
Shanghai
Expressway connects Suzhou
Suzhou
with Shanghai, alternatively, there is the Yangtze
Yangtze
Riverine Expressway and the Suzhou-Jiaxing- Hangzhou
Hangzhou
Expressway. In 2005, the Suzhou
Suzhou
Outer Ring was completed, linking the peripheral county-level cities of Taicang, Kunshan, and Changshu. China
China
National Highway 312 also passes through Suzhou. Air transport[edit] Suzhou
Suzhou
is served by three airports, Sunan Shuofang International Airport (co-owned by Wuxi
Wuxi
and Suzhou), Shanghai
Shanghai
Hongqiao International Airport ( one hour drive ), Shanghai
Shanghai
Pudong
Pudong
International Airport ( two hours drive ).[45] Water transport[edit] Main article: Port of Suzhou Port of Suzhou, on the right bank of Yangtze
Yangtze
River, dealt with 428 million tons of cargo and 5.86 million TEU containers in 2012, which made it the busiest inland river port in the world by annual cargo tonnage and container volume.[46][47] Metro[edit] Main article: Suzhou
Suzhou
Rail Transit The Suzhou Rail Transit
Suzhou Rail Transit
currently has three lines in operation and two other lines under construction. The masterplan consists of nine independent lines. Line 1 started operation on April 28, 2012, Line 2 started operation on December 28, 2013.[48],and Line 4 started operation in 2017. Tram[edit] Main article: Suzhou
Suzhou
Tram Suzhou Tram system has one route in the Suzhou
Suzhou
New District. Bus[edit] See also: Suzhou
Suzhou
BRT Suzhou
Suzhou
has public bus routes that run into all parts of the city. Fares are flat rated, usually 1 Yuan for a non-air-conditioned bus and 2 Yuan for an air-conditioned one.[citation needed] The Suzhou
Suzhou
BRT, a 25-kilometre (16 mi) bus rapid transit system opened in 2008, operates 5 lines using elevated busways and bus-only lanes throughout the city. Culture[edit]

The Yunyan Pagoda, or Huqiu Tower, a tower that is now leaning due to lack of foundational support (half soil, half rock), built during the latter part of the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms
Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms
era (907-960 AD).

The Beisi Pagoda
Pagoda
of Suzhou, built between 1131 and 1162 during the Song Dynasty
Song Dynasty
(with later renovations), 76 m (243 ft) tall.

The "xi shi" stone bridge

Opera: Kunqu
Kunqu
originates in the Suzhou
Suzhou
region, as does the much later Suzhou
Suzhou
Opera. Ballad-singing, or Suzhou
Suzhou
pingtan, is a local form of storytelling that mixes singing (accompanied by the pipa and sanxian) with portions in spoken dialect. Silk: throughout China's Imperial past, Suzhou
Suzhou
silk has been associated with high-quality silk products, supplying silks to ancient royal families. By the 13th century, Suzhou
Suzhou
was already the center of the profitable silk trade. Song brocade: Suzhou's Song brocade, with its flashy colors, exquisite patterns, strong and soft texture, is one of China's three famous brocades, together with Nanjing
Nanjing
Yun brocade and Sichuan
Sichuan
Shu brocade.Suzhou's brocade production can be traced back to the Five Dynasties. It prospered in the Song Dynasty. After the government moved the capital southward, the country's political and cultural center moved to the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
area. To cope with the special need of artists, a type of very thin brocade for decorating paintings emerged in Suzhou. These amazing brocades and paintings have been preserved. Whenever people talked about brocade, they mentioned the Song Dynasty, and thus Song brocade got its name and has been well-known ever since. Handicrafts: Suzhou
Suzhou
embroidery, fans, Chinese musical instruments, scroll mounting, lanterns, mahogany furniture, jade carving, silk tapestry, traditional painting pigments of Jiangenxutang Studio, the New Year's wood-block prints of Taohuawu Studio. Paintings Calligraphic art Cuisine: Yangcheng Lake
Yangcheng Lake
large crab Suzhou
Suzhou
Silk
Silk
Hand Embroidery Art Suzhou
Suzhou
is the original place of "Jasmine", a song sung by Chinese singers or actresses thousands of times on the occasions of almost every important meetings or celebrations. Jasmine is the symbol of Suzhou
Suzhou
as well as Tai Hu Lake. Suzhou
Suzhou
Gardens: Gardens in Suzhou
Suzhou
have an ancient history. The first garden in Suzhou
Suzhou
belonged to the emperor of Wu State in Spring and Autumn Period (600 BC). More than 200 gardens existed in Suzhou between the 16th and 18th centuries. Gardens in Suzhou
Suzhou
were built according to the style of Chinese Paintings. Every view in a garden can be seen as a piece of Chinese Painting and the whole garden is a huge piece of Chinese Paintings. At present, the Humble Administrator's Garden, built in 16th, is the largest private garden in Suzhou. It belonged to by Wang Xianchen, an imperial censor.[citation needed] Suzhou embroidery
Suzhou embroidery
together with embroidery of Hunan, Sichuan
Sichuan
and Guangdong
Guangdong
are called as the "Four Famous Embroideries". Suzhou tapestry method is done in fine silks and gold thread. Other art forms found in this area are sculpture, Song brocade, jade and rosewood carving. The Suzhou Museum
Suzhou Museum
has a rich collection of relics from many eras. The collection includes revolutionary records, stele carving, folk customs, drama and verse, Suzhou
Suzhou
embroidery, silk cloth, gardens, coins and Buddhist artifacts.[49]

