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The Spokane Chiefs
Spokane Chiefs
are a major junior ice hockey team that plays in the Western Hockey League
Western Hockey League
based out of Spokane, Washington. The team plays its home games at the Spokane Arena. Their uniforms are similar to those of the NHL's Montreal Canadiens. Spokane consistently ranks in the top 10 in the Canadian Hockey League
Canadian Hockey League
in attendance.[1] The Chiefs won the Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
in 1991 and 2008. They also hosted the first-ever outdoor hockey game in WHL history, on January 15, 2011, at Avista Stadium
Avista Stadium
versus the Kootenay Ice.

Contents

1 History 2 Outdoor hockey game 3 Players

3.1 Current roster 3.2 NHL alumni

4 Club records 5 Season-by-season record

5.1 Regular season

6 WHL Championship history 7 Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
finals history

7.1 Playoff history

8 Executives

8.1 Head coaches and all-time regular season records 8.2 General managers

9 Radio and television coverage 10 Arenas

10.1 Spokane Arena
Spokane Arena
hockey attendance records 10.2 Chiefs attendance averages and WHL attendance rank

11 See also 12 References 13 External links

History[edit]

The Chiefs line up for a game with the Tri-City Americans.

The Spokane Chiefs
Spokane Chiefs
was also the name of the hockey team that played in the Western International Hockey League from 1982 to 1985. In their final year the Chiefs were the regular-season champions of the WIHL.[2] The current franchise was granted in 1982 to Kelowna, British Columbia as the Kelowna Wings. In 1985, the team relocated to Spokane, Washington and became the Chiefs. Before the Spokane Chiefs, there was another WHL franchise in Spokane, the Spokane Flyers, which played between 1980–1982. The Chiefs won the WHL and CHL Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
championships in 1991 and 2008. In addition, they have won two division titles and four Western Conference championships. The Chiefs and Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
are the only United States
United States
based teams to win the Memorial Cup. The Chiefs were also the first team in the history of the Western Hockey League to come back from an 0–3 deficit to win a best-of-seven series, which they did against the Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
in 1996; the feat has happened only one other time, when the Kelowna Rockets
Kelowna Rockets
came back from an 0-3 deficit to defeat the Seattle Thunderbirds
Seattle Thunderbirds
in 2013. The 1991 Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
team included future NHL players: Ray Whitney, Pat Falloon, Trevor Kidd, Jon Klemm, and Scott Bailey. This team of future NHL'ers blew through the Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
Tournament, scoring a goal in the first couple of minutes of virtually every game. The Chiefs' move to the new Spokane Arena
Spokane Arena
in 1995 proved to be good luck. Along with being called the gem of the Western Hockey League, the Arena hosted many memorable events in the first year and saw the Chiefs win 50 games and advance to the WHL finals, only to lose in five games to the Brandon Wheat Kings.

The Chiefs won the Western Conference Championship cup in 1991, 1996, 2000 and 2008.

Just two years later, the Chiefs hosted the 1998 Memorial Cup, setting an attendance record at the time. In the 1999–00 season head coach Mike Babcock
Mike Babcock
led the team from a last place finish the previous year to a first place, 47 win season. The Chiefs advanced to play the Kootenay Ice
Kootenay Ice
in the WHL finals, but lost in six games. Between 2001 and 2005, the Chiefs struggled to find an identity. The organization went through three head coaches in five years: Perry Ganchar (resigned), Al Conroy (fired) and Bill Peters. Still Spokane fans, known for their robust support, continued to turn out. The Chiefs consistently average 6,000–7,000 fans per game, one of the top figures in the Western and Canadian Hockey Leagues. The Chiefs are also known for a goal celebration often called the 'best in junior hockey.' [3] In 1999, the fans were named the best in the WHL. On Saturday nights, often referred to as 'Hockey Night in Spokane', the Spokane Arena
Spokane Arena
is generally sold out, and sellouts are expected when the Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
come to town.

The Chiefs lower the Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
via rope, from the roof of the Spokane Arena
Spokane Arena
on Opening Night 2008. Four months earlier, the Cup broke in the Chiefs hands during the celebration in Kitchener, Ontario.

