HOME
The Info List - Sharad Pawar


--- Advertisement ---



Sharad Govindrao Pawar (born 12 December 1940)[1] is an Indian politician who serves as the president of the Nationalist Congress Party which he founded in 1999, after separating from the Indian National Congress. He previously served as the Chief Minister of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
on three separate occasions and held the posts of Minister of Defence and Minister of Agriculture in the Government of India. Pawar hails from the town of Baramati
Baramati
in the Pune
Pune
district of Maharashtra. He is a member of the Rajya Sabha
Rajya Sabha
where he leads the NCP delegation. He holds a position of prominence in national politics as well as the regional politics of Maharashtra. Pawar has served as the Chairman of the Board of Control for Cricket in India
India
from 2005 to 2008 and as the president of the International Cricket
Cricket
Council from 2010 to 2012.[2] On 17 June 2015, he was re-elected as president of the Mumbai Cricket
Cricket
Association, a position he held from 2001 to 2010 and in 2012.[3] On 17 December 2016, he stepped down as the President of Mumbai Cricket
Cricket
Association.[4] In 2017, he was awarded the Padma Vibhushan, India's second highest civilian honour.

Contents

1 Early life and family 2 Political career

2.1 1967–1990 2.2 Early 1990s 2.3 Mid 1990s 2.4 Political career since 1997

2.4.1 Formation of Nationalist Congress Party 2.4.2 Cabinet minister in UPA government

3 Sports administration 4 Educational Institutions 5 Controversy

5.1 Links to criminals 5.2 Stamp paper scam 5.3 Controversial wheat imports 5.4 Criticism of agricultural produce prices 5.5 Farmer suicides 5.6 Promotion of endosulfan 5.7 Land allotment 5.8 IPL exemption from tax controversy 5.9 Controversy faced after assets declaration 5.10 Nira Radia's allegations 5.11 Lavasa 5.12 Comments on the 2010 Pune
Pune
bombing 5.13 Slapping incident

