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Sesame Street
Sesame Street
is an American educational children's television series that combines live action, sketch comedy, animation and puppetry. It is produced by Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
(formerly known as the Children's Television Workshop until June 2000) and was created by Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett. The program is known for its images communicated through the use of Jim Henson's Muppets, and includes short films, with humor and cultural references. The series premiered on November 10, 1969, to positive reviews, some controversy,[1] and high viewership; it has aired on the U.S.'s national public television provider PBS
PBS
since its debut, with its first run moving to premium channel HBO
HBO
on January 16, 2016.[2] The show has undergone significant changes in its history. The format of Sesame Street
Sesame Street
consists of a combination of commercial television production elements and techniques which have evolved to reflect the changes in American culture and the audience's viewing habits. With the creation of Sesame Street, producers and writers of a children's television show used, for the first time, educational goals and a curriculum to shape its content. It was also the first time a show's educational effects were formally studied. Shortly after creating Sesame Street, its producers developed what came to be called the "CTW model" (after the production company's previous name), a system of television show planning, production, and evaluation based on collaborations between producers, writers, educators, and researchers. The show was initially funded by government and private foundations but has become somewhat self-supporting due to revenues from licensing arrangements, international sales, and other media. By 2006, there were independently produced versions, or "co-productions", of Sesame Street broadcast in twenty countries. In 2001 there were over 120 million viewers of various international versions of Sesame Street, and by the show's 40th anniversary in 2009, it was broadcast in more than 140 countries. Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was by then the fifteenth-highest-rated children's television show in the United States. A 1996 survey found that 95% of all American preschoolers had watched the show by the time they were three years old. In 2008, it was estimated that 77 million Americans had watched the series as children. As of 2014, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
has won 167 Emmy Awards
Emmy Awards
and 8 Grammy Awards—more than any other children's show.

Contents

1 History 2 Format 3 Educational goals 4 Funding 5 Production

5.1 Research 5.2 Writing 5.3 Media

6 Cast, crew and characters 7 Reception

7.1 Ratings 7.2 Influence 7.3 Critical reception

8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Works cited 12 External links

History[edit] Main article: History of Sesame Street Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was conceived in 1966 during discussions between television producer Joan Ganz Cooney
Joan Ganz Cooney
and Carnegie Foundation vice president Lloyd Morrisett. Their goal was to create a children's television show that would "master the addictive qualities of television and do something good with them",[3] such as helping young children prepare for school. After two years of research, the newly formed Children's Television Workshop (CTW) received a combined grant of US$8 million ($53 million in 2017 dollars)[4] from the Carnegie Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the U.S. Federal Government to create and produce a new children's television show.[5] The program premiered on public television stations on November 10, 1969.[6] It was the first preschool educational television program to base its contents and production values on laboratory and formative research.[7] Initial responses to the show included adulatory reviews, some controversy,[8] and high ratings. By its 40th anniversary in 2009, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was broadcast in over 120 countries, and 20 international versions had been produced.[9]

"I've always said of our original team that developed and produced Sesame Street: Collectively, we were a genius."

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
creator Joan Ganz Cooney[10]

Co-creator Joan Ganz Cooney, in 1985

Lloyd Morrisett, Co-creator

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
has evolved from its initial inception. According to writer Michael Davis, by the mid-1970s the show had become "an American institution".[11] The cast and crew expanded during this time, with emphasis on the hiring of women crew members and the addition of minorities to the cast. The show's success continued into the 1980s. In 1981, when the federal government withdrew its funding, CTW turned to, and expanded, other revenue sources, including its magazine division, book royalties, product licensing, and foreign broadcast income.[12] Sesame Street's curriculum has expanded to include more affective topics such as relationships, ethics, and emotions. Many of the show's storylines were taken from the experiences of its writing staff, cast, and crew, most notably, the 1982 death of Will Lee—who played Mr. Hooper[13]—and the marriage of Luis and Maria in 1988.[14] In recent years[when?] Sesame Street
Sesame Street
has faced societal and economic challenges, including changes in viewing habits of young children, competition from other shows, the development of cable television, and a drop in ratings.[15] After the turn of the 21st century, Sesame Street made major structural changes. For example, starting in 2002, its format became more narrative and included ongoing storylines. After its thirtieth anniversary in 1999 and due to the popularity of the Muppet Elmo, the show also incorporated a popular segment known as "Elmo's World".[16] Upon its fortieth anniversary in 2009, the show received a Lifetime Achievement Emmy at the 36th Daytime Emmy Awards.[17] On August 13, 2015, as part of a five-year programming and development deal, Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
announced that first-run episodes of Sesame Street would move to premium television service HBO
HBO
beginning with season 46, which premiered on January 16, 2016.[2] HBO
HBO
will hold first-run rights to all newer episodes of the series, after which they will air on PBS
PBS
member stations following a nine-month exclusivity window, with no charge to the stations for airing the content.[18] The agreement also gives HBO
HBO
exclusive rights to stream past and future Sesame Street
Sesame Street
episodes on HBO
HBO
Go and HBO
HBO
Now – assuming those rights from Amazon Video
Amazon Video
and Netflix; on August 14, Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
announced that it would phase out its in-house subscription streaming service, Sesame Go, as a standalone service; the service will remain in operation, likely with its offerings reduced to a slate content available for free or serving as a portal for Sesame Street's website.[19] The deal came in the wake of cutbacks that had affected the series in recent years, the changing viewer habits of American children in the previous ten years, and Sesame Workshop's dependence upon revenue from DVD sales.[20][21] In April 2017, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
introduced Julia, a new Muppet who has autism, performed by Stacey Gordon, who has a son on the autism spectrum.[22] Format[edit] Main article: Format of Sesame Street From its first episode, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
has structured its format by using "a strong visual style, fast-moving action, humor, and music," as well as animation and live-action short films.[23] When Sesame Street premiered, most researchers believed that young children did not have long attention spans, therefore the new show's producers were concerned that an hour-long show would not hold their audience's attention. At first, the show's "street scenes"—the action taking place on its set—consisted of character-driven interactions and were not written as ongoing stories. Instead, they consisted of individual, curriculum-based segments which were interrupted by "inserts" consisting of puppet sketches, short films, and animations. This structure allowed the producers to use a mixture of styles and characters, and to vary the show's pace. By season 20, research had shown that children were able to follow a story, and the street scenes, while still interspersed with other segments, became evolving storylines.[24][25]