The 2007–08 season produced the most wins by a Spokane Chiefs
Spokane Chiefs
team since the 1999–00 season, a season which saw the Chiefs go to the WHL Finals. The team, backed by a solid goaltending tandem and an offensive attack led by Carolina Hurricanes
Carolina Hurricanes
draft pick Drayson Bowman, ranked in the top ten of the CHL for most of the season, and reached the #1 spot in late February. In one of the greatest series in WHL history the Chiefs beat their arch-rival, the Tri-City Americans, 4 games to 3 in the Western Conference finals to earn a spot in the 2008 WHL Finals. Five of the 7 games went into overtime, including 3 games decided in double overtime. In the Finals, the Chiefs outscored the Lethbridge Hurricanes
Lethbridge Hurricanes
15–5 and swept the series 4–0, just as they did in the 1991 WHL playoffs, to earn a trip to the Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
in Kitchener, Ontario. The Chiefs skated to a perfect 3–0 round robin record en route to their 2nd Memorial Cup, defeating the host Kitchener Rangers
Kitchener Rangers
4–1 in the championship game. The Chiefs remain the only U.S. team ever to win the Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
on Canadian soil. The Chiefs and the Portland Winterhawks
Portland Winterhawks
would make history again in the playoffs in 2010, as Portland beat Spokane in the Western Conference quarterfinals, 4 games to 3. It is the only series in Western Hockey League
Western Hockey League
history in which the home team didn't win a game. On May 4, 2010 the Chiefs announced they declined to exercise the option on Hardy Sauter's contract, thereby ending his two-year stint as the team's head coach.[4] Weeks later, speculation begin swirling when former Tri-City coach Don Nachbaur unexpectedly resigned from a coaching position in the AHL. Just hours later, Nachbaur was named the new head coach of the Chiefs, further sparking the heated rivalry between Tri-City and Spokane.[5] Nachbaur's first season as head coach would be one filled with low expectations. Most picked Spokane to finish at or near the bottom of the Western Conference. But Nachbaur's Chiefs finished the season with 102 points- the third highest total in team history, and only one point away from the regular season Western Conference crown. Led by sniper and Tampa Bay Lightning
Tampa Bay Lightning
prospect Tyler Johnson, the Chiefs led the league in goals scored and power play goals. The surprising Chiefs would also allow the second fewest goals in the league, led by Ottawa Senators prospect Jared Cowen. Spokane would advance to the Western Conference finals, only to lose to Portland four games to two. Nachbaur was named WHL Coach of the Year for 2011 - becoming the only coach in WHL history to win the honor with three different teams (Spokane, Seattle and Tri-City). Outdoor hockey game[edit] During the 2010 offseason, the Chiefs and the Western Hockey League announced the WHL's first-ever outdoor hockey game would be played in Spokane on January 15, 2011 between the Chiefs and the Kootenay Ice. While the game was welcomed with great excitement in Spokane, many fans questioned the location of the 7,000-seat Avista Stadium- the home of the Spokane Indians
Spokane Indians
baseball club. Joe Albi Stadium, a 28,000-seat facility that usually hosts high school and college football, was thought to be a much-better choice. Chiefs owner Bobby Brett, who also owns the Indians baseball team, said the Chiefs could not reach an agreement with the city on using Joe Albi.

The Chiefs hosted the Kootenay Ice
Kootenay Ice
in the WHL's first-ever outdoor hockey game at Avista Stadium
Avista Stadium
in Spokane. The Chiefs won the game 11-2.

