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Starbucks Corporation
Starbucks Corporation
is an American coffee company and coffeehouse chain. Starbucks
Starbucks
was founded in Seattle, Washington in 1971. As of 2017, the company operates 27,339 locations worldwide. Starbucks
Starbucks
is considered the main representative of "second wave coffee", initially distinguishing itself from other coffee-serving venues in the US by taste, quality, and customer experience while popularizing darkly roasted coffee.[5] Since the 2000s, third wave coffee makers have targeted quality-minded coffee drinkers with hand-made coffee based on lighter roasts, while Starbucks
Starbucks
nowadays uses automated espresso machines for efficiency and safety reasons.[5][6] Starbucks
Starbucks
locations serve hot and cold drinks, whole-bean coffee, microground instant coffee known as VIA, espresso, caffe latte, full- and loose-leaf teas including Teavana
Teavana
tea products,[7] Evolution Fresh juices, Frappuccino
Frappuccino
beverages, La Boulange pastries, and snacks including items such as chips and crackers; some offerings (including their annual fall launch of the Pumpkin Spice Latte) are seasonal or specific to the locality of the store. Many stores sell pre-packaged food items, hot and cold sandwiches, and drinkware including mugs and tumblers; select " Starbucks
Starbucks
Evenings" locations offer beer, wine, and appetizers.[8] Starbucks-brand coffee, ice cream, and bottled cold coffee drinks are also sold at grocery stores. Starbucks
Starbucks
first became profitable in Seattle
Seattle
in the early 1980s.[9] Despite an initial economic downturn with its expansion into the Midwest
Midwest
and British Columbia
British Columbia
in the late 1980s,[10] the company experienced revitalized prosperity with its entry into California in the early 1990s.[11] The first Starbucks
Starbucks
location outside North America opened in Tokyo
Tokyo
in 1996; overseas properties now constitute almost one-third of its stores.[12] The company opened an average of two new locations daily between 1987 and 2007.[13] On December 1, 2016, Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
announced he would resign as CEO effective April 2017 and would be replaced by Kevin Johnson. Johnson assumed the role of CEO on April 3, 2017.[14]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Founding 1.2 Sale and expansion 1.3 Expansion to new markets and products

2 Corporate governance 3 Products

3.1 Tea 3.2 Coffee
Coffee
quality 3.3 Other products

4 Locations

4.1 Current 4.2 Expansion 4.3 Former 4.4 Unbranded stores 4.5 Licensed and franchise operations 4.6 Automated locations 4.7 Facilities

5 Advertising

5.1 Logo 5.2 Partnerships

6 Parodies and infringements 7 Environmental and social policies

7.1 Environmental impact

7.1.1 Recycling

7.2 Farmer equity practices 7.3 Fair trade 7.4 Ethos water 7.5 Food bank donations

8 Controversies

8.1 Market strategy 8.2 Labor disputes 8.3 "War On Christmas" 8.4 Opening without planning permission 8.5 Israel 8.6 "The Way I See It" 8.7 US military viral email 8.8 Gun controversy 8.9 Same-sex marriage 8.10 European tax avoidance 8.11 Chinese pricing 8.12 #Racetogether marketing campaign 8.13 Supporting refugees 8.14 Muslim boycott of Starbucks 8.15 Korea, workers 8.16 California cancer warning rule

9 Music, film, and television 10 See also 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External links

History

Interior of the Pike Place Market
Pike Place Market
location in 1977

Founding The first Starbucks
Starbucks
opened in Seattle, Washington, on March 31, 1971,[15] by three partners who met while they were students at the University of San Francisco:[16] English teacher Jerry Baldwin, history teacher Zev Siegl, and writer Gordon Bowker were inspired to sell high-quality coffee beans and equipment by coffee roasting entrepreneur Alfred Peet after he taught them his style of roasting beans.[17] The company took the name of the chief mate in the book Moby-Dick: Starbuck, after considering "Cargo House" and "Pequod".[18] Bowker recalls that Terry Heckler, with whom Bowker owned an advertising agency, thought words beginning with "st" were powerful. The founders brainstormed a list of words beginning with "st". Someone pulled out an old mining map of the Cascade Range
Cascade Range
and saw a mining town named "Starbo", which immediately put Bowker in mind of the character "Starbuck". Bowker said, " Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
didn't have anything to do with Starbucks
Starbucks
directly; it was only coincidental that the sound seemed to make sense."[19]

The Starbucks
Starbucks
store at 1912 Pike Place. This is the second location of the original Starbucks, which was at 2000 Western Avenue from 1971 to 1976.

The first Starbucks
Starbucks
store was located in Seattle
Seattle
at 2000 Western Avenue from 1971–1976. This cafe was later moved to 1912 Pike Place; never to be relocated again.[20] During this time, the company only sold roasted whole coffee beans and did not yet brew coffee to sell.[21] The only brewed coffee served in the store were free samples. During their first year of operation, they purchased green coffee beans from Peet's, then began buying directly from growers. Sale and expansion In 1984, the original owners of Starbucks, led by Jerry Baldwin, purchased Peet's.[22] During the 1980s, total sales of coffee in the US were falling, but sales of specialty coffee increased, forming 10% of the market in 1989, compared with 3% in 1983.[23] By 1986, the company operated six stores in Seattle[23] and had only just begun to sell espresso coffee.[24] In 1987, the original owners sold the Starbucks
Starbucks
chain to former manager[25] Howard Schultz, who rebranded his Il Giornale coffee outlets as Starbucks
Starbucks
and quickly began to expand. In the same year, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened its first locations outside Seattle
Seattle
at Waterfront Station in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Chicago, Illinois.[26] By 1989, 46 stores existed across the Northwest and Midwest, and annually Starbucks
Starbucks
was roasting over 2,000,000 pounds (907,185 kg) of coffee.[23] At the time of its initial public offering (IPO) on the stock market in June 1992, Starbucks
Starbucks
had 140 outlets, with a revenue of US$73.5 million, up from US$1.3 million in 1987. The company's market value was US$271 million by this time. The 12% portion of the company that was sold raised around US$25 million for the company, which facilitated a doubling of the number of stores over the next two years.[27] By September 1992, Starbucks' share price had risen by 70% to over 100 times the earnings per share of the previous year.[21] In July 2013, over 10% of in-store purchases were made on customer's mobile devices using the Starbucks
Starbucks
app.[28] The company once again utilized the mobile platform when it launched the "Tweet-a-Coffee" promotion in October 2013. On this occasion, the promotion also involved Twitter
Twitter
and customers were able to purchase a US$5 gift card for a friend by entering both "@tweetacoffee" and the friend's handle in a tweet. Research firm Keyhole monitored the progress of the campaign and a December 6, 2013, media article reported that the firm had found that 27,000 people had participated and US$180,000 of purchases were made to date.[29][30] Expansion to new markets and products

This section is missing information about order and pay feature in app. Please expand the section to include this information. Further details may exist on the talk page. (December 2016)

The first Starbucks
Starbucks
location outside North America opened in Tokyo, Japan, in 1996.[31] On December 4, 1997, the Philippines
Philippines
became the third market to open outside North America with its first branch in the country located at 6750 Ayala Building in Makati
Makati
City, Philippines.[32][33] Starbucks
Starbucks
entered the U.K. market in 1998 with the $83 million[34] USD acquisition of the then 56-outlet, UK-based Seattle
Seattle
Coffee
Coffee
Company, re-branding all the stores as Starbucks. In September 2002, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened its first store in Latin America, at Mexico
Mexico
City. Currently, there are over 500 locations in Mexico
Mexico
and there are plans for the opening of up to 850 by 2018.[35] In 1999, Starbucks
Starbucks
experimented with eateries in the San Francisco Bay area through a restaurant chain called Circadia.[36] These restaurants were soon "outed" as Starbucks
Starbucks
establishments and converted to Starbucks
Starbucks
cafes. In October 2002, Starbucks
Starbucks
established a coffee trading company in Lausanne, Switzerland
Switzerland
to handle purchases of green coffee. All other coffee-related business continued to be managed from Seattle.[37] In April 2003, Starbucks
Starbucks
completed the purchase of Seattle's Best Coffee
Coffee
and Torrefazione Italia
Torrefazione Italia
from AFC Enterprises
AFC Enterprises
for $72m. The deal only gained 150 stores for Starbucks, but according to the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, the wholesale business was more significant.[38] In September 2006, rival Diedrich Coffee
Coffee
announced that it would sell most of its company-owned retail stores to Starbucks. This sale included the company-owned locations of the Oregon-based Coffee
Coffee
People chain. Starbucks
Starbucks
converted the Diedrich Coffee
Coffee
and Coffee
Coffee
People locations to Starbucks, although the Portland International Airport Coffee
Coffee
People locations were excluded from the sale.[39] In August 2003, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened its first store in South America in Lima, Peru.[40] In 2007, the company opened its first store in Russia, ten years after first registering a trademark there.[41] In 2008, they purchased the manufacturer of the Clover Brewing System. They began testing the "fresh-pressed" coffee system at several Starbucks
Starbucks
locations in Seattle, California, New York, and Boston.[42]

Graph showing the growth in the number of Starbucks
Starbucks
stores between 1971 and 2011[26]

In early 2008, Starbucks
Starbucks
started a community website, My Starbucks Idea, designed to collect suggestions and feedback from customers. Other users comment and vote on suggestions. Journalist Jack Schofield noted that "My Starbucks
Starbucks
seems to be all sweetness and light at the moment, which I don't think is possible without quite a lot of censorship". The website is powered by Salesforce.com
Salesforce.com
software.[43] In May 2008, a loyalty program was introduced for registered users of the Starbucks
Starbucks
Card (previously simply a gift card) offering perks such as free Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Internet access, no charge for soy milk and flavored syrups, and free refills on brewed drip coffee, iced coffee, or tea.[44] In 2009, Starbucks
Starbucks
began beta testing its mobile app for the Starbucks
Starbucks
card, a stored value system in which consumers access pre-paid funds to purchase products at Starbucks.[45] Starbucks released its complete mobile platform on January 11, 2011. On November 14, 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced the purchase of Teavana
Teavana
for US$620 million in cash[46] and the deal was formally closed on December 31, 2012.[47] On February 1, 2013, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened its first store in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam,[48][49][50] and this was followed by an announcement in late August 2013 that the retailer will be opening its inaugural store in Colombia. The Colombian announcement was delivered at a press conference in Bogota, where the company's CEO explained, "Starbucks has always admired and respected Colombia's distinguished coffee tradition."[51] In August 2014, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened their first store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. This location will be one of 30 Starbucks
Starbucks
stores that will serve beer and wine.[52] In September 2014, it was revealed that Starbucks
Starbucks
would acquire the remaining 60.5 percent stake in Starbuck Coffee
Coffee
Japan
Japan
that it does not already own, at a price of $913.5 million.[53] In August 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced that it will enter Cambodia, its 16th market in the China/Asia Pacific region. The first location will open in the capital city of Phnom Penh by the end of 2015.[54] In February 2016, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced that it will enter Italy, its 24th market in Europe. The first location will open in Milan
Milan
by 2018.[55] In August, startup company FluxPort introduced Qi inductive charging pads at select locations in Germany.[56][57][58] In September 2016, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced a debut of its first-ever original content series called "Upstanders" which aims to inspire Americans with stories of compassion, citizenship, and civility. The series features podcasts, written word, and video, and will be distributed via the Starbucks
Starbucks
mobile app, online, and through the company's in-store digital network.[59] On July 27, 2017, Starbucks
Starbucks
acquired the remaining 50% stake in their Chinese venture from long-term joint venture partners Uni-President Enterprises Corporation
Corporation
(UPEC) and President Chain Store Corporation (PCSC).[60] On March 21, 2018, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced that it is considering the use of blockchain technology with an idea to connect coffee drinkers with coffee farmers who eventually can take advantage of new financial opportunities. The pilot program is going to start with farmers in Costa Rica, Colombia
Colombia
and Rwanda in order to develop a new way to track the bean to cup journey. [61] Corporate governance

Howard Schultz, Executive Chairman
Chairman
of Starbucks

Starbucks' chairman, Howard Schultz, has talked about making sure growth does not dilute the company's culture[62] Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
served as the company's CEO until 2000.[63] Orin C. Smith was President and CEO of Starbucks
Starbucks
from 2001 to 2005. In January 2008, Schultz resumed his roles as President and CEO after an eight-year hiatus, replacing Jim Donald, who took the posts in 2005 but was asked to step down after sales slowed in 2007. Schultz aims to restore what he calls the "distinctive Starbucks
Starbucks
experience" in the face of rapid expansion. Analysts believe that Schultz must determine how to contend with higher materials prices and enhanced competition from lower-price fast food chains, including McDonald's
McDonald's
and Dunkin' Donuts. Starbucks
Starbucks
announced it would discontinue the warm breakfast sandwich products they originally intended to launch nationwide in 2008 and refocus on coffee, but they reformulated the sandwiches to deal with complaints and kept the product line.[64] As of January 2015[update], the chief operating officer of Starbucks was Troy Alstead, though at that time he announced he was taking an extended leave of absence of undetermined length.[63] Subsequently, Kevin Johnson was appointed to succeed Alstead as president and COO.[65] In October 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
hired its first Chief Technology Officer, Gerri Martin-Flickinger, to lead their technology team.[66] In April 2017, Schultz became executive chairman of Starbucks
Starbucks
with Johnson becoming President and CEO. Starbucks
Starbucks
maintains control of production processes by communicating with farmers to secure beans, roasting its own beans, and managing distribution to all retail locations. Additionally, Starbucks' Coffee and Farmer Equity Practices require suppliers to inform Starbucks
Starbucks
what portion of wholesale prices paid reaches farmers.[67][68] Products