"We basically deconstructed the show. It's not a magazine format anymore. It's more like the Sesame hour. Children will be able to navigate through it easier."

—Executive producer Arlene Sherman, speaking of the show's restructuring in 2002[26]

Upon recommendations by child psychologists, the producers initially decided that the show's human actors and Muppets
Muppets
would not interact because they were concerned it would confuse young children.[27] When the CTW tested the appeal of the new show, they found that although children paid attention to the shows during the Muppet segments, their interest was lost during the "Street" segments.[28] The producers requested that Henson and his team create Muppets
Muppets
such as Big Bird
Big Bird
and Oscar the Grouch
Oscar the Grouch
to interact with the human actors, and the Street segments were re-shot.[29][30] Sesame Street's format remained intact until the 2000s, when the changing audience required that producers move to a more narrative format. In 1998, the popular segment "Elmo's World", a 15-minute-long segment hosted by the Muppet Elmo, was created.[31] Starting in 2014, during the show's 45th season, the producers introduced a half-hour version of the program. The new version, which originally complemented the full-hour series, and was both broadcast weekday afternoons and streamed on the internet.[32] The half-hour version of the show became the standard with the 46th season. Educational goals[edit] Main article: Educational goals of Sesame Street As author Malcolm Gladwell
Malcolm Gladwell
has stated, " Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was built around a single, breakthrough insight: that if you can hold the attention of children, you can educate them".[33] Gerald S. Lesser, the CTW's first advisory board chair, went even further, saying that the effective use of television as an educational tool needed to capture, focus, and sustain children's attention.[34] Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was the first children's show to structure each episode, and the segments within them, to capture children's attention, and to make, as Gladwell put it, "small but critical adjustments" to keep it.[35] According to CTW researchers Rosemarie Truglio and Shalom Fisch, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was one of the few children's television programs to utilize a detailed and comprehensive educational curriculum, garnered from formative and summative research.[36] The creators of Sesame Street
Sesame Street
and their researchers formulated both cognitive and affective goals for the show. Initially, they focused on cognitive goals, while addressing affective goals indirectly, in the belief that doing so would increase children's self-esteem and feelings of competency.[37][38] One of their primary goals was preparing very young children for school, especially children from low-income families,[39] using modeling,[40] repetition,[41] and humor[34] to fulfill these goals. They made changes in the show's content to increase their viewers' attention and to increase its appeal,[42] and encouraged "co-viewing" to entice older children and parents to watch the show by including more sophisticated humor, cultural references, and celebrity guest appearances.[43] After Sesame Street's first season, its critics forced its producers and researchers to address more overtly such affective goals as social competence, tolerance of diversity, and nonaggressive ways of resolving conflict. These issues were addressed through interpersonal disputes among its Street characters.[44] During the 1980s, the show incorporated the real-life experiences of the show's cast and crew, including the death of Will Lee
Will Lee
(Mr. Hooper) and the pregnancy of Sonia Manzano
Sonia Manzano
(Maria) to address affective concerns.[13] In later seasons, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
addressed real-life disasters such as the September 11 terrorist attacks
September 11 terrorist attacks
and Hurricane Katrina.[45] The show's goals for outreach were addressed through a series of programs that first focused on promotion and then, after the first season, on the development of educational materials used in preschool settings. Innovative programs were developed because their target audience, children and their families in low-income, inner-city homes, did not traditionally watch educational programs on television and because traditional methods of promotion and advertising were not effective with these groups.[46] Funding[edit] As a result of Cooney's initial proposal in 1968, the Carnegie Institute awarded her an $8 million ($53 million in 2017 dollars)[4] grant to create a new children's television program and establish the CTW,[5][47] renamed in June 2000 to Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
(SW).[48] Cooney and Morrisett procured additional multimillion-dollar grants from the U.S. federal government, The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, CPB, and the Ford Foundation.[3] Davis reported that Cooney and Morrisett decided that if they did not procure full funding from the beginning, they would drop the idea of producing the show.[49] As Lesser reported, funds gained from a combination of government agencies and private foundations protected them from the economic pressures experienced by commercial broadcast television networks, but created challenges in procuring future funding.[50] After Sesame Street's initial success, its producers began to think about its survival beyond its development and first season and decided to explore other funding sources. From the first season, they understood that the source of their funding, which they considered "seed" money, would need to be replaced.[51] The 1970s were marked by conflicts between the CTW and the federal government; in 1978, the U.S. Department of Education refused to deliver a $2 million check until the last day of CTW's fiscal year. As a result, the CTW decided to depend upon licensing arrangements with toy companies and other manufacturers, publishing, and international sales for their funding.[12] In 1998, the CTW accepted corporate sponsorship to raise funds for Sesame Street
Sesame Street
and other projects. For the first time, they allowed short advertisements by indoor playground manufacturer Discovery Zone, their first corporate sponsor, to air before and after each episode. Consumer advocate Ralph Nader, who had previously appeared on Sesame Street, called for a boycott of the show, saying that the CTW was "exploiting impressionable children".[6] Production[edit] Research[edit] Main article: Sesame Street
Sesame Street
research Producer Joan Ganz Cooney
Joan Ganz Cooney
has stated, "Without research, there would be no Sesame Street".[52] In 1967, when Cooney and her team began to plan the show's development, combining research with television production was, as she put it, "positively heretical".[52] Shortly after creating Sesame Street, its producers began to develop what came to be called "the CTW model", a system of planning, production, and evaluation that did not fully emerge until the end of the show's first season.[53][note 2] According to Morrow, the CTW model consisted of four parts: "the interaction of receptive television producers and child science experts, the creation of a specific and age-appropriate curriculum, research to shape the program directly, and independent measurement of viewers' learning".[53] Cooney credited the show's high standard in research procedures to Harvard professors Gerald S. Lesser, whom the CTW hired to design the show's educational objectives, and Edward L. Palmer, who was responsible for conducting the show's formative research and for bridging the gap between the show's producers and researchers.[54] The CTW conducted research in two ways: in-house formative research that informed and improved production,[55] and independent summative evaluations, conducted by the Educational Testing Service
Educational Testing Service
(ETS) during the show's first two seasons, which measuring its educational effectiveness.[7] Cooney stated, "From the beginning, we—the planners of the project—designed the show as an experimental research project with educational advisers, researchers, and television producers collaborating as equal partners".[56] Cooney also described the collaboration as an "arranged marriage".[52] Writing[edit] Sesame Street
Sesame Street
has used many writers in its long history. As Dave Connell, one of Sesame Street's original producers, has stated, it was difficult to find adults who could identify a preschooler's interest level. Fifteen writers a year worked on the show's scripts, but very few lasted longer than one season. Norman Stiles, head writer in 1987, reported that most writers would "burn out" after writing about a dozen scripts.[13] According to Gikow, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
went against the convention of hiring teachers to write for the show, as most educational television programs did at the time. Instead, Cooney and the producers felt that it would be easier to teach writers how to interpret curriculum than to teach educators how to write comedy.[57] As Stone stated, "Writing for children is not so easy".[57] Long-time writer Tony Geiss agreed, stating in 2009, "It's not an easy show to write. You have to know the characters and the format and how to teach and be funny at the same time, which is a big, ambidextrous stunt".[58]