6 Awards 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External links

Early life and family[edit] Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
is one of eleven children born to Govindrao Pawar, who was employed in the Baramati
Baramati
Farmers' Cooperative (Sahakari Kharedi Vikri Sangh), and Shardabai Pawar, who looked after the family farm at Katewadi, ten kilometres from Baramati. Pawar studied at Brihan Maharashtra
Maharashtra
College of Commerce (BMCC), University of Pune. He was an average student but active in student politics.[5] Pawar is married to Pratibha (née Shinde). They have one daughter, Supriya, who is married to Sadanand Sule. Supriya currently represents the Baramati
Baramati
constituency in the 15th Lok Sabha. Pawar's nephew, Ajit Pawar, is also a prominent politician and served as the Deputy Chief Minister of Maharashtra. Pratap Pawar, Sharad Pawar's younger brother, runs the influential Marathi daily, Sakal. Political career[edit] 1967–1990[edit] Pawar entered the Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Legislative Assembly for the first time in 1967, representing Baramati, and as a member of the undivided Congress Party. Yashwantrao Chavan
Yashwantrao Chavan
was the political mentor of Sharad Pawar.[6] Pawar broke away from the Congress party to form a coalition government with the Janata Party in 1978, becoming the Chief Minister of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
for the first time. This Progressive Democratic Front government was dismissed in February 1980, following Indira Gandhi's return to power. In the 1980 elections Congress (I) won the majority in the state assembly, and A.R. Antulay took over as chief minister. Pawar took over the Presidency of his Indian National Congress
Indian National Congress
(Socialist) (Congress(S)) party in 1983. For the first time, he won the Lok Sabha election from the Baramati
Baramati
parliamentary constituency in 1984. He also won the state assembly election of March 1985 for Baramati
Baramati
and preferred to continue in state politics for a while, resigning from the Lok Sabha. Congress (S), won 54 seats out of 288 in the state assembly, and he became the leader of the opposition. His returning to Congress (I) in 1987 has been cited as a reason for the rise of the Shiv Sena
Shiv Sena
at that time. Pawar had stated at the time, "the need to save the Congress Culture in Maharashtra", as his reason for returning to Congress. In June 1988, Prime Minister of India
Prime Minister of India
and Congress President Rajiv Gandhi
Rajiv Gandhi
decided to induct then Maharashtra Chief Minister Shankarrao Chavan
Shankarrao Chavan
into his Union Cabinet as Finance Minister and Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
was chosen to replace Chavan as chief minister. Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
had the task of checking the rise of the Shiv Sena in state politics, which was a potential challenge to the dominance of Congress in the state.[citation needed] In the 1989 Lok Sabha elections, Congress won 28 seats out of 48 in Maharashtra. In the state assembly elections of February 1990, the alliance between the Shiv Sena
Shiv Sena
and the Bharatiya Janata Party posed a stiff challenge to Congress. Congress fell short of an absolute majority in the state assembly, winning 141 seats out of 288. Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
was sworn in as chief minister again on 4 March 1990 with the support of 12 independent or unaffiliated members of the legislative assembly (MLAs). Early 1990s[edit] During the course of the 1991 election campaign, former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi
Rajiv Gandhi
was assassinated. There were reports in the media that Pawar's name was being considered for the prime minister's post, along with those of P.V. Narasimha Rao
P.V. Narasimha Rao
and N.D. Tiwari, in the event of a Congress victory.[7][8][9] However the Congress Parliamentary Party (party MPs) elected P.V. Narasimha Rao
P.V. Narasimha Rao
as its leader and he was sworn in as prime minister on 21 June 1991. Rao named Pawar as Defence Minister. On 26 June 1991, Pawar took over that portfolio, continuing till March 1993. After Pawar's successor in Maharashtra, Sudhakarrao Naik, stepped down, Rao sent Pawar back as chief minister of the state. "He was sworn in as chief minister for his fourth and most controversial term[citation needed] on 6 March 1993. Almost immediately, Mumbai, the financial capital of India
India
and the state capital of Maharashtra, was rocked with series of bomb blasts on 12 March 1993." Mid 1990s[edit] In 1993, the Deputy Commissioner of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation, G. R. Khairnar made a series of accusations against Pawar for being involved in corruption and protecting criminals.[10][11] Though Khairnar could not produce any evidence in support of his claims, it inevitably affected Pawar's popularity. Notable social worker Anna Hazare
Anna Hazare
started a fast-unto-death to demand the expulsion of 12 officers of the Maharashtra
Maharashtra
state forest department who had been accused of corruption. The opposition parties accused Pawar's government of trying to shield the corrupt officers. The 1994 Gowari stampede
1994 Gowari stampede
occurred at Nagpur, during the winter session of the state assembly, and killed 114 people. Nagpur
Nagpur
Police were trying to disperse almost 50,000 Gowari
Gowari
and Vanjari protesters using baton charges but the police created panic and triggered a stampede amongst protesters.[12] Allegations were made that the mishap occurred because welfare minister Madhukarrao Pichad did not meet with the delegation of the Vanjari people in time. Though Pichad, accepting moral responsibility for the mishap, stepped down, this incident was another setback to Sharad Pawar's government. After 16 years of protest by the Namantar Andolan
Namantar Andolan
(Name-change Movement), the state government finally renamed Marathwada University as Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University
Marathwada University
on 14 January 1994, the compromise new name being an expansion of the old name (Namvistar) rather than a complete change of name (Namanatar). As chief minister Mr Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
announced few developments in university departments.[clarification needed][13] New elections to the Vidhan Sabha
Vidhan Sabha
were held in 1995. The Shiv Sena-BJP coalition was leading Congress in the polls, and there was widespread rebellion in the Congress party. Shiv Sena-BJP won 138 seats while Congress retained only 80 seats in the state assembly. Sharad Pawar had to step down and Shiv Sena
Shiv Sena
leader Manohar Joshi took over as chief minister on 14 March 1995. Until the Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
elections of 1996, Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
served as the Leader of the Opposition in the state assembly. In the 1996 General elections, Pawar won the Baramati
Baramati
seat in the Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
and left the state assembly. Political career since 1997[edit] In June 1997, Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
unsuccessfully challenged Sitaram Kesri for the post of President of the Indian National Congress. In the mid-term parliamentary elections of 1998, Pawar not only won his constituency, Baramati, but also led Congress to a win by a large majority[clarification needed] of Maharashtran Lok Sabha constituencies. Congress was aligned with the Republican Party of India
India
(Athvale) and Samajwadi Party
Samajwadi Party
for the Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
elections in Maharashtra. The Congress party won 33 Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
seats outright, and the allied Republican Party of India
India
won 4 more, for a total of 37 out of 48 in the state. Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
served as Leader of Opposition in the 12th Lok Sabha. In May 2017, Pawar ruled out being a candidate for the June 2017 Indian presidential election.[14] Formation of Nationalist Congress Party[edit] In 1999, after the 12th Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
was dissolved and elections to the 13th Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
were called, Pawar, P. A. Sangma, and Tariq Anwar demanded that the Congress party needed to propose someone native-born as the prime ministerial candidate and not the Italian-born Sonia Gandhi, who had entered party politics and replaced Kesri as Congress president. In June 1999, Pawar and Sangma founded the Nationalist Congress Party. This new party had to align with the Congress party to form a coalition government in Maharashtra, as neither party could win an absolute majority on its own in the 1999 state assembly elections. Pawar, however, did not return to state politics and Vilasrao Deshmukh of Congress was chosen as chief minister, with Chagan Bhujbal representing the NCP as his deputy. Cabinet minister in UPA government[edit] After the 2004 Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
elections, Pawar joined the United Progressive Alliance government headed by Prime Minister Manmohan Singh as the Minister of Agriculture. In January 2012, Pawar announced that he would not contest the 2014 Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
election in order to make way for younger leadership.[15] Also in 2012, Pawar gave up the chairmanship of the Empowered Group of Ministers investigating the 2G spectrum case, days after his appointment by the prime minister, fearing that his association with the decision-making process would drag him into the 2G Spectrum controversy.[16] Sports administration[edit] Pawar has interests in cricket, kabbadi, kho kho, wrestling and football. He has served as the head of various sports organisations, including

Mumbai Cricket
Cricket
Association[17] Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Wrestling
Wrestling
Association Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Kabbadi
Kabbadi
Association Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Kho Kho Association Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Olympics Association Board of Control for Cricket in India
Board of Control for Cricket in India
President 2005–2008 International Cricket Council
International Cricket Council
Vice President[18] International Cricket Council
International Cricket Council
President[19]

Pawar served as the president of Pune
Pune
International Marathon Trust, which has hosted Pune
Pune
International Marathon for last 22 years.[citation needed] Educational Institutions[edit] Pawar is associated with the Hon. Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
Public School,[20] under the Shree Gurudatta Education Society;[citation needed] the Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
International School, Pune; and the Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
Cricket Academy, near Mumbai. Controversy[edit]

This article's Criticism or Controversy section may compromise the article's neutral point of view of the subject. Please integrate the section's contents into the article as a whole, or rewrite the material. (November 2014)