Brett also had liability concerns regarding the astroturf installed at Albi. In the end, the game was played at Avista Stadium
Avista Stadium
in front of a sell-out crowd of 7,075- though ticket prices did make a sell-out uncertain until the last minute. While they enjoyed the experience, many fans complained about the view from their seats at Avista Stadium. Fans who bought front-row tickets discovered they were eye-level with the side boards, making only the upper-part of the players' bodies visible and making it impossible to see the puck.[6] Construction crews begin their work at Avista Stadium
Avista Stadium
the week after New Year's. A platform was constructed between first and third base on the baseball field, and then the ice refrigeration unit was placed on top of the platform. It took crews about one week to have the ice rink ready to go. Weather played a critical role in the lead up to the game and on game day itself. Initial forecasts called for arctic temperatures and more than a foot of snow falling on January 15. That changed the week of the game, when a warm pacific storm barrled through the northwest and melted nearly a foot of snow already on the ground in Spokane. To the disappointment of many fans, the temperatures on game-day reached 50-degrees and there was no snow. As if on cue, moments before the puck dropped, the sun tucked behind the clouds and didn't show for the rest of the day, providing near-perfect viewing conditions. The Chiefs ended up winning the game 11-2 over Kootenay, as nine different players scored for Spokane. Brett and the Chiefs organization have said it is very unlikely an outdoor game would ever be played in Spokane again, although the following day general manager Tim Speltz did leave open the possibility of hosting a game at Joe Albi Stadium. Players[edit] Current roster[edit]

Number Player Position Birth year Hometown

NHL team

2 Luke Gallagher* D 2000 Spokane, Washington

Eligible 2018

3 Matt Leduc* D 2000 Richmond, British Columbia

Eligible 2018

4 Jeff Faith D 1998 Wilcox, Saskatchewan

Undrafted

6 Tyson Helgesen (C) D 1997 Fairview, Alberta

Undrafted

7 Nolan Reid D 1998 Deer Valley, Saskatchewan

Undrafted

8 Jake McGrew* RW 1999 Orange, California

2017, 159nd Overall, SJS

9 Keanu Yamamoto RW 1996 Spokane, Washington

Undrafted

10 Ethan McIndoe LW 1999 Camrose, Alberta

Undrafted

11 Jaret Anderson-Dolan C 1999 Calgary, Alberta

2017, 41nd Overall, LAK

12 Alex Mowbray RW 1996 Calgary, Alberta

Undrafted

13 Riley Woods LW 1998 Regina, Saskatchewan

Undrafted

16 Taylor Ross LW 1998 Kronau, Saskatchewan

Undrafted

17 Kailer Yamamoto RW 1998 Spokane, Washington

2017, 22nd Overall, EDM

20 Hayden Ostir RW 1999 Winnipeg, Manitoba

Undrafted

21 Pavel Kousal* LW 1998 Jihlava, Czech Republic

Undrafted

23 Jake Toporowski D 1998 Bettendorf, Iowa

Undrafted

24 Ty Smith* D 2000 Lloydminster, Alberta

Eligible 2018

25 Ondrej Najma]* C 1998 Jihlava, Czech Republic

Undrafted

26 Hudson Elynuik C 1997 Calgary, Alberta

2016, 162nd Overall, CAR

27 Riley McKay* LW 1999 Swan River, Manitoba

Undrafted

28 Rykr Cole LW 1997 Moosomin, Saskatchewan

Undrafted

29 Eli Zummack* C 2000 Kelowna, British Columbia

Eligible 2018

32 Dalton Hamaliuk D 1998 Leduc, Alberta

Undrafted

33 Jayden Sittler G 1996 Red Deer, Alberta

Undrafted

37 Dawson Weatherill* G 1999 Red Deer, Alberta

Undrafted

Asterisk indicates rookie NHL alumni[edit]

Mike Babcock
Mike Babcock
- Coach Scott Bailey Mike Berger Rick Berry Maxim Bets Drayson Bowman Valeri Bure Marian Cisar Jared Cowen Rocky Dundas Pat Falloon Justin Falk Brad Ference Link Gaetz Troy Gamble

Perry Ganchar - Coach Brent Gilchrist Butch Goring
Butch Goring
- Coach Michael Grabner Travis Green Ian Herbers Justin Hocking Tony Horacek Jan Hrdina Tyler Johnson Ty Jones Steve Junker Matt Keith Trevor Kidd Jon Klemm

Zenith Komarniski Jason Labarbera Greg Leeb Jamie Linden Darcy Loewen Lynn Loyns Doug Lynch Bryan Maxwell - Coach Bryan McCabe Jamie McLennan Brantt Myhres Don Nachbaur - Coach Rich Parent Jason Podollan Craig Reichert

Jeff Rohlicek Kyle Rossiter Kurt Sauer Kevin Sawyer Paxton Schulte Cam Severson Jeff Sharples Jared Spurgeon Dustin Tokarski Roman Tvrdon Mick Vukota Darcy Wakaluk Trent Whitfield Ray Whitney

Club records[edit]

On Sept. 27, 2008, the Chiefs unveiled their WHL and Memorial Cup Championship banners. The Chiefs have won two Western Hockey League titles and two Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
titles. Banners for the championships hang in the Spokane Arena
Spokane Arena
rafters. Division and conference championship banners are hung throughout the Arena concourse.

Most goals: 68 - Valeri Bure
Valeri Bure
(1992–93) Most career goals: 147 - Mitch Holmberg (2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14) Most assists: 118 - Ray Whitney (1990–91) Most points: 185 - Ray Whitney (1990–91) Most points, rookie: 78 - Pat Falloon (1988–89) Most points, defenceman: 85 - Brenden Kichton (2012–13) Most penalty minutes: 505 - Kerry Toporowski (1990–91) Best goals against average, goaltender: 1.97 - Dustin Tokarski (2008–09) Most shutouts, goaltender: 15 - Dustin Tokarski
Dustin Tokarski
(2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09) Most saves, goaltender: 2,007 - Troy Gamble (1987–88) Most regular season wins, goaltender: 85 - James Reid (2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11) Most single-season games played, goaltender: 67 - Troy Gamble (1987–88) Most points in standings, team: 107 (2007–08) Most wins, team: 50 (1995–96), (2007–08) Longest game: 2:26:05 - 4 OT's (vs. Vancouver - April 10, 2009) (2nd longest game in WHL history) Season-by-season record[edit] Regular season[edit] Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties OTL = Overtime losses Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against

Season GP W L T OTL GF GA Points Finish Playoffs

1985–86 72 30 41 1 - 373 413 61 3rd West Lost West Division semi-final

1986–87 72 37 33 2 - 374 350 76 3rd West Lost West Division semi-final

1987–88 72 37 32 3 - 330 296 77 2nd West Lost West Division final

1988–89 72 25 45 2 - 326 419 56 6th West Out of playoffs

1989–90 72 30 37 5 - 334 344 65 4th West Lost West Division semi-final

1990–91 72 48 23 1 - 435 275 97 2nd West Won WHL championship and Memorial Cup

1991–92 72 37 29 6 - 267 270 80 2nd West Lost West Division semi-final

1992–93 72 28 40 4 - 311 319 60 5th West Lost West Division semi-final

1993–94 72 31 37 4 - 324 320 66 5th West Lost West Division quarter-final

1994–95 72 32 36 4 - 244 261 68 5th West Lost West Division semi-final

1995–96 72 50 18 4 - 322 221 104 1st West Lost WHL finals

1996–97 72 35 33 4 - 260 235 74 3rd West Lost West Division semi-final

1997–98 72 45 23 4 - 288 235 94 2nd West Lost West Division final & Lost Memorial Cup

1998–99 72 19 44 9 - 193 268 47 7th West Out of playoffs

1999–00 72 47 19 4 2 272 191 100 1st West Lost WHL finals

2000–01 72 35 28 7 2 242 219 79 4th West Lost West Division final

2001–02 72 33 25 11 3 223 206 80 2nd U.S. Lost Western Conference semi-final

2002–03 72 26 36 6 4 216 261 62 2nd U.S. Lost Western Conference semi-final

2003–04 72 32 29 4 7 200 215 75 4th U.S. Lost Western Conference quarter-final

2004–05 72 24 38 8 2 192 230 58 5th U.S. Out of playoffs

Season GP W L OTL SOL GF GA Points Finish Playoffs

2005–06 72 25 39 5 3 193 254 58 5th U.S. Out of playoffs

2006–07 72 36 28 4 4 232 217 80 4th U.S. Lost Western Conference quarter-final

2007–08 72 50 15 1 6 251 160 107 2nd U.S. Won WHL championship and Memorial Cup

2008–09 72 46 23 0 3 246 145 95 2nd U.S. Lost Western Conference semi-final

2009–10 72 45 22 3 2 240 179 95 3rd U.S. Lost Western Conference quarter-final

2010–11 72 48 18 4 2 310 193 102 2nd U.S. Lost Western Conference final

2011–12 72 38 25 5 4 257 225 85 3rd U.S. Lost Western Conference semi-final

2012–13 72 44 26 2 0 269 230 90 2nd U.S. Lost Western Conference semi-final

2013–14 72 40 26 3 3 244 213 86 4th U.S. Lost Western Conference quarter-final

2014–15 72 34 34 3 1 219 229 72 4th U.S. Lost Western Conference quarter-final

2015–16 72 33 30 5 4 223 245 75 4th U.S. Lost Western Conference quarter-final

2016–17 72 27 33 8 4 235 272 66 5th U.S. Out of playoffs

2017–18 72 41 25 3 3 282 240 88 3rd U.S. Lost Western Conference quarter-final

WHL Championship history[edit]

1990–91: Win, 4-0 vs Lethbridge 1995–96: Loss, 1-4 vs Brandon 1999–00: Loss, 2-4 vs Kootenay 2007–08: Win, 4-0 vs Lethbridge

Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
finals history[edit]

1991 Win, 5-1 vs Drummondville 2008 Win, 4-1 vs Kitchener

Playoff history[edit]

1985–86: Lost to Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
5 games to 4 in Conference semi-finals. 1986–87: Lost to Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
5 games to 0 in Conference semi-finals. 1987–88: Defeated Victoria Cougars 5 games to 3 in Conference semi-finals. Lost to Kamloops Blazers
Kamloops Blazers
5 games to 2 in Conference finals. 1988–89: Out of playoffs. 1989–90: Lost to Kamloops Blazers
Kamloops Blazers
5 games to 1 in Conference semi-finals 1990–91: Defeated Seattle Thunderbirds
Seattle Thunderbirds
5 games to 1 in Conference semi-finals. Defeated Kamloops Blazers
Kamloops Blazers
5 games to 0 in Conference finals. Defeated Lethbridge Hurricanes
Lethbridge Hurricanes
4 games to 0 in WHL finals. WHL CHAMPIONS Finished Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
round-robin in first place (3–0). Defeated Drummondville Voltigeurs 5–1 to win Memorial Cup. MEMORIAL CUP CHAMPIONS 1991–92: Defeated Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
4 games to 2 in Conference quarter-finals. Lost to Seattle Thunderbirds
Seattle Thunderbirds
3 games to 1 in Conference semi-finals. 1992–93: Defeated Tacoma Rockets 4 games to 3 in Conference quarter-finals. Lost to Kamloops Blazers
Kamloops Blazers
3 games to 0 in Conference semi-finals. 1993–94: Lost to Seattle Thunderbirds
Seattle Thunderbirds
3 games to 0 in Conference quarter-finals. 1994–95: Advanced past round-robin tournament with 3–1 record. Lost to Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
4 games to 3 in Conference semi-finals. 1995–96: Defeated Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
4 games to 3 in Conference quarter-finals. Earned second-round bye. Defeated Kamloops Blazers
Kamloops Blazers
4 games to 2 in Conference finals. Lost to Brandon Wheat Kings
Brandon Wheat Kings
4 games to 1 in WHL Finals. 1996–97: Defeated Kelowna Rockets
Kelowna Rockets
4 games to 2 in Conference quarter-finals. Lost to Prince George Cougars
Prince George Cougars
3 games to 0 in Conference semi-finals. 1997–98: Defeated Kelowna Rockets
Kelowna Rockets
4 games to 3 in Conference quarter-finals. Defeated Prince George Cougars
Prince George Cougars
3 games to 1 in Conference semi-finals. Lost to Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
4 games to 3 in Conference finals. Hosted Memorial Cup, finished round-robin in third place (1–2). Lost 2–1 (OT) in Semi-Final to Guelph Storm. 1998–99: Out of playoffs. 1999–00: Defeated Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
4 games to 0 in Conference quarter-finals. Earned second-round bye. Defeated Prince George Cougars
Prince George Cougars
4 games to 1 in Conference finals. Lost to Kootenay Ice
Kootenay Ice
4 games to 2 in WHL finals. 2000–01: Defeated Kamloops Blazers
Kamloops Blazers
4 games to 0 in Conference quarter-finals. Defeated Seattle Thunderbirds
Seattle Thunderbirds
3 games to 0 in Conference semi-finals. Lost to Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
4 games to 1 in Conference finals. 2001–02: Defeated Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
4 games to 1 in Conference quarter-finals. Lost to Kelowna Rockets
Kelowna Rockets
4 games to 2 in Conference semi-finals. 2002–03: Defeated Portland Winter Hawks
Portland Winter Hawks
4 games to 3 in Conference quarter-finals. Lost to Kelowna Rockets
Kelowna Rockets
4 games to 0 in Conference semi-finals. 2003–04: Lost to Everett Silvertips
Everett Silvertips
4 games to 0 in Conference quarter-finals. 2004–05: Out of playoffs. 2005–06: Out of playoffs. 2006–07: Lost to Everett Silvertips
Everett Silvertips
4 games to 2 in Conference quarter-finals. 2007–08: Defeated Everett Silvertips
Everett Silvertips
4 games to 0 in Conference quarter-finals. Defeated Vancouver Giants
Vancouver Giants
4 games to 2 in Conference semi-finals. Defeated Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
4 games to 3 in Conference finals. Defeated Lethbridge Hurricanes
Lethbridge Hurricanes
4 games to 0 in WHL finals. WHL CHAMPIONS Finished Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
round-robin in first place (3–0). Defeated Kitchener Rangers
Kitchener Rangers
4–1 to win Memorial Cup. MEMORIAL CUP CHAMPIONS 2008–09: Defeated Seattle Thunderbirds
Seattle Thunderbirds
4 games to 1 in Conference quarter-finals. Lost to Vancouver Giants
Vancouver Giants
4 games to 3 in Conference semi-finals. 2009–10: Lost to Portland Winterhawks
Portland Winterhawks
4 games to 3 in Conference quarter-finals. 2010–11: Defeated Chilliwack Bruins 4 games to 1 in Conference quarter-finals. Defeated Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
4 games to 2 in Conference semi-finals. Lost to Portland Winterhawks
Portland Winterhawks
4 games to 2 in Conference finals. 2011-12: Defeated Vancouver Giants
Vancouver Giants
4 games to 2 in Conference quarter finals. Lost to Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
4 games to 3 in Conference semi-finals. 2012-13: Defeated Tri-City Americans
Tri-City Americans
4 games to 1 in Conference quarter finals. Lost to Portland Winterhawks
Portland Winterhawks
4 games to 0 in Conference semi-finals. 2013–14: Lost to Victoria Royals
Victoria Royals
4 games to 2 in Conference quarter-finals. 2014–15: Lost to Everett Silvertips
Everett Silvertips
4 games to 2 in Conference quarter-finals. 2015–16: Lost to Victoria Royals
Victoria Royals
4 games to 2 in Conference quarter-finals. 2016–17: Out of playoffs. All-Time Playoff Record (Not Including Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
Games): 139–131 All-Time Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
Tournament Record: 9–3

Executives[edit] Head coaches and all-time regular season records[edit]

1985–86 Ernie Gare Jr. (1–5–0) 1985–86 Marc Pezzin (30–41–1) 1986–87 Peter Esdale (37–33–2) 1987–89 Butch Goring
Butch Goring
(39–41–3) 1989 (Interim)- Bob Strumm (2–4–0) 1988–89 Gary Braun (21–32–2) 1989–94 Bryan Maxwell (165–155–22)* Resigned Mid-Season 1993–94 1994 (Interim)- Tim Speltz (1–0) 1994 (Interim)- Perry Shockey (0–1) 1994 (Interim)- Mike Fedorko (9–11–2) 1994–00 Mike Babcock
Mike Babcock
(234–169–29–2) 1997 (Interim)- Brian Cox (5–2–0) 2000–02 Perry Ganchar (68–53–18–5) 2003–05 Al Conroy (82–103–18–13) 2005–08 Bill Peters (111–81–10–12) 2008 (Interim) Leigh Mendelson (1–0) 2008–10 Hardy Sauter (91–45–3–5) 2010-17 Don Nachbaur (86–43–9–6) 2017-Curent Dan Lambert (8-7-1-2)

General managers[edit]

1985–86 Marc Pezzin 1986–89 Bob Strumm 1989–90 Brian Maxwell 1990–16 Tim Speltz 2016–Present Scott Carter

Radio and television coverage[edit] Spokane Chiefs
Spokane Chiefs
games are broadcast on AM 1510 KGA throughout Eastern Washington, Northern Idaho and parts of British Columbia. The current play-by-play broadcaster of the Chiefs is Mike Boyle, a fill-in sports anchor/reporter for KREM 2.[7] Jay Stewart was the radio voice for Spokane through the 2001 season, taking over for longtime broadcaster Craig West who left the organization to join the Tri-City Americans. Jay Stewart is now the Director of Public Relations for the Spokane Chiefs and is the television announcer during live games. Spokane is the only U.S. team in the WHL that can regularly be seen on television in Canada. Spokane's ABC, CBS and NBC television stations are available in Calgary, AB., Edmonton, AB., Saskatoon, SK., and other cities in Western and Central Canada. A half-dozen games are televised in Spokane on SWX Right Now, a sports and weather channel owned by KHQ-TV. Arenas[edit]

1950–1995 Spokane Coliseum
Spokane Coliseum
(5,400 capacity) 1995–Present Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena
Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena
9,916 current hockey capacity according to the spokane arena website (old capacity was 10,759)

Spokane Arena
Spokane Arena
hockey attendance records[edit]

The Spokane Arena
Spokane Arena
is the home of the Spokane Chiefs.

Largest crowds: 10,759 vs. Tri-City (7 times since 1995), 10,751 Spokane vs. Val d'Or (1998 Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
opener), 10,700 vs. Tri-City (8 times since 1995), 10,650 vs. Tri-City (2 times since 1995), 10,538 vs. Tri-City (5 times since 1995), 10,530 vs. Tri City (2010), 10,529 vs. Tri-City (2 times in 2010), 10,475 vs. Tri-City (2 times in 2011), 10,431 vs. Tri-City (4 times since 1995) Smallest crowd: 3,025 Spokane vs. Kelowna (February 8, 2006) 1995–96 Sellouts: 11 (Includes NHL Exhibition Game) 1996–97 Sellouts: 9 1997–98 Sellouts: 14 (Includes 8 Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
Games) 1998–99 Sellouts: 5 1999–00 Sellouts: 5 2000–01 Sellouts: 4 2001–02 Sellouts: 2 2002–03 Sellouts: 1 2003–04 Sellouts: 2 2004–05 Sellouts: 3 2005–06 Sellouts: 2 2006–07 Sellouts: 2 2007–08 Sellouts: 3 2008–09 Sellouts: 4 2009–10 Sellouts: 4 2010-11 Sellouts: 3* (Includes Rockstar Outdoor Hockey Classic) 2011-12 Sellouts: 1 2012-13 Sellouts: 2 2013-14 Sellouts: 2 2014-15 Sellouts: 0

Chiefs attendance averages and WHL attendance rank[edit]