The Kaufman Astoria Studios, where Sesame Street
Sesame Street
is taped.

The show's research team developed an annotated document, or "Writer's Notebook", which served as a bridge between the show's curriculum goals and script development.[59] The notebook was a compilation of programming ideas designed to teach specific curriculum points,[60] provided extended definitions of curriculum goals, and assisted the writers and producers in translating the goals into televised material.[61] Suggestions in the notebook were free of references to specific characters and contexts on the show so that they could be implemented as openly and flexibly as possible.[62] The research team, in a series of meetings with the writers, also developed "a curriculum sheet" that described the show's goals and priorities for each season. After receiving the curriculum focus and goals for the season, the writers met to discuss ideas and story arcs for the characters, and an "assignment sheet" was created that suggested how much time was allotted for each goal and topic.[59][63] When a script was completed, the show's research team analyzed it to ensure that the goals were met. Then each production department met to determine what each episode needed in terms of costumes, lights, and sets. The writers were present during the show's taping, which for the first twenty-four years of the show took place in Manhattan, and after 1992, at the Kaufman Astoria Studios
Kaufman Astoria Studios
in Queens
Queens
to make last-minute revisions when necessary.[64][65][66][note 3] Media[edit] Main articles: Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
funding sources, Music of Sesame Street, and International co-productions of Sesame Street Early in their history Sesame Street
Sesame Street
and the CTW began to look for alternative funding sources and turned to creating products and writing licensing agreements. They became, as Cooney put it, "a multiple-media institution".[67] In 1970, the CTW created a "non-broadcast" division responsible for creating and publishing books and Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Magazine.[68] They decided that all materials their licensing program created would "underscore and amplify"[69] the show's curriculum. In 2004, over 68% of Sesame Street's revenue came from licenses and products such as toys and clothing.[70][71] By 2008, the Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Muppets
Muppets
accounted for between $15 million and $17 million per year in licensing and merchandising fees, split between the Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
and The Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Company.[72] Jim Henson, the creator of the Muppets, owned the trademarks to those characters, and was reluctant to market them at first. He agreed when the CTW promised that the profits from toys, books, computer games, and other products were to be used exclusively to fund the CTW and its outreach efforts.[51][73] Even though Cooney and the CTW had very little experience with marketing, they demanded complete control over all products and product decisions.[74] Any product line associated with the show had to be educational and inexpensive, and could not be advertised during the show's airings.[75] As Davis reported, "Cooney stressed restraint, prudence, and caution" in their marketing and licensing efforts.[75] Director Jon Stone, talking about the music of Sesame Street, said: "There was no other sound like it on television".[76] For the first time in children's television, the show's songs fulfilled a specific purpose and supported its curriculum.[77] In order to attract the best composers and lyricists, the CTW allowed songwriters like Sesame Street's first musical director Joe Raposo to retain the rights to the songs they wrote, which earned them lucrative profits and helped the show sustain public interest.[78] By 1991, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
and its songwriters had received eight Grammys.[79] Sesame Street
Sesame Street
used animations and short films commissioned from outside studios,[80] interspersed throughout each episode, to help teach their viewers basic concepts like numbers and letters.[81] Jim Henson was one of the many producers to create short films for the show.[82] Shortly after Sesame Street
Sesame Street
debuted in the United States, the CTW was approached independently by producers from several countries to produce versions of the show at home. These versions came to be called "co-productions".[83] By 2001 there were over 120 million viewers of all international versions of Sesame Street,[84] and in 2006, there were twenty co-productions around the world.[85] By the show's 40th anniversary in 2009, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was broadcast in more than 140 countries.[86] In 2005, Doreen Carvajal of The New York Times reported that income from the co-productions and international licensing accounted for $96 million.[70] Cast, crew and characters[edit] Main articles: Sesame Street characters
Sesame Street characters
and List of guest stars on Sesame Street

