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Stacy Renée Dragila (née Mikaelson; born 25 March 1971 in Auburn, California) is an American former pole vaulter.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Pole Vaulting 3 Professional 4 International competitions 5 National titles 6 References 7 External links

Early life[edit]

Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
standing in front of her photographic statue while being inducted into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame

Stacy grew up in the rural town of Auburn. When her older brother Eric got involved with Rodeo, she followed him into the sport. She also participated in gymnastics, but had to give it up due to childhood asthma. She attended Placer Union High School where she played volleyball and ran on the track team as a sprinter, hurdler and jumper. Early on, she didn't feel she was living up to her potential. She got coaching from Yuba Community College's John Orognen. She managed to get to the finals of the 300 meters hurdles at the CIF California
California
State Meet, but didn't place.[1] She placed second at the Golden West Invitational in the 400 meters hurdles.[2] After high school, she continued to Yuba College and continued with Orognen, working on hurdles and eventually spreading her effort to the heptathlon. Her primary focus was to gain a track scholarship to a four-year school. Orognen was diagnosed with lung cancer. From his death bed he advised her to pursue her dreams without compromise. Dave Nielsen offered the promising heptathlete a scholarship to Idaho State University. While there, her scores improved to the respectable range of 4,700 to 4,800 points, but she seemed to reach a ceiling. She also married Iraq war veteran Brent Dragila. Pole Vaulting[edit] An ex-pole vaulter, Nielsen got her to try the pole vault. At the time it was not an official event for women. She reluctantly gave it a try to appease her coach. She showed no aptitude for the event. But with Nielsen's coaching and body control coaching from his wife, Joy Umenhofer who coached for the United States
United States
Tumbling & Trampoline team, she was able to get the hang of it. She cleared 10 feet in 1994 and was surprised when Track and Field News published the mark as an American record. As the women's pole vault was becoming a demonstration sport, she vaulted at more and more competitions. She cleared 11 feet in 1995 at the BYU Cougar Track Invitational., 11'2" at the Prefontaine Classic and almost 11'6" as a demonstration at the USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships. The national championships qualified her to compete with the U.S. team in Great Britain. She joined the European track circuit where her marks continued to improve. The sport gained popularity during the season, with China's Sun Caiyun, Czech Republic's Daniela Bártová and Australia's Emma George attempting to set new world records at every meet before her eyes as Stacy improved to over 12 feet. After graduating, Nielsen gave her a job as assistant coach, which she supplemented by working as a waitress. Her improvement continued, clearing 13 feet in January 1996. By June she was up to 13' 9" The Olympic Trials held the women's pole vault as a demonstration event, which Stacy won by a foot. But there was no Olympics for her that year.[3] Professional[edit]

Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
accepting her induction into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame

The first ever women's pole vault world championship was held at the 1997 IAAF
IAAF
World Indoor Championships. All the top vaulters were there and Stacy took the gold medal, setting a new indoor world record in the process. Along with the win came $25,000 in prize money, but the IAAF
IAAF
instead disqualified her from the prize money because Stacy's skimpy outfit didn't leave room for the sponsor's bib number. It took a succession of apologetic letters to collect her prize. Though she tried, sponsorships were hard to come by. Athletic women pole vaulting in skimpy outfits attracted the public's attention, but the event was not yet scheduled for the outdoor World Championships or Olympics. The vigorous move to Olympic status started before the 17,000 strong crowd at the 1998 Millrose Games, with Stacy attempting a world record over 14'6" at the end of a battle with Janine Whitlock of Great Britain. In the next weeks, Emma George kept improving the world record, becoming the first woman over 15 feet, Stacy was right there in position to challenge until a stress fracture curtailed her season. At the invitation of Amy Acuff, Stacy posed for a calendar to benefit the Florence Griffith Joyner
Florence Griffith Joyner
Foundation. The photo attracted attention and turned Stacy into a hot commodity for photo sessions with Vogue and W. Suddenly, sponsors were calling her. While others, including Tatiana Grigorieva, Kellie Suttle and Melissa Mueller were improving the records, it increased the popularity of the sport and increased the prize money. When the Santa Barbara Beach Vault offered $100,000 to the first woman to clear 15 feet, Stacy cashed in.[4] With all this popularity, the IOC
IOC
had little choice but to include the women's pole vault in the 2000 Olympic program.[5] The first outdoor world championship was held at the 1999 World Championships in Athletics. While Emma George had a bad day competitively, Stacy took not only the gold medal but George's world record, which George would never get back. With the new rule allowing indoor marks to be counted as world records, Stacy continued to improve the world record and held it continuously for almost four years, save a 6-day period when Svetlana Feofanova
Svetlana Feofanova
took the record in the 2001 indoor season. Yelena Isinbayeva finally took the record in 2003 and is still the current world record holder. At the 2000 Summer Olympics
2000 Summer Olympics
she won the first gold medal in women's pole vaulting dramatically coming from behind to beat the former Soviet turned Australian Grigorieva on home turf. She also repeated gold at the 2001 World Championships in Athletics. She is a 2-time Jesse Owens Award
Jesse Owens Award
winner (2000, 2001). Her best mark in the pole vault is 4.83 metres, set in Ostrava
Ostrava
in 2004. She divorced Brent in 2006.[6] Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
resides in San Diego, California
California
and is the founder of Altius Track Club. She made the 2009 World Championships in Athletics
2009 World Championships in Athletics
her final major championship and she finished with a jump of 4.25 m, not progressing to the pole vault final.[7] Dragila was one of the foremost athletes in the early years of women's pole vaulting, winning the gold medal at the first three major pole vaulting championships. Her best vault of 4.83 m set in 2004 was significantly higher than other female vaulters of her generation.[8] While she jumped 4.70m at age 37, her 4.55m at age 38 in 2009 is the ratified W35 Masters World Record. Dragila married American discus thrower Ian Waltz and welcomed daughter Allyx (an alternative spelling of the standard 'Alex') Josephine Waltz on June 21, 2010.[9] In 2014, she was elected into the National Track and Field Hall of Fame.[10] Dragila Way, on the campus of Idaho State University
Idaho State University
is named in her honor. International competitions[edit]

Year Competition Venue Position Notes

1997 World Indoor Championships Paris, France 1st Pole vault

1999 World Championships Seville, Spain 1st Pole vault

2000 Olympic Games Sydney, Australia 1st Pole vault

2001 World Championships Edmonton, Alberta 1st Pole vault

2001 Goodwill Games Brisbane, Australia 1st Pole vault

2003 World Athletics Final Fontvieille, Monaco 1st Pole vault

2004 World Indoor Championships Budapest, Hungary 2nd Pole vault

National titles[edit]

USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships

Pole vault
Pole vault
(9): 1996†, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

USA Indoor Track and Field Championships

Pole vault
Pole vault
(8): 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004

† The 1996 contest was a non-championship event References[edit]

^ http://lynbrooksports.prepcaltrack.com/ATHLETICS/TRACK/1990/gwi_res.pdf ^ http://lynbrooksports.prepcaltrack.com/ATHLETICS/TRACK/1990/gwi_res.pdf ^ https://www.usatf.org/statistics/champions/OlympicTrials/HistoryOfTheOlympicTrials.pdf ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-27. Retrieved 2014-12-22.  ^ http://www.jockbio.com/Bios/Dragila/Dragila_bio.html ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-22. Retrieved 2014-12-22.  ^ Landells, Steve (2009-08-15). Event Report - Women's Pole Vault - Qualification. IAAF. Retrieved on 2009-08-16. ^ [1] ^ http://trackfield.teamusa.org/news/2010/09/27/a-decade-later-stacy-dragila/38733 ^ http://www.usatf.org/Athlete-Bios/Hall-of-Fame/2014-Hall-of-Fame-Bios/Stacy-Renee-Mikaelsen-Dragila.aspx

External links[edit]

Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
profile at IAAF Her profile from USA Track & Field

Records

Preceded by Emma George Women's pole vault world record holder August 21, 1999 – July 13, 2003 Succeeded by Yelena Isinbayeva

Awards

Preceded by Marion Jones Women's Track & Field Athlete of the Year 2001 Succeeded by Paula Radcliffe

v t e

Olympic champions in women's pole vault

2000:  Stacy Dragila (USA) 2004:  Yelena Isinbayeva (RUS) 2008:  Yelena Isinbayeva (RUS) 2012:  Jenn Suhr (USA) 2016:  Katerina Stefanidi (GRE)

v t e

IAAF World Championships in Athletics
IAAF World Championships in Athletics
champions in women's pole vault