Notable people[edit] Main article: List of people from Suzhou Education[edit]

High Schools

Suzhou
Suzhou
High School(江苏省苏州中学) Liangfeng High School(江苏省梁丰高级中学) Changshu
Changshu
High School(江苏省常熟中学) Liangfeng High School(江苏省梁丰高级中学) Changshu
Changshu
High School(江苏省常熟中学) Zhenze Middle School(江苏省震泽中学) Suzhou
Suzhou
Experimental High School(江苏省苏州实验中学) Kunshan
Kunshan
Senior High School(江苏省昆山中学) Taicang
Taicang
Senior High School(江苏省太仓高级中学) Suzhou
Suzhou
No.10 High School(江苏省苏州第十中学) Suzhou
Suzhou
No.1 High School(江苏省苏州第一中学) SIP Experimental Middle School(苏州工业园区星海实验中学) Wuxian High School(吴县中学)

An exhibition of Penjing
Penjing
at Tiger Hill in Suzhou.

Public institutions having full-time Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
programs include

Soochow University(苏州大学) University of Science and Technology of Suzhou(苏州科技大学) Renmin University of China(Suzhou Campus)(中国人民大学苏州校区) Changshu
Changshu
Institute of Technology(常熟理工学院)

Postgraduate Institution

Suzhou Graduate Town
Suzhou Graduate Town
( National University of Singapore
National University of Singapore
and Fudan Joint Graduate School, Nanjing
Nanjing
University Graduate School, etc.)

Sino-British universities offering full-time Bachelor's degree, Master's degree and Ph.D. degrees
Ph.D. degrees
programs include

Xi'an
Xi'an
Jiaotong-Liverpool University(西交利物浦大学)

Private institutions having full-time Bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
programs include

Duke Kunshan
Kunshan
University

Private Schools

Suzhou
Suzhou
Foreign Language School EtonHouse International School-Suzhou Dulwich College Suzhou Dulwich International High School Suzhou Japanese School of Suzhou Suzhou
Suzhou
Korean School Suzhou
Suzhou
Singapore International School Skema Business School : Chinese campus of the French business school Overseas Chinese Academy of Suzhou (苏州工业园区海归人才子女学校)

See also[edit]

List of twin towns and sister cities in China Port of Suzhou

Notes[edit]

^ "Table showing land area and population". Suzhou
Suzhou
People's Government. 2003. Retrieved 2007-09-07.  ^ a b Calculated using data from Suzhou
Suzhou
Statistics Bureau. Life Expectancy Index = 0.9672, Education Index = 0.8244, Income Index = 0.896. Refs:

苏州市统计局. "2016年苏州市情市力" (PDF). Retrieved 2017-03-13.  "新建改扩建410所学校 苏州教育有"国际范"". 腾讯网. Retrieved 2017-03-13.  "苏州人均期望寿命高于北京上海 癌症仍是"头号杀手"". 城市商报. 2016-04-22. Retrieved 2016-10-05. 