Jim Henson, creator of the Muppets, in 1989

Caroll Spinney
Caroll Spinney
with Oscar the Grouch

Shortly after the CTW was created in 1968, Joan Ganz Cooney
Joan Ganz Cooney
was named its first executive director. She was one of the first female executives in American television. Her appointment was called "one of the most important television developments of the decade".[87] She assembled a team of producers, all of whom had previously worked on Captain Kangaroo. Jon Stone was responsible for writing, casting, and format; Dave Connell took over animation; and Sam Gibbon served as the show's chief liaison between the production staff and the research team.[88] Cameraman Frankie Biondo worked on Sesame Street
Sesame Street
from its first episode.[89] Jim Henson
Jim Henson
and the Muppets' involvement in Sesame Street
Sesame Street
began when he and Cooney met at one of the curriculum planning seminars in Boston. Author Christopher Finch reported that Stone, who had worked with Henson previously, felt that if they could not bring him on board, they should "make do without puppets".[5] Henson was initially reluctant, but he agreed to join Sesame Street
Sesame Street
to meet his own social goals. He also agreed to waive his performance fee for full ownership of the Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Muppets
Muppets
and to split any revenue they generated with the CTW.[72] As Morrow stated, Henson's puppets were a crucial part of the show's popularity and it brought Henson national attention.[90] Davis reported that Henson was able to take "arcane academic goals" and translate them to "effective and pleasurable viewing".[91] In early research, the Muppet segments of the show scored high, and more Muppets
Muppets
were added during the first few seasons. Morrow reported that the Muppets
Muppets
were effective teaching tools because children easily recognized them, they were stereotypical and predictable, and they appealed to adults and older siblings.[92]

" Sesame Street
Sesame Street
is best known for the creative geniuses it attracted, people like Jim Henson
Jim Henson
and Joe Raposo and Frank Oz, who intuitively grasped what it takes to get through to children. They were television's answer to Beatrix Potter or L. Frank Baum or Dr. Seuss."

—Author Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point[93]

Although the producers decided against depending upon a single host for Sesame Street, instead casting a group of ethnically diverse actors,[94] they realized that a children's television program needed to have, as Lesser put it, "a variety of distinctive and reliable personalities",[95] both human and Muppet. Jon Stone, whose goal was to cast white actors in the minority,[13] was responsible for hiring the show's first cast. He did not audition actors until Spring 1969, a few weeks before the five test shows were due to be filmed. Stone videotaped the auditions, and Ed Palmer took them out into the field to test children's reactions. The actors who received the "most enthusiastic thumbs up" were cast.[96] For example, Loretta Long was chosen to play Susan when the children who saw her audition stood up and sang along with her rendition of "I'm a Little Teapot".[96][97] As Stone said, casting was the only aspect of the show that was "just completely haphazard".[69] Most of the cast and crew found jobs on Sesame Street
Sesame Street
through personal relationships with Stone and the other producers.[69] According to the CTW's research, children preferred watching and listening to other children more than to puppets and adults, so they included children in many scenes.[98] Dave Connell insisted that no child actors be used,[99] so these children were nonprofessionals, unscripted, and spontaneous. Many of their reactions were unpredictable and difficult to control, but the adult cast learned to handle the children's spontaneity flexibly, even when it resulted in departures from the planned script or lesson.[100] CTW research also revealed that the children's hesitations and on-air mistakes served as models for viewers.[101] According to Morrow, this resulted in the show having a "fresh quality", especially in its early years.[99] Children were also used in the voice-over commentaries of most of the live-action films the CTW produced. Reception[edit] Main article: Influence of Sesame Street Ratings[edit] When Sesame Street
Sesame Street
premiered in 1969, it aired on only 67.6% of American televisions, but it earned a 3.3 Nielsen rating, which totaled 1.9 million households.[102] By the show's tenth anniversary in 1979, nine million American children under the age of 6 were watching Sesame Street
Sesame Street
daily. According to a 1993 survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Education, out of the show's 6.6 million viewers, 2.4 million kindergartners regularly watched it. 77% of preschoolers watched it once a week, and 86% of kindergartners and first- and second-grade students had watched it once a week before starting school. The show reached most young children in almost all demographic groups.[103] The show's ratings significantly decreased in the early 1990s, resulting from changes in children's viewing habits and in the television marketplace. The producers responded by making large-scale structural changes to the show.[104] By 2006, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
had become "the most widely viewed children's television show in the world", with 20 international independent versions and broadcasts in over 120 countries.[9] A 1996 survey found that 95% of all American preschoolers had watched the show by the time they were three years old.[105] In 2008, it was estimated that 77 million Americans had watched the series as children.[9] By the show's 40th anniversary in 2009, it was ranked the fifteenth-most-popular children's show on television.[106] Influence[edit] Main article: Sesame Street research
Sesame Street research
§  Summative research As of 2001, there were over 1,000 research studies regarding Sesame Street's efficacy, impact, and effect on American culture.[54] The CTW solicited the Educational Testing Service
Educational Testing Service
(ETS) to conduct summative research on the show.[107] ETS's two "landmark"[108] summative evaluations, conducted in 1970 and 1971, demonstrated that the show had a significant educational impact on its viewers.[109] These studies have been cited in other studies of the effects of television on young children.[108][note 4] Additional studies conducted throughout Sesame Street's history demonstrated that the show continued to have a positive effect on its young viewers.[note 5]

