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Shoichiro Toyoda
Shoichiro Toyoda
(豊田 章一郞, Toyoda Shōichirō, born February 17, 1925) is a retired Japanese business executive, who served as chairman of Toyota Motor Corporation
Toyota Motor Corporation
between 1992–1999[1] as well as, chairman of the influential Japan
Japan
Business Federation (日本経済団体連合会, Nippon Keidanren),[2] beginning in May 1994 through May 1998.[3] Under his supervision, he approved the development of the Lexus brand and the Prius hybrid.[4]

Contents

1 Toyota 2 Professional Recognition

2.1 National honours (Japan) 2.2 Other national honours and decorations

3 Early life and education

3.1 Family tree

4 Notes 5 References 6 External links

Toyota[edit] Son to the company founder, in 1952, Toyoda joined his father's business at Toyota
Toyota
Motors. In ten years, he had risen to the position of managing director; and he was promoted to senior managing director in 1967, to executive vice president in 1972, and president of the Company's marketing organization in 1981.[5] The merger of the sales and production organizations in 1982 produced Toyota
Toyota
Motor Corporation. Toyoda became the new entity's first president. The disparate nature of the two distinct corporate cultures required his attention, and the extent to which the "oil and water" of these two Toyota
Toyota
groups were merged successfully was attributed in large part to his leadership.[6] He served as chairman from 1992 to 1999; and he became honorary chairman in 1999.[5] Toyoda's leadership would be integral to the global introduction into popular culture of the Lexux brand of luxury automobiles and environmentally focused Prius engine electric hybrids. Professional Recognition[edit]

1980 – Deming Prize, Japan.[1] 1993 – International Fellow Royal Academy of Engineering[7] 2000 – FISITA Medal of the International Federation of Automotive Engineering Societies 2005 – Society of Automotive Engineers
Society of Automotive Engineers
Foundation's Manufacturing Leadership Award, United States.[5] 2007 – Induction into the Automotive Hall of Fame, Detroit, MI, USA

National honours (Japan)[edit]

1972 – Medal of Honor (Dark Blue Ribbon) November 1984 – Medal of Honor (Blue Ribbon).[8] 1984, 1985 – Medal of Honor (Dark Blue Ribbon). April 1995 – Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure.[8] April 2002 – Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun.[8] November 2007 – Grand Cordon of the Order of the Paulownia Flowers[8]

Other national honours and decorations[edit]

May 1986 – Grand Cross of the Order of Antonio Jose de Sucre of Venezuela[8] September 1990 – Knight Commander of the Order of the Crown of Thailand[8] April 1991 – Commander of the Order of Leopold of Belgium[8] December 1991 – Grand Cross of the National Order of Merit of Colombia[8] 1993 – Economic Medal First Class of Taiwan March 1995 – Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE), UK.[8] September 1995 – Grand Cross of the Order of Francisco de Miranda, Venezuela. (Commander: October 1988[8]) March 1996 – Ordem Nacional do Cruzeiro do Sul, Brazil.[8] February 1998 – Order of Merit of the Republic of Turkey.[8] June 1999 – Companion of the Order of Australia
Order of Australia
(AC)[8] November 1999 – Grand Decoration of Honour in Gold with Star for Services to the Republic of Austria.[8][9] March 2000 – Commander of the Order of Isabel the Catholic, Spain.[8] May 2001 – Commander's Cross of the Bundesverdienstkreuz, Germany.[8] April 2004 – Commander's Cross with Star of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland, Poland.[8] December 2004 – Knight Grand Cordon of the Order of the Direkgunabhorn, First Class, Thailand.[8] March 2005 – Grand Officer of the Legion d'Honneur
Legion d'Honneur
of France.[1] (Commander: April 1998 [8]) May 2005 – Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of Portugal
Order of Merit of Portugal
(GCM)[8] August 2005 – Grand Cross of the Order of Juan Mora Fernandez, Placa de Plata of Costa Rica[8] September 2005 – Commander of the Order of the Equatorial Star of Gabon[8] October 2007 – Knight Grand Cross with the Grand Collar of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic.[1] (Grand Officer: June 1998 [8]) April 2010 – Grand Collar of the Order of Lakandula
Order of Lakandula
of the Philippines[8]

Early life and education[edit] Grandson to the founder of Toyoda Automatic Loomworks, and son to the Toyota
Toyota
Motors founder, Shoichiro Toyoda
Shoichiro Toyoda
was born in Nagoya on February 17, 1925,[10] to Kiichiro Toyoda
Kiichiro Toyoda
and Hatako née Shinshichi Toyoda, the daughter of the Takashimaya department store chain co-founder, Iida Shinshichi. He attended the Tokyo First Middle School (Hibiya High School) and First High School(Tokyo University), and graduated from Nagoya Imperial University (Nagoya University) in 1947 with a degree in Engineering BS. He would be awarded a PhD, by Tohoku University, in 1955. At the height of the pacific theater of World War II, the Toyoda family was effected on both family business and home fronts. Shoichiro's education would be delayed by his own conscription into civil service, and his father's business warrant to manufacture trucks for the imperial Japanese Army, of which his family's firm was spared destruction in the days before the Japanese government's surrender. Family tree[edit]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sasuke

 

Heikichi

 

 

 

 

 

Asako

 

Sakichi

 

Tami

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kazuko

 

Eiji

 

 

 

Rizaburo

 

Aiko

 

Kiichiro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kanshiro

 

Tetsuro

 

Shuhei

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tatsuro

 

Shoichiro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Akio

Notes[edit]

^ a b c d Toyota: Honorary Chairman
Chairman
Archived 2009-06-04 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Basu, Shankar. (1999). Corporate Purpose: Why it Matters More Than Strategy, p. 55. ^ "Imai officially tapped by Toyoda to head Keidanren," Japan
Japan
Times. January 12, 1998 ;Keidanren: New Year's greeting, 1994. ^ http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/biography/S-Z/Toyoda-Shoichiro-1925.html ^ a b c MCADCafé: "Dr. Shoichiro Toyoda
Shoichiro Toyoda
To Receive SAE Foundation's 2005 Manufacturing Leadership Award," PR Newswire. March 15, 2005. ^ Hino, Satoshi. (2006). Inside the Mind of Toyota, p. 24. ^ "List of Fellows".  ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Toyota
Toyota
Chairmen: honours and decorations ^ "Reply to a parliamentary question about the Decoration of Honour" (pdf) (in German). p. 1300. Retrieved November 2012.  Check date values in: access-date= (help) ^ International Directory of Business Biographies: Shoichiro Toyoda

References[edit]

Basu, Shankar. (1999). Corporate Purpose: Why it Matters More Than Strategy. London: Taylor & Francis. ISBN 978-0-8153-3374-6 Hino, Satoshi and Andrew Dillon. (2006). Inside the Mind of Toyota: Management Principles for Enduring Growth. Productivity Press. ISBN 978-1-56327-300-1; OCLC 62127859

External links[edit]

Toyota
Toyota
Motor Corporation: official bio

Business positions

Preceded by Eiji Toyoda President of Toyota 1982–1994 Succeeded by Tatsuro Toyoda

Chairman
Chairman
of Toyota 1994–1999 Succeeded by Takeshi Uchiyamada

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 16327774 LCCN: n88204818 N

.