Season Total attendance Average Games WHL rank

1996–97 281,743 7,826 36 2nd

1997–98 289,735 8,048 36 2nd

1998–99 259,150 7,404 36 2nd

1999–00 255,974 7,110 36 1st

2000–01 231,960 6,443 36 2nd

2001–02 229,308 6,369 36 3rd

2002–03 219,586 6,099 36 3rd

2003–04 226,550 6,293 36 3rd

2004–05 225,002 6,250 36 4th

2005–06 219,802 6,105 36 5th

2006–07 220,019 6,112 36 4th

2007–08 236,056 6,557 36 3rd

2008–09 239,620 6,656 36 3rd

2009–10 243,370 6,760 36 3rd

2010–11 231,811 6,439 36 3rd

2011–12 231,946 6,442 36 2nd

2012–13 229,232 6,368 36 3rd

2013–14 219,662 6,101 36 4th

2014–15 209, 836 5,829 36 5th

See also[edit]

Spokane Flyers

References[edit]

^ "League Attendance Report". Mib.org. Retrieved 2010-07-03.  ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=h9sRAAAAIBAJ&sjid=E-8DAAAAIBAJ&pg=3108,6900125&hl=en ^ The StarPhoenix October 28, 2007 (2007-10-28). "On the road again". Canada.com. Retrieved 2010-07-03.  ^ " Spokane Chiefs
Spokane Chiefs
decline to pick up option on head coach Hardy Sauter's contract - NHL.com - News". NHL.com. Retrieved 2010-07-03.  ^ " Don Nachbaur will coach Chiefs: Official announcement will be made at press conference Wednesday". American Chronicle. 2007-05-14. Retrieved 2010-07-03.  ^ http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2011/jan/16/chiefs-lit-the-fuse-on-perfect-outdoor-outcome/ ^ http://www.krem.com/on-tv/bios/65012857.html

External links[edit]

Spokane Chiefs
Spokane Chiefs
website Spokane Chiefs
Spokane Chiefs
Fan Page

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Spokane Chiefs

Based in Spokane, Washington Founded in 1982 Member of the Western Hockey League

The Franchise

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Arenas

Kelowna Memorial Arena Spokane Coliseum Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena

Memorial Cup
Memorial Cup
Championships

1991 2008

Conference Championships

1990-91 1995-96 1999-00 2007-08

Division Championships

West 1995-96 1999-00

President's/Ed Chynoweth Cup

1990-91 2007-08

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Western Hockey League

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Sports teams based in Washington

Baseball

MLB Seattle Mariners PCL Tacoma Rainiers NwL Everett AquaSox Spokane Indians Tri-City Dust Devils WCL Bellingham Bells Cowlitz Black Bears Kitsap BlueJackets Walla Walla Sweets Wenatchee AppleSox Yakima Valley Pippins

Basketball

WNBA Seattle Storm IBL Bellingham Slam Olympia Reign Seattle Flight Vancouver Volcanoes ABA Kitsap Admirals Seattle Mountaineers

Football

NFL Seattle Seahawks WFA Everett Reign Seattle Majestics Tacoma Trauma LFL Seattle Mist

Ice hockey

WHL Everett Silvertips Seattle Thunderbirds Spokane Chiefs Tri-City Americans BCHL Wenatchee Wild USPHL Seattle Ravens Tri-City Outlaws West Sound Warriors WSHL Bellingham Blazers Seattle Totems Vancouver Rangers

Roller derby

WFTDA Bellingham Roller Betties Dockyard Derby Dames Jet City Roller Derby Lilac City Roller Girls Oly Rollers Port Scandalous Roller Derby Rainy City Roller Dolls Rat City Roller Derby Slaughter County Roller Vixens RDCL Tilted Thunder Rail Birds MRDA Puget Sound Outcast Derby

Rugby

MLR Seattle Seawolves CDI Premier League Seattle Saracens

Soccer

MLS Seattle Sounders FC NWSL Seattle Reign USL Seattle Sounders FC 2 PDL Seattle Sounders FC U-23 NPSL Kitsap Soccer Club OSA FC MASL Tacoma Stars

Ultimate

AUDL Seattle Cascades

College athletics

NCAA Division I Eastern Washington Eagles Gonzaga Bulldogs Seattle Redhawks Washington Huskies Washington State Cougars NCAA Division II Central Washington Wildcats Saint Martin's Saints Seattle Pacific Falcons Western Washington Vikings NCAA Division III Pacific Lutheran Lutes Puget Sound Loggers Whitman Blues

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