1999: Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
(USA) 2001: Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
(USA) 2003: Svetlana Feofanova
Svetlana Feofanova
(RUS) 2005: Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(RUS) 2007: Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(RUS) 2009: Anna Rogowska
Anna Rogowska
(POL) 2011: Fabiana Murer
Fabiana Murer
(BRA) 2013: Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(RUS) 2015: Yarisley Silva
Yarisley Silva
(CUB) 2017: Katerina Stefanidi
Katerina Stefanidi
(GRE)

v t e

World Indoor Champions in women's pole vault

1997: Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
(USA) 1999: Nastja Ryshich (GER) 2001: Pavla Hamáčková (CZE) 2003: Svetlana Feofanova
Svetlana Feofanova
(RUS) 2004 – 2008: Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(RUS) 2010: Fabiana Murer
Fabiana Murer
(BRA) 2012: Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(RUS) 2014: Yarisley Silva
Yarisley Silva
(CUB) 2016: Jenn Suhr
Jenn Suhr
(USA) 2018: Sandi Morris
Sandi Morris
(USA)

v t e

US National Championship winners in women's pole vault

1996†–97: Stacy Dragila 1998: Kellie Suttle 1999–2005: Stacy Dragila 2006–10: Jenn Suhr 2011: Kylie Hutson 2012–16: Jenn Suhr 2017: Sandi Morris

Notes

Since 2000 the championships has incorporated the Olympic Trials in Olympic years.

The 1996 contest was a non-championship event

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World Best Year Performance in Women's Pole Vault

1991: Zhang Chunzhen (CHN) 1992–1994: Sun Caiyun (CHN) 1995–1998: Emma George (AUS) 1999: Emma George (AUS) and Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
(USA) 2000–2001: Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
(USA) 2002: Svetlana Feofanova
Svetlana Feofanova
(RUS) 2003–2009: Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(RUS) 2010–2013: Jenn Suhr
Jenn Suhr
(USA) 2014: Fabiana Murer
Fabiana Murer
(BRA) 2015: Yarisley Silva
Yarisley Silva
(CUB) 2016: Jenn Suhr
Jenn Suhr
(USA) 2017: Katerina Stefanidi
Katerina Stefanidi
(GRE)

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IAAF
IAAF
World Athlete of the Year (women)

Florence Griffith Joyner
Florence Griffith Joyner
(1988) Ana Fidelia Quirot (1989) Merlene Ottey
Merlene Ottey
(1990) Katrin Krabbe
Katrin Krabbe
(1991) Heike Henkel
Heike Henkel
(1992) Sally Gunnell
Sally Gunnell
(1993) Jackie Joyner-Kersee
Jackie Joyner-Kersee
(1994) Gwen Torrence (1995) Svetlana Masterkova (1996) Marion Jones
Marion Jones
(1997–98) Gabriela Szabo
Gabriela Szabo
(1999) Marion Jones
Marion Jones
(2000) Stacy Dragila
Stacy Dragila
(2001) Paula Radcliffe
Paula Radcliffe
(2002) Hestrie Cloete (2003) Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(2004–05) Sanya Richards (2006) Meseret Defar
Meseret Defar
(2007) Yelena Isinbayeva
Yelena Isinbayeva
(2008) Sanya Richards (2009) Blanka Vlašić
Blanka Vlašić
(2010) Sally Pearson
Sally Pearson
(2011) Allyson Felix
Allyson Felix
(2012) Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
(2013) Valerie Adams
Valerie Adams
(2014) Genzebe Dibaba
Genzebe Dibaba
(2015) Almaz Ayana
Almaz Ayana
(2016) Nafissatou Thiam
Nafissatou Thiam
(2017)

v t e

2000 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

2000 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Abdi Abdirahman Kenny Brokenburr (r) John Capel James Carter Curt Clausen Tony Cosey Mark Crear Mark Croghan Alan Culpepper Rod DeHaven Pascal Dobert Jon Drummond Philip Dunn Mark Everett Adam Goucher Maurice Greene Alvin Harrison Calvin Harrison (r) Brad Hauser Floyd Heard Andrew Hermann Gabe Jennings Allen Johnson Curtis Johnson Michael Johnson Meb Keflezighi Rich Kenah Brian Lewis (r) Coby Miller Tim Montgomery (r) Antonio Pettigrew Jason Pyrah Nick Rogers Tim Seaman Michael Stember Angelo Taylor Eric Thomas Terrence Trammell Bernard Williams (r) Bryan Woodward Jerome Young (r)

Men's field athletes

Charles Austin Andy Bloom LaMark Carter Walter Davis Lance Deal Kenny Evans John Godina Breaux Greer Chad Harting Robert Howard Chris Huffins Nick Hysong Kip Janvrin Lawrence Johnson Nathan Leeper Melvin Lister Jud Logan Kevin McMahon Adam Nelson Tom Pappas Dwight Phillips Adam Setliff Savanté Stringfellow Anthony Washington

Women's track & road athletes

Andrea Anderson (r) Kim Batten Tonja Buford-Bailey Yueling Chen Chris Clark Hazel Clark Joetta Clark Diggs LaTasha Colander-Richardson Michelle Collins Sharon Couch Shayne Culpepper Gail Devers Deena Drossin Elva Dryer Torri Edwards Chryste Gaines Sandra Glover Suzy Favor Hamilton Monique Hennagan Libbie Hickman Marion Jones Anne Marie Lauck Debbi Lawrence Jearl Miles-Clark Melissa Morrison Nanceen Perry Jennifer Rhines Passion Richardson (r) Michelle Rohl Amy Rudolph Marla Runyan

Women's field athletes

Amy Acuff Erin Aldrich Lynda Blutreich Dawn Burrell Shelia Burrell Jesseca Cross Karol Damon Stacy Dragila Dawn Ellerbe Nicole Gamble Marion Jones Kris Kuehl Mel Mueller DeDee Nathan Amy Palmer Suzy Powell Connie Price-Smith Seilala Sua Kellie Suttle Teri Tunks Shana Williams

Coaches

John Chaplin (men's head coach) Dick Booth (men's assistant coach) Dixon Farmer (men's assistant coach) Rob Johnson (men's assistant coach) John Moon (men's assistant coach) Jerry Quiller (men's assistant coach) Jay Silvester
Jay Silvester
(men's assistant coach) Bubba Thornton (men's assistant coach) Karen Dennis (women's head coach) Sandy Fowler (women's assistant coach) Ernest Gregoire (women's assistant coach) Judy Harrison (women's assistant coach) Rita Somerlot (women's assistant coach) LaVerne Sweat (women's assistant coach) Mark Young (women's assistant coach)

v t e

2004 USA Olympic Track & Field Team

Qualification

2004 United States
United States
Olympic Trials (track and field)

Men's track & road athletes

Abdihakem Abdirahman Bennie Brazell Derrick Brew Tim Broe Dan Browne James Carter Curt Clausen Shawn Crawford Alan Culpepper Philip Dunn Kevin Eastler Anthony Famiglietti Robert Gary Justin Gatlin Maurice Greene Charlie Gruber Otis Harris Allen Johnson Jonathan Johnson Meb Keflezighi Daniel Lincoln Coby Miller John Nunn Darvis Patton Derrick Peterson Jonathon Riley Dathan Ritzenhein Grant Robison Khadevis Robinson Andrew Rock Duane Ross Tim Seaman Angelo Taylor Terrence Trammell Jeremy Wariner Alan Webb Bernard Williams Darold Williamson Kelly Willie

Men's field athletes

Kenta Bell Bryan Clay Walter Davis John Godina Breaux Greer Tora Harris Matt Hemingway Reese Hoffa A. G. Kruger Melvin Lister Timothy Mack Casey Malone Derek Miles John Moffitt Adam Nelson Jamie Nieto Tom Pappas James Parker Dwight Phillips Jarred Rome Toby Stevenson Paul Terek Ian Waltz

Women's track & road athletes

Hazel Clark Jearl Miles Clark LaTasha Colander Crystal Cox Shayne Culpepper Colleen De Reuck Lashinda Demus Gail Devers Elva Dryer Allyson Felix Shalane Flanagan Joanna Hayes Monique Henderson Monique Hennagan Sheena Johnson Marion Jones Deena Kastor Muna Lee LaShauntea Moore Melissa Morrison Kate O'Neill Jennifer Rhines Sanya Richards Moushaumi Robinson Marla Runyan Brenda Taylor Nicole Teter Carrie Tollefson DeeDee Trotter Teresa Vaill Angela Williams Lauryn Williams

Women's field athletes

Amy Acuff Stephanie Brown Shelia Burrell Stacy Dragila Laura Gerraughty Erin Gilreath Kristin Heaston Aretha Hill Chaunté Howard Tiombe Hurd Jackie Jeschelnig Marion Jones Kim Kreiner Tiffany Lott-Hogan Anna Mahon Yuliana Pérez Michelle Perry Rose Richmond Jillian Schwartz Seilala Sua Kellie Suttle Grace Upshaw Tisha Waller

Coach

.