Links to criminals[edit] In 1992–93, the then Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Chief Minister Sudhakarrao Naik made a statement that the state leader of Indian National Congress party and erstwhile-Chief Minister Pawar, had asked him to "go easy on Pappu Kalani", a well known criminal-turned-politician.[21] Shiv Sena chief, Bal Thackeray, later concurred with these allegations.[22] Further, Chief Minister Naik also alleged that it was possible that Kalani and Hitendra Thakur, another criminal-turned-politician from Virar, had been given tickets to contest election for the Maharashtra State Legislature at the behest of Pawar, who also put in a word for Naik with the police when the latter was arrested for his role in post- Demolition of the Babri Masjid
Demolition of the Babri Masjid
riots in Mumbai.[23] Pawar is also alleged to have close links with the underworld don Dawood Ibrahim[24] through Ibrahim's henchman Lakhan Singh based in the Middle East
Middle East
and close relationship with Shahid Balwa, also a suspect in the 2G spectrum case. These allegations were strengthened by the revelation about the involvement of Vinod Goenka, Balwa's business partner, in a controversial commercial project in Yerwada, Pune, which was being constructed under the same survey number as Pawar's family friend, Atul Chordia, had constructed the Panchshil Tech Park. BJP leader Eknath Khadse alleged that it was Balwa who had applied for environmental clearance for the two projects, a charge that Chordia refuted. Coincidentally, Chordia's Panchshil Pvt. Ltd. has Pawar's daughter, Supriya Sule, and her husband Sadanand as investors.[25] The state government's decision to hand over a 3-acre plot of the Yerwada
Yerwada
police station for "re-development" to Balwa was retracted following Balwa's arrest. Stamp paper scam[edit] Pawar was also named as a beneficiary in a stamp paper scam by a convicted Indian criminal, Abdul Karim Telgi, during a narcoanalysis test, filmed by various Indian news channels, wherein he also mentioned Chhagan Bhujbal.[26] Controversial wheat imports[edit] In 2007, the BJP asked for Pawar's resignation after alleging he was involved in a multi-crore Indian rupee
Indian rupee
(INR) scam involving wheat imports. In May 2007, a tender floated by the Food Corporation of India
India
(FCI) for procurement of wheat was cancelled when the lowest bid received was for 263 USD/ton. The government subsequently allowed private traders to purchase wheat directly from farmers that year resulting in a paucity of wheat to stock FCI granaries. By July 2007 the shortage at FCI was large enough to require import of wheat at a much higher price of 320–360 USD/ton. Taking advantage of this, traders who had domestically purchased wheat at 900 INR/ton earlier, were now offering the same to FCI at 1,300 INR/ton.[27][28] Criticism of agricultural produce prices[edit] As the Minister of Agriculture, Pawar was consistently accused of colluding in the extreme hike in prices of agricultural produce:

Wheat import in 2007 – The Bombay High Court
Bombay High Court
issued notices to Union agriculture minister Sharad Pawar, questioning the decision to import defective red wheat, and asking for a directive to submit details of procurement of the crop from different states and the exact process of importing it.[29][30] Sugar prices in 2009 – Opposition parties, including the BJP and the CPI(M) accused Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
of engineering a steep rise in the price of sugar to the advantage of hoarders and importers.[31] Wheat, Sugar, Rice, and Bean prices in 2009-2010 – The opposition accused Pawar to be responsible on the issue of spiraling prices.[32]

Farmer suicides[edit] During his tenure as Minister of Agriculture, there have been farmer suicides in excess of 10,000 per year, totalling over 200,000 since 1997.[33][citation needed] Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
has stated on record that he believes that the rate of farmer suicide in India
India
is a 'normal thing'. However he reaffirms that he is taking the necessary steps to reduce the numbers.[34][citation needed] Promotion of endosulfan[edit] Even though the pesticide endosulfan has been banned, India
India
is slow to phase it out. In spite of its known negative health effects, Pawar made a remark that endosulfan is not yet proved dangerous. This remark prompted activist Vandana Shiva
Vandana Shiva
to call him a corrupt minister.[35][36][37] Land allotment[edit] On 27 October 2007, the Bombay High Court
Bombay High Court
served notices to institutions headed by Pawar, Ajit Pawar, and Sadanand Sule (Sharad Pawar's son-in-law), along with a corresponding notice served to the Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Krishna Valley Development Corporation (MKVDC) on why special privileges were given to Pawar and his family. This was done in consideration of Public Interest Litigation
Public Interest Litigation
No. 148 of 2006, filed by Shamsunder Potare alleging that the said 2002 land allocations in Pune
Pune
were illegal. The institutions and properties mentioned include:

Two 141.15-acre (57.12 ha) plots given allotted to Vidya Pratishthan, an educational society headed by Sharad Pawar A 2-acre (0.81 ha) plot allotted to Anant Smriti Pratishthan, headed by Ajit Pawar, the Maharashtra
Maharashtra
state minister for irrigation and Sharad Pawar's nephew A 32.12-acre (13.00 ha) plot allotted to Lavasa
Lavasa
Corporation, owned by Sule. Sule handed over his share in 2006.[clarification needed][citation needed] A 1-acre (0.40 ha) plot allotted to Shivajinagar Agriculture College A 3-acre (1.2 ha) plot allotted to Sharadchandraji Scout and Guide Training Institute.