A typical sales area, this one in Peterborough, UK, showing a display of food and the beverage preparation area

In 1994, Starbucks
Starbucks
bought The Coffee
Coffee
Connection, gaining the rights to use, make, market, and sell the "Frappuccino" beverage.[69] The beverage was introduced under the Starbucks
Starbucks
name in 1995 and as of 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
had annual Frappuccinos sales of over $2 billion.[69] The company began a "skinny" line of drinks in 2008, offering lower-calorie and sugar-free versions of the company's offered drinks that use skim milk, and can be sweetened by a choice of "natural" sweeteners (such as raw sugar, agave syrup, or honey), artificial sweeteners (such as Sweet'N Low, Splenda, Equal), or one of the company's sugar-free syrup flavors.[70][71] Starbucks
Starbucks
stopped using milk originating from rBGH-treated cows in 2007.[72] In June 2009, the company announced that it would be overhauling its menu and selling salads and baked goods without high fructose corn syrup or artificial ingredients.[73] This move was expected to attract health- and cost-conscious consumers and will not affect prices.[73] Starbucks
Starbucks
introduced a new line of instant coffee packets, called VIA "Ready Brew", in March 2009. It was first unveiled in New York City with subsequent testing of the product also in Seattle, Chicago, and London. The first two VIA flavors include Italian Roast and Colombia, which were then rolled out in October 2009, across the U.S. and Canada with Starbucks
Starbucks
stores promoting the product with a blind "taste challenge" of the instant versus fresh roast, in which many people could not tell the difference between the instant and fresh brewed coffee. Analysts[who?] speculated that by introducing instant coffee, Starbucks
Starbucks
would devalue its own brand.[74] Starbucks
Starbucks
began selling beer and wine at some US stores in 2010. As of April 2012[update], it is available at seven locations and others have applied for licenses.[75] In 2011, Starbucks
Starbucks
introduced its largest cup size, the Trenta, which can hold 31 ounces.[76] In September 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced the Verismo, a consumer-grade single-serve coffee machine that uses sealed plastic cups of coffee grounds, and a "milk pod" for lattes.[77] On November 10, 2011, Starbucks Corporation
Starbucks Corporation
announced that it had bought juice company Evolution Fresh
Evolution Fresh
for $30 million in cash and planned to start a chain of juice bars starting in around middle of 2012, venturing into territory staked out by Jamba Inc. Its first store released in San Bernardino, California and plans for a store in San Francisco were to be launched in early 2013.[78] In 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
began selling a line of iced Starbucks
Starbucks
Refresher beverages that contain an extract from green arabica coffee beans. The beverages are fruit flavored and contain caffeine but advertised as having no coffee flavor. Starbucks' green coffee extraction process involves soaking the beans in water.[79] On June 25, 2013, Starbucks
Starbucks
began to post calorie counts on menus for drinks and pastries in all of their U.S. stores.[80] In 2014, Starbucks
Starbucks
began producing their own line of "handcrafted" sodas, dubbed "Fizzio".[81] In 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
began serving coconut milk as an alternative to dairy and soy.[82] In March 2017, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced to launch limited-edition of two new specialty drinks made from beans aged in whiskey barrels at its Seattle
Seattle
roastery.[83] Starbucks' barrel-aged coffee will be sold with a small batch of unroasted Starbucks
Starbucks
Reserve Sulawesi beans, which are then hand-scooped into whiskey barrels from Washington D.C.[84]

Name Measurement Notes

Demi 3 US fl oz (89 ml) Smallest size. Espresso
Espresso
shots.

Short 8 US fl oz (240 ml) Smaller of the two original sizes

Mini[85] 10 US fl oz (300 ml) Smaller than the three original Frappuccino
Frappuccino
sizes, offered as lower-calorie option

Tall 12 US fl oz (350 ml) Larger of the two original sizes

Grande 16 US fl oz (470 ml) Italian for "large"

Venti 20 US fl oz (590 ml) 24 US fl oz (710 mL) Italian for "twenty"

Trenta 31 US fl oz (920 ml) Italian for "thirty"

Tea Starbucks
Starbucks
entered the tea business in 1999 when it acquired the Tazo brand for US$8,100,000.[86][87] In late 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
paid US$620 million to buy Teavana.[47][88] As of November 2012[update], there is no intention of marketing Starbucks' products in Teavana
Teavana
stores, though the acquisition will allow the expansion of Teavana
Teavana
beyond its current main footprint in shopping malls.[87] In January 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
began to roll out Teavana
Teavana
teas into Starbucks
Starbucks
stores, both in to-go beverage and retail formats.[89] Coffee
Coffee
quality Kevin Knox, who was in charge of doughnuts quality at Starbucks
Starbucks
from 1987 to 1993, recalled on his blog in 2010 how George Howell, coffee veteran and founder of the Cup of Excellence, had been appalled at the dark roasted beans that Starbucks
Starbucks
was selling in 1990.[42][90] Talking to the New York Times in 2008, Howell stated his opinion that the dark roast used by Starbucks
Starbucks
does not deepen the flavor of coffee, but instead can destroy purported nuances of flavor.[42] The March 2007 issue of Consumer Reports
Consumer Reports
compared American fast-food chain coffees and ranked Starbucks
Starbucks
behind McDonald's
McDonald's
Premium Roast. The magazine called Starbucks
Starbucks
coffee "strong, but burnt and bitter enough to make your eyes water instead of open".[91] As reported by TIME in 2010, third wave coffee proponents generally criticize Starbucks
Starbucks
for over-roasting beans.[92] Other products In 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
introduced Starbucks
Starbucks
Verismo, a line of coffee makers that brew espresso and regular chocolate from coffee capsules, a type of pre-apportioned single-use container of ground coffee and flavorings utilizing the K-Fee pod system.[93] In a brief review of the 580 model, Consumer Reports
Consumer Reports
described the results of a comparative test of the Verismo 580 against two competitive brands: "Because you have to conduct a rinse cycle between each cup, the Verismo wasn't among the most convenient of single-serve machines in our coffeemaker tests. Other machines we've tested have more flexibility in adjusting brew strength—the Verismo has buttons for coffee, espresso, and latte with no strength variation for any type. And since Starbucks
Starbucks
has limited its coffee selection to its own brand, there are only eight varieties so far plus a milk pod for the latte."[94] Locations The company's headquarters is located in Seattle, Washington, United States, where 3,501 people worked as of January 2015.[95] The main building in the Starbucks
Starbucks
complex was previously a Sears distribution center. Current

As of July 7, 2016, Starbucks
Starbucks
is present on 6 continents and in 75 countries and territories, with a total of 23,768 locations[2][96][97]

Africa

 Egypt: 32  Morocco: 9  South Africa: 7

Asia

 China: 2,500  Japan: 1,191  South Korea: 985  Taiwan: 430  Turkey: 408  Philippines: 300  Thailand: 264  Indonesia: 249  Malaysia: 220  Hong Kong: 147  United Arab Emirates: 138  Singapore: 125  Saudi Arabia: 92  India: 89  Kuwait: 89  Lebanon: 30  Vietnam: 28  Bahrain: 19  Qatar: 18  Jordan: 14  Oman: 11  Kazakhstan: 11  Cyprus: 11  Cambodia: 7  Azerbaijan: 4  Brunei: 4

Europe

 United Kingdom: 884  Germany: 161  France: 121  Russia: 112  Spain: 107  Ireland: 67   Switzerland: 63  Netherlands: 59  Poland: 45  Romania: 37  Greece: 28  Czech Republic: 26  Denmark: 21  Austria: 20  Belgium: 19  Norway: 17  Sweden: 17  Hungary: 16  Portugal: 11  Finland: 9  Bulgaria: 6  Slovakia: 4  Luxembourg: 3  Monaco: 1  Andorra: 1

North America

 United States: 13,327  Canada: 2,359  Mexico: 531  Puerto Rico: 25  Bahamas: 12  Costa Rica: 12  El Salvador: 11  Guatemala: 7  Jamaica: 5  Panama: 5  Trinidad and Tobago: 5  Aruba: 3  Curaçao: 3

Oceania

 New Zealand: 26  Australia: 35

South America

 Brazil: 104  Argentina: 100  Chile: 91  Peru: 81  Colombia: 24  Bolivia: 4

Expansion In 2008, Starbucks
Starbucks
continued its expansion, settling in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, and Portugal.[26] European and Scandinavian expansion continued in 2009 with Poland (April),[98] Utrecht, Netherlands
Netherlands
(August), and Sweden
Sweden
at Arlanda Airport outside Stockholm
Stockholm
(October).[99] In 2010, growth in new markets continued. In May 2010, Southern Sun Hotels South Africa
South Africa
announced that they had signed an agreement with Starbucks
Starbucks
to brew Starbucks
Starbucks
coffees in select Southern Sun and Tsonga Sun hotels in South Africa. The agreement was partially reached so Starbucks
Starbucks
coffees could be served in the country in time for the 2010 FIFA World Cup hosted by South Africa.[100] In June 2010, Starbucks opened its first store in Budapest, Hungary
Hungary
and in November, the company opened the first Central American store in El Salvador's capital, San Salvador.[101] In December 2010, Starbucks
Starbucks
debuted their first ever Starbucks
Starbucks
at sea, where with a partnership with Royal Caribbean International; Starbucks opened a shop aboard their Allure of the Seas
Allure of the Seas
Royal Caribbean's second largest ship, and also the second largest ship in the world.[102] Starbucks
Starbucks
is planning to open[when?] its fourth African location, after South Africa, Egypt, and Morocco, in Algeria. A partnership with Algerian food company Cevital
Cevital
will see Starbucks
Starbucks
open its first Algerian store in Algiers.[103]

Starbucks
Starbucks
at Delhi Airport.

In January 2011, Starbucks
Starbucks
and Tata Coffee, Asia's largest coffee plantation company, announced plans for a strategic alliance to bring Starbucks
Starbucks
to India
India
and also to source and roast coffee beans at Tata Coffee's Kodagu
Kodagu
facility.[104] Despite a false start in 2007,[105] in January 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced a 50:50 joint venture with Tata Global Beverages called Tata Starbucks. Tata Starbucks
Tata Starbucks
will own and operate Starbucks
Starbucks
outlets in India
India
as Starbucks
Starbucks
Coffee
Coffee
"A Tata Alliance".[106] Starbucks
Starbucks
opened its first store in India
India
in Mumbai
Mumbai
on October 19, 2012.[107][108][109]