^ a b 苏州市统计局. "2014年苏州市情市力" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 April 2014. Retrieved 19 April 2014.  ^ Incorporating neighboring suburban regions and the satellite cities of Kunshan, Zhangjiagang, Taicang, and Changshu. This statement is based on data from local government, while a United Nations report (see below) claims its (urban) population is 5.156 million in 2014. ^ United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. "World Urbanization Prospects: The 2014 Revision" (PDF). Retrieved 1 January 2015. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ^ Elizabeth MacBride (22 December 2014). "Keep an eye on these emerging market cities". CNBC. Retrieved 1 January 2015.  ^ Tertius Chandler (1987). Four Thousand Years of Urban Growth: An Historical Census. St. David's University Press. ISBN 978-0889462076.  ^ "Top 10 Cities of the Year 100". About.com. Retrieved 2013-10-20.  ^ "The Grand Canal". UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Center. Retrieved 1 January 2014.  ^ Marme, Michael (2005). Suzhou: Where the Goods of All the Provinces Converge. Stanford: Stanford University Press. ISBN 9780804731126.  ^ Xu (2000), pp. 16, 72–73, 159. ^ "寻梦苏州 探寻一座城市的现代化之路". 人民网. 2005-01-26. Retrieved 2013-08-27.  ^ Visit some of China's best gardens next week without a passport » Arts/Entertainment » Andover Townsman, Andover, MA[permanent dead link]. Andovertownsman.com. Retrieved on 2011-08-28. ^ Thorpe, Annabelle. "Suzhou: Real China
China
outside Shanghai". The Times. London. Retrieved 2010-05-24.  ^ Fussell, Betty (1988-03-13). "Exploring Twin Cities By Canal Boat". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-24.  ^ "Supplement to the Local Gazetteer of Wu Prefecture". World Digital Library. 1134. Retrieved 2013-09-06.  ^ Dictionary of Chinese Place-names Ancient and Modern (中国古今地名大词典, Zhongguo Gujin Diming Dacidian), p. 1438. Shanghai
Shanghai
Lexicographical Publishing House (Shanghai), 2006. (in Chinese) ^ a b c d e f EB (1887). ^ a b c d e f g h i EB (1911). ^ Suzhou, China
China
Daily ^ Cradle of Wu Culture from Jiangsu
Jiangsu
Official website ^ The old editions of the Britannica give the erroneous date of AD 484.[18][19] ^ Xu (2000), pp. 34–36. ^ Johnson, Linda C. Cities of Jiangnan in Late Imperial China, pp. 26–27. SUNY Press, 1993. ISBN 0-7914-1423-X, 9780791414231. ^ "Chongming County" in the Encyclopedia of Shanghai, pp. 50 ff. Archived 10 January 2015 at the Wayback Machine. Shanghai
Shanghai
Scientific & Technical Publishers (Shanghai), 2010. Hosted by the Municipality of Shanghai. ^ Xu (2000), p. 16. ^ Brook, Timothy. The Confusions of Pleasure: Commerce and Culture in Ming China. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. ISBN 0-520-22154-0. Page 45. ^ 《苏州市2010年第六次全国人口普查主要数据公报》. Suzhou
Suzhou
Statistics Bureau. 3 May 2011. Accessed 24 Feb 2013. (in Chinese) ^ 中国江苏网 [Míngchéng Xīnwén Wǎng, City News Online]. 《昨最高气温再创历史新高 苏州筹划人工增雨降温》 ["Yesterday was highest temperature on record, Suzhou
Suzhou
planning artificial rain to cool".] 1 Aug 2013. Accessed 20 Jan 2014. (in Chinese) ^ 中国苏州 Archived 23 October 2004 at the Wayback Machine. [Zhōngguó Sūzhōu, Suzhou
Suzhou
Municipal Government Website]. 《苏州历史最高最低气温问题》 ["Question about Suzhou's Highest and Lowest Temperature Records"]. 20 Jan 2011. Accessed 20 Jan 2014. (in Chinese) ^ Official Travel and Tourism Websites For Suzhou ^ "苏州太湖旅游度假区顺利晋级5A级景区". Retrieved 30 July 2016.  ^ "苏州太湖国家旅游度假区中心区控制性详细规划公示". Retrieved 30 July 2016.  ^ "$700 million skyscraper 'resembles a pair of pants'". Retrieved 30 July 2016.  ^ Ingles (1982), 144. ^ a b Ingles (1982), 145. ^ Kim, Hyung Min. "The Role of Foreign Firms in China's Urban Transformation: A Case Study of Suzhou" (Chapter 8). In: Wong, Tai-Chee, Sun Sheng Han, and Hongmei Zhang. Population Mobility, Urban Planning and Management in China. Springer Science+Business Media, March 24, 2015. ISBN 3319152572, 9783319152578. Start: 127. CITED: p. 139. ^ SuZhou Statistical Yearbook 2016 sztjj.gov.cn ^ a b " China
China
Regional Focus: Suzhou, Jiangsu
Jiangsu
Province", China Briefing, Shanghai, 02 May 2014. ^ Rightsite.asi Suzhou
Suzhou
Industry Park. Rightsite.asia (1994-02-26). Retrieved on 2011-08-28. ^ Rightsite.asia Suzhou Industrial Park
Suzhou Industrial Park
Export Processing Zone[dead link] ^ Suzhou
Suzhou
Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone. Rightsite.asia. Retrieved on 2011-08-28. ^ The Official website of the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup, FIBA.com, Retrieved 9 March 2016. ^ 沪通铁路2013年正式开建 南通到上海仅需一小时 (Construction work on the Hu-Tong Railway will officially start in 2013. It will take just an hour to travel from Nantong
Nantong
to Shanghai), 2012-12-24, (in Chinese) ^ 苏州交通运输 (in Chinese). People's Daily. Archived from the original on 30 September 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013.  ^ "苏州港外贸吞吐量首破1亿吨". 新华日报. 2013-01-13. Retrieved 2013-01-15.  ^ 小汤. "苏州港去年货物吞吐量4.28亿吨". 苏州日报. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 24 March 2013.  ^ "苏州地铁规划图 ( Suzhou
Suzhou
MRT Map)" (in Chinese). 2009-04-20. Retrieved 2009-04-20.  ^ " Suzhou
Suzhou
Museum". 

