St Andrew's Church, Rugby
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The Church of St Andrew is a
Church of England The Church of England (C of E) is a Christian church Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Critic ...
parish church A parish church (or parochial church) in Christianity Christianity is an Abrahamic religions, Abrahamic, Monotheism, monotheistic religion based on the Life of Jesus in the New Testament, life and Teachings of Jesus, teachings of Jesus, Je ...
in the centre of
Rugby Rugby may refer to: Sports Rugby codes * Rugby football in various forms: ** Rugby league: 13 players per side *** Masters Rugby League *** Mod league *** Rugby league nines *** Rugby league sevens *** Touch (sport) *** Wheelchair rugby league ** ...
, in
Warwickshire Warwickshire (; abbreviated Warks) is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers ( ...

Warwickshire
, England. It is a
grade II* listed building A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England Historic England (officially the Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England) is an executive ...
. It is unique in having two peals of bells hung in separate towers and is part of the
Major Churches Network The Major Churches Network, founded in 1991 as the Greater Churches Network, is a group of Church of England parish churches defined as having exceptional significance, being physically very large (over 1000m2 footprint), listed as Grade I, II* (o ...
.


History

The first record of a church at the site was from 1140, originally as a
chapel A chapel is a Christian place of prayer and worship that is usually relatively small. The term has several meanings. Firstly, smaller spaces inside a church that have their own altar are often called chapels; the Lady chapel is a common type ...
of the mother church at nearby Clifton-upon-Dunsmore, until Rugby became a parish in 1221. Nothing remains of the original church, as it was rebuilt in either the 13th or 14th century. The oldest surviving part of the church is the high west tower, which is unusual in that its appearance and construction bears strong resemblance to that of a castle tower, meaning it was likely built to serve a defensive as well as religious role. According to a local legend, the tower was built from stones from a castle at Rugby, which had been demolished on the orders of King Henry II of England, Henry II, who Adulterine castle, forbade private fortifications without royal approval, however there was no prohibition against fortified churches, and so the tower may have been constructed, nominally as an addition to the church, but in reality as a way to provide a place of defence, while still conforming to the statute. The west tower is usually dated to the 14th century, but was possibly built during the reign of King Henry III of England, Henry III (1216–1272), and is Rugby's oldest building. The church has other artefacts of medieval Rugby including the 13th-century parish chest, and a medieval baptismal font, font. In order to cater for the growing population of the town, the church was Victorian restoration, extensively rebuilt on a much larger footprint in the 19th century, to the designs of William Butterfield, retaining only the tower and nave arcade from the medieval church. These works were carried out between 1877 and 1879. From 1895 to 1896, further additions were made to the church by Ewan Christian to Butterfield's original designs, including a new east tower, added in 1895 which has a spire high. Very unusually, both of the church towers have Change ringing, ringable bells, the main peal of bells (all cast in 1896 by Whitechapel Bell Foundry, Mears & Stainbank, London) being located in the eastern tower, and the old peal (all cast in 1711 by Joseph Smith of Edgbaston) located in the western tower. On 11 October 1949, the church was designated a
grade II* listed building A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England Historic England (officially the Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England) is an executive ...
.


Architecture

The church is built from Bath stone with some detailing in red Alton stone, and is set under a grey slate roof. It has been described as representing "a competent Victorian design with distinctive elements and style strongly influenced by early medieval English architecture." The design of the church's east tower and spire bears resemblance to Butterfield's other works, such as St Peter's Cathedral, Adelaide, Adelaide Cathedral.


Present day

St Andrew's stands in the Liberal Anglo-Catholicism, liberal catholic Churchmanship, tradition of the
Church of England The Church of England (C of E) is a Christian church Christian Church is a Protestant Protestantism is a form of Christianity that originated with the 16th-century Reformation, a movement against what its followers perceived to be Critic ...
.


Notable clergy

* Robin Gill (priest), Robin Gill, theologian, served his curacy here from 1968 to 1971 * Geoffrey Studdert Kennedy, known as "Woodbine Willie", served his curacy here before the First World War.


Gallery

St Andrew's Church from Regent Street, Rugby, 3.21.jpg, The east tower spire seen from Regent Street St Andrew's Church, Rugby (1825 drawing).jpg, Drawing of the church from 1825, prior to its expansion and addition of the second tower St Andrew's Church 3.21.jpg, The church seen from the south Old tower St Andrews Church, Jan 2006.jpg, Close up of the Medieval west tower Interior of St Andrew's Church, Rugby (2) 10.21.jpg, Interior


References


External links


Church website

A Church Near You entry
{{DEFAULTSORT:Rugby, Saint Andrew Grade II* listed churches in Warwickshire 14th-century church buildings in England William Butterfield buildings Buildings and structures in Rugby, Warwickshire Church of England church buildings in Warwickshire Anglo-Catholic church buildings in Warwickshire Fortified church buildings in England