HOME
The Info List - Steve Coll


--- Advertisement ---



Steve Coll
Steve Coll
(born October 8, 1958) is an American journalist, academic and executive. He is currently the dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, where he is also the Henry R. Luce Professor of Journalism. A staff writer for The New Yorker, he served as the president and CEO of the New America Foundation
New America Foundation
from 2007 to 2012. He is the recipient of two Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
awards, two Overseas Press Club Awards, a PEN American Center
PEN American Center
John Kenneth Galbraith Award, an Arthur Ross Book Award, a Livingston Award, a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, a Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award, and the Lionel Gelber Prize. From 2012 to 2013, he was a voting member of the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
Board before continuing to serve in an ex officio capacity as the dean of the Columbia Journalism School.

Contents

1 Early life and family 2 Career

2.1 Journalism 2.2 New America Foundation 2.3 Columbia University
Columbia University
Graduate School of Journalism

3 Honors and awards 4 Bibliography

4.1 Books 4.2 Essays and reporting 4.3 Contributions on newyorker.com

5 Podcasts 6 References 7 External links

7.1 Interviews

Early life and family[edit] Steve Coll
Steve Coll
was born on October 8, 1958, in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
He attended Thomas S. Wootton High School
Thomas S. Wootton High School
in Rockville, Maryland, graduating in 1976. He moved to Los Angeles, California, and enrolled in Occidental College, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. In 1980, he graduated cum laude with majors in English and History. Coll also attended the University of Sussex
University of Sussex
during his studies. Coll is married to journalist and poet Eliza Griswold.[1] Career[edit] Journalism[edit]

In 1980, following his graduation from Occidental College
Occidental College
in 1980, Coll joined the writing staff of California
California
magazine, eventually working on staff as a contributing editor.[2] In 1985, he started working for the Washington Post as a general assignment feature writer for the paper's Style section. Two years later, he was promoted to serve as the financial correspondent for the newspaper, based in New York City. He and David A. Vise collaborated on a series of reports scrutinizing the Securities and Exchange Commission for which they received the 1990 Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Explanatory Reporting. In 1989, he moved to New Delhi, when he was appointed as the Post's South Asia bureau chief. He served as a foreign correspondent through 1995.[3] Coll began working for the newspaper's Sunday magazine insert in 1995, serving as publisher of the magazine from 1996 to 1998. He was promoted to managing editor of the newspaper in 1998 and served in that capacity through 2004. He has also served as an associate editor for the newspaper from late 2004 to August 2005. In September 2005, Coll joined the writing staff of The New Yorker. Based in Washington, D.C., he reported on foreign intelligence and national security.[4] New America Foundation[edit] On July 23, 2007, Coll was named as the next director of the New America Foundation, a non-profit, non-partisan think tank headquartered in Washington, D.C.[5][6] He has also contributed to the New York Review of Books, particularly about the war in Afghanistan. On June 25, 2012, Coll announced his resignation as President of the New America Foundation
New America Foundation
to pen a follow up to Ghost Wars.[7] On October 23, 2012, Coll was elected to the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
Board, administered by Columbia University.[8] Columbia University
Columbia University
Graduate School of Journalism[edit] On March 18, 2013, Coll was announced to succeed Nick Lemann
Nick Lemann
as the Dean of the Columbia University
Columbia University
Graduate School of Journalism, effective July 1, 2013.[9][10][11][12] Honors and awards[edit]

1990: Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
(co-winner with David A. Vise)[3] 1991: Livingston Award for International Reporting for "Crisis and Change in South Asia", The Washington Post
The Washington Post
(winner)[13] 2000: Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for "Peace Without Justice: A Journey to the Wounded Heart of Africa", The Washington Post
The Washington Post
(1st Prize: International Print) 2000: Ed Cunningham Award for "Peace Without Justice: A Journey to the Wounded Heart of Africa", The Washington Post[14] 2004: Lionel Gelber Prize for Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 (winner) 2004: Cornelius Ryan Award for Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 (winner)[15] 2005: Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction
Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction
for Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 (winner)[16] 2005: Arthur Ross Book Award for Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 (winner) 2008: National Book Critics Circle Award for The Bin Ladens: An Arabian Family in the American Century (finalist)[17] 2009: PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for The Bin Ladens: An Arabian Family in the American Century (winner) 2012: Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award for Private Empire (winner)[18] 2012: National Book Critics Circle Award for Private Empire (finalist)[19]

Bibliography[edit] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Books[edit]

Coll, Steve (1986). The deal of the century : the breakup of AT&T. Atheneum.  — (1987). The taking of Getty Oil : the full story of the most spectacular & catastrophic takeover of all time. Scribner.  Vise, David A.; Coll, Steve (1991). Eagle on the Street : based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning account of the SEC's battle with Wall Street. New York: Scribner's.  Coll, Steve (1993). On the Grand Trunk Road : a journey into South Asia. Crown Press.  — (2004). Ghost wars : the secret history of the CIA, Afghanistan and Bin Laden, from the Soviet invasion to September 10, 2001. Penguin.  — (2008). The Bin Ladens
The Bin Ladens
: an Arabian family in the American Century. Penguin.  — (2012). Private empire : ExxonMobil and American power. Penguin.  — (2018). Directorate S : the C.I.A. and America's secret wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan, 2001–2016. Penguin. 