Starbucks
Starbucks
at the Forbidden City, Beijing, China

In February 2011, Starbucks
Starbucks
started selling their coffee in Norway
Norway
by supplying Norwegian food shops with their roasts. The first Starbucks-branded Norwegian shop opened on February 8, 2012, at Oslo Airport, Gardermoen. In October 2011, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened another location in Beijing, China, at the Beijing Capital International Airport's Terminal 3, international departures hall; making the company's 500th store in China. The store is the 7th location at the airport. The company planned to expand to 1,500 stores in China
China
by 2015.[110] In May 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened its first coffeehouse in Finland, with the location being Helsinki-Vantaa Airport
Helsinki-Vantaa Airport
in Vantaa.[111] Starbucks
Starbucks
recently[when?] opened a store in San Jose Costa Rica, in 2 popular locations. 1 opened in a mall and the other in Avenida Escazu. In October 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced plans to open 1,000 stores in the United States
United States
in the next five years.[112] The same month, the largest Starbucks
Starbucks
in the US opened at the University of Alabama's Ferguson Center.[113] In 2013, Starbucks
Starbucks
met with Dansk Supermarked, which is the biggest retail company in Denmark. The first Starbucks
Starbucks
inside Dansk Supermarked opened in August 2013 in the department stores Salling in Aalborg
Aalborg
and Aarhus.[114] Starbucks
Starbucks
has announced its first café in Bolivia
Bolivia
would open in 2014 in Santa Cruz de la Sierra
Santa Cruz de la Sierra
and the first in Panama
Panama
in 2015.[115] On June 19, 2015, a Starbucks
Starbucks
opened at Disney's Animal Kingdom
Disney's Animal Kingdom
on Discovery Island. Since the park does not allow plastic straws due to the animals, this location features special green eco-friendly straws with their cold drinks.[116] This was the sixth Starbucks
Starbucks
to open in Walt Disney World, following locations in the Magic Kingdom
Magic Kingdom
(Main Street, U.S.A.), Epcot
Epcot
(Future World), Disney's Hollywood Studios (Hollywood Boulevard),[117] and two in Disney Springs
Disney Springs
(Marketplace and West Side). In addition to these six, there are locations in Disneyland
Disneyland
(Main Street, U.S.A.), Disney California Adventure
Disney California Adventure
(Buena Vista Street), Anaheim's Downtown Disney, and Disney Village
Disney Village
at Disneyland
Disneyland
Paris. The Downtown Disney and Disney Springs
Disney Springs
locations are Starbucks-operated, while the locations inside of the theme parks are Disney-operated.[118] Bill Sleeth, Starbucks' vice president of global design, has overseen efforts to make a neighborhood feel for new stores, saying "What you don't want is a customer walking into a store in downtown Seattle, walking into a store in the suburbs of Seattle
Seattle
and then going into a store in San Jose, and seeing the same store." Sleeth said "The customers were saying, 'Everywhere I go, there you are,' and not in a good way. We were pretty ubiquitous." As part of a change in compact direction, Starbucks
Starbucks
management wanted to transition from the singular brand worldwide to focusing on locally relevant design for each store. [119] Starbucks' first Channel Island store was opened in early 2015, in the primary business area of St Peter Port
St Peter Port
in Guernsey.[120] In 2014 Starbucks
Starbucks
was scheduled to open a store in Azerbaijan, in the Port Baku Mall.[121] In August 2013, Starbucks' CEO, Howard Schultz, personally announced the opening of Starbucks
Starbucks
stores in Colombia. The first café was set to open in 2014 in Bogotá
Bogotá
and add 50 more stores throughout Colombia's main cities in a 5-year limit. Schultz also stated that Starbucks
Starbucks
will work with both the Colombian Government and USAID
USAID
to continue "empowering local coffee growers and sharing the value, heritage and tradition of its coffee with the world." Starbucks
Starbucks
noted that the aggressive expansion into Colombia
Colombia
was a joint venture with Starbucks' Latin partners, Alsea and Colombia's Grupo Nutresa
Grupo Nutresa
that has previously worked with Starbucks
Starbucks
by providing coffee through Colcafe. This announcement comes after Starbucks' Farmer Support Center was established in Manizales, Colombia
Colombia
the previous year making Colombia an already established country by the corporation.[122] On April 21, 2015, Kesko, the second largest retailer in Finland, announced its partnership with Starbucks, with stores opened next to K-Citymarket
K-Citymarket
hypermarkets.[123] As of June 2017, 3 stores had been opened next to K-Citymarkets: In Sello
Sello
in Espoo
Espoo
and in Myyrmanni
Myyrmanni
and Jumbo in Vantaa.[2]

Starbucks
Starbucks
in Lomas de Zamora, Argentina

On December 18, 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened in Almaty, Kazakhstan. On the next day, 1 more coffee shop was opened.[124] The first Starbucks
Starbucks
store in Slovakia
Slovakia
opened in Aupark
Aupark
Shopping Center in Bratislava
Bratislava
on May 31, 2016,[125][126] with two more stores confirmed to open in Bratislava
Bratislava
by the end of 2016. In February 2016, Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
announced the opening of stores in Italy. The first Italian Starbucks
Starbucks
store will open in Milan
Milan
in 2017.[127] After Taste Holdings acquired outlet licensing for South African stores, Starbucks
Starbucks
opened its first store in South Africa
South Africa
in Rosebank, Johannesburg on Thursday, April 21, 2016, and its second in the country at the end of April in Mall of Africa.[128][129] In May 2017, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced it was commencing operations in Jamaica, where the first store is to open in the resort city of Montego Bay.[130] The company announced that its first store would be on located on the shores of the world-famous Doctor's Cave Beach, offering views of the Caribbean Sea. Three other Starbucks
Starbucks
locations were scheduled to be opened at the Sangster International Airport, the busiest international airport in the Anglophone Caribbean, also in the city of Montego Bay, in late 2017 (now set to February 2018).[131] Starbucks
Starbucks
Jamaica
Jamaica
expects thereafter to roll out a further 14 locations across the island by the year 2020. The company also reaffirmed its commitment to working with local coffee farmers to "implement systems to increase productivity and yields, while also increasing compliance to international standards."[132] Starbucks Jamaica
Jamaica
officially opened its first store on November 21, 2017, with plans to open 15 locations islandwide over a 5-year period. The next store is set to open in Jamaica's capital city, Kingston, in early 2018.[133] Starbucks
Starbucks
Jamaica, recently opened its 3 stores at the Sangster International Airport
Sangster International Airport
in Montego Bay
Montego Bay
and one at the Historic Falmouth Pier, in Falmouth, Jamaica. Its Kingston store is due to open in April. At the end of December in 2017, the world biggest Starbucks
Starbucks
store opened in Shanghai, China. Former In 2003, after struggling with fierce local competition, Starbucks closed all six of its locations in Israel, citing "on-going operational challenges" and a "difficult business environment."[134][135] The Starbucks
Starbucks
location in the former imperial palace in Beijing closed in July 2007. The coffee shop had been a source of ongoing controversy since its opening in 2000 with protesters objecting that the presence of the American chain in this location "was trampling on Chinese culture."[136][137] In July 2008, the company announced it was closing 600 underperforming company-owned stores and cutting U.S. expansion plans amid growing economic uncertainty.[138][139] On July 29, 2008, Starbucks
Starbucks
also cut almost 1,000 non-retail jobs as part of its bid to re-energize the brand and boost its profit. Of the new cuts, 550 of the positions were layoffs and the rest were unfilled jobs.[140] These closings and layoffs effectively ended the company's period of growth and expansion that began in the mid-1990s. Starbucks
Starbucks
also announced in July 2008 that it would close 61 of its 84 stores in Australia
Australia
in the following month.[141] Nick Wailes, an expert in strategic management of the University of Sydney, commented that " Starbucks
Starbucks
failed to truly understand Australia's cafe culture."[142] In May 2014, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced ongoing losses in the Australian market, which resulted in the remaining stores being sold to the Withers Group.[143] In January 2009, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced the closure of an additional 300 underperforming stores and the elimination of 7,000 positions. CEO Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
also announced that he had received board approval to reduce his salary.[144] Altogether, from February 2008 to January 2009, Starbucks
Starbucks
terminated an estimated 18,400 U.S. jobs and began closing 977 stores worldwide.[145] In August 2009, Ahold
Ahold
announced closures and rebranding for 43 of their licensed store Starbucks
Starbucks
kiosks for their US based Stop & Shop and Giant supermarkets.[146][147] In July 2012, the company announced that they may begin closing unprofitable European stores immediately.[148] Unbranded stores Main article: Stealth Starbucks In 2009, at least three stores in Seattle
Seattle
were de-branded to remove the logo and brand name, and remodel the stores as local coffee houses "inspired by Starbucks."[149][150] CEO Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
says the unbranded stores are a "laboratory for Starbucks".[151] The first, 15th Avenue Coffee
Coffee
and Tea, opened in July 2009 on Capitol Hill. It served wine and beer and hosted live music and poetry readings.[152] It has since been remodeled and reopened as a Starbucks-branded store. Another is Roy Street Coffee
Coffee
and Tea
Tea
at 700 Broadway E., also on Capitol Hill. Although the stores have been called "stealth Starbucks"[149][153] and criticized as "local-washing",[154] Schultz says that "It wasn't so much that we were trying to hide the brand, but trying to do things in those stores that we did not feel were appropriate for Starbucks."[151] Licensed and franchise operations Independently operated Starbucks
Starbucks
locations exist. Stores that independently operate locations include Ahold
Ahold
Delhaize, Barnes & Noble, Target, and Tom Thumb stores. As of 2015, 4,962 licensed locations exist.[155] In the EMEA
EMEA
markets, Starbucks
Starbucks
holds a franchising program. Different to the License program in which existing corporations may apply to operate a Starbucks
Starbucks
kiosk within an existing store, Franchises have the ability to create new freestanding stores. Automated locations Starbucks
Starbucks
has automated systems in some areas. These machines have 280 possible drink combinations to choose from. They have touchscreens and customers can play games while they wait for their order.[156] Facilities

Starbucks
Starbucks
in Dortmund, Germany

Starbucks
Starbucks
in İzmir, Turkey

Free Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Internet access varies in different regions. In Germany, customers get unlimited free Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
through BT Openzone, and in Switzerland
Switzerland
and Austria, customers can get 30 minutes with a voucher card (through T-Mobile). Since 2003, Starbucks
Starbucks
in the UK rolled out a paid Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
based on one-time, hourly or daily payment. Then, in September 2009, it was changed to a 100% free Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
at most of its outlets. Customers with a Starbucks
Starbucks
Card are able to log-on to the Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
in-store for free with their card details, thereby bringing the benefits of the loyalty program in-line with the United States.[157] Since July 2010, Starbucks
Starbucks
has offered free Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
in all of its US stores via AT&T and information through a partnership with Yahoo!. This is an effort to be more competitive against local chains, which have long offered free Wi-Fi, and against McDonald's, which began offering free wireless internet access in 2010.[158] On June 30, 2010, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced it would begin to offer unlimited and free Internet access via Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
to customers in all company-owned locations across Canada
Canada
starting on July 1, 2010.[159] In October 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
and Duracell Powermat
Powermat
announced a pilot program to install Powermat
Powermat
charging surfaces in the tabletops in selected Starbucks
Starbucks
stores in the Boston area.[160] Furthermore, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced its support in the Power Matters Alliance
Power Matters Alliance
(PMA) and its membership in the PMA board, along with Google and AT&T, in an effort to create "a real-world ecosystem of wireless power" through a universal wireless charging standard that customers could use to recharge smartphones.[161] Starbucks
Starbucks
launched a new Mobile Order & Pay app in Portland, Oregon on December 2015.[162] This includes a bar code in mobile. This bar code needs to be scanned by a small scanner at the counter. Customers can pay from their smartphone by just waving their phone off the scanner. In one-quarter, 16% of transactions were made through this mobile app.[citation needed] Advertising Logo