" Sesame Street
Sesame Street
[is] perhaps the most vigorously researched, vetted, and fretted-over program on the planet. It would take a fork-lift to now to haul away the load of scholarly paper devoted to the series..."

—Author Michael Davis[110]

Lesser believed that Sesame Street research
Sesame Street research
"may have conferred a new respectability upon the studies of the effects of visual media upon children".[111] He also believed that the show had the same effect on the prestige of producing shows for children in the television industry.[111] Historian Robert Morrow, in his book Sesame Street
Sesame Street
and the Reform of Children's Television, which chronicled the show's influence on children's television and on the television industry as a whole, reported that many critics of commercial television saw Sesame Street as a "straightforward illustration for reform".[112] Les Brown, a writer for Variety, saw in Sesame Street
Sesame Street
"a hope for a more substantial future" for television.[112] Morrow reported that the networks responded by creating more high-quality television programs, but that many critics saw them as "appeasement gestures".[113] According to Morrow, despite the CTW Model's effectiveness in creating a popular show, commercial television "made only a limited effort to emulate CTW's methods", and did not use a curriculum or evaluate what children learned from them.[114] By the mid-1970s, commercial television abandoned their experiments with creating better children's programming.[115] Other critics hoped that Sesame Street, with its depiction of a functioning, multicultural community, would nurture racial tolerance in its young viewers.[116] It was not until the mid-1990s when a children's television educational program, Blue's Clues, used the CTW's methods to create and modify their content. The creators of Blue's Clues
Blue's Clues
were influenced by Sesame Street, but wanted to use research conducted in the 30 years since its debut. Angela Santomero, one of its producers, said, "We wanted to learn from Sesame Street
Sesame Street
and take it one step further".[117] As critic Richard Roeper
Richard Roeper
has stated, perhaps one of the strongest indicators of the influence of Sesame Street
Sesame Street
has been the enduring rumors and urban legends surrounding the show and its characters, especially those concerning Bert and Ernie.[118] Critical reception[edit] Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was praised from its debut in 1969. Newsday reported that several newspapers and magazines had written "glowing" reports about the CTW and Cooney.[102] The press overwhelmingly praised the new show; several popular magazines and niche magazines lauded it.[119] In 1970, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
won twenty awards, including a Peabody Award, three Emmys, an award from the Public Relations Society of America, a Clio, and a Prix Jeunesse.[120] By 1995, the show had won two Peabody Awards
Peabody Awards
and four Parents' Choice Awards. In addition, it was the subject of retrospectives at the Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
and the Museum of Modern Art.[43]

" Sesame Street
Sesame Street
is...with lapses, the most intelligent and important program in television. That is not anything much yet."

—Renata Adler, The New Yorker, 1972[121]

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was not without its detractors, however. In May 1970, the state commission in Mississippi, the state Henson was actually from, that operated the state's PBS
PBS
member station voted to not air Sesame Street
Sesame Street
because of its "highly integrated cast of children" which "the commission members felt ... Mississippi
Mississippi
was not yet ready for".[122] According to Children and Television, Lesser's account of the development and early years of Sesame Street, there was little criticism of the show in the months following its premiere, but it increased at the end of its first season and beginning of the second season.[123][note 6] Historian Robert W. Morrow speculated that much of the early criticism, which he called "surprisingly intense",[124] stemmed from cultural and historical reasons in regards to, as he put it, "the place of children in American society and the controversies about television's effects on them".[124] According to Morrow, the "most important" studies finding negative effects of Sesame Street
Sesame Street
were conducted by educator Herbert A. Sprigle and psychologist Thomas D. Cook during its first two seasons.[125] Social scientist and Head Start Program
Head Start Program
founder Urie Bronfenbrenner criticized the show for being too wholesome.[126] Psychologist Leon Eisenberg saw Sesame Street's urban setting as "superficial" and having little to do with the problems confronted by the inner-city child.[127] Head Start director Edward Zigler was probably Sesame Street's most vocal critic in the show's early years.[128] In spite of their commitment to multiculturalism, the CTW experienced conflicts with the leadership of minority groups, especially Latino groups and feminists, who objected to Sesame Street's depiction of Latinos and women.[129] The CTW took steps to address their objections. By 1971, the CTW hired Hispanic actors, production staff, and researchers, and by the mid-1970s, Morrow reported that "the show included Chicano and Puerto Rican cast members, films about Mexican holidays and foods, and cartoons that taught Spanish words".[130] As The New York Times
The New York Times
has stated, creating strong female characters "that make kids laugh, but not...as female stereotypes" has been a challenge for the producers of Sesame Street.[131] According to Morrow, change regarding how women and girls were depicted on Sesame Street
Sesame Street
occurred slowly.[132] As more female Muppets
Muppets
performers like Fran Brill, Pam Arciero, Carmen Osbahr, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, Jennifer Barnhart, and Leslie Carrara-Rudolph
Leslie Carrara-Rudolph
were hired and trained, stronger female characters like Rosita and Abby Cadabby
Abby Cadabby
were created.[133]

Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
CEO Gary Knell, Executive Vice-President Terry Fitzpatrick, and puppeteer Kevin Clash
Kevin Clash
(with Elmo) at the 69th Annual Peabody Awards, in 2010

In 2002, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
was ranked No. 27 on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.[134] It also won another Peabody Award
Peabody Award
in 2009 for sesamestreet.org.[135] In 2013, TV Guide ranked the series No. 30 on its list of the 60 Best Series.[136] As of 2016, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
has received 167 Emmy Awards, more than any other television series.[137] See also[edit]

International co-productions of Sesame Street List of awards and nominations received by Sesame Street List of human Sesame Street
Sesame Street
characters Pop culture influenced by Sesame Street Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(comic strip)

Muppets
Muppets
portal New York City portal Television in the United States portal

Notes[edit]

^ Season 44 (2013–2014) was the first time episodes were numbered in a seasonal order rather than the numerical and chronological fashion used since the show premiered. For example, episode 4401 means "the first episode of the 44th season", not "the 4401st episode" (it is in fact the 4328th episode). ^ See Gikow, p. 155, for a visual representation of the CTW model. ^ Most of the first season was filmed at a studio near Broadway, but a strike forced their move to Teletape Studios. In the early days, the set was simple, consisting of four structures (Gikow, pp. 66–67). In 1982, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
began filming at Unitel Studios on 57th Street, but relocated to Kaufman Astoria Studios
Kaufman Astoria Studios
in 1993, when the producers decided they needed more space (Gikow, pp. 206–207). ^ According to Edward Palmer and his colleague Shalom M. Fisch, these studies were responsible for securing funding for the show over the next several years.[109] ^ See Gikow, pp. 284–285; "G" Is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and Sesame Street, pp. 147–230. ^ See Lesser, pp. 175–201 for his response to the early critics of Sesame Street.

References[edit]

