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Son of Godzilla
Godzilla
(怪獣島の決戦 ゴジラの息子, Kaijū-tō no Kessen Gojira no Musuko, lit. Monster Island's Decisive Battle: Son of Godzilla) is a 1967 Japanese science fiction kaiju film featuring Godzilla, produced and distributed by Toho. The film is directed by Jun Fukuda with special effects by Sadamasa Arikawa with supervision by Eiji Tsuburaya
Eiji Tsuburaya
and stars Tadao Takashima, Akira Kubo, Akihiko Hirata, and Beverly Maeda, with Hiroshi Sekita, Seiji Onaka, and Haruo Nakajima as Godzilla
Godzilla
and Marchan the Dwarf as Minilla.[3] The film was released in Japan on December 16, 1967 and released directly to television in the United States in 1969 through the Walter Reade Organization.[4]

Contents

1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Release 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Plot[edit] A team of scientists are trying to perfect a weather-controlling system. Their efforts are hampered by the arrival of a nosy reporter and by the sudden presence of 2-meter tall giant praying mantises. The first test of the weather control system goes awry when the remote control for a radioactive balloon is jammed by an unexplained signal coming from the center of the island. The balloon detonates prematurely, creating a radioactive storm that causes the giant mantises to grow to enormous sizes. Investigating the mantises, which are named Kamacuras
Kamacuras
(Gimantis in the English-dubbed version), the scientists find the monstrous insects digging an egg out from under a pile of earth. The egg hatches, revealing a baby Godzilla. The scientists realize that the baby's telepathic cries for help were the cause of the interference that ruined their experiment. Shortly afterwards, Godzilla
Godzilla
arrives on the island in response to the infant's cries, demolishing the scientist's base while rushing to defend the baby. Godzilla
Godzilla
kills two of the Kamacuras
Kamacuras
during the battle while one manages to fly away to safety, Godzilla
Godzilla
then adopts the baby. The baby Godzilla, named Minilla, quickly grows to about half the size of the adult Godzilla
Godzilla
and Godzilla
Godzilla
instructs him on the important monster skills of roaring and using its atomic ray. At first, Minilla has difficulty producing anything more than atomic smoke rings, but Godzilla
Godzilla
discovers that stressful conditions (i.e. stomping on his tail) or motivation produces a true radioactive blast. Minilla
Minilla
comes to the aid of Saeko when she is attacked by a Kamacuras, but inadvertently awakens Kumonga
Kumonga
(Spiga in the English-dubbed version), a giant spider that was sleeping in a valley. Kumonga
Kumonga
attacks the caves where the scientists are hiding and Minilla
Minilla
stumbles into the fray. Kumonga
Kumonga
traps Minilla
Minilla
and the final Kamacuras
Kamacuras
with its webbing, but as Kumonga
Kumonga
begins to feed on the deceased Kamacuras, Godzilla
Godzilla
arrives. Godzilla
Godzilla
saves Minilla
Minilla
and they work together to defeat Kumonga
Kumonga
by using their atomic rays on the giant spider. Hoping to keep the monsters from interfering in their attempt to escape the island, the scientists finally use their perfected weather altering device on the island and the once tropical island becomes buried in snow and ice. As the scientists are saved by an American submarine, Godzilla
Godzilla
and Minilla
Minilla
begin to hibernate as they wait for the island to become tropical again. Cast[edit]

Akira Kubo as Maki Goro Tadao Takashima as Professor Kusumi Beverly Maeda as Saeko Matsumiya Akihiko Hirata
Akihiko Hirata
as Fujisaki Yoshio Tsuchiya as Furukawa Kenji Sahara as Morio Kenichiro Maruyama as Ozawa Seishiro Kuno as Tashiro Hiroshi Sekita, Seiji Onaka, and Haruo Nakajima
Haruo Nakajima
as Godzilla[5] Marchan the Dwarf as Minilla[5]

Production[edit]

Sadamasa Arikawa gives instructions to Marchan the Dwarf (Minilla). "Marchan the Dwarf" was hired to play the character partially for his ability to perform athletic rolls and flips inside the thick rubber suit.

For the second Godzilla
Godzilla
film in a row, Toho
Toho
produced an island themed adventure with a smaller budget than most of their monster films from this time period.[6] While the a-list crew of talent was hired to work on that year's King Kong
King Kong
Escapes, (Ishiro Honda, Eiji Tsuburaya, and Akira Ifukube), the second string crew of cheaper talent was once again tapped to work on this project as they had done with Ebirah, Horror of the Deep. This included Jun Fukuda (director), Sadamasa Arikawa (special effects), and Masaru Sato (composer). This was the first film where Arikawa was officially listed as the director of Special
Special
Effects,[7] although he did receive some supervision from Tsuburaya when he was available.[7] Toho
Toho
wanted to create a baby Godzilla
Godzilla
to appeal to the "date crowd" (a genre of films that were very popular among young couples during this time period), with the idea that girls would like a "cute" baby monster.[8] For the idea behind Minilla, Fukuda stated, "We wanted to take a new approach, so we gave Godzilla
Godzilla
a child. We thought it would be a little strange if we gave Godzilla
Godzilla
a daughter, so instead we gave him a son".[9] Fukuda also wanted to portray the monsters almost as people[10] in regards to the father-son relationship between Godzilla and Minilla, as Fukuda stated "We focused on the relationship between Godzilla
Godzilla
and his son throughout the course of Son of Godzilla.[9] Minilla
Minilla
was designed to incorporate features of not only a baby Godzilla
Godzilla
but a human baby was well.[11] "Marchan the Dwarf" was hired to play the character due to his ability to play-act and to give the character a childlike ambiance. He was also hired because of his ability to perform athletic rolls and flips inside the thick rubber suit.[11] The Godzilla
Godzilla
suit built for this film was the biggest in terms of size and girth.[12] This was done in order to give Godzilla
Godzilla
a "maternal" appearance and to give a parent-like stature in contrast next to Minilla.[11] Because of the size of the suit, seasoned Godzilla
Godzilla
suit actor Haruo Nakajima
Haruo Nakajima
was only hired to play Godzilla
Godzilla
in two scenes because the suit was much to big for him to wear.[13] The smaller suit he had worn for the films Ebirah, Horror of the Deep
Ebirah, Horror of the Deep
and Invasion of Astro-Monster was used for these sequences.[14] The much larger Seji Onaka instead played Godzilla
Godzilla
in the film, although he was replaced midway through filming by Hiroshi Sekita after he broke his fingers.[4] Outside of the two monster suits, various marionettes and puppets were used to portray the Island's gigantic inhabitants. The various giant preying mantises known as Kamacuras
Kamacuras
and the huge poisonous spider Kumonga.[15][16] Arikawa would usually have 20 puppeteers at a time working on the various marionettes.[4] The massive Kumonga
Kumonga
puppet needed 2 to 3 people at a time to operate each leg.[4] Release[edit] Son of Godzilla
Godzilla
was distributed theatrically in Japan by Toho
Toho
on December 16, 1967.[2] Son of Godzilla
Godzilla
was never released theatrically in the United States.[2] The film was released directly to television by Walter Reade Sterling as well as American International Pictures (AIP-TV) in some markets in 1969.[2] The American television version was cut to 84 minutes.[2] In 2005, the film was released on DVD by Sony Pictures
Sony Pictures
in its original uncut length with the original Japanese audio and Toho's international English dub.[2] See also[edit]

List of Japanese films of 1967 List of science fiction films of the 1960s

References[edit]

Footnotes

^ a b c d e Galbraith IV 2008, p. 244. ^ a b c d e f g Galbraith IV 2008, p. 245. ^ Ragone 2007, p. 169. ^ a b c d Ryfle 1998, p. 143. ^ a b Ryfle 1998, p. 357. ^ Kabushiki 1993, p. 62. ^ a b Kabushiki 1993, p. 63. ^ Ragone, August; Eggleton, Bob (2014). "The Complete Godzilla Chronology 1954-2004". Famous Monsters of Filmland. No. 274. Movieland Classics LLC. p. 23.  ^ a b Ryfle 1998, p. 141. ^ Godziszewski, Ed (1979). "Twenty-five Years with Godzilla". Fangoria. No. 1. O'Quinn Studios Inc. p. 38.  ^ a b c Kabushiki 1993, p. 64. ^ Kaneko & Nakajima 1983, p. 101. ^ Haruo Nakajima
Haruo Nakajima
Monster Photo Book(中島春雄怪獣写真集). Yuizumi Publishing. 2014. Pg.264 ^ Ryfle 1998, p. 142. ^ Kaneko & Nakajima 1983, p. 76. ^ Kaneko & Nakajima 1983, p. 77.

Bibliography

Galbraith IV, Stuart (2008). The Toho
Toho
Studios Story: A History and Complete Filmography. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 1461673747.  Kabushiki, Gaisha (1993). Gojira eiga 40-nenshi, gojira deizu (in Japanese). Shueisha. ISBN 4087810917.  Kaneko, Masumi; Nakajima, Shinsuke (1983). グラフブックゴジラ (テレビマガジンデラックス 22) (in Japanese). Kondansya Publishing. ISBN 4-06-172472-X.  Ragone, August (2007). Eiji Tsuburaya: Master of Monsters. Chronicle Books. ISBN 978-0-8118-6078-9.  Ryfle, Steve (1998). Japan's Favorite Mon-star: The Unauthorized Biography of "The Big G". ECW Press. ISBN 9781550223484.  Ryfle, Steve; Godziszewski, Ed (2017). Ishiro Honda: A Life in Film, from Godzilla
Godzilla
to Kurosawa. Wesleyan University Press. ISBN 9780819570871. 

External links[edit]

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Son of Godzilla

Godzilla
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on the web(Japan) Son of Godzilla
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on IMDb Son of Godzilla
Godzilla
at Rotten Tomatoes "怪獣島の決戦 ゴジラの息子 (Kaijū-tō no Kessen Gojira no Musuko)" (in Japanese). Japanese Movie Database. Retrieved 2007-07-17. 

v t e

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vs. Godzilla
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vs. Godzilla
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(1964) Invasion of Astro-Monster
Invasion of Astro-Monster
(1965) Ebirah, Horror of the Deep
Ebirah, Horror of the Deep
(1966) Son of Godzilla
Godzilla
(1967) Destroy All Monsters
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All Monsters Attack
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(2000) Godzilla, Mothra
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and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack (2001) Godzilla
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Current series

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American films

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(1956) Godzilla
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1985 (1985)

TriStar Pictures

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Television

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(1973-1974) Zone Fighter (1973) Godzilla
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List of Godzilla
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Kaiju

Godzilla Anguirus Rodan Moguera Varan Mothra King Kong Manda Dogora King Ghidorah Baragon Frankenstein's monster Gaira Sanda Ebirah Mechani-Kong Gorosaurus Kamacuras Kumonga Minilla Gezora Kamoebas Hedorah Gigan Megalon Jet Jaguar King Caesar Mechagodzilla Titanosaurus Biollante Mecha-King Ghidorah Battra Godzilla
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Related films

Rodan
Rodan
(1956) The Mysterians
The Mysterians
(1957) Varan the Unbelievable (1958) Battle in Outer Space
Battle in Outer Space
(1959) Mothra
Mothra
(1961) Gorath
Gorath
(1962) Atragon
Atragon
(1963) Dogora
Dogora
(1964) Frankenstein Conquers the World
Frankenstein Conquers the World
(1965) The War of the Gargantuas
War of the Gargantuas
(1966) King Kong Escapes
King Kong Escapes
(1967) Latitude Zero (1969) Space Amoeba
Space Amoeba
(1970) The War in Space
The War in Space
(1977) Gunhed (1989) Yamato Takeru (1994) Rebirth of Mothra
Mothra
(1996) Rebirth of Mothra
Mothra
II (1997) Rebirth of Mothra
Mothra
III (1998) Chousei Kantai Sazer-X the Movie: Fight! Star Warriors (2005) Always: Sunset on Third Street 2 (2007) Kong: Skull Island (2017)

See also

Gamera Ultraman Ultra Series The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms Gojirasaurus Gorgo The Giant Behemoth Reptilicus Yongary: Monster from the Deep

Book Category

v t e

Films directed by Jun Fukuda

1950s

Osorubeki hi asobi (1959)

1960s

The Secret of the Telegian
The Secret of the Telegian
(1960) Ankokugai gekimetsu meirei (1961) Arigataya sandogasa (1961) Nakito gozansu (1961) Nasake muyo no wana (1961) Hoero datsugokushu (1961) Ankokugai no kiba (1962) Nihon ichi no wakadaisho (1962) Norainu sakusen (1963) Hawai no wakadaishô (1963) Nippon jitsuwa jidai (1963) Chi to daiyamondo (1964) Trap of Suicide Kilometer (1964) Hyappatsu hyakuchu (1965) Honkon no shiroibara (1965) Ankokugai gekitotsu sakusen (1965) Ebirah, Horror of the Deep
Ebirah, Horror of the Deep
(1966) Doto ichiman kairi (1966) Son of Godzilla
Godzilla
(1967) Hyappatsu hyakuchu: Ogon on me (1968) Konto Gojugo-go: Uchu daiboken (1969) Dai Nippon suri washudan (1969) Nyu jirando no wakadaisho (1969) Furesshuman wakadaisho (1969)

1970s

Kigeki sore ga otoko no ikiru michi (1970) Yaju toshi (1970) Nishi no betenshi, higashi no sagishi (1971) Godzilla
Godzilla
vs. Gigan
Gigan
(1972) Godzilla
Godzilla
vs. Megalon
Megalon
(1973) Kigeki damashi no jingi (1974) Godzilla
Godzilla
vs. Mechagodzilla
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(1974) ESPY (1974) The W

.