Essays and reporting[edit]

Coll, Steve (November 10, 2008). "The test". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 84 (36): 29–30. Retrieved 2015-11-29.  — (October 26, 2009). "War and Politics". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 85 (34): 31–32.  — (October 11, 2010). "Behind Closed Doors". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 86 (31): 35–36.  — (November 8, 2010). "Leaks". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 86 (35): 27–28. Retrieved 21 November 2011.  — (April 4, 2011). "The Casbah Coalition". Letter from Tunis. The New Yorker. 87 (7): 34–40. Retrieved 2014-05-15.  — (March 4, 2013). "Name calling". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 89 (3): 17–18. Retrieved 2015-05-06.  — (April 1, 2013). "The spy who said too much : why the Administration targeted a C.I.A. officer". The Political Scene. The New Yorker. 89 (7): 54–63. Retrieved 2016-01-01.  John Kiriakou — (May 6, 2013). "Remote control : our drone delusion". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 89 (12): 76–79.  — (June 10–17, 2013). "The President and the press". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 89 (17): 39–40. CS1 maint: Date format (link) — (July 1, 2013). "Options". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 89 (19): 19–20.  — (November 4, 2013). "Party crashers". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 89 (35): 37–38.  — (February 10, 2014). "On the trail". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 89 (48): 19–20.  — (March 24, 2014). "The Senator vs. the C.I.A." The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 90 (5): 31–32. Retrieved 2015-02-23.  — (July 27, 2015). "The deal". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 91 (21): 17–18. Retrieved 2015-11-29.  — (April 11, 2016). "Global Trump". The New Yorker.  — (August 8–15, 2016). "Defying conventions". The Talk
Talk
of the Town. Comment. The New Yorker. 92 (24): 19–20. CS1 maint: Date format (link) [20] — (September 5, 2016). "Assad's War on Aleppo". The New Yorker.  — (October 3, 2016). "A Season of Terror and Donald Trump". The New Yorker.  — (February 6, 2017). "Info Wars". The New Yorker.  — (April 17, 2017). "Trump's Confusing Strike on Syria". The New Yorker.  — (June 26, 2017). "An Unquiet Week in Washington". The New Yorker.  — (October 2, 2017). "The Madman Theory of North Korea". The New Yorker.  — (November 13, 2017). "The Trump Administration's Looming Political Crisis". The New Yorker.  — (December 11, 2017). "Donald Trump's "Fake News" Tactics". The New Yorker. 

Contributions on newyorker.com[edit]

Coll, Steve (December 2, 2016). "Travelling with James Mattis, Donald Trump's Pick for Secretary of Defense". The New Yorker.  — (December 11, 2016). "Rex Tillerson, from a Corporate Oil Sovereign to the State Department". The New Yorker.  — (January 18, 2017). "The Strongman Problem, from Modi to Trump". The New Yorker.  — (February 1, 2017). "The Many Dangers of Donald Trump's Executive Order". The New Yorker.  — (February 22, 2017). "What Trump Means for the World's Poorest People". The New Yorker.  — (March 7, 2017). "Donald Trump Meets the Surveillance State". The New Yorker.  — (March 30, 2017). "Rex Tillerson Is Still Acting Like a C.E.O." The New Yorker.  — (April 18, 2017). "Facebook and the Murderer". The New Yorker.  — (June 6, 2017). "While Trump Tweets, Assad and Putin Advance in Syria". The New Yorker.  — (June 29, 2017). "How Can the Qatar Crisis Be Resolved?". The New Yorker.  — (July 20, 2017). "A Deportation at M.I.T., and New Risks for the Undocumented". The New Yorker.  — (August 10, 2017). "The Trump Administration Rolls Back Anti-Corruption Efforts in the Oil Industry". The New Yorker.  — (August 23, 2017). "The Taliban's Response to Trump's Afghanistan Address". The New Yorker.  — (August 31, 2017). "Things to Think About When Taking Down Statues". The New Yorker.  — (November 8, 2017). "When a Day in Court Is a Trap for Immigrants". The New Yorker. 