1971–87

1992–2011

2011–present

In 2006, Valerie O'Neil, a Starbucks
Starbucks
spokeswoman, said that the logo is an image of a "twin-tailed mermaid, or siren as she's known in Greek mythology".[163] The logo has been significantly streamlined over the years. In the first version,[164] the Starbucks
Starbucks
siren was topless and had a fully visible double fish tail.[165] The image also had a rough visual texture and has been likened to a melusine.[166] The image is said by Starbucks
Starbucks
to be based on a 16th-century "Norse" woodcut, although other scholars note that it is apparently based on a 15th-century woodcut in J.E. Cirlot's Dictionary of Symbols.[167][168] In the second version, which was used from 1987–92, her breasts were covered by her flowing hair, but her navel was still visible.[169] The fish tail was cropped slightly, and the primary color was changed from brown to green, a nod to the Alma Mater of the three founders, the University of San Francisco.[170][171] In the third version, used between 1992 and 2011, her navel and breasts are not visible at all, and only vestiges remain of the fish tails. The original "woodcut" logo has been moved to the Starbucks' Headquarters in Seattle. At the beginning of September 2006 and then again in early 2008, Starbucks
Starbucks
temporarily reintroduced its original brown logo on paper hot-drink cups. Starbucks
Starbucks
has stated that this was done to show the company's heritage from the Pacific Northwest and to celebrate 35 years of business. The vintage logo sparked some controversy due in part to the siren's bare breasts,[172] but the temporary switch garnered little attention from the media. Starbucks
Starbucks
had drawn similar criticism when they reintroduced the vintage logo in 2006.[173] The logo was altered when Starbucks
Starbucks
entered the Saudi Arabian market in 2000 to remove the siren, leaving only her crown,[174] as reported in a Pulitzer Prize-winning column by Colbert I. King in The Washington Post in 2002. The company announced three months later that it would be using the international logo in Saudi Arabia.[175] In January 2011, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced that they would make small changes to the company's logo, removing the Starbucks
Starbucks
wordmark around the siren, enlarging the siren image, and making it green.[176] Partnerships Starbucks
Starbucks
has agreed to a partnership with Apple to collaborate on selling music as part of the "coffeehouse experience". In October 2006, Apple added a Starbucks
Starbucks
Entertainment area to the iTunes Store, selling music similar to that played in Starbucks
Starbucks
stores. In September 2007, Apple announced that customers would be able to browse the iTunes Store at Starbucks
Starbucks
via Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
in the US—with no requirement to log into the Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
network—targeted at iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, and MacBook
MacBook
users. The iTunes Store will automatically detect recent songs playing in a Starbucks
Starbucks
and offer users the opportunity to download the tracks. Some stores feature LCD screens with the artist name, song, and album information of the current song playing. This feature has been rolled out in Seattle, New York City, and the San Francisco Bay Area, and was offered in limited markets during 2007–2008.[177] During the fall of 2007, Starbucks
Starbucks
also began to sell digital downloads of certain albums through iTunes. Starbucks
Starbucks
gave away 37 different songs for free download through iTunes as part of the "Song of the Day" promotion in 2007, and a "Pick of the Week" card is now available at Starbucks
Starbucks
for a free song download. Since 2011, Starbucks also gives away a "Pick of the Week" card for app downloads from the App Store. A Starbucks
Starbucks
app is available in the iPhone App Store. Starting on June 1, 2009, the MSNBC
MSNBC
morning news program Morning Joe has been presented as "brewed by Starbucks" and the show's logo changed to include the company logo. Although the hosts have previously consumed Starbucks
Starbucks
coffee on air "for free" in the words of MSNBC
MSNBC
president Phil Griffin, it was not paid placement at that time.[178] The move was met with mixed reactions from rival news organizations, viewed as both a clever partnership in an economic downturn and a compromise of journalistic standards.[179] Starbucks
Starbucks
and Kraft Foods
Kraft Foods
entered into a partnership in 1998 to sell Starbucks
Starbucks
products in the Mondelez grocery stores owned by the latter. Starbucks
Starbucks
claimed that Kraft did not sufficiently promote its products and offered Kraft US$750 million to terminate the agreement; however, Kraft declined the offer, but Starbucks
Starbucks
proceeded with the termination anyway. Starbucks
Starbucks
wanted to terminate the agreement because at the time, single coffee packs were beginning to become popular. In their agreement, Starbucks
Starbucks
was confined to selling packs that only worked in Kraft's Tassimo machines. Starbucks
Starbucks
didn't want to fall behind in the market opportunities for k cups.[180] In mid-November 2013, an arbitrator ordered Starbucks
Starbucks
to pay a fine of US$2.8 billion to Kraft spin-off Mondelez International
Mondelez International
for its premature unilateral termination of the agreement.[181][182][183] In June 2014, Starbucks
Starbucks
announced a new partnership with Arizona State University (ASU) that would allow Starbucks
Starbucks
employees in their Junior and Senior years of college to complete four years of college at Arizona State University's online program for only around 23K. Starbucks
Starbucks
employees admitted into the program will receive a scholarship from the college, College Achievement Plan (CAP), that will cover 44% of their tuition. The remaining balance and all other expenses would be paid by the student or through traditional financial aid. In April 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
and ASU announced an expansion of the College Achievement Program. The program would now allow all eligible part-time and full-time employees working in a U.S. Starbucks
Starbucks
to enroll in the program for full-tuition reimbursement.[184] After the completion of each semester, Starbucks
Starbucks
reimburses the student their portion of the tuition. The student can then use the reimbursement to pay any loans or debt incurred during the semester.[185] In 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
signed a deal with PepsiCo
PepsiCo
to market and distribute Starbucks
Starbucks
products in several Latin American countries for 2016.[186] In May 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
entered a partnership with music streaming service Spotify. The partnership entailed giving U.S.-based employees a Spotify
Spotify
premium subscription and to help influence the music played in store via playlists made using Spotify. Starbucks
Starbucks
was also given its own curated Spotify
Spotify
playlist to be featured on Spotify's mobile app.[187] Parodies and infringements Starbucks
Starbucks
has been a target of parodies and imitations of its logo, particularly the 1992 version, and has used legal action against those it perceives to be infringing on its intellectual property. In 2000, San Francisco cartoonist Kieron Dwyer
Kieron Dwyer
was sued by Starbucks
Starbucks
for copyright and trademark infringement after creating a parody of its siren logo and putting it on the cover of one of his comics; later placing it on coffee mugs, T-shirts, and stickers that he sold on his website and at comic book conventions. Dwyer felt that since his work was a parody it was protected by his right to free speech under U.S. law. The case was eventually settled out of court, as Dwyer claimed he did not have the financial ability to endure a trial case with Starbucks. The judge agreed that Dwyer's work was a parody and thus enjoyed constitutional protection; however, he was forbidden from financially "profiting" from using a "confusingly similar" image of the Starbucks
Starbucks
siren logo. Dwyer was allowed to display the image as an expression of free speech, but he can no longer sell it.[188] In a similar case, a New York store selling stickers and T-shirts using the Starbucks
Starbucks
logo with the phrase "Fuck Off" was sued by the company in 1999.[189][190] An anti- Starbucks
Starbucks
website, starbuckscoffee.co.uk, which encouraged people to deface the Starbucks
Starbucks
logo[191] was transferred to Starbucks
Starbucks
in 2005,[192][193] but has since resurfaced at www.starbuckscoffee.org.uk. Christian bookstores and websites in the US are selling a T-shirt featuring a logo with the siren replaced by Jesus and the words "Sacrificed for me" around the edge.[194] Other successful cases filed by Starbucks
Starbucks
include the case won in 2006 against the chain Xingbake in Shanghai, China
China
for trademark infringement, because the chain used a green-and-white circular logo with a name that sounded phonetically similar to the Chinese for Starbucks.[195] Starbucks
Starbucks
did not open any stores after first registering its trademark in Russia
Russia
in 1997 and in 2002 a Russian lawyer successfully filed a request to cancel the trademark. He then registered the name with a Moscow company and asked for $600,000 to sell the trademark to Starbucks, but was ruled against in November 2005.[41] In 2003, Starbucks
Starbucks
sent a cease-and-desist letter to "HaidaBucks Coffee
Coffee
House" in Masset, British Columbia, Canada. The store was owned by a group of young Haida men, who claimed that the name was a coincidence, due to "buck" being a Haida word for "young man" (a claim that cannot be substantiated). After facing criticism, Starbucks dropped its demand after HaidaBucks dropped "coffee house" from its name.[196] Sam Buck Lundberg, who owns a coffee store in Oregon, was prohibited from using "Sambuck's Coffee" on the shop front in 2006.[197] Starbucks
Starbucks
lost a trademark infringement case against a smaller coffee vendor in South Korea
South Korea
that operates coffee stations under the name Starpreya. The company, Elpreya, says Starpreya is named after the Norse goddess, Freja, with the letters of that name changed to ease pronunciation by Koreans. The court rejected Starbucks' claim that the logo of Starpreya is too similar to their own logo.[198] A bar owner in Galveston, Texas, USA won the right to sell "Star Bock Beer" after a lawsuit by Starbucks
Starbucks
in 2003 after he registered the name, but the 2005 federal court ruling also stated that the sale of the beer must be restricted to Galveston, a ruling upheld by the Supreme Court in 2007.[199]

"Rat City Rollergirls" logo

Ongoing cases include a dispute over the copyright application for Seattle's Rat City Rollergirls
Rat City Rollergirls
logo in 2008.[200] The company claimed the roller derby league's logo by a Washington artist[201] was too similar to its own. Starbucks
Starbucks
requested an extension to further examine the issue and possibly issue a complaint, which was granted by the Trademark Office. The July 16, 2008, deadline passed without action by the corporation.[202] Starbucks
Starbucks
launched action against an Indian cosmetics business run by Shahnaz Husain, after she applied to register the name Starstruck for coffee and related products. She said she aimed to open a chain of stores that would sell coffee and chocolate-based cosmetics.[203] A cafe in Al-Manara Square,[204] Ramallah, Palestinian Territories, opened in 2009 with the name "Stars and Bucks" and a logo using a similar green circle and block lettering.[205] Like Starbucks, the Stars and Bucks serves cappuccinos in ceramic cups, and offers free Wifi. According to speculation cited in the Seattle
Seattle
Post Intelligencer, the cafe's name and imitation Starbucks
Starbucks
style may be a political satire of American consumerism. Starbucks
Starbucks
is not known to have taken action against this business. In 2014, Nathan Fielder, a Canadian comedian behind the hit show Nathan for You, opened a store called "Dumb Starbucks
Starbucks
Coffee" in Los Feliz, Los Angeles CA. The store resembled a typical Starbucks
Starbucks
with one exception: everything was preceded by the word "dumb." For example, the drinks he carried included Dumb Skinny Vanilla Lattes and Dumb Frapuccinos.[206] The store carried music titled "Dumb Jazz Standards" and "Dumb Norah Jones Duets." [207] He thought he could bypass infringement and copyright claims through the "Parody Law", referring to the parody aspect of Fair Use
Fair Use
laws (that protect parodists such as "Weird Al" Yankovic
"Weird Al" Yankovic
and SNL). No lawsuits were filed though because the store was short-lived. The Los Angeles Health Department shut it down after 4 days because Fielder lacked the proper permits.[208][209] Others have used the Starbucks
Starbucks
logo unaltered and without permission, such as a café in Pakistan that used the logo in 2003 in its advertisements[210] and a cafe in Cambodia
Cambodia
in 2009, the owner saying that "whatever we have done we have done within the law".[211] Environmental and social policies Environmental impact

Grounds for your Garden

In 1999, Starbucks
Starbucks
started "Grounds for your Garden" to make their business environmentally friendlier. This gives leftover coffee grounds to anyone requesting it for composting. Although not all stores and regions participate, customers can request and lobby their local store to begin the practice. In 2004, Starbucks
Starbucks
began reducing the size of their paper napkins and store garbage bags, and lightening their solid waste production by 816.5 t (1,800,000 lb).[212] In 2008, Starbucks
Starbucks
was ranked No.15 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's list of Top 25 Green Power Partners for purchases of renewable energy.[213] In October 2008, The Sun newspaper reported that Starbucks
Starbucks
was wasting 23.4 million liters (6.2 million US gal) of water a day by leaving a tap constantly running for rinsing utensils in a 'dipper well' in each of its stores,[214] but this is often required by governmental public health code.[215] In June 2009, in response to concerns over its excessive water consumption, Starbucks
Starbucks
re-evaluated its use of the dipper well system. In September 2009, company-operated Starbucks
Starbucks
stores in Canada
Canada
and the United States
United States
successfully implemented a new water saving solution that meets government health standards. Different types of milk are given a dedicated spoon that remains in the pitcher and the dipper wells were replaced with push button metered faucets for rinsing. This will reportedly save up to 150 US gal (570 l) of water per day in every store.[216][not in citation given] Recycling

A bin overflowing with Starbucks
Starbucks
cups

Starbucks
Starbucks
began using 10% recycled paper in its beverage cups in 2006—the company claimed that the initiative was the first time that recycled material had been used in a product that came into direct contact with a food or beverage.[217] Allen Hershkowitz
Allen Hershkowitz
of the Natural Resources Defense Council called the 10% content "minuscule",[217] but Starbucks
Starbucks
received the National Recycling Coalition Recycling Works Award in 2005 for the initiative.[218] In a 2008 media article, Starbucks' vice president of corporate social responsibility acknowledged that the company continued to struggle with environmental responsibility, as none of its cups were recyclable and stores did not have recycling bins. At the time that the article was published, Starbucks
Starbucks
gave customers who brought in their own reusable cup a 10-cent discount, in addition to using corrugated cup sleeves made from 85 percent post-consumer recycled fiber, which is 34 percent less paper than the original. During the same period, Starbucks
Starbucks
entered into a partnership with Conservation International—pledging US$7.5 million over three years—to help protect the natural environment of coffee-growing communities in Mexico
Mexico
and Indonesia.[219] Farmer equity practices Starbucks
Starbucks
began drafting plans for corporate social responsibility in 1994.[220] Since Starbucks
Starbucks
has partnered with Conservation International (CI) to draft plans and audit its coffee and farmer equity (C.A.F.E.) program,[221] Starbucks' C.A.F.E. practices are based on a rating system of 249 indicators. Farmers who earn high overall scores receive higher prices than those who achieve lower scores. Ratings categories include economic accountability, social responsibility, environmental leadership in coffee growing and processing. Indicators for social responsibility have evolved and now include 'zero tolerance' indicators that require workers to be paid in cash, check, or direct deposit, ensure that all workers are paid the established minimum wage, that workplaces are free of harassment and abuse, that workplaces are nondiscriminatory and do not employ persons under the age of 14, and several more.[222] Starbucks
Starbucks
has moved 90% of its coffee purchases to preferred C.A.F.E. certified providers, and the company is approaching its stated goal to purchase 100% of its coffee through C.A.F.E. or other 'ethically sourced' certification systems.[221] Washington State University
Washington State University
Assistant Professor Daniel Jaffee argues that Starbucks' C.A.F.E. practices merely 'green wash' "to burnish their corporate image."[223] Additionally, Professor Marie-Christine Renard of Rural Sociology of Chapingo University
Chapingo University
in Mexico
Mexico
wrote a case study of Starbucks', Conservation International's, and Agro-industries United of Mexico
Mexico
(AMSA) joint conservation effort in Chiapas, Mexico
Mexico
in which she concluded that "[w]hile the CI-Starbucks-AMSA Alliance paid better prices, it did not allow the producers to appropriate the knowledge that was necessary for the organizations to improve the quality of their coffee."[224] Fair trade

Starbucks
Starbucks
coffee beans

In 2000, the company introduced a line of fair trade products.[225] Of the approximately 136,000 metric tons (300 million pounds) of coffee Starbucks
Starbucks
purchased in 2006, only about 6% was certified as fair trade.[226] According to Starbucks, they purchased 2,180 metric tons (4.8 million pounds) of Certified Fair Trade coffee in fiscal year 2004 and 5,220 metric tons (11.5 million pounds) in 2005. They have become the largest buyer of Certified Fair Trade coffee in North America (10% of the global market). Transfair USA,[227][full citation needed] a third-party certifier of Fair Trade Certified coffee in the United States, has noted the impact Starbucks
Starbucks
has made in the area of Fair Trade and coffee farmer's lives:

Since launching its FTC coffee line in 2000, Starbucks
Starbucks
has undeniably made a significant contribution to family farmers through their rapidly growing FTC coffee volume. By offering FTC coffee in thousands of stores, Starbucks
Starbucks
has also given the FTC label greater visibility, helping to raise consumer awareness in the process.[attribution needed]

All espresso roast sold in the UK and Ireland is Fairtrade.[228] Questions have been raised regarding the legitimacy of the Fair Trade designation.[229] Groups such as Global Exchange
Global Exchange
are calling for Starbucks
Starbucks
to further increase its sales of fair trade coffees.[230] According to Starbucks, in 2004 it paid on average $1.42 per pound ($2.64 kg) for high-quality coffee beans, 74% above the commodity prices at the time.[231] After a long-running dispute between Starbucks
Starbucks
and Ethiopia, Starbucks agreed to support and promote Ethiopian coffees. An article in BBC NEWS,[232] states that Ethiopian ownership of popular coffee designations such as Harrar and Sidamo is acknowledged, even if they are not registered. Ethiopia fought hard for this acknowledgement mainly to help give its poverty-stricken farmers a chance to make more money. Unfortunately, this has not been the case. In 2006, Starbucks says it paid $1.42 per pound for its coffee. The coffee Starbucks bought for $1.42 per pound, had a selling price—after transportation, processing, marketing, store rentals, taxes, and staff salary and benefits—of $10.99 per pound.[233] As of August 2010, the Starbucks
Starbucks
website sells only one Ethiopian coffee, which it says is new. In addition, Starbucks
Starbucks
is an active member of the World Cocoa Foundation. Ethos water Ethos, a brand of bottled water acquired by Starbucks
Starbucks
in 2003, is sold at locations throughout North America. Ethos bottles feature prominent labeling stating "helping children get clean water", referring to the fact that US$0.05 from each US$1.80 bottle sold (US$0.10 per bottle in Canada) is used to fund clean water projects in under-developed areas. Although sales of Ethos water
Ethos water
have raised over US$6,200,000 for clean water efforts, the brand is not incorporated as a charity. Critics have argued that the claim on the label misleads consumers into thinking that Ethos is primarily a charitable organization when it is actually a for-profit brand and the vast majority of the sale price (97.2%) does not support clean-water projects.[234][235] The founders of Ethos have stated that the brand is intended to raise awareness of third-world clean water issues and provide socially responsible consumers with an opportunity to support the cause by choosing Ethos over other brands.[236] Starbucks
Starbucks
has since redesigned the American version of the Ethos water
Ethos water
bottles, stating the amount of money donated per bottle in the description. Food bank donations Since 2010, Starbucks
Starbucks
has been donating leftover pastries in the United States
United States
to local food banks through a food collection service named Food Donation Connection.[237] In March 2016, Starbucks
Starbucks
unveiled a five-year plan to donate 100 percent of unsold food from its 7,600 company-operated stores in the U.S. to local food banks and pantries.[238] Perishable food will be transported in refrigerated trucks to area food banks through the company's partnerships with the Food Donation Connection
Food Donation Connection
and Feeding America. This program, called FoodShare, is expected to provide up to 50 million meals over the next five years.[239] As of 2017, the program was in 10 different markets, including New York City.[240] In New York, Starbucks
Starbucks
works with Feeding America
Feeding America
and City Harvest, both non-profits, to donate food from 45 locations. It plans to expand the program to all 305 Manhattan stores. Controversies

This section's images may require adjustment of image placement, formatting, and size. Please see the picture tutorial and the image placement policy for further information. (February 2013)

A local coffee shop in New York's East Village claiming it had to close because Starbucks
Starbucks
is willing to pay higher rent for the space

Starbucks
Starbucks
has been accused of selling unhealthy products.[241][242][243][244] Market strategy

Starbucks
Starbucks
footprint in the United States, showing saturation of metropolitan areas

Some of the methods Starbucks
Starbucks
has used to expand and maintain their dominant market position, including buying out competitors' leases, intentionally operating at a loss, and clustering several locations in a small geographical area (i.e., saturating the market), have been labeled anti-competitive by critics.[245] For example, Starbucks fueled its initial expansion into the UK market with a buyout of Seattle
Seattle
Coffee
Coffee
Company but then used its capital and influence to obtain prime locations, some of which operated at a financial loss. Critics claimed this was an unfair attempt to drive out small, independent competitors, who could not afford to pay inflated prices for premium real estate.[246] While relations with independent coffeehouse chains have been strained, some owners have credited Starbucks
Starbucks
with educating customers on coffee.[247] Labor disputes Starbucks
Starbucks
workers in seven stores have joined the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) as the Starbucks Workers Union since 2004.[248] According to a Starbucks
Starbucks
Union press release, since then, the union membership has begun expanding to Chicago
Chicago
and Maryland in addition to New York City, where the movement originated.[249][250] On March 7, 2006, the IWW and Starbucks
Starbucks
agreed to a National Labor Relations Board settlement in which three Starbucks
Starbucks
workers were granted almost US$2,000 in back wages and two fired employees were offered reinstatement.[251][252][253] According to the Starbucks
Starbucks
Union, on November 24, 2006, IWW members picketed Starbucks
Starbucks
locations in more than 50 cities around the world in countries including Australia, Canada, Germany, and the UK, as well as U.S. cities including New York, Chicago, Minneapolis, and San Francisco,[254] to protest the firing of five Starbucks Workers Union organizers by Starbucks
Starbucks
and to demand their reinstatement.

The Reverend Billy
Reverend Billy
leading an anti- Starbucks
Starbucks
protest in Austin, Texas in 2007

Some Starbucks
Starbucks
baristas in Canada,[255] Australia
Australia
and New Zealand,[256] and the United States[257] belong to a variety of unions. In 2005, Starbucks
Starbucks
paid out US$165,000 to eight employees at its Kent, Washington, roasting plant to settle charges that they had been retaliated against for being pro-union. At the time, the plant workers were represented by the International Union of Operating Engineers. Starbucks
Starbucks
admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement.[248] A Starbucks
Starbucks
strike occurred in Auckland, New Zealand, on November 23, 2005.[256] Organized by Unite Union, workers sought secure hours, a minimum wage of NZ$12 an hour, and the abolition of youth rates. The company settled with the Union in 2006, resulting in pay increases, increased security of hours, and an improvement in youth rates.[258] In March 2008, Starbucks
Starbucks
was ordered to pay baristas over US$100 million in back tips in a Californian class action lawsuit launched by baristas alleging that granting shift-supervisors a portion of tips violates state labor laws. The company plans to appeal. Similarly, an 18-year-old barista in Chestnut Hill, MA has filed another suit with regards to the tipping policy. Massachusetts law also states that managers may not get a cut of tips.[259][260] A similar lawsuit was also filed in Minnesota on March 27, 2008.[261] "War On Christmas" Main article: Christmas controversy § 2010s In November 2015, Starbucks
Starbucks
introduced solid red seasonal cups, unlike previous seasonal iterations that were decorated with winter or Christmas-oriented imagery (such as reindeer and ornaments), but no overtly religious symbols. The cup design was discussed extensively on social media, with some citing it as another example of the "War on Christmas", calling it "cup-gate", and others expressed puzzlement over the outrage generated by a simple cup.[262][263][264] A man named Joshua Feuerstien then released a video suggesting that customers tell the baristas that their name was "Merry Christmas" so that baristas were forced to write it on the cups and shout "Merry Christmas" when calling off the drinks. This also started the trend #MerryChristmasStarbucks.[265] Opening without planning permission Starbucks
Starbucks
has been accused by local authorities of opening several stores in the UK in retail premises, without the planning permission for a change of use to a restaurant. Starbucks
Starbucks
has argued that "Under current planning law, there is no official classification of coffee shops. Starbucks, therefore, encounters the difficult scenario whereby local authorities interpret the guidance in different ways. In some instances, coffee shops operate under A1 permission, some as mixed use A1/A3 and some as A3".[266] In May 2008, a branch of Starbucks
Starbucks
was completed on St. James's Street in Kemptown, Brighton, England, despite having been refused permission by the local planning authority, Brighton
Brighton
and Hove City Council, who claimed there were too many coffee shops already present on the street.[267][268] Starbucks
Starbucks
appealed the decision by claiming it was a retail store selling bags of coffee, mugs, and sandwiches, gaining a six-month extension,[269] but the council ordered Starbucks
Starbucks
to remove all tables and chairs from the premises, to comply with planning regulations for a retail shop.[270] 2500 residents signed a petition against the store,[271] but after a public inquiry in June 2009, a government inspector gave permission for the store to remain.[272] A Starbucks
Starbucks
in Hertford
Hertford
won its appeal in April 2009 after being open for over a year without planning permission.[273] Two stores in Edinburgh,[274] one in Manchester,[275] one in Cardiff,[276] one in Pinner
Pinner
and Harrow, were also opened without planning permission.[266] The Pinner
Pinner
cafe, opened in 2007, won an appeal to stay open in 2010.[277] One in Blackheath Village, Lewisham[278] was also under investigation in 2002 for breach of its licence, operating as a restaurant when it only had a licence for four seats and was limited to take away options. There was a considerable backlash from members of the local community who opposed any large chains opening in what is a conservation area. To this date, the Starbucks
Starbucks
is still operating as a takeaway outlet. Israel

A store on Piccadilly
Piccadilly
with its windows boarded up after being smashed by protesters