Bibliography[edit]

Xu, Yinong (2000). The Chinese City in Space and Time: The Development of Urban Form in Suzhou. Hawaii: University of Hawaii
Hawaii
Press. ISBN 9780824820763. 

References[edit]

 Baynes, T.S.; Smith, W.R., eds. (1887), "Su-chow", Encyclopædia Britannica, 22 (9th ed.), New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, p. 617 .  Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911), "Su-chow", Encyclopædia Britannica, 26 (11th ed.), Cambridge University Press, p. 7 . Economic profile for Suzhou
Suzhou
at HKTDC

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Suzhou.

Wikivoyage has a travel guide for Suzhou.

Official Resource for English-speaking travelers Official website for Suzhou's municipal government Suzhou
Suzhou
city guide with open directory ( Jiangsu
Jiangsu
Network) Geographic data related to Suzhou
Suzhou
at OpenStreetMap

v t e

Jiangsu
Jiangsu
topics

Nanjing
Nanjing
(capital)

General

History Politics Economy

Geography

Cities Grand Canal of China Yellow Sea East China
China
Sea Xishan Island Yangtze
Yangtze
River Lake Tai Hongze Lake Yangcheng Lake Huai River Qixia Mountain

Education

Nanjing
Nanjing
University Southeast University Hohai University Nanjing
Nanjing
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Nanjing
University of Science and Technology

Culture

Wuyue culture Shuochang Cuisine Chinese opera Ge Yuan Garden

Visitor attractions

Purple Mountain Sun Yat-sen Mausoleum Ming Xiaoling Mausoleum Jiming Temple Nanjing
Nanjing
Yangtze River
Yangtze River
Bridge Hanshan Temple Huqiu Tower Grand Buddha at Ling Shan Chaotian Palace Qixia Temple Tianning Temple Pagoda Zhouzhuang

Category Commons

v t e

County-level divisions of Jiangsu
Jiangsu
Province

Nanjing
Nanjing
(capital)

Sub-provincial city

Nanjing

Xuanwu District Qinhuai District Jianye District Gulou District Pukou District Luhe District Qixia District Yuhuatai District Jiangning District Lishui
Lishui
District Gaochun District

Prefecture-level cities

Wuxi

Binhu District Huishan District Xishan District Liangxi District Xinwu District Jiangyin
Jiangyin
City Yixing
Yixing
City

Xuzhou

Yunlong District Gulou District Jiawang District Tongshan District Quanshan District Pizhou
Pizhou
City Xinyi City Suining
Suining
County Pei County Feng County

Changzhou

Zhonglou District Tianning District Xinbei District Wujin District Jintan District Liyang
Liyang
City

Suzhou

Gusu District Huqiu District Wuzhong District Xiangcheng District Wujiang District Kunshan
Kunshan
City Taicang
Taicang
City Changshu
Changshu
City Zhangjiagang
Zhangjiagang
City

Nantong

Chongchuan District Gangzha District Tongzhou District Haimen
Haimen
City Qidong City Rugao
Rugao
City Rudong County Hai'an County

Lianyungang

Haizhou District Lianyun District Ganyu District Guanyun County Donghai County Guannan County

Huai'an

Qingjiangpu District Huai'an
Huai'an
District Huaiyin District Hongze District Jinhu County Xuyi County Lianshui County

Yancheng

Tinghu District Yandu District Dafeng District Dongtai
Dongtai
City Sheyang County Funing County Binhai
Binhai
County Xiangshui County Jianhu County

Yangzhou

Guangling District Hanjiang District Jiangdu District Yizheng
Yizheng
City Gaoyou
Gaoyou
City Baoying County

Zhenjiang

Jingkou District Runzhou District Dantu District Yangzhong
Yangzhong
City Danyang City Jurong City

Taizhou

Hailing District Gaogang District Jiangyan District Jingjiang
Jingjiang
City Taixing
Taixing
City Xinghua City

Suqian

Sucheng District Suyu District Shuyang County Siyang County Sihong County

v t e

Metropolitan cities of China

Major Metropolitan regions

Jingjinji
Jingjinji
(JJJ) Pearl River Delta
Pearl River Delta
(PRD) / Yuegang'ao Greater Bay Area Yangtze River
Yangtze River
Delta (YRD)

Central Plain (Zhongyuan) Chengyu Cross-Strait Western Coast Guanzhong Mid-Southern Liaoning Shandong
Shandong
Peninsula Yangtze River
Yangtze River
Mid-Reaches ( Yangtze River
Yangtze River
Valley)