These allocations were allegedly made by NCP leader and minister Ramraje Naik Nimbalkar who was in charge of MKVDC at the time.[38][39] Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
was served a contempt of court notice on 1 May 2008 in connection with this case for issuing statements to the press even though the matter was subjudice at the time. Also in connection with the case, the respondents were directed not to create third-party interests in the property under dispute and to undertake any developments at their own risk.[40][41] IPL exemption from tax controversy[edit] In 2010, in the case of tax exemptions of the Indian Premier League (IPL), Shiv Sena
Shiv Sena
MLA Subhash Desai
Subhash Desai
alleged that the state cabinet decided in January to impose the tax, before the year's IPL season started, but the decision was not implemented because of NCP chief Pawar's association with the Board of Control for Cricket
Cricket
in India (BCCI).[42] Bombay High Court
Bombay High Court
on August 2010 said there was "nothing on record" to show that the Union Minister influenced the Maharashtra government's decision to exempt Indian Premier League
Indian Premier League
matches from entertainment tax.[43] Controversy faced after assets declaration[edit] In 2011, Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
declared his assets to be worth ₹120 million (equivalent to ₹180 million or US$2.7 million in 2017) as part of a mandatory disclosure, but his critics claimed that his wealth far exceeded the stated amount.[44][45] In 2010, it was alleged that the Pawar family indirectly held a 16% stake in the City Corporation, which had bid ₹11.76 billion (equivalent to ₹19 billion or US$290 million in 2017) for the Pune franchise of the Indian Premier League
Indian Premier League
(IPL). Pawar and his family denied the allegations, but the bidders board of the IPL contradicted their claims.[46][47][48] Nira Radia's allegations[edit] In 2011, under investigation of the 2G spectrum case Nira Radia told the Central Bureau of Investigation
Central Bureau of Investigation
(CBI) that agriculture minister Pawar may be controlling the controversial DB Realty. According to the reports, she also told the investigative agency that Pawar may have spoken with former telecom minister A. Raja about the allocation of spectrum and licence to Swan Telecom. Radia also said that she had no documentary proof to back up her allegations.[49] Pawar has denied any link with former DB managing director Shahid Balwa who is now in CBI custody. Lavasa[edit] Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
is alleged to have demanded compensation for allowing the planned-city Lavasa
Lavasa
to be constructed. When Lavasa
Lavasa
Corporation was receiving necessary clearances from the government of Maharashtra, relatives of Pawar had part-ownership of the company developing the project.[50] Pawar's daughter and son-in-law had more than 20% ownership between 2002 and 2004, and they later sold their stakes.[51] A nephew of his was chairman of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Krishna Valley Development Corporation (MKVDC) when the MKVDC signed off on lease agreements for Lavasa
Lavasa
and allowed it to store water and build dams.[50][52][53] Comments on the 2010 Pune
Pune
bombing[edit] After the 2010 Pune
Pune
bombing of German Bakery, Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
appeared to take the incident lightly. He said to the reporters, "It is not alright to arrive at a conclusion that the entire Pune
Pune
city has been targeted. The place where the blast took place is an isolated area", adding "when I was Chief Minister, Mumbai saw 11 simultaneous blasts but everything returned to normal soon."[54] Slapping incident[edit] Pawar was slapped by a youth named Harvinder Singh at the New Delhi Municipal Corporation centre while leaving the premises after attending a literary function on 24 November 2011.[55] The attacker, who previously is said to have assaulted former telecom minister Sukh Ram, was later arrested. Awards[edit] Padma Vibhushan
Padma Vibhushan
(2017) See also[edit]

First Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
ministry

References[edit]

^ a b c d "Detailed Profile: Shri Sharad Chandra Govindrao Pawar". India.gov.in. Retrieved 17 December 2016.  ^ Indian Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
becomes new ICC president: BBC ^ Kotian, Harish (18 June 2015). " Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
re-elected Mumbai Cricket
Cricket
Association president". Rediff.com. Retrieved 18 June 2015.  ^ " Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
steps down as president of Mumbai Cricket Association". Cricbuzz. Retrieved 18 December 2016.  ^ Gajrani, S.R. (Editor); Bakshi, S.R (Editor); Sharma, S. (Editor) (1998). Sharad Pawar : The Maratha Legacy. New Delhi: APH Pub. Corp. p. 124. ISBN 9788176480086. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) ^ Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
– A Short BIO by MNS Archived 27 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine.. Manase.org. Retrieved on 30 July 2011. ^ Hazarika, Sanjoy (22 May 1991). "ASSASSINATION IN INDIA; Indians Express Anger, Revulsion and Disbelief". New York Times. Retrieved 5 April 2009.  ^ "Gandhi". The Deseret News. 22 May 1991. Retrieved 5 April 2009.  ^ Crossette, Barbara (24 May 1991). "Assassination in India: Replacing a Dynasty; Congress Party Is Scrambling to Deal With Its Dependence on One Family". New York Times. Retrieved 5 April 2009.  ^ "G R Khairnar". Times of India. 10 December 2002. Retrieved 5 February 2011.  ^ Mhasawade, Shashank. "HC reinstates Khairnar with full benefits". Indian Express. Indian Expr5, 2011. Archived from the original on 19 February 2014.  ^ "Dani exonerates Pawar; Govt rejects report". The Indian Express. Express News Service. 31 December 1998. Archived from the original on 11 May 2008. Retrieved 12 October 2015.  ^ Damle, J. S. (2001). Beyond Economic Development: A Case Study of Marathwada, Mittal Publications, pp. 140–146 ^ "Presidential Election 2017: Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
rules himself out, says don't want to retire from politics". Financial Express. 30 May 2017. Retrieved 31 May 2017.  ^ [1] NCP chief Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
to make way for GenNext in 2014 ^ "Pawar quits as chairman of telecom EGoM". 3 July 2012.  ^ PTI. " Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
resigns as MCA president". The Hindu. Retrieved 2017-02-27.  ^ International Cricket Council
International Cricket Council
– ICC Events, ICC Cricket
Cricket
Rankings, Live Cricket
Cricket
Scores, ODI Fantasy League, Test Predictor Archived 7 January 2009 at the Wayback Machine.. Icc-cricket.yahoo.com (3 July 1951). Retrieved on 30 July 2011. ^ "Pawar takes over as ICC president". BBC News. 1 July 2010.  ^ "About Us". Hon. Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
Public School. 2015. Retrieved 30 October 2015.  ^ Gouri Shah (11 October 2004). "The F-factor: Kalani certain of clean sweep". The Economic Times. Archived from the original on 25 October 2004. Retrieved 24 May 2007.  ^ PTI (18 November 1998). "Thackeray blames Pawar for rise in crime". The Indian Express. Retrieved 22 February 2009.  ^ Prafulla Marpakwar (7 May 1997). "Pawar men rattled by Naik's outburst". The Indian Express. Archived from the original on 19 February 2014. Retrieved 22 February 2009.  ^ Pawar's Time Of Reckoning. www.outlookindia.com. 14 February 1996. Retrieved on 6 December 2011. ^ Will Maharashtra
Maharashtra
forgive Sharad Pawar? – Blogs – DNA. Dnaindia.com. 5 April 2011. Retrieved on 6 December 2011. ^ "Telgi names Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
in scam". CNN-IBN Live. 7 September 2006. Retrieved 2 February 2011. Politicians are the backbone of this business  ^ BJP seeks Pawar's resignation Archived 11 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine. The Pioneer – 13 July 2007. ^ Wheat import scandalous: BJP. The Hindu. 13 July 2007. ^ "Clarification on wheat imports sought". The Hindu. Retrieved 2017-02-27.  ^ "Wheat scam notice to Pawar". The Telegraph. 29 November 2007. Retrieved 7 November 2014.  ^ Joshi, Sandeep (7 August 2009). "Sugar scam brewing, says Brinda Karat". The Hindu. Chennai, India. Retrieved 7 November 2014.  ^ "BJP demands Sharad Pawar's resignation, CBI probe into 'scams'". Dnaindia.com. Daily News and Analysis. 24 January 2010. Retrieved 7 November 2014.  ^ Every 12 hours, one farmer commits suicide in India. Indiatribune.com (2010-11-06). Retrieved on 2014-05-21.[dead link] ^ Farmer suicide is a normal thing: Pawar - IBNLive. Ibnlive.in.com. Retrieved on 2014-05-21. Archived 21 May 2014 at the Wayback Machine. ^ "Tamil Nadu News: India
India
should join consensus on Endosulfan
Endosulfan
ban: Vandana Shiva". The Hindu. 18 April 2011. Retrieved 26 November 2011.  ^ "Indian Agrarian Crisis – Ban Endosulfan". Agrariancrisis.in. Retrieved 26 November 2011.  ^ "Kerala: Ban endosulfan, says Vandana Shiva". The New Indian Express. 17 April 2011. Retrieved 26 November 2011.  ^ Shiv Kumar (27 October 2007). "Pawar in trouble over land allotment". Tribune India. Archived from the original on 31 March 2009. Retrieved 22 February 2009.  ^ Shloka Nath (27 October 2007). "HC notices to Sharad Pawar, family". NDTV. Archived from the original on 30 December 2007. Retrieved 22 February 2009.  ^ Judge Bilal Nazki and Judge S. A. Bobde (12 March 2008). "CIVIL APPLICATION NO.101/2007 in PIL NO.148/2006" (PDF). Bombay High Court. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 October 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2014.  ^ Times of India
Times of India
(1 May 2008). "Notice to Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
for contempt". Times of India. Retrieved 7 November 2014.  ^ Tax exemptions for rich costs govt Rs 4.6L cr ^ No proof to show Pawar influenced IPL exemption from tax: HC ^ India's Most Hated Politicians: Sharad Pawar, Rediff.com, 7 December 2011. ^ Abhay Vaidya & Partha Sarathi Biswas. Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
fooled all with Rs12 crore assets disclosure. DNA, 14 September 2011. ^ IPL bidder's January 31 board resolution contradicts Pawar & Sule's claims. The Times of India, 2010. ^ Pawar & family get entangled in IPL mess, IBNLive 25 June 2010. ^ IPL scam most serious blow to Sharad Pawar’s power, credibility, DNA, 7 June 2010. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 15 September 2012. Retrieved 2012-01-31.  Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
controlls [sic] DB Realty: Niira Radia to CBI, Hindustan Times 14 April 2011. ^ a b Vaidya, Abhay (26 December 2010). " Lavasa
Lavasa
trail reinforces the Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
connection & IPL link". Pune: DNA. Retrieved 21 February 2011.  ^ Byatnal, Amruta (31 October 2010). "Symbolic of luxury, Lavasa
Lavasa
is built on irregularities". The Hindu. Chennai, India. Retrieved 21 February 2011.  ^ Sharad Pawar's, Ajit Pawar's and Supriya Sule's names also prominently figure in the multi-crore Lavasa
Lavasa
land scam. Downtoearth.org.in (15 April 2011). Retrieved on 30 July 2011. ^ "Medha Patkar slams Pawar over alleged involvement in Lavasa project". Indian Express. Aurangabad. 22 December 2010.  access-date= requires url= (help) ^ "Not alright to say entire Pune
Pune
targeted, says Pawar". India
India
Today, Headlines Today Bureau. 13 February 2010.  ^ BBC News
BBC News
India
India
agriculture minister Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
slapped. Bbc.co.uk (24 November 2011). Retrieved on 6 December 2011.

Further reading[edit]

P. K. Ravindranath (1 February 1992) Sharad Pawar- the making of a modern maratha South Asia Books. ISBN 81-85674-46-9 Page 23 of the Times of India, New Delhi, India, Tuesday, 12 December 2006 Profile at BBC News Profile at Govt. of India
India
website

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Sharad Pawar.

Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
on Twitter
Twitter

Political offices

Preceded by Rajnath Singh Minister of Agriculture Succeeded by Radha Mohan Singh

Preceded by Sharad Yadav Minister of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution Succeeded by K. V. Thomas

Preceded by Vasantdada Patil Chief Minister of Maharashtra 18 July 1978 – 17 February 1980 Succeeded by A R Antule

Preceded by Shankarrao Chavan Chief Minister of Maharashtra 26 June 1988 – 25 June 1991 Succeeded by Sudhakarrao Naik

Preceded by Shankarrao Chavan Chief Minister of Maharashtra 6 March 1993 – 14 March 1995 Succeeded by Manohar Joshi

Preceded by Rameshwar Thakur Presidents of the Bharat Scouts and Guides 2001–2004 Succeeded by Rameshwar Thakur

Party political offices

Preceded by Sharad Pawar Leader of the Nationalist Congress Party
Nationalist Congress Party
in the 15th Lok Sabha 2009-2014 Succeeded by Tariq Anwar

v t e

Padma Vibhushan
Padma Vibhushan
award recipients

Arts

Ebrahim Alkazi Kishori Amonkar Amitabh Bachchan M. Balamuralikrishna T. Balasaraswati Asha Bhosle Nandalal Bose Hariprasad Chaurasia Girija Devi Kumar Gandharva Adoor Gopalakrishnan Satish Gujral Gangubai Hangal Bhupen Hazarika M. F. Husain Ilaiyaraaja Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer Bhimsen Joshi Ali Akbar Khan Amjad Ali Khan Allauddin Khan Bismillah Khan Ghulam Mustafa Khan Yamini Krishnamurthy Dilip Kumar R. K. Laxman Birju Maharaj Kishan Maharaj Lata Mangeshkar Sonal Mansingh Mallikarjun Mansur Zubin Mehta Mario Miranda Kelucharan Mohapatra Raghunath Mohapatra Jasraj
Jasraj
Motiram Benode Behari Mukherjee Hrishikesh Mukherjee Rajinikanth Ram Narayan D. K. Pattammal K. Shankar Pillai Akkineni Nageswara Rao Kaloji Narayana Rao Satyajit Ray S. H. Raza Zohra Sehgal Uday Shankar Ravi Shankar V. Shantaram Shivkumar Sharma Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman M. S. Subbulakshmi K. G. Subramanyan Kapila Vatsyayan Homai Vyarawalla K. J. Yesudas

Civil Service

Bimala Prasad Chaliha Naresh Chandra T. N. Chaturvedi Jayanto Nath Chaudhuri Suranjan Das Rajeshwar Dayal Basanti Devi P. N. Dhar Jyotindra Nath Dixit M. S. Gill Hafiz Mohamad Ibrahim H. V. R. Iyengar Bhola Nath Jha Dattatraya Shridhar Joshi Ajudhia Nath Khosla Rai Krishnadasa V. Krishnamurthy P. Prabhakar Kumaramangalam Pratap Chandra Lal K. B. Lall Sam Manekshaw Om Prakash Mehra Mohan Sinha Mehta M. G. K. Menon Brajesh Mishra Sumati Morarjee A. Ramasamy Mudaliar Sardarilal Mathradas Nanda Chakravarthi V. Narasimhan Braj Kumar Nehru Bhairab Dutt Pande Ghananand Pande Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit T. V. Rajeswar C. R. Krishnaswamy Rao Pattadakal Venkanna R Rao V. K. R. V. Rao Khusro Faramurz Rustamji Harish Chandra Sarin Binay Ranjan Sen Homi Sethna Arjan Singh Harbaksh Singh Kirpal Singh Manmohan Singh Tarlok Singh Lallan Prasad Singh Balaram Sivaraman Chandrika Prasad Srivastava T. Swaminathan Arun Shridhar Vaidya Dharma Vira Narinder Nath Vohra

Literature and Education

V. S. R. Arunachalam Jagdish Bhagwati Satyendra Nath Bose Tara Chand Suniti Kumar Chatterji D. P. Chattopadhyaya Bhabatosh Datta Avinash Dixit Mahasweta Devi John Kenneth Galbraith Sarvepalli Gopal Lakshman Shastri Joshi Kaka Kalelkar Dhondo Keshav Karve Gopinath Kaviraj Kuvempu O. N. V. Kurup Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis Sitakant Mahapatra John Mathai Kotha Satchidanda Murthy Giani Gurmukh Singh Musafir Basanti Dulal Nagchaudhuri Bal Ram Nanda R. K. Narayan P. Parameswaran Amrita Pritam K. N. Raj C. Rangarajan Raja Rao Ramoji Rao Hormasji Maneckji Seervai Rajaram Shastri Kalu Lal Shrimali Govindbhai Shroff Khushwant Singh Chandeshwar Prasad Narayan Singh Premlila Vithaldas Thackersey Mahadevi Varma Bashir Hussain Zaidi

Medicine

Jasbir Singh Bajaj B. K. Goyal Purshotam Lal A. Lakshmanaswami Mudaliar S. I. Padmavati Autar Singh Paintal Kantilal Hastimal Sancheti Balu Sankaran V. Shanta Vithal Nagesh Shirodkar Prakash Narain Tandon Brihaspati Dev Triguna M. S. Valiathan