^ Linton, Caroline. "'Sesame Street' Turns 45: 14 Most Controversial Moments." AM New York. November 2014. Accessed July 20, 2017. http://www.amny.com/entertainment/sesame-street-turns-45-14-most-controversial-moments-1.9601111 ^ a b "Big Bird, Elmo
Elmo
and Cookie Monster Are Back as Sesame Street Debuts Its 46th Season Saturday, January 16th, 2016 on HBO" (PDF). Sesame Workshop. November 24, 2015. Retrieved November 24, 2015.  ^ a b Davis, p. 8 ^ a b Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2018.  ^ a b c Finch, p. 53 ^ a b Brooke, Jill (1998-11-13). "'Sesame Street' Takes a Bow to 30 Animated Years". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-10-09.  ^ a b Palmer & Fisch in Fisch & Truglio, p. 9 ^ "Ten Controversial 'Sesame Street' Moments." Desert News. November 2014. Accessed July 20, 2017. http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865614987/10-controversial-Sesame-Street-moments.html ^ a b c Friedman, Michael Jay (2006-04-08). " Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Educates and Entertains Internationally" (PDF). America.gov. U.S. Department of State Bureau of International Information Programs. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-08-15. Retrieved 2008-10-09.  ^ Gikow, p. 26 ^ Davis, p. 220 ^ a b O'Dell, pp. 73–74 ^ a b c d Hellman, Peter (1987-11-23). "Street Smart: How Big Bird & Company Do It". New York Magazine. 20 (46): 52. ISSN 0028-7369. Retrieved 2009-08-11.  ^ Borgenicht, p. 80 ^ Davis, p. 320 ^ Goodman, Tim (2002-02-04). "Word on the 'Street'". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2008-10-09.  ^ 36th Daytime Emmy Awards. The CW.  ^ Frank Pallotta; Brian Stelter
Brian Stelter
(August 13, 2015). "'Sesame Street' is heading to HBO". CNN Money. Time Warner. Retrieved August 13, 2015.  ^ Brian Fung (August 14, 2015). " Sesame Street
Sesame Street
is killing off its subscription streaming service, Sesame Go". The Washington Post. Graham Media Group. Retrieved August 15, 2015.  ^ "'Sesame Street' to Air First on HBO
HBO
for Next 5 Seasons". The New York Times. The New York Times
The New York Times
Company. August 13, 2015. Retrieved August 13, 2015.  ^ Brian Steinberg (August 13, 2015). " HBO
HBO
Picks Up 'Sesame Street' As Kids' Viewing Habits Change". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved August 14, 2015.  ^ " Sesame Street
Sesame Street
welcomes Julia, a muppet with autism". BBC News. March 20, 2017.  ^ O'Dell, p. 70 ^ Morrow, p. 87 ^ Gikow, p. 179 ^ Goodman, Tim (2002-02-04). "Word on the 'Street': Classic Children's Show to Undergo Structural Changes This Season". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2011-05-25.  ^ Fisch & Bernstein in Fisch & Truglio, p. 39 ^ Gladwell, p. 105 ^ Gladwell, p. 106 ^ Fisch & Bernstein in Fisch & Truglio, pp. 39–40 ^ Clash, p. 75 ^ Dockterman, Eliana (June 18, 2014). "We're Getting a Half-Hour Version of Sesame Street". Time Magazine. Retrieved February 13, 2015.  ^ Gladwell, p. 100 ^ a b Lesser, p. 116 ^ Gladwell, p. 91 ^ Fisch, Shalom M.; Rosemarie T. Truglio (2001). "Why Children Learn from Sesame Street". In Shalom M. Fisch & Rosemarie T. Truglio. "G" is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and Sesame Street. Mahweh, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers. p. 234. ISBN 0-8058-3395-1. CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) ^ Morrow, p. 76 ^ Morrow, p. 106 ^ Lesser, p. 46 ^ Lesser, pp. 86–87 ^ Lesser, p. 107 ^ Lesser, p. 87 ^ a b Hymowitz, Kay S. (Autumn 1995). "On Sesame Street, It's All Show". City Journal. New York. Retrieved 2008-12-18.  ^ Huston, Aletha C; Daniel R. Anderson; John C. Wright; Deborah Linebarger; Kelly L. Schmidt (2001). "" Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Viewers as Adolescents: The Recontact Study". In Shalom M. Fisch & Rosemarie T. Truglio. "G" is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and Sesame Street. Mahweh, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers. p. 133. ISBN 0-8058-3395-1. CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) ^ Gikow, p. 165 ^ Gikow, p. 181 ^ Palmer & Fisch in Fisch & Truglio, p. 3 ^ "Joan Ganz Cooney". Sesameworkshop.org.  ^ Davis, p. 105 ^ Lesser, p. 17 ^ a b Davis, p. 203 ^ a b c Cooney in Fisch & Truglio, p. xi ^ a b Morrow, p. 68 ^ a b Cooney in Fisch & Truglio, p. xii ^ Mielke in Fisch & Truglio, pp. 84–85 ^ Borgenicht, p. 9 ^ a b Gikow, p. 178 ^ Gikow, p. 174 ^ a b Lesser, p. 101 ^ Morrow, p. 82 ^ Palmer & Fisch in Fisch & Truglio, p. 10 ^ Palmer & Fisch in Fisch & Truglio, p. 11 ^ Lesser, Gerald S.; Joel Schneider (2001). "Creation and Evolution of the Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Curriculum". In Shalom M. Fisch & Rosemarie T. Truglio. "G" is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and Sesame Street. Mahweh, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers. p. 28. ISBN 0-8058-3395-1. CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) ^ Murphy, Tim (2009-11-01). "How We Got to 'Sesame Street'". New York Magazine. Retrieved 2011-08-23.  ^ "How to Get to 'Sesame Street' at the Apollo Theater". New York City Mayor's Office. 2008-11-19. Retrieved 2009-08-07.  ^ Spinney, Caroll; Jason Milligan (2003). The Wisdom of Big Bird
Big Bird
(and the Dark Genius of Oscar the Grouch): Lessons from a Life in Feathers. New York: Random House. p. 3. ISBN 0-375-50781-7.  ^ Cherow-O'Leary in Fisch & Truglio, p. 197 ^ Cherow-O'Leary in Fisch & Truglio, pp. 197–198 ^ a b c Davis, p. 167 ^ a b Carvajal, Doreen (2005-12-12). " Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Goes Global: Let's All Count the Revenue". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-06-10.  ^ See Gikow, pp. 280–285 for a list of many of the show's products. ^ a b Davis, p. 5 ^ Gikow, p. 268 ^ Davis, p. 205 ^ a b Davis, p. 204 ^ Gikow, p. 220 ^ Gikow, p. 227 ^ Davis, p. 256 ^ Kohn, Martin F (1991-03-08). "Grammy's Greatest (Children's) Hits". Entertainment Weekly (56): 18. Retrieved 2009-07-08.  ^ Gikow, p. 236 ^ Morrow, p. 89 ^ Gikow, p. 246 ^ Cole et al. in Fisch & Truglio, p. 148 ^ Cole et al. in Fisch & Truglio, p. 147 ^ Knowlton, Linda Goldstein and Linda Hawkins Costigan (producers) (2006). The World According to Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(documentary). Participant Productions.  ^ Gikow, p. 263 ^ Davis, pp. 128–129 ^ Davis, p. 147 ^ Gikow, p. 15 ^ Morrow, p. 93 ^ Davis, p. 163 ^ Morrow, pp. 94–95 ^ Gladwell, p. 99 ^ Lesser, p. 99 ^ Lesser, p. 125 ^ a b Borgenicht, p. 15 ^ Davis, p. 172 ^ Lesser, p. 127 ^ a b Morrow, p. 84 ^ Lesser, pp. 127–128 ^ Gikow, p. 123 ^ a b Seligsohn, Leo. (1970-02-09). "Backstage at Sesame Street". New York Newsday. Quoted in Davis, p. 197. ^ Zill, Nicholas (2001). "Does Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Enhance School Readiness? Evidence from a National Survey of Children". "G" is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and Sesame Street. Mahweh, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers. pp. 117–120. ISBN 0-8058-3395-1.  ^ Weiss, Joanna (2005-10-19). "New Character Joins PBS". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2009-07-06.  ^ Truglio, Rosemarie T; Shalom M. Fisch (2001). "Introduction". In Shalom M. Fisch & Rosemarie T. Truglio. "G" is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and Sesame Street. Mahweh, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers. p. xvi. ISBN 0-8058-3395-1. CS1 maint: Uses editors parameter (link) ^ Guernsey, Lisa (2009-05-23). "'Sesame Street': The Show That Counts". Newsweek. Retrieved 2009-08-18.  ^ Mielke in Fisch & Truglio, p. 85 ^ a b Mielke in Fisch & Truglio, p. 88 ^ a b Palmer & Fisch in Fisch & Truglio, p. 20 ^ Davis, p. 357 ^ a b Lesser, p. 235 ^ a b Morrow, p. 122 ^ Morrow, p. 127 ^ Morrow, p. 130 ^ Morrow, p. 132 ^ Morrow, p. 124 ^ Gladwell, p. 111 ^ Roeper, Richard (2001). Hollywood Urban Legends: The Truth Behind All Those Delightfully Persistent Myths of Film, Television and Music. Franklin Lakes, New Jersey: Career Press. pp. 48–53. ISBN 1-56414-554-9.  ^ Morrow, pp. 119–120 ^ Morrow, p. 119 ^ Lesser, p. 165 ^ " Mississippi
Mississippi
Agency Votes for a TV Ban on 'Sesame Street'". (1970-05-03). The New York Times. Quoted in Davis, p. 202 ^ Lesser, pp. 174–175 ^ a b Morrow, p. 3 ^ Morrow, pp. 146–147 ^ Kanfer, Stefan (1970-11-23). "Who's Afraid of Big, Bad TV?". Time. Retrieved 2009-03-06.  ^ Morrow, p. 98 ^ Morrow, p. 147 ^ Morrow, pp. 157–158 ^ Morrow, p. 155 ^ Gikow, p. 142 ^ Morrow, p. 156 ^ Gikow, p. 143 ^ "TV Guide Names Top 50 Shows". CBS News. Associated Press. 2009-02-11. Retrieved 2011-06-19.  ^ 69th Annual Peabody Awards, May 2010. ^ "TV Guide Magazine's 60 Best Series of All Time". 23 December 2013.  ^ DeMara, Bruce (2016-07-28). " Sesame Street
Sesame Street
tells veteran cast to hit the road". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2016-09-26. 