Major Cities

National Central Cities

Beijinga Chongqinga Guangzhoub2 Shanghaia2 Tianjina2

Special
Special
Administrative Regions

Hong Kong Macau

Regional Central Cities

Chengdub Nanjingb Shenyangb Shenzhenc1 Wuhanb Xi'anb

Sub-provincial cities

Changchunb Chengdub Dalianc2 Guangzhoub2 Hangzhoub Harbinb Jinanb Nanjingb Ningboc2 Qingdaoc2 Shenyangb Shenzhenc1 Wuhanb Xi'anb Xiamenc1

Provincial capitals (Prefecture-level)

Changsha Fuzhou2 Guiyang Haikou Hefei Kunming Lanzhou Nanchang Shijiazhuang Taiyuan Xining Zhengzhou Taibei5

Autonomous regional capitals

Hohhot Lhasa Nanning Ürümqi Yinchuan

Comparatively large cities

Anshan Baotou Benxi Datong Fushun Handan Huainan Jilin Luoyang Suzhou Tangshan Qiqihar Wuxi Xuzhou Zibo

Prefecture-level cities
Prefecture-level cities
by Province

Hebei

Shijiazhuang* Tangshan* Qinhuangdao2 Handan* Xingtai Baoding Zhangjiakou Chengde Cangzhou Langfang Hengshui

Shanxi

Taiyuan* Datong* Yangquan Changzhi Jincheng Shuozhou Jinzhong Yuncheng Xinzhou Linfen Lüliang

Inner Mongolia

Hohhot* Baotou* Wuhai Chifeng Tongliao Ordos Hulunbuir Bayannur Ulanqab

Liaoning

Shenyang* Dalian* Anshan* Fushun* Benxi* Dandong Jinzhou Yingkou Fuxin Liaoyang Panjin Tieling Chaoyang Huludao

Jilin

Changchun* Jilin Siping Liaoyuan Tonghua Baishan Songyuan Baicheng

Heilongjiang

Harbin* Qiqihar* Jixi Hegang Shuangyashan Daqing Yīchun Jiamusi Qitaihe Mudanjiang Heihe Suihua

Jiangsu

Nanjing* Wuxi* Xuzhou* Changzhou Suzhou* Nantong Lianyungang2 Huai'an Yancheng Yangzhou Zhenjiang Tàizhou Suqian

Zhejiang

Hangzhou* Ningbo* Wenzhou2 Jiaxing Huzhou Shaoxing Jinhua Quzhou Zhoushan Tāizhou Lìshui

Anhui

Hefei* Wuhu Bengbu Huainan* Ma'anshan Huaibei Tongling Anqing Huangshan Chuzhou Fùyang Sùzhou Lu'an Bozhou Chizhou Xuancheng

Fujian

Fúzhou* Xiamen* Putian Sanming Quanzhou Zhangzhou Nanping Longyan Ningde

Jiangxi

Nanchang* Jingdezhen Píngxiang Jiujiang Xinyu Yingtan Ganzhou Jí'ān Yíchun Fǔzhou Shangrao

Shandong

Jinan* Qingdao* Zibo* Zaozhuang Dongying Yantai2 Weifang Jĭning Tai'an Weihai Rizhao Laiwu Linyi Dezhou Liaocheng Binzhou Heze

Henan

Zhengzhou* Kaifeng Luoyang* Pingdingshan Anyang Hebi Xinxiang Jiaozuo Puyang Xuchang Luohe Sanmenxia Nanyang Shangqiu Xinyang Zhoukou Zhumadian

Hubei

Wuhan* Huangshi Shiyan Yichang Xiangyang Ezhou Jingmen Xiaogan Jinzhou Huanggang Xianning Suizhou

Hunan

Changsha* Zhuzhou Xiangtan Hengyang Shaoyang Yueyang Changde Zhangjiajie Yiyang Chenzhou Yongzhou Huaihua Loudi

Guangdong

Guangzhou* Shaoguan Shenzhen* Zhuhai1 Shantou1 Foshan Jiangmen Zhanjiang2 Maoming Zhaoqing Huizhou Meizhou Shanwei Heyuan Yangjiang Qingyuan Dongguan Zhongshan Chaozhou Jieyang Yunfu

Guangxi

Nanning* Liuzhou Guilin Wuzhou Beihai2 Fangchenggang Qinzhou Guigang Yùlin Baise Hezhou Hechi Laibin Chongzuo

Hainan1

Haikou* Sanya Sansha4 Danzhou

Sichuan

Chengdu* Zigong Panzhihua Luzhou Deyang Mianyang Guangyuan Suining Neijiang Leshan Nanchong Meishan Yibin Guang'an Dazhou Ya'an Bazhong Ziyang

Guizhou

Guiyang* Liupanshui Zunyi Anshun Bijie Tongren

Yunnan

Kunming* Qujing Yuxi Baoshan Zhaotong Lìjiang Pu'er Lincang

Tibet

Lhasa* Shigatse Chamdo Nyingchi Shannan

Shaanxi

Xi'an* Tongchuan Baoji Xianyang Weinan Yan'an Hanzhong Yúlin Ankang Shangluo

Gansu

Lanzhou* Jiayuguan Jinchang Baiyin Tianshui Wuwei Zhangye Pingliang Jiuquan Qingyang Dingxi Longnan

Qinghai

Xining* Haidong

Ningxia

Yinchuan* Shizuishan Wuzhong Guyuan Zhongwei

Xinjiang

Ürümqi* Karamay Turpan Hami

Taiwan5

(none)

Other cities (partly shown below)

Prefecture-level capitals (County-level)

(Inner Mongolia: Ulanhot Xilinhot) Jiagedaqi3, Heilongjiang Enshi, Hubei Jishou, Hunan (Sichuan:Xichang Kangding Barkam) (Guizhou: Xingyi Kaili Duyun) (Yunnan: Chuxiong Mengzi Wenshan Jinghong Dali Mangshi Shangri-La Lushui) (Gansu: Linxia Hezuo) (Qinghai: Yushu Delingha) (Xinjiang: Changji Bole Korla Yining Artux Aksu Kashgar1 Hotan Tacheng Altay)

Province-governed cities (Sub-prefecture-level)

Jiyuan, Henan (Hubei: Xiantao Qiánjiang Tianmen Shennongjia) (Hainan1: Wuzhishan Qionghai Wenchang Wanning Dongfang) ( Xinjiang
Xinjiang
- XPCC(Bingtuan) cities: Shihezi Aral Tumxuk Wujiaqu Beitun Tiemenguan Shuanghe Kokdala Kunyu)

Former Prefecture-level cities

Chaohu, Anhui Yumen,Gansu Dongchuan, Yunnan Shashi, Hubei (Sichuan: Fuling Wanxian) (Jilin: Meihekou Gongzhuling)

Sub-prefecture-level cities (Prefecture-governed)

Qian'an, Hebei Manzhouli, Inner Mongolia Erenhot, Inner Mongolia Golmud, Qinghai

County-level cities
County-level cities
by Province

Hebei

Xinji Jinzhou Xinle Zunhua Qian'an* Wu'an Nangong Shahe Zhuozhou Dingzhou Anguo Gaobeidian Botou Renqiu Huanghua Hejian Bazhou Sanhe Shenzhou

Shanxi

Gujiao Lucheng Gaoping Jiexiu Yongji Hejin Yuanping Houma Huozhou Xiaoyi Fenyang

Inner Mongolia

Holingol Manzhouli* Yakeshi Zhalantun Ergun Genhe Fengzhen Ulanhot* Arxan Erenhot* Xilinhot*

Liaoning

Xinmin Wafangdian Zhuanghe Haicheng Donggang Fengcheng Linghai Beizhen Gaizhou Dashiqiao Dengta Diaobingshan Kaiyuan Beipiao Lingyuan Xingcheng

Jilin

Yushu Dehui Jiaohe Huadian Shulan Panshi Gongzhuling Shuangliao Meihekou Ji'an Linjiang Fuyu Taonan Da'an Yanji Tumen Dunhua Hunchun Longjing Helong

Heilongjiang

Shangzhi Wuchang Nehe Hulin Mishan Tieli Tongjiang Fujin Fuyuan Suifenhe Hailin Ning'an Muling Dongning Bei'an Wudalianchi Anda Zhaodong Hailun

Jiangsu

Jiangyin Yixing Xinyi Pizhou Liyang Changshu Zhangjiagang Kunshan Taicang Qidong Rugao Haimen Dongtai Yizheng Gaoyou Danyang Yangzhong Jurong Jingjiang Taixing Xinghua

Zhejiang

Jiande Lin'an Yuyao Cixi Fenghua Rui'an Yueqing Haining Pinghu Tongxiang Zhuji Shengzhou Lanxi Yiwu Dongyang Yongkang Jiangshan Wenling Linhai Longquan

Anhui

Chaohu Jieshou Tongcheng Tianchang Mingguang Ningguo

Fujian

Fuqing Changle Yong'an Shishi Jinjiang Nan'an Longhai Shaowu Wuyishan Jian'ou Zhangping Fu'an Fuding

Jiangxi

Leping Ruichang Gongqingcheng Lushan Guixi Ruijin Jinggangshan Fengcheng Zhangshu Gao'an Dexing

Shandong

Zhangqiu Jiaozhou Jimo Pingdu Laixi Tengzhou Longkou Laiyang Laizhou Penglai Zhaoyuan Qixia Haiyang Qingzhou Zhucheng Shouguang Anqiu Gaomi Changyi Qufu Zoucheng Xintai Feicheng Rongcheng Rushan Laoling Yucheng Linqing

Henan

Gongyi Xingyang Xinmi Xinzheng Dengfeng Yanshi Wugang Ruzhou Linzhou Weihui Huixian Qinyang Mengzhou Yuzhou Changge Yima Lingbao Dengzhou Yongcheng Xiangcheng Jiyuan*

Hubei

Daye Danjiangkou Yidu Dangyang Zhijiang Laohekou Zaoyang Yicheng Zhongxiang Yingcheng Anlu Hanchuan Shishou Honghu Songzi Macheng Wuxue Chibi Guangshui Enshi* Lichuan Xiantao* Qianjiang* Tianmen*

Hunan

Liuyang Liling Xiangxiang Shaoshan Leiyang Changning Wugang Miluo Linxiang Jinshi Yuanjiang Zixing Hongjiang Lengshuijiang Lianyuan Jishou*

Guangdong

Lechang Nanxiong Taishan Kaiping Heshan Enping Lianjiang Leizhou Wuchuan Gaozhou Huazhou Xinyi Sihui Xingning Lufeng Yangchun Yingde Lianzhou Puning Luoding

Guangxi

Cenxi Dongxing Guiping Beiliu Jingxi Yizhou Heshan Pingxiang

Hainan

Wuzhishan* Qionghai* Wenchang* Wanning* Dongfang*

Sichuan

Dujiangyan Pengzhou Qionglai Chongzhou Jianyang Guanghan Shifang Mianzhu Jiangyou Emeishan Langzhong Huaying Wanyuan Barkam* Kangding* Xichang*

Guizhou

Qingzhen Chishui Renhuai Xingyi* Kaili* Duyun* Fuquan

Yunnan

Anning Xuanwei Tengchong Chuxiong* Mengzi* Gejiu Kaiyuan Mile Wenshan* Jinghong* Dali* Ruili Mangshi* Lushui* Shangri-La*

Tibet

(none)

Shaanxi

Xingping Hancheng Huayin

Gansu

Yumen Dunhuang Linxia* Hezuo*

Qinghai

Yushu* Golmud* Delingha*

Ningxia

Lingwu Qingtongxia

Xinjiang

Changji* Fukang Bole* Alashankou Korla* Aksu* Artux* Kashgar* Hotan* Yining* Kuytun Korgas Tacheng* Wusu Altay* Shihezi* Aral* Tumxuk* Wujiaqu* Beitun* Tiemenguan* Shuanghe* Kokdala* Kunyu*

Taiwan5

(none)

Notes

* Indicates this city has already occurred above. aDirect-controlled Municipalities. bSub-provincial cities as provincial capitals. cSeparate state-planning cities. 1Special Economic Zone Cities. 2Coastal development cities. 3Prefecture capital status established by Heilongjiang
Heilongjiang
Province and not recognized by Ministry of Civil Affairs. Disputed by Oroqen Autonomous Banner, Hulunbuir, Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
as part of it. 4Only administers islands and waters in South China
China
Sea and have no urban core comparable to typical cities in China. 5The claimed province of Taiwan no longer have any internal division announced by Ministry of Civil Affairs of PRC, due to lack of actual jurisdiction. See Template:Administrative divisions of the Republic of China
China
instead. All provincial capitals are listed first in prefecture-level cities by province.

 

v t e

Largest cities or towns in China Sixth National Population Census of the People's Republic of China (2010)

Rank Name Province Pop. Rank Name Province Pop.

Shanghai

Beijing 1 Shanghai Shanghai 20,217,700 11 Foshan Guangdong 6,771,900

Chongqing

Guangzhou

2 Beijing Beijing 16,858,700 12 Nanjing Jiangsu 6,238,200

3 Chongqing Chongqing 12,389,500 13 Shenyang Liaoning 5,890,700

4 Guangzhou Guangdong 10,641,400 14 Hangzhou Zhejiang 5,849,500

5 Shenzhen Guangdong 10,358,400 15 Xi'an Shaanxi 5,399,300

6 Tianjin Tianjin 10,007,700 16 Harbin Heilongjiang 5,178,000

7 Wuhan Hubei 7,541,500 17 Dalian Liaoning 4,222,400

8 Dongguan Guangdong 7,271,300 18 Suzhou Jiangsu 4,083,900

9 Chengdu Sichuan 7,112,000 19 Qingdao Shandong 3,990,900

10 Hong Kong Hong Kong 7,055,071 20 Zhengzhou Henan 3,677,000

v t e

Major regions and cities of China

National megalopolises

Jingjinji (Inner) Bohai Economic Rim

Beijing

Beijing

Changping Daxing Fangshan Mentougou Shunyi Tongzhou

Tianjin

Tianjin

Binhai Dongli Jinnan Wuqing

Hebei

Baoding

Xiong'an

Cangzhou Chengde Langfang Shijiazhuang Tangshan

Caofeidian Qian'an

Zhangjiakou

Yangtze River
Yangtze River
Delta (Economic Zone)

Jiangsu

Changzhou Lianyungang Nanjing Nantong Suzhou Taizhou Wuxi Yangzhou Zhenjiang

Shanghai

Shanghai

Baoshan Jiading Minhang Pudong Qingpu Songjiang

Zhejiang

Hangzhou Huzhou Jiaxing Jinhua Lishui Ningbo Quzhou Shaoxing Taizhou Wenzhou Zhoushan

Anhui

Chuzhou Hefei Huainan Ma'anshan Wuhu

Pearl River Delta/ Yuegang'ao Greater Bay Area (Economic Zone)

Guangdong

Dongguan Foshan Guangzhou

Huadu Nansha Panyu

Huizhou Jiangmen Shenzhen

Bao'an

Zhaoqing Zhongshan Zhuhai

Hengqin

SARs

Hong Kong

Kowloon

Macau

Cotai

West Triangle Economic Zone

Chongqing

Chongqing

Fuling Liangjiang Qianjiang Wanzhou Xinbei

Sichuan

Chengdu Dazhou Deyang Guang'an Leshan Luzhou Meishan Mianyang Nanchong Neijiang Suining Yibin Zigong Ziyang

Shaanxi

Baoji Tongchuan Weinan Xi'an Xianyang

Yangling

Harbin- Changchun
Changchun
Megalopolis (Northeastern Cities)

Heilongjiang

Harbin Daqing Mudanjiang Qiqihar

Jilin

Changchun Jilin Siping Yanji

Middle Reaches of the Yangtze
Yangtze
River/ Yangtze River
Yangtze River
Valley (Central Triangle Economic Zone)

Hubei

Ezhou Huanggang Huangshi Qianjiang Tianmen Wuhan Xianning Xiantao Xiaogan

Hunan

Changde Changsha Hengyang Loudi Xiangtan Yiyang Yueyang Zhuzhou

Jiangxi

Fuzhou Ji'an Jingdezhen Jiujiang Nanchang Shangrao Xinyu Yichun Yingtan

Anhui

Anqing Bengbu Chizhou Chuzhou Hefei Huainan Lu'an Ma'anshan Tongling Wuhu Xuancheng

(North) Bohai Economic Rim

Liaoning

Anshan Dalian

Lüshun

Huludao Jinzhou Panjin Shenyang Yingkou

(South) Bohai Economic Rim

Shandong

Binzhou Dongying Jinan Qingdao Weifang Weihai Yantai Zibo

Regions

East

Northeast

North South Central

Central South Huizhou

Western

Northwest Southwest

Administrative divisions

By GDP By GDP per capita By Human Development Index Prefecture-level divisions County-level divisions

Cities

Direct-controlled municipality Prefecture-level city Sub-provincial city County-level city List of cities in China

by GDP per capita by population

Capitals

Historical capitals Current and former capitals

Categories: Subdivisions Regions Cities

v t e

World Heritage Sites in China

East

Classical Gardens of Suzhou Fujian
Fujian
Tulou Lushan Huangshan Mount Sanqing Mount Tai Wuyi Mountains Temple and Cemetery of Confucius
Cemetery of Confucius
and Kong Family Mansion in Qufu Xidi, and Hongcun West Lake Kulangsu

South Central

Ancient Building Complex in the Wudang Mountains Historic Centre of Macau Shennongjia Kaiping
Kaiping
Diaolou
Diaolou
and Villages Longmen Grottoes Historic Monuments of Dengfeng, including the Shaolin Monastery
Shaolin Monastery
and Gaocheng Observatory Zuojiang Huashan Rock Art Wulingyuan Yinxu

Southwest

Chengjiang Fossil Site Dazu Rock Carvings Potala Palace, including the Jokhang
Jokhang
and Norbulingka Honghe Hani Rice Terraces Huanglong Jiuzhaigou Old Town of Lijiang Mount Emei
Mount Emei
and Leshan
Leshan
Giant Buddha Mount Qingcheng
Mount Qingcheng
and Dujiangyan Sichuan
Sichuan
Giant Panda Sanctuaries Three Parallel Rivers

North

Mount Wutai Chengde
Chengde
Mountain Resort, including Putuo Zongcheng Temple, Xumi Fushou Temple and Puning
Puning
Temple Forbidden City Zhoukoudian Pingyao Summer Palace Temple of Heaven Xanadu Yungang Grottoes

Northeast

Koguryo sites Mukden Palace

Northwest

Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor Mogao Caves Xinjiang
Xinjiang
Tianshan Qinghai
Qinghai
Hoh Xil

Multiple regions

Great Wall China
China
Danxia Imperial Tombs of the Ming and Qing Dynasties South China
China
Karst Grand Canal Silk
Silk
Roads Tusi Sites<

.