A damaged front window of a Starbucks
Starbucks
coffee shop in Toronto

There have been calls for boycott of Starbucks
Starbucks
stores and products because it has been wrongly claimed that Starbucks
Starbucks
sends part of its profits to the Israeli military,[279] but such allegations are based on a hoax letter attributed to the President, Chairman, and CEO of Starbucks
Starbucks
Howard Schultz, who is Jewish[280] and supports Israel's right to exist.[281] He is a recipient of several Israeli awards including "The Israel
Israel
50th Anniversary Tribute Award" for "playing a key role in promoting a close alliance between the United States
United States
and Israel".[282] The hoax letter claiming that Schultz had donated money to the Israeli military was actually written by an Australian weblogger, Andrew Winkler, who has admitted fabricating the document.[281][283] Starbucks
Starbucks
responded to these claims, widely circulated on the internet, stating that "Neither Chairman
Chairman
Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
nor Starbucks fund support the Israeli Army. Starbucks
Starbucks
is a non-political organization and does not support individual political causes".[282] The protests against Starbucks
Starbucks
derived from the Winkler letter were not the first; earlier protests occurred in June 2002 in Cairo, Dubai and Beirut
Beirut
universities in response to Schultz's criticism of Yasser Arafat.[283] Starbucks
Starbucks
has been a regular target of activists protesting against Israel's role in the Gaza War over the claims. Organizations have urged a boycott of Starbucks, accusing Starbucks
Starbucks
of serving as an ally of Israeli militarists.[284][285] Starbucks
Starbucks
was forced to close a store in Beirut, Lebanon
Lebanon
due to demonstrators shouting anti- Israel
Israel
slogans and causing customers to flee.[286] Demonstrators hung several banners on the shop's window and used white tape to paste a Star of David
Star of David
over the green-and-white Starbucks
Starbucks
sign. They also distributed a letter saying, Schultz "...is one of the pillars of the American Jewish lobby
Jewish lobby
and the owner of the Starbucks," which they said donates money to the Israeli military.[287] On January 2009, two Starbucks
Starbucks
stores in London
London
were the target of vandalism by pro-Palestinian demonstrators who broke windows and reportedly ripped out fittings and equipment after clashes with riot police.[288][289][290][291][292][293] "The Way I See It" Quotes by artists, writers, scientists, and others have appeared on Starbucks
Starbucks
cups since 2005 in a campaign called "The Way I See It".[294] Some of the quotes have caused controversy, including one by writer Armistead Maupin
Armistead Maupin
and another by Jonathan Wells that linked 'Darwinism' to eugenics, abortion and racism.[295] Disclaimers were added to the cups noting that these views were not necessarily those of Starbucks.[296] US military viral email A US Marines
US Marines
Sergeant emailed ten of his friends in August 2004 having wrongly been told that Starbucks
Starbucks
had stopped supplying the military with coffee donations because the company did not support the Iraq War. The email became viral, being sent to tens of millions of people. Starbucks
Starbucks
and the originator sent out a correction,[297] but Starbucks' VP of global communications, Valerie O'Neil, said in September 2009 that the email was still being forwarded to her every few weeks.[298][299][300] Gun controversy As gun laws in many US states have become more relaxed, and more states have adopted open carry or concealed carry statutes, some gun owners have begun carrying guns while performing everyday shopping or other tasks. Many stores and companies have responded by banning the carrying of guns on their premises, as allowed by many states' local laws. Starbucks
Starbucks
has not instituted an official policy banning guns in their stores. In 2010, the Brady Campaign
Brady Campaign
proposed a boycott of Starbucks
Starbucks
due to their gun policy.[301] At that time, Starbucks
Starbucks
released a statement saying "We comply with local laws and statutes in all the communities we serve. That means we abide by the laws that permit open carry in 43 U.S. states. Where these laws don't exist, openly carrying weapons in our stores is prohibited. The political, policy and legal debates around these issues belong in the legislatures and courts, not in our stores."[302][303] In 2012, the National Gun Victims Action Council published an open letter to Starbucks, asking them to revise their policy, and also proposed a "Brew not Bullets" boycott of the chain until the policy is changed, with Valentine's Day
Valentine's Day
selected as a particular day to boycott the chain.[304][305][306] In response, gun rights advocates started a counter "Starbucks Appreciation Day" buycott to support Starbucks' stance, and suggested paying for products using two-dollar bills as a sign of Second Amendment support.[307] On July 29, 2013, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, initiated a petition demanding a ban on guns in Starbucks
Starbucks
stores.[308] On September 17, 2013, founder and CEO Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
asked customers to no longer bring guns into its stores. He made the comments in an open letter on the company's website. Schultz said he was not banning guns, but making a request.[309] Same-sex marriage In January 2012, a Starbucks
Starbucks
executive stated that the company supports the legalization of same-sex marriage. This resulted in a boycott by the National Organization for Marriage, a political organization that opposes same-sex marriage, who received 22,000 signatures in favor of their boycott.[310] When another shareholder (who had been quoted by NOM before) mentioned during a meeting that recent earnings had been "disappointing" since the boycott began, CEO Howard Schultz
Howard Schultz
responded: "If you feel, respectfully, that you can get a higher return than the 38 percent you got last year, it's a free country. You can sell your shares of Starbucks
Starbucks
and buy shares in another company. Thank you very much."[311] In addition, 640,000 people also signed a petition thanking Starbucks
Starbucks
for its support.[312] (As of June 26, 2015, same-sex marriage in the United States
United States
is legal in all states following the Supreme Court ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges.)[313][314][315] European tax avoidance In October 2012, Starbucks
Starbucks
faced criticism after a Reuters investigation found that the company reportedly paid only £8.6 million in corporation tax in the UK over 14 years, despite generating over £3 billion in sales—this included no tax payments on £1.3 billion of sales in the three years prior to 2012.[316][317] It is alleged that Starbucks
Starbucks
was able to do this by charging high licensing fees to the UK branch of the business, allowing them to declare a £33 million loss in 2011.[318] The UK subsidiary pays patent fees to the US subsidiary, purchases coffee beans from the Netherlands
Netherlands
subsidiary (where corporation tax is lower than in the UK), and uses the Swiss subsidiary for other "miscellaneous services".[319] A YouGov survey suggested that Starbucks' brand image was substantially weakened by the controversy surrounding how much tax it pays in the UK several weeks after the allegations surfaced.[320] Starbucks' chief financial officer (CFO) appeared before the Public Accounts Committee in November 2012 and admitted that the Dutch government granted a special tax rate to their European headquarters, which the UK business pays royalties to.[321] Dutch law permits companies to transfer royalties collected from other countries to tax havens without incurring taxes, unlike in the rest of the EU.[322] The CFO denied that they chose the Netherlands
Netherlands
as their European headquarters to avoid tax, explaining that the company's Dutch coffee roasting plant was the reason for the decision.[321] Until 2009, the royalty rate was 6% of UK sales, but after being challenged by UK tax authorities it was reduced to 4.7%.[322] The CFO told the committee this reflected costs such as designing new stores and products, but admitted that there was no detailed analysis by which the rate is decided. The coffee they serve in the UK is purchased from the Swiss subsidiary, which charges a 20% markup on the wholesale price and pays 12% corporation tax on profits.[321] Coffee
Coffee
is not transported to Switzerland
Switzerland
but the 30 people who work in the subsidiary assess coffee quality. Regarding Starbucks' frequent reports of loss in the UK, the CFO told the committee that Starbucks
Starbucks
are "not at all pleased" about their financial performance in the UK.[321] MPs replied that it "just doesn't ring true" that the business made a loss, pointing out that the head of the business had been promoted to a new post in the US and they consistently told shareholders that the business was profitable.[316][323] In Ireland, Starbucks' subsidiary Ritea only paid €35,000 in tax between 2005 and 2011 and the subsidiary recorded losses in every year other than 2011. Ritea is owned by Netherlands-based Starbucks
Starbucks
Coffee Emea.[324] Their French and German subsidiaries make large losses because they are heavily in debt to the Dutch subsidiary, which charges them higher interest rates than the group pays to borrow. Reuters
Reuters
calculated that without paying interest on the loans and royalty fees, the French and German subsidiaries would have paid €3.4 million in tax. The Dutch subsidiary that royalties are paid to made a €507,000 profit in 2011 from revenues of €73 million, while the company that roasts coffee made a profit of €2 million in 2011 and paid tax of €870,000.[322] Protesters, who were unimpressed by the company's offer to pay £20 million in tax over the next two years, staged demonstrations in December 2012 in affiliation with UK Uncut.[325] In June 2014, the European Commission
European Commission
anti-trust regulator launched an investigation of the company's tax practices in the Netherlands, as part of a wider probe of multi-national companies' tax arrangements in various European countries.[326] The investigation ended in October 2015, with the EC ordering Starbucks
Starbucks
to pay up to €30 million in overdue taxes, which the EC regards as illegal state support for corporations. A pair of economists from the KU Leuven noted that the Commission did not forbid Starbucks' tax construction as such, pretending that Starbucks
Starbucks
is a Dutch company and effectively rewarding the Dutch state for its lenient tax policy.[327] Chinese pricing In October 2013, China
China
Central Television accused Chinese Starbucks
Starbucks
of over-pricing. The report compared the price of a tall (12 fl. oz., 354 mL) latte in Beijing, Chicago, London, and Mumbai. It was found that Beijing stores charged the most while Mumbai
Mumbai
stores charged the least. It was also found that a tall latte cost 4 Chinese yuan (approx. USD $0.67) to make, but it sold at 27 yuan (approx. USD $4.50).[328][329] #Racetogether marketing campaign On Monday, March 16, 2015,[330] Starbucks
Starbucks
launched a marketing campaign to promote conversations about race between customers and employees.[331] This marketing campaign also called for baristas to write the hashtag #RaceTogether on customers' cups – similar to how Starbucks
Starbucks
is already known for writing customers' names on each cup. It was characterised as a "fiasco" by some media outlets,[332][333][334][335] to the extent that Starbucks' vice president of public relations deleted his Twitter
Twitter
account.[336][337] On March 22, Starbucks
Starbucks
CEO advised his employees there is no longer a need to write #racetogether on cups. Reuters
Reuters
reported that "Starbucks said the phase of the campaign that involved messages on drink cups was always scheduled to end Sunday."[263][338] Supporting refugees On January 27, 2017,[339] President Donald Trump
Donald Trump
signed an executive order to indefinitely suspend the entry of Syrian refugees into the United States
United States
and suspended entry into the United States
United States
of nearly all citizens of seven countries until proper vetting measures could be implemented.[340] The same day, Starbucks' Chairman
Chairman
and CEO Howard Schultz wrote a letter to Starbucks' employees, stating in part, "There are more than 65 million citizens of the world recognized as refugees by the United Nations, and we are developing plans to hire 10,000 of them over five years in the 75 countries around the world where Starbucks
Starbucks
does business. And we will start this effort here in the U.S. by making the initial focus of our hiring efforts on those individuals who have served with U.S. troops as interpreters and support personnel in the various countries where our military has asked for such support."[341] As a result of Schultz's letter, supporters of President Trump's executive order supported a boycott of Starbucks, with some saying that Starbucks
Starbucks
should give more help to American veterans.[342][343] In 2014, Starbucks
Starbucks
established a program to support veterans and their families.[343] Starbucks
Starbucks
hired 8,000 veterans and military spouses since 2014.[343] Starbucks
Starbucks
operates 30 stores located near military bases that help provide assistance to military families.[344] Organizations that offer free legal help and other services to military families hold meetings at Starbucks
Starbucks
stores on Military Mondays.[344] Muslim boycott of Starbucks Muhammadiyah, the second largest Muslim group in Indonesia
Indonesia
with 29 million members,[345] and Perkasa, a group with 700,000 members, have called for a boycott of Starbucks
Starbucks
over its support of gay rights.[346][347][348] Korea, workers From the research in Korea, the brand that many part time workers want to work is Starbucks.[349] California cancer warning rule In March 2018, a California judge ruled that Starbucks
Starbucks
and other companies must provide warning labels on all coffee products, warning consumers of chemicals that may cause cancer, a requirement by California law which Starbucks
Starbucks
was found in violation of.[350][351] The chemical in question is acrylamide, a carcinogen byproduct of roasted coffee beans found in high levels throughout brewed coffee. Declining to comment, Starbucks
Starbucks
instead referred to a statement by the National Coffee
Coffee
Association claiming that cancer warnings on products would be "misleading".[352] After the first phase of the trial, Starbucks
Starbucks
may be subject to civil proceeding penalties of fines up to $2,500 per consumer exposed over the last eight years.[353] Music, film, and television Main article: Hear Music

Starbucks' second Hear Music
Hear Music
Coffeehouse
Coffeehouse
at the South Bank development adjacent to the River Walk in downtown San Antonio, Texas.

Hear Music
Hear Music
is the brand name of Starbucks' retail music concept. Hear Music began as a catalog company in 1990, adding a few retail locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Hear Music
Hear Music
was purchased by Starbucks
Starbucks
in 1999. Nearly three years later, in 2002, they produced a Starbucks
Starbucks
opera album, featuring artists such as Luciano Pavarotti, followed in March 2007 by the hit CD "Memory Almost Full" by Paul McCartney, making McCartney the first artist signed to New Hear Music Label sold in Starbucks
Starbucks
outlets. Its inaugural release was a big non-coffee event for Starbucks
Starbucks
the first quarter of 2007. In 2006, the company created Starbucks
Starbucks
Entertainment, one of the producers of the 2006 film Akeelah and the Bee. Retail stores advertised the film before its release and sold the DVD.[354] Starbucks
Starbucks
has become the subject of a protest song, "A Rock Star Bucks a Coffee
Coffee
Shop" by Neil Young
Neil Young
and his band, Promise of the Real. The single from Young's album, The Monsanto Years
The Monsanto Years
aims at Starbucks' alleged use of genetically modified food, but also at the GMO company Monsanto.[355][356] By May 31, 2015, the song was Video of the week on the Food Consumer website.[357]

See also

Coffee
Coffee
portal Seattle
Seattle
portal Companies portal Food portal

Coffee
Coffee
culture List of coffee companies List of coffeehouse chains List of companies based in Seattle Multinational corporation

References

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boycott calls lead to violence Archived January 20, 2009, at the Wayback Machine., Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA), January 19, 2009. ^ "Thousands protest in UK over Gaza". BBC News. January 17, 2009. Retrieved November 13, 2011.  ^ Starbucks
Starbucks
smashed and looted as anti- Israel
Israel
protests turn to violence by Alastair Jamieson, Telegraph.com.uk, January 17, 2009. ^ "The Way I See It". Starbucks
Starbucks
Coffee
Coffee
Company. Archived from the original on January 18, 2009. Retrieved March 29, 2009.  ^ Rosen, Rebecca (May 16, 2007). " Starbucks
Starbucks
stirs things up with controversial quotes". The Denver Post. Retrieved March 29, 2009.  ^ Lynn, Cathy (2005-10-19). "USATODAY.com - Starbucks
Starbucks
stirs things up with a God quote on cups". Usatoday30.usatoday.com. Retrieved 2017-11-16.  ^ "Rumor Response: Misinformation About Starbucks
Starbucks
and the United States Military". Starbucks. January 11, 2005. Archived from the original on June 20, 2008. Retrieved September 22, 2009.  ^ Ugly Rumours Archived October 6, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. Communicate magazine, September 2009 ^ Mikkelson, Barbara. "G.I. Joe". Snopes. Retrieved September 22, 2009.  ^ Warner, Melanie (December 26, 2004). "Cup of Coffee, Grain of Salt". The New York Times. Retrieved September 22, 2009.  ^ " Brady Campaign
Brady Campaign
Urges Starbucks
Starbucks
To Prohibit Guns In Its Retail Outlets". Brady Campaign. Archived from the original on October 14, 2011. Retrieved February 15, 2012.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
Target of Anti-Second Amendment Groups, But Advocates Organize Counter Rally in Hawaii and Other States". Hawaii Reporter. Retrieved February 14, 2012.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
Position on Open Carry Gun Laws". Starbucks. Archived from the original on February 11, 2012. Retrieved February 14, 2012.  ^ "GVAC Email Starbucks". GVAC. Archived from the original on January 31, 2012. Retrieved February 14, 2012.  ^ "Boycott against Starbucks
Starbucks
over gun laws". abc4.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2012. Retrieved February 15, 2012.  ^ "Lovers and gun lovers at Starbucks?". ajc.com. Archived from the original on February 18, 2012. Retrieved February 15, 2012.  ^ "Guns and coffee: Starbucks
Starbucks
again an open carry policy battleground". Loundon times. Retrieved February 14, 2012.  ^ "Starbucks, in switch, asks customers not to bring guns into stores". NBC News. Archived from the original on September 20, 2013. Retrieved September 18, 2013.  ^ Harlow, Poppy; O'Toole, James (September 18, 2013). " Starbucks
Starbucks
to customers: Please don't bring your guns!". CNN. Retrieved September 18, 2013.  ^ NOM Launches Starbucks
Starbucks
Boycott Over Same-Sex Marriage Stance Retrieved July 19, 2012 ^ The Week (March 21, 2013). "Why Starbucks' pro-gay marriage stance won't hurt its bottom line – Yahoo!
Yahoo!
News". News.yahoo.com. Retrieved May 9, 2014.  ^ SumOfUs. "Thank Starbucks
Starbucks
for standing up for gay rights – SumOfUs". sumofus.org. Archived from the original on 2012-03-22.  ^ "U.S. 21st country to allow same-sex marriage nationwide". CNN. June 26, 2015.  ^ Liptak, Adam. "Same-Sex Marriage Is a Right, Supreme Court Rules, 5-4". The New York Times. Retrieved June 26, 2015.  ^ "Obergefell et al. v. Hodges, Director, Ohio, Department of Health, et al." (PDF). supremecourt.gov. Retrieved June 26, 2015.  ^ a b " Special
Special
Report: How Starbucks
Starbucks
avoids UK taxes". Reuters. October 15, 2012. Retrieved October 16, 2012.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
'paid just £8.6m UK tax in 14 years'". BBC News. October 16, 2012. Retrieved October 16, 2012.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
paid no tax in the UK in the last 4 years". RTÉ News. Archived from the original on October 19, 2012. Retrieved October 17, 2012.  ^ Joe Lynam (October 16, 2012). Starbucks' tax payment is 'unfair' say independent cafes (video). BBC Newsnight. 1:20 minutes in. Retrieved November 12, 2012.  ^ Simon Neville and Shiv Malik (November 12, 2012). " Starbucks
Starbucks
wakes up and smells the stench of tax avoidance controversy". London: The Guardian. Retrieved November 12, 2012.  ^ a b c d "Starbucks, Google and Amazon grilled over tax avoidance". BBC News. November 12, 2012. Retrieved November 12, 2012.  ^ a b c Tom Berkin (November 1, 2012). " Special
Special
Report – Starbucks's European tax bill disappears down $100 million hole". Reuters. Retrieved November 12, 2012.  ^ Press Association (November 12, 2012). " Starbucks
Starbucks
executive denies lying over UK losses". London: The Guardian. Retrieved November 12, 2012.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
may face UK tax probe as MP calls for probe". RTÉ. October 17, 2012. Archived from the original on January 12, 2013. Retrieved November 12, 2012.  ^ Escobales, Roxanne; McVeigh, Tracy (December 8, 2012). "Starbucks hit by UK Uncut
UK Uncut
protests as tax row boils over". Guardian. London. Retrieved December 8, 2012.  ^ " European Commission
European Commission
to probe tax affairs of Apple, Starbucks
Starbucks
and Fiat". Europe Sun. Retrieved June 12, 2014.  ^ Hagen, Rutger; Wijsman, Sebastiaan (23 October 2015). "Een 'straf' die Nederland bonus oplevert" [A 'punishment' that works as a bonus for Holland]. De Volkskrant.  ^ "央视批星巴克咖啡暴利引热议". Finance.sina.com.cn. October 21, 2013. Retrieved May 9, 2014.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
Is Criticized by Chinese State Media for Higher Prices". The Wall Street Journal. October 21, 2013. Retrieved Oct 21, 2013.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
wants its baristas to talk about race". Business Insider. March 17, 2015.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
Faces Criticism Over 'Race Together' Campaign". NPR.org. March 18, 2015.  ^ "The Top 5 Tweets From Starbucks' #RaceTogether Fiasco". Fast Company.  ^ "This Is What Happens When You Walk Into Starbucks
Starbucks
And Talk
Talk
To The Barista
Barista
About Race". Co.Create.  ^ "How absurd is the Starbucks
Starbucks
#RaceTogether campaign? THIS absurd (the ridicule will crack you up)". Twitchy.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
#RaceTogether campaign mocked online". BBC News.  ^ Corey Du medium.com ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
exec deletes Twitter
Twitter
account after RaceTogether backlash". Daily Mail Online.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
ends 'Race Together' campaign in stores, effort not over". Yahoo News Canada. March 22, 2015.  ^ "Full Executive Order Text: Trump's Action Limiting Refugees Into the U.S." The New York Times. 2017-01-27. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 1, 2017.  ^ Shear, Michael D.; Nixon, Ron (January 29, 2017). "How Trump's Rush to Enact an Immigration Ban Unleashed Global Chaos". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 30, 2017.  ^ Shaffer, Leslie (January 30, 2017). " Starbucks
Starbucks
CEO Howard Schultz: We will hire 10,000 refugees". NBC News. Retrieved January 30, 2017.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
Faces Boycott After Pledging to Hire Refugees". Fortune. Retrieved January 30, 2017.  ^ a b c "People are boycotting Starbucks
Starbucks
after CEO announces plan to hire thousands of refugees". Business Insider. Retrieved January 30, 2017.  ^ a b Berr, Jonathan (January 31, 2017). "Does Starbucks
Starbucks
ignore vets while helping refugees?". CBS News. Retrieved February 1, 2017.  ^ "Malaysia, Indonesia
Indonesia
Muslim groups call for Starbucks
Starbucks
boycott". Chicago
Chicago
Tribune. Associated Press. Retrieved 11 July 2017. This week and last, leaders of Indonesia's second largest mainstream Muslim group, Muhammadiyah, with an estimated 29 million members, denounced the chain.  ^ "Malaysian Muslim group joins Indonesian call for Starbucks
Starbucks
boycott over LGBT stand". Reuters. July 6, 2017. Retrieved November 16, 2017.  ^ "After Indonesia, Perkasa
Perkasa
calls for boycott against Starbucks
Starbucks
over 'pro-LGBT stand' (VIDEO) Malaysia". Malay Mail Online. 2017-07-02. Retrieved 2017-11-16.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 4, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.  ^ "스타벅스, 알바생이 일하고 싶은 브랜드 2위…1위는?". mk.co.kr (in Korean). Retrieved 2018-03-22.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
coffee in California must have cancer warning, judge says". Reuters.  ^ "Starbucks, others must carry cancer warning in California, judge rules". CBS.  ^ " Starbucks
Starbucks
coffee in California must have cancer warning, judge says". Reuters.  ^ "Starbucks, others must carry cancer warning in California, judge rules". CBS.  ^ Ault, Susanne (June 2, 2006). " Starbucks
Starbucks
rocks with Berry DVD". Video Business. Archived from the original on August 18, 2009. Retrieved August 18, 2009.  ^ Zumic "The Monsanto
Monsanto
Years" – Neil Young
Neil Young
+ Promise Of The Real (Official Full Album Stream + Zumic Review) by Francesco Marano Published: June 22nd, 2015 ^ Daniel Kreps (May 22, 2015). " Neil Young
Neil Young
Previews Cheeky 'Rock Starbucks' Video". Rolling Stone. Retrieved December 24, 2017.  ^ Food Consumer Video Of The Week, A Rock Star Bucks A Coffee
Coffee
Shop Archived June 30, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.

Further reading

Behar, Howard with Janet Goldstein. (2007). It's Not About the Coffee: Leadership Principles from a Life at Starbucks, 208 pages. ISBN 1-59184-192-5. Clark, Taylor. (2007). Starbucked: A Double Tall Tale of Caffeine, Commerce and Culture. 336 pages. ISBN 0-316-01348-X. Michelli, Joseph A. (2006). The Starbucks
Starbucks
experience: 5 principles for turning ordinary into extraordinary, 208 pages. ISBN 0-07-147784-5. Pendergrast, Mark (2001) [1999]. Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee
Coffee
and How It Transformed Our World. London: Texere. ISBN 1-58799-088-1.  Schultz, Howard. and Dori Jones Yang. (1997). Pour Your Heart Into It: How Starbucks
Starbucks
Built a Company One Cup at a Time, 350 pages. ISBN 0-7868-6315-3. Simon, Bryant. (2009). Everything but the Coffee: Learning about America from Starbucks. 320 pages. ISBN 0-520-26106-2.

External links

Official website Starbucks
Starbucks
Store

Business data for Starbucks: Google Finance Yahoo!
Yahoo!
Finance Reuters SEC filings

Media related to Starbucks
Starbucks
at Wikimedia Commons

v t e

Starbucks
Starbucks
Corporation

Corporate directors

Barbara Bass Bill Bradley Mellody Hobson Kevin Johnson Howard Schultz Clara Shih Myron Ullman

Assets and products

Ethos Water Evolution Fresh Hear Music Pasqua Coffee Seattle's Best Coffee Starbucks
Starbucks
Coffee Tata Starbucks Teavana Torrefazione Italia Verismo by Starbucks

Former assets

Tazo
Tazo
Tea
Tea
Company

See also

Original Starbucks Starbucks
Starbucks
Israel

Links to related articles

v t e

Coffee

Topics

Economics Fair trade History

Production

Coffee
Coffee
production List of countries by coffee production

Species and varieties

Arabica

Kona coffee S795 coffee

Charrieriana Liberica Robusta

Components

Cafestol Caffeic acid Caffeine Coffee
Coffee
bean Furan-2-ylmethanethiol

Processing

Coffee
Coffee
roasting Coffee
Coffee
wastewater Decaffeination Home roasting

Preparation

AeroPress Arabic coffee Brewed coffee Canned coffee Cezve Chorreador Coffeemaker Coffee
Coffee
syrup Cold brew Espresso

doppio lungo ristretto

Espresso
Espresso
machine French press Handpresso Hyper Text Coffee
Coffee
Pot Control Protocol Instant coffee Knockbox List of coffee dishes Moka pot Percolator Turkish coffee Vacuum maker

Coffee
Coffee
drinks

Affogato Americano Bica Bicerin Black Russian Cà phê sữa đá Café au lait Café de olla Café con leche Caffè crema Café Cubano Caffè mocha Café Touba Caffè corretto Café com Cheirinho Caffè macchiato Cappuccino Carajillo Coffee
Coffee
milk Cortado Espresso Flat white Frappuccino Galão Garoto Greek frappé coffee Iced coffee Indian filter coffee Ipoh white coffee Irish coffee Karsk Kopi Luwak Kopi tubruk Latte Latte
Latte
macchiato Liqueur coffee Long black Lungo Mazagran Oliang Red eye Ristretto Rüdesheimer Kaffee Tenom coffee Turkish coffee White coffee White Russian Wiener Melange Yuenyeung

Organisation lists

Coffee
Coffee
companies Coffeehouses

Lifestyle

Barista Caffè sospeso Coffee
Coffee
break Coffee
Coffee
ceremony CoffeeCon Coffee
Coffee
culture Coffee
Coffee
cupping Coffee
Coffee
Palace Coffeehouse Fika Kopi tiam Latte
Latte
art Viennese coffee house

Substitutes

Barley coffee Barley tea Barleycup Caro Chicory Dandelion coffee Inka Postum Qishr Roasted grain drink

Misc.

Coffee
Coffee
and doughnuts Coffee
Coffee
cup

Coffee
Coffee
cup sleeve Demitasse Tasse à café

Coffee
Coffee
leaf rust

King Gustav's twin experiment

Coffee
Coffee
vending machine Demitasse
Demitasse
spoon Single-serve coffee container Third wave of coffee

Coffee
Coffee
portal  Category: Coffee

v t e

Coffee
Coffee
in Seattle

Coffee
Coffee
roasters

Caffé Vita Espresso
Espresso
Vivace Seattle's Best Coffee Starbucks Tully's Coffee

Coffeehouses

bauhaus books + coffee Café Allegro Last Exit on Brooklyn Monorail Espresso Original Starbucks Top Pot Doughnuts

People

David Schomer Howard Schultz

Technology

Coffee
Coffee
Equipment Company

v t e

Seattle-based Corporations (within the Seattle
Seattle
metropolitan area)

Seattle
Seattle
and SeaTac-based Fortune 1000
Fortune 1000
corporations

Alaska Airlines
Alaska Airlines
(#482) Amazon.com (#49) Expeditors International
Expeditors International
(#428) Nordstrom
Nordstrom
(#227) Starbucks
Starbucks
(#208)

Puget Sound-based Fortune 1000
Fortune 1000
corporations

Companies listed above, plus: Costco
Costco
Wholesale (#22) Expedia Group
Expedia Group
(#515) Microsoft
Microsoft
(#35) Paccar
Paccar
(#168) Puget Sound Energy
Puget Sound Energy
(#703) Weyerhaeuser
Weyerhaeuser
(#363)

Major Seattle- and Puget Sound-based non-public or externally owned corporations

Big Fish Games Darigold Eddie Bauer Jones Soda Nash Holdings Nintendo
Nintendo
of America QFC REI Safeco T-Mobile
T-Mobile
US

v t e

Fast food
Fast food
and fast casual restaurant chains in the United States

Chicken chains Coffeehouse
Coffeehouse
chains Pizza chains

Hamburgers

A&W Arctic Circle Back Yard Big Boy BurgerFi Burger King Carl's Jr. Checkers/Rally's Cook Out Cheeburger Cheeburger Dairy Queen Fatburger Five Guys Freddy's Fuddruckers The Habit Hardee's Hwy 55 In-N-Out Jack in the Box Johnny Rockets Krystal McDonald's Red Robin Roy Rogers Shake Shack Smashburger Sonic Steak 'n Shake Wayback Wendy's Whataburger White Castle

Asian

L&L Hawaiian Barbecue Manchu Wok Panda Express Pei Wei Asian Diner P. F. Chang's China
China
Bistro Pick Up Stix

Baked goods

Au Bon Pain Auntie Anne's Bruegger's Cheesecake Factory Cinnabon Corner Bakery
Bakery
Cafe Dunkin' Donuts Einstein Bros. Great American Cookies Honey Dew Donuts Krispy Kreme Mrs. Fields Nestlé Toll House Panera Bread Pretzelmaker/Pretzel Time Shipley Do-Nuts Tim Hortons T.J. Cinnamons Wetzel's Winchell's

Beverages

Argo Tea Biggby Coffee Caribou Coffee
Coffee
Bean & Tea
Tea
Leaf Coffee
Coffee
Beanery Dunn Bros Gloria Jean's Jamba Juice Juice It Up! Orange Julius Peet's Planet Smoothie Robeks Seattle's Best Coffee Smoothie King Starbucks Teavana Tropical Smoothie Cafe Tully's

Frozen desserts

Baskin-Robbins Ben & Jerry's Braum's Bruster's Carvel Cold Stone Culver's Dairy Queen Dippin' Dots Fosters Freeze Friendly's Golden Spoon Graeter's Häagen-Dazs Handel's Kiwi Yogurt MaggieMoo's Marble Slab Menchie's Pinkberry Red Mango Rita's Sweet Frog Tastee-Freez TCBY Tropical Sno Tutti Frutti Yogen Früz Yogurtland

Hot dogs

Hot Dog on a Stick Nathan's Famous Portillo's Wienerschnitzel

Mexican-style / Tex-Mex

Baja Fresh Cafe Rio Chipotle Del Taco El Pollo Loco Freebirds Green/Red Burrito La Salsa Moe's Pancheros Qdoba Rubio's Taco Bell Taco Bueno Taco Cabana Taco del Mar Taco John's Taco Mayo Taco Time Tijuana Flats Wahoo's Fish Taco

Other

Fazoli's Noodles & Company Skyline Chili

Sandwiches

Arby's Atlanta Bread Blimpie Capriotti's Charley's Così Cousins D'Angelo Daphne's Erbert & Gerbert's Firehouse Subs Great Wraps Jason's Jerry's Subs Jersey Mike's Jimmy John's Lee's Sandwiches Lenny's Sub McAlister's Deli Miami Subs Newk's Eatery Penn Station Port of Subs Potbelly Primo Hoagies Quiznos Rax Sandella's Schlotzsky's Steak Escape Subway Togo's Tubby's Tudor's Biscuit World Which Wich?

Seafood

Arthur Treacher's Captain D's H. Salt Esquire Ivar's Long John Silver's Skippers Seafood
Seafood
& Chowder House

Defunct

Bresler's Brigham's Burger Chef Carrols D'Lites Druther's Henry's Hamburgers Hot 'n Now Hot Sam Pretzels Naugles Red Barn Sandy's White Tower Zantigo

v t e

Food chains in Australia

Casual dining

Hog's Breath Café La Porchetta Nando's Sizzler

Fast food

Bing Boy Boost Juice Bucking Bull Burger Urge Chicken Treat Chooks Fresh & Tasty Domino's Pizza Eagle Boys Fast Eddys Grill'd Guzman y Gomez Hungry Jack's
Hungry Jack's
(Burger King) KFC Mad Mex Fresh Mexican Grill McDonald's Noodle Box Oporto Pancake Parlour Pizza Capers Pizza Haven Pizza Showtime Red Rooster Salsa's Fresh Mex Grill Spudbar Sumo Salad Schnitz Uncle Tony's Kebabs Zambrero

Baked goods

Donut King Bakers Delight Breadtop Brumby's Bakeries Krispy Kreme Pie Face Subway

Coffeehouses and tea rooms

The Coffee
Coffee
Club Dôme Gloria Jean's
Gloria Jean's
Coffees Hudsons Coffee Jamaica
Jamaica
Blue McDonald's
McDonald's
McCafé Michel's Patisserie Muffin Break Muzz Buzz Shingle Inn Starbucks
Starbucks
Coffee Vittoria Coffee Zarraffas Coffee

Dairy

Baskin-Robbins Ben & Jerry's Cold Rock Ice Creamery Mr Whippy Wendy's
Wendy's
Supa Sundaes

List of restaurant chains in Australia

v t e

Restaurant chains in Ireland

Coffeehouse

AMT Coffee Butlers Chocolate Café Caffè Nero Caffè Ritazza Costa Coffee Esquires Gloria Jean's Insomnia Coffee
Coffee
Company Starbucks

Fast food
Fast food
restaurants

Abrakebabra Apache Pizza Burger King Domino's Pizza Four Star Pizza KFC McDonald's Supermac's

Casual dining

The Counter Eddie Rocket's Gourmet Burger Kitchen Hard Rock Café Harry Ramsden's Leo Burdock MAO Milano Nando's Pizza Hut T.G.I. Friday's Wagamama Zizzi

Sandwich
Sandwich
shops

O'Briens Quiznos Subway Upper Crust

v t e

Restaurant chains in Poland

Casual dining

Fabryka Pizzy Pizza Hut Chłopskie Jadło Sfinx

Coffee
Coffee
shops and tea rooms

A. Blikle Coffeeshop Company Cukiernia Sowa Caffè Nero Carte d'Or Costa Coffee E. Wedel Grycan Second Cup So! Coffee Starbucks Tchibo

Fast food
Fast food
restaurants

Blue Frog Burger King Conieco. Dairy Queen Domino’s Pizza Dunkin’ Donuts KFC McDonald's North Fish Subway Telepizza

v t e

Food chains in Taiwan

Coffeehouse

From USA

Starbucks Swensen's Cold Stone Creamery Dairy Queen

Local

85C Bakery
Bakery
Cafe Gong Cha Ten Ren Tea Dante Mr. Brown Chun Shui Tang EasyWay Chatime Quickly

Fast food
Fast food
restaurants

From USA

Burger King KFC McDonald's Pizza Hut Domino's Pizza Subway Lee's Sandwiches

From Japan

Ajisen Ramen Yoshinoya Pepper Lunch Sukiya Ichiran

Local

TKK Fried Chicken MOS Burger KLG Napoli Pizza

Casual dining

From USA

Chili's Gordon Biersch Hooters Outback Steakhouse Romano's Macaroni Grill Ruth's Chris Steak House T.G.I. Friday's

Local

Formosa Chang Sushi Express 3375 Steak my home noble Steak Wowprime Steak Tasty Tokiya ikki giguo 12hotpot chamonix Hot 7 yakiyan pinnada Grazie Tinopizza

Donut

Mister Donut Krispy Kreme

Former chains

Boston Market California Pizza Kitchen Hard Rock Cafe Planet Hollywood Wendy's

v t e

Food chains in the United Kingdom

Casual dining

Angus Steakhouse Ask Beefeater Grill Belgo Bella Italia Bill's Brewers Fayre Byron Hamburgers Café Rouge Carluccio's Chiquito Côte Damon's Dishoom Ed's Easy Diner Franco Manca Frankie & Benny's Giraffe Gourmet Burger Kitchen Harry Ramsden's Harvester Hungry Horse Jimmy's Restaurants Las Iguanas La Tasca Little Chef Loch Fyne Restaurants Nando's OK Diner Pizza Hut PizzaExpress Prezzo Sticks'n'Sushi Strada Table Table T.G.I. Friday's Toby Carvery Tony Roma's Wagamama Wahaca Wildwood Kitchen Zizzi

Fast food

Barburrito Burger King Chicken Cottage Chipotle Mexican Grill Dixy Chicken Domino's Pizza Five Guys KFC Leon McDonald's Morley's Papa John's Pizza Sam's Chicken Southern Fried Chicken Square Pie Subway Taco Bell Tops Pizza Tortilla Wasabi Wimpy YO! Sushi

Baked goods

Auntie Anne's Cinnabon Cooplands Dunkin' Donuts Eat Greggs Krispy Kreme Millie's Cookies Patisserie Valerie Poundbakery Pret a Manger Sayers Spudulike Upper Crust The West Cornwall Pasty Company

Coffee
Coffee
shops and tea rooms

AMT Coffee Betty's Caffè Nero Caffè Ritazza Coffee
Coffee
#1 Coffee
Coffee
Republic Costa Coffee Harris + Hoole Starbucks

Dairy

Baskin-Robbins Ben & Jerry's Kaspa's

Pub chains

All Bar One Chef & Brewer O'Neill's Slug and Lettuce Walkabout Wetherspoons Yates's

v t e

Companies of the NASDAQ-100
NASDAQ-100
index

21st Century Fox Activision Blizzard Adobe Systems Alexion Pharmaceuticals Align Technology Alphabet Amazon.com American Airlines Group Amgen Analog Devices Apple Applied Materials ASML Holding Autodesk Automatic Data Processing Baidu Biogen BioMarin Pharmaceutical Booking Holdings Broadcom Limited CA Technologies Cadence Design Systems Celgene Cerner Charter Communications Check Point Cintas Cisco Systems Citrix Systems Cognizant Comcast Costco CSX Ctrip.com International Dentsply Sirona Dish Network Dollar Tree eBay Electronic Arts Expedia Express Scripts Facebook Fastenal Fiserv Gilead Sciences Hasbro Henry Schein Hologic Idexx Laboratories Illumina Incyte Intel Intuit Intuitive Surgical J. B. Hunt
J. B. Hunt
Transport Services JD.com KLA-Tencor Kraft Heinz Lam Research Liberty Global Liberty Interactive Marriott International Maxim Integrated
Maxim Integrated
Products MercadoLibre Microchip Technology Micron Technology Microsoft Mondelez International Monster Beverage Mylan NetEase Netflix Nvidia O'Reilly Auto Parts Paccar Paychex PayPal Qualcomm Regeneron Ross Stores Seagate Technology Shire Sirius XM Holdings Skyworks Solutions Starbucks Symantec Synopsys T-Mobile
T-Mobile
US Take-Two Interactive Tesla, Inc. Texas Instruments Ulta Beauty Verisk Analytics Vertex Pharmaceuticals Vodafone Walgreens Boots Alliance Western Digital Workday Wynn Resorts Xilinx

v t e

PepsiCo

Corporate directors

Indra Nooyi
Indra Nooyi
( Chairman
Chairman
& CEO) Robert Eugene Allen Dina Dublon Alberto Ibargüen Steven Reinemund

Pepsi

Diet Pepsi Pepsi
Pepsi
Max (North America and International versions) Pepsi
Pepsi
Next Pepsi-Cola Made with Real Sugar Jazz Diet Kas Izze Mountain Dew Manzanita Sol Mirinda Mist Twst Mug Root Beer Slice 7 Up
7 Up
(outside United States) Amp Energy Aquafina Ethos Water
Ethos Water
(under license) Lipton
Lipton
(Brisk Iced Tea) (under license) No Fear (under license) Ocean Spray (under license) Frappuccino
Frappuccino
(under license) Starbucks
Starbucks
(under license) SoBe Shani Duke's Lemonade Duke's Mangola

Frito-Lay (Canada)

Lay's Ruffles Doritos Tostitos Fritos Cheetos Rold Gold Funyuns Sun Chips Cracker Jack Munchos Smartfood Oberto (distributed) Hostess Lay's
Lay's
Stax Miss Vickie's Munchies Walkers Sabritas Smith's Bluebird Gamesa Kurkure Uncle Chipps Sabra (49%)

Tropicana Products

Copella Dole (under license) Naked Tropicana Tropolis

Quaker Oats Company

Quaker Instant Oatmeal Cap'n Crunch Life Quisp King Vitaman Oh's Aunt Jemima Chewy Granola Bars Rice-A-Roni Toddy Scott's Porage Oats Tchudo

Gatorade

Propel Fitness Water

Other holdings

Lebedyansky Sandora Simba Wimm-Bill-Dann Duke and Sons Pepsi
Pepsi
P1

Authority control

WorldCat Identities LCCN: no95039213 ISNI: 0000 0001 2222 5399 GND: 46333

.