Other

Sunderlal Bahuguna B. K. S. Iyengar Rambhadracharya Ravi Shankar Jaggi Vasudev

Public Affairs

L. K. Advani Montek Singh Ahluwalia Aruna Asaf Ali Fazal Ali Adarsh Sein Anand Madhav Shrihari Aney Parkash Singh Badal Sikander Bakht Milon K. Banerji Mirza Hameedullah Beg P. N. Bhagwati Raja Chelliah Chandra Kisan Daphtary Niren De C. D. Deshmukh Anthony Lancelot Dias Uma Shankar Dikshit Kazi Lhendup Dorjee P. B. Gajendragadkar Benjamin A. Gilman Zakir Husain V. R. Krishna Iyer Jagmohan Lakshmi Chand Jain Aditya Nath Jha Murli Manohar Joshi Mehdi Nawaz Jung Ali Yavar Jung Vijay Kelkar Hans Raj Khanna V. N. Khare Balasaheb Gangadhar Kher Akhlaqur Rahman Kidwai Jivraj Narayan Mehta V. K. Krishna Menon Hirendranath Mukherjee Ajoy Mukherjee Pranab Mukherjee Padmaja Naidu Gulzarilal Nanda Govind Narain Fali Sam Nariman Hosei Norota Nanabhoy Palkhivala K. Parasaran Hari Vinayak Pataskar Sunder Lal Patwa Sharad Pawar Naryana Raghvan Pillai Sri Prakasa N. G. Ranga Ravi Narayana Reddy Y. Venugopal Reddy Ghulam Mohammed Sadiq Lakshmi Sahgal P. A. Sangma M. C. Setalvad Karan Singh Nagendra Singh Swaran Singh Walter Sisulu Soli Sorabjee Kalyan Sundaram Chandulal Madhavlal Trivedi Atal Bihari Vajpayee M. N. Venkatachaliah Kottayan Katankot Venugopal Jigme Dorji Wangchuck

Science and Engineering

V. K. Aatre Salim Ali Norman Borlaug Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar Rajagopala Chidambaram Charles Correa Satish Dhawan Anil Kakodkar A. P. J. Abdul Kalam Krishnaswamy Kasturirangan Har Gobind Khorana Daulat Singh Kothari Verghese Kurien Raghunath Anant Mashelkar G. Madhavan Nair Roddam Narasimha Jayant Narlikar Rajendra K. Pachauri Benjamin Peary Pal Yash Pal I. G. Patel Venkatraman Ramakrishnan K. R. Ramanathan Raja Ramanna C. R. Rao C. N. R. Rao Palle Rama Rao Udupi Ramachandra Rao Vikram Sarabhai Man Mohan Sharma Obaid Siddiqi E. Sreedharan M. R. Srinivasan George Sudarshan M. S. Swaminathan

Social Work

Baba Amte Pandurang Shastri Athavale Janaki Devi Bajaj Mirabehn Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay Durgabai Deshmukh Nanaji Deshmukh Nirmala Deshpande Mohan Dharia U. N. Dhebar Valerian Gracias Veerendra Heggade Mary Clubwala Jadhav Gaganvihari Lallubhai Mehta Usha Mehta Sister Nirmala Nellie Sengupta

Sports

Viswanathan Anand Edmund Hillary Sachin Tendulkar

Trade and Industry

Dhirubhai Ambani Ghanshyam Das Birla Ashok Sekhar Ganguly Karim Al Hussaini Aga Khan Lakshmi Mittal N. R. Narayana Murthy M. Narasimham Prithvi Raj Singh Oberoi Azim Premji Prathap C. Reddy J. R. D. Tata Ratan Tata

Portal Category WikiProject

v t e

Rajya Sabha
Rajya Sabha
members from Maharashtra
Maharashtra
for term 2010–2016

RS Members for term 2004-2010 2006-2012 2008-2014 ----- 2012-2018 2014-2020 2016-2022

Elected in 2010 for full term

Tariq Anwar Vijay J. Darda Piyush Goyal Ishwarlal Jain Avinash Pandey Sanjay Raut

Elected in by-elections until 2016

from 2014

Praful Patel
Praful Patel
( Anwar - resigned )

Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
members from Maharashtra 15th Lok Sabha
15th Lok Sabha
(2009-2014) 16th Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
(2014-2019)

v t e

Second Manmohan Singh
Manmohan Singh
Cabinet

Prime Minister: Manmohan Singh

Cabinet Ministers

Agriculture

Sharad Pawar

Civil Aviation

Ajit Singh

Coal

Shriprakash Jaiswal

Commerce and Industry

Anand Sharma

Communications and IT

Kapil Sibal

Culture

Chandresh Kumari Katoch

Defence

A. K. Antony

Earth Sciences

Jaipal Reddy

External Affairs

Salman Khurshid

Finance

P. Chidambaram

Food Processing Industries

Sharad Pawar

Health and Family Welfare

Ghulam Nabi Azad

Heavy Ind. & Public Enterprises

Praful Patel

Home Affairs

Sushilkumar Shinde

Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation

Girija Vyas

Human Resource Development

Pallam Raju

Labour and Employment

Sis Ram Ola

Law and Justice

Kapil Sibal

Mines

Dinsha Patel

Minority Affairs

K. Rahman Khan

New and Renewable Energy

Farooq Abdullah

Overseas Indian Affairs

Vayalar Ravi

Parliamentary Affairs

Kamal Nath

Petroleum and Natural Gas

Veerappa Moily

Railway

Mallikarjun Kharge

Road Transport and Highways

Oscar Fernandes

Rural development

Jairam Ramesh

Science and Technology

Jaipal Reddy

Social Justice and Emp.

Selja Kumari

Steel

Beni Prasad Verma

Shipping

G. K. Vasan

Textiles

Kavuri Samba Siva Rao

Tribal Affairs

Kishore Chandra Deo

Urban Development

Kamal Nath

Water Resources

Harish Rawat

Ministers of State (Independent Charge)

Chemicals and Fertilizers

Srikant Kumar Jena

Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution

K. V. Thomas

Corporate Affairs

Sachin Pilot

Development of North Eastern Region

Paban Singh Ghatowar

Drinking Water and Sanitation

Bharatsinh Madhavsinh Solanki

Environment and Forests

Jayanthi Natarajan

Information and Broadcasting

Manish Tewari

MSME

K. H. Muniyappa

Power

Jyotiraditya Madhavrao Scindia

Statistics and Programme Implementation

Srikant Kumar Jena

Tourism

K. Chiranjeevi

Women and Child Dev.