Works cited[edit]

Borgenicht, David (1998). Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Unpaved. New York: Hyperion Publishing. ISBN 0-7868-6460-5 Clash, Kevin, Gary Brozek, and Louis Henry Mitchell (2006). My Life as a Furry Red Monster: What Being Elmo
Elmo
has Taught Me About Life, Love and Laughing Out Loud. New York: Random House. ISBN 0-7679-2375-8 Davis, Michael (2008). Street Gang: The Complete History of Sesame Street. New York: Viking Penguin. ISBN 978-0-670-01996-0 Finch, Christopher (1993). Jim Henson: The Works: the Art, the Magic, the Imagination. New York: Random House. ISBN 9780679412038 Fisch, Shalom M. and Rosemarie T. Truglio, Eds. (2001). "G" is for Growing: Thirty Years of Research on Children and Sesame Street. Mahweh, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Publishers. ISBN 0-8058-3395-1

Cooney, Joan Ganz, "Foreword", pp. xi–xiv. Palmer, Edward and Shalom M. Fisch, "The Beginnings of Sesame Street Research", pp. 3–24. Fisch, Shalom M. and Lewis Bernstein, "Formative Research Revealed: Methodological and Process Issues in Formative Research", pp. 39–60. Mielke, Keith W., "A Review of Research on the Educational and Social Impact of Sesame Street", pp. 83–97. Cole, Charlotte F., Beth A. Richman, and Susan A. McCann Brown, "The World of Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Research", pp. 147–180. Cherow-O'Leary, Renee, "Carrying Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Into Print: Sesame Street Magazine, Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Parents, and Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Books" pp. 197–214.

Gikow, Louise A. (2009). Sesame Street: A Celebration— Forty Years of Life on the Street. New York: Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers. ISBN 978-1-57912-638-4. Gladwell, Malcolm (2000). The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. New York: Little, Brown, and Company. ISBN 0-316-31696-2 Lesser, Gerald S. (1974). Children and Television: Lessons From Sesame Street. New York: Vintage Books. ISBN 0-394-71448-2 Morrow, Robert W. (2006). Sesame Street
Sesame Street
and the Reform of Children's Television. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-8230-3 O'Dell, Cary (1997). Women Pioneers in Television: Biographies of Fifteen Industry Leaders. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. ISBN 0-7864-0167-2.

External links[edit]

Find more aboutSesame Streetat's sister projects

Definitions from Wiktionary Media from Wