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Museum display of shoes

A shoe is an item of footwear intended to protect and comfort the human foot. Shoes are also used as an item of decoration and fashion. The design of shoes has varied enormously through time and from culture to culture, with appearance originally being tied to function. Additionally, fashion has often dictated many design elements, such as whether shoes have very high heels or flat ones. Contemporary footwear in the 2010s varies widely in style, complexity and cost. Basic sandals may consist of only a thin sole and simple strap and be sold for a low cost. High fashion shoes made by famous designers may be made of expensive materials, use complex construction and sell for hundreds or even thousands of dollars a pair. Some shoes are designed for specific purposes, such as boots designed specifically for mountaineering or skiing.

Traditionally, shoes have been made from leather, wood or canvas, but in the 2010s, they are increasingly made from rubber, plastics, and other petrochemical-derived materials. Though the human foot is adapted to varied terrain and climate conditions, it is still vulnerable to environmental hazards such as sharp rocks and temperature extremes, which shoes protect against. Some shoes are worn as safety equipment, such as steel-soled boots which are required on construction sites.

  • Jazz shoes. This style is frequently worn by acro dancers

  • A foot thong, viewed from the bottom

  • Ladies' ballroom shoes

  • Jazz shoes. This style is frequently worn by acro

    Jazz shoes. This style is frequently worn by acro dancers

  • Men's ballroom sho

    Men's ballroom shoes

  • Orthopedic

    Tap shoes

    Orthopedic

    Orthopedic shoes are specially-designed footwear to relieve discomfort associated with many foot and ankle disorders, such as blisters, bunions, calluses and corns, hammer toes, plantar fasciitis, or heel spurs. They may

    Orthopedic shoes are specially-designed footwear to relieve discomfort associated with many foot and ankle disorders, such as blisters, bunions, calluses and corns, hammer toes, plantar fasciitis, or heel spurs. They may also be worn by individuals with diabetes or people with unequal leg length. These shoes typically have a low heel, tend to be wide with a particularly wide toe box, and have a firm heel to provide extra support. Some may also have a removable insole, or orthotic, to provide extra arch support.[13]

    Measures and sizes

    Units for shoe sizes vary widely around the world. European sizes are measured in Paris Points, which are worth two-thirds of a centimeter. The UK and American units result in whole-number sizes spaced at one barleycorn (​13 inch), with UK adult sizes starting at size 1 = 8 23 in (22.0 cm). In the US, this is size 2. Men's and women's shoe sizes often have different scales.[citation needed] Shoe size is often measured using a Brannock Device, which can determine both the width and length size valu

    Units for shoe sizes vary widely around the world. European sizes are measured in Paris Points, which are worth two-thirds of a centimeter. The UK and American units result in whole-number sizes spaced at one barleycorn (​13 inch), with UK adult sizes starting at size 1 = 8 23 in (22.0 cm). In the US, this is size 2. Men's and women's shoe sizes often have different scales.[citation needed] Shoe size is often measured using a Brannock Device, which can determine both the width and length size values of the foot.[78] A metric standard for shoe sizing, the Mondopoint system, was introduced in the 1970s by International Standard ISO 2816:1973 "Fundamental characteristics of a system of shoe sizing to be known as Mondopoint" and ISO 3355:1975 "Shoe sizes – System of length grading (for use in the Mondopoint system)".[79] the current version of the standard is ISO 9407:2019, "Shoe sizes—Mondopoint system of sizing and marking".[80] The Mondopoint system includes measurements of both length and width of the foot.

    In many places in the world shoes are removed when moving from exteriors to interiors, particularly in homes and religious buildings. In many Asian countries outdoor shoes are exchanged for indoor shoes or slippers. Some fitness centres require that shoes be exchanged for indoor shoes to prevent dirt and grime from being transferred to the equipment.

    See also

    References

    1. ^ "The Scottish Ten". The Engine Shed. Centre for Digital Documentation and Visualisation LLP. Retrieved 14 October 2017.