Krishna Tirath

Youth Affairs and Sports

Jitendra Singh

Ministers of State

Agriculture

Charan Das Mahant, Tariq Anwar

Civil Aviation

K. C. Venugopal

Coal

Pratik Prakashbapu Patil

Commerce and Industry

Daggubati Purandeswari, E. M. Sudarsana Natchiappan

Comm. & IT

Killi Krupa Rani, Milind Murli Deora

Corporate Affairs

R. P. N. Singh

Defence

Jitendra Singh

External Affairs

E. Ahamed, Preneet Kaur

Finance

Namo Narain Meena, S. S. Palanimanickam

Food Processing Ind.

Charan Das Mahant

Health and Family Welfare

Abu Hasem Khan Choudhury, S. Gandhiselvan

Home Affairs

Mullappally Ramachandran, R. P. N. Singh

Human Resource Development

Jitin Prasada, Shashi Tharoor

Information and Broadcasting

S. Jagathrakshakan

Labour and Employment

Kodikunnil Suresh

Minority Affairs

Ninong Ering

Parliamentary Affairs

Paban Singh Ghatowar, Rajeev Shukla

Petroleum and Natural Gas

Panabaka Lakshmi, R. P. N. Singh

New and Renewable Energy

S. Jagathrakshakan

Personnel, Public Griev. & Pensions

V. Narayanasamy

Planning Commission

Rajeev Shukla

Power

K. C. Venugopal

PMO

V. Narayanasamy

Railway

Adhir Ranjan Chowdhury, K. J. Surya Prakash Reddy

Road Trans. & Highways

Sarvey Sathyanarayana, Tushar Amarsinh Chaudhary

Rural development

Lal Chand Kataria, Pradeep Jain Aditya

Shipping

Milind Murli Deora

Social Justice and Emp.

Balram Naik, Manikrao Hodlya Gavit

Textiles

Panabaka Lakshmi

Tribal Affairs

Mahadeo Singh Khandela, Ranee Narah

Urban Development

Deepa Dasmunsi

v t e

Defence Ministers of India

Baldev Singh Kailash Nath Katju V. K. Krishna Menon Yashwantrao Chavan Jagjivan Ram Chaudhary Bansi Lal R. Venkataraman Rajiv Gandhi V. P. Singh K. C. Pant Chandra Shekhar Singh Sharad Pawar P. V. Narasimha Rao Pramod Mahajan Mulayam Singh Yadav George Fernandes Jaswant Singh George Fernandes Pranab Mukherjee A. K. Antony Arun Jaitley Manohar Parrikar Nirmala Sitharaman

v t e

Chief Ministers of Maharashtra

Yashwantrao Chavan Marotrao Kannamwar P. K. Sawant Vasantrao Naik Shankarrao Chavan Vasantdada Patil Sharad Pawar A. R. Antulay Babasaheb Bhosale Shivajirao Patil Nilangekar Sudhakarrao Naik Manohar Joshi Narayan Rane Vilasrao Deshmukh Sushilkumar Shinde Ashok Chavan Prithviraj Chavan Devendra Fadnavis

v t e

Presidents of ICC

Colin Cowdrey
Colin Cowdrey
(1989–1993) Clyde Walcott
Clyde Walcott
(1993–1997) Jagmohan Dalmiya (1997–2000) Malcolm Gray (2000–2003) Ehsan Mani (2003–2006) Percy Sonn (2006–2007) Ray Mali (2007–2008) David Morgan (2008–2010) Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
(2010–2012) Alan Isaac
Alan Isaac
(2012–2014) Mustafa Kamal (2014–2015) Zaheer Abbas
Zaheer Abbas
(2015–2016) discontinued

v t e

Presidents of the Board of Control for Cricket
Cricket
in India

1928-1950

R. E. Grant Govan (1928-1933) Sikandar Hayat Khan (1933-1935) Hamidullah Khan
Hamidullah Khan
(1935-1937) Digvijaysinhji Ranjitsinhji
Digvijaysinhji Ranjitsinhji
(1937-1938) P. Subbarayan
P. Subbarayan
(1938-1946) Anthony S. D'Mello (1946-1951)

1951-1975

J. C. Mukherjee (1951-1954) Maharajkumar of Vizianagram
Maharajkumar of Vizianagram
(1954-1956) Sardar Surjit Singh Majithia (1956-1958) R. K. Patel (1958-1960) M. A. Chidambaram
M. A. Chidambaram
(1960-1963) Fatehsinghrao Gaekwad
Fatehsinghrao Gaekwad
(1963-1966) Zal Irani (1966-1969) A. N. Ghosh (1969-1972) Purushottam Rungta (1972-1975)

1976-2000

Ramprakash Mehra (1975-1977) M. Chinnaswamy (1977-1980) S. K. Wankhede (1980-1982) N. K. P. Salve (1982-1985) S. Sriraman (1985-1988) B. N. Dutt (1988-1990) Madhavrao Scindia (1990-1993) Inderjit Singh Bindra (1993-1996) Raj Singh Dungarpur (1996-1999) A. C. Muthiah
A. C. Muthiah
(1999-2001)

2001-present

Jagmohan Dalmiya (2001-2004) Ranbir Singh Mahendra (2004-2005) Sharad Pawar
Sharad Pawar
(2005-2008) Shashank Manohar (2008-2011) N. Srinivasan (2011-2013) Jagmohan Dalmiya (2013) N. Srinivasan (2013-2014) Sunil Gavaskar
Sunil Gavaskar
(2014) Shivlal Yadav (2014) Jagmohan Dalmiya (2014-2015) Shashank Manohar (2015-2016) Anurag Thakur
Anurag Thakur
(2016-2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 74712958 LCCN: n89204

.