Podcasts[edit]

Coll, Steve (November 23, 2015). "ISIS After Paris" (Podcast). The New Yorker.  — (August 1, 2016). "Defying Conventions" (Podcast). The New Yorker.  — (August 29, 2016). "Images of War" (Podcast). The New Yorker.  — (September 26, 2016). "The Fear Factor" (Podcast). The New Yorker.  — (April 10, 2017). "Trump's Intervention" (Podcast). The New Yorker. 

References[edit]

^ "Steve Coll". Columbia Journalism School. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ "Conversations with History" (Interview). Interview with Harry Kreisler. University of California, Berkeley. 15 March 2005. Retrieved 5 January 2018.  ^ a b "The Pulitzer Prizes Awards". Pulitzer.org. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ "Contributors: Steve Coll". Newyorker.com. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ Cohen, Patricia (July 23, 2007). " Journalist
Journalist
Chosen to Lead a Public Policy Institute". The New York Times.  ^ "Steve Coll". NewAmerica.net. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ "Abiz Top 50 Business Luncheon - August 23, 2012".  ^ "The Pulitzer Prizes Journalist, playwright and regional newspaper editor named to Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
Board". Pulitzer.org. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ " Steve Coll
Steve Coll
named Dean of J-School". journalism.columbia.edu. Columbia University
Columbia University
Graduate School of Journalism. Archived from the original on 2013-03-19. Retrieved 2013-03-18.  ^ Kaminer, Ariel (2013-03-18). "Columbia Names New Dean for Journalism School". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2013-03-18.  ^ Pompeo, Joe (March 19, 2013). " Steve Coll
Steve Coll
Named Dean Columbia Journalism School". Capital New York. Retrieved March 22, 2013.  ^ Carr, David (April 1, 2013). "Columbia Looks Ahead in an Age of Disruption". New York Times.  ^ "Past Winners Livingston Awards". Livawards.org. Archived from the original on 2013-03-22. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ Award Name:  10 The Ed Cunningham Award. "The Ed Cunningham Award 2000 Overseas Press Club
Overseas Press Club
of America". Opcofamerica.org. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ Award Name:  14 The Cornelius Ryan Award. "The Cornelius Ryan Award 2004 Overseas Press Club
Overseas Press Club
of America". Opcofamerica.org. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ "The Pulitzer Prizes Citation". Pulitzer.org. 2013-03-11. Retrieved 2013-03-17.  ^ "National Book Critics Circle: 2008 NBCC Finalists Announced". bookcritics.org.  ^ Laurie Muchnick (November 3, 2012). " Steve Coll
Steve Coll
Wins FT/Goldman Prize for Exxon Mobil Study". Business Week. Retrieved 2012-11-04.  ^ John Williams (January 14, 2012). "National Book Critics Circle Names 2012 Award Finalists". New York Times. Retrieved 2013-01-15.  ^ Online version is titled "The D.N.C. and the summer of discontent".

External links[edit]

Steve Coll
Steve Coll
at The New York Review of Books Appearances on C-SPAN

Interviews[edit]

Steve Coll
Steve Coll
discusses Ghost Wars on National Public Radio's All Things Considered, August 2004 (three-part online audio series) Hour-long interview about "The Bin Ladens: An Arabian Family in the American Century" by Amy Goodman
Amy Goodman
on Democracy Now!, September 15, 2008 (video, audio, and print transcript) Video (with mp3 available) of conversation with Coll on Bloggingheads.tv Webcast Interview on The Bin Ladens
The Bin Ladens
at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library on October 23, 2008 Webcast Interview on Ghost Wars at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library on January 27, 2005

v t e

Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction
Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction
(2001–2025)

Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan
Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan
by Herbert P. Bix (2001) Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama, the Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution by Diane McWhorter (2002) "A Problem from Hell": America and the Age of Genocide by Samantha Power (2003) Gulag: A History by Anne Applebaum
Anne Applebaum
(2004) Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 by Steve Coll
Steve Coll
(2005) Imperial Reckoning
Imperial Reckoning
by Caroline Elkins (2006) The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11 by Lawrence Wright (2007) The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945 by Saul Friedländer
Saul Friedländer
(2008) Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans
Americans
from the Civil War to World War II by Douglas A. Blackmon
Douglas A. Blackmon
(2009) The Dead Hand
The Dead Hand
by David E. Hoffman (2010) The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee (2011) The Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen Greenblatt
Stephen Greenblatt
(2012) Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America by Gilbert King (2013) Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation by Dan Fagin
Dan Fagin
(2014) The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert
Elizabeth Kolbert
(2015) Black Flags: The Rise of ISIS by Joby Warrick (2016) Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond (2017)

Complete list (1962–1975) (1976–2000) (2001–2025)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 79197364 LCCN: n85269589 ISNI: 0000 0000 8159 2597 GND: 134163729 SUDOC: 083511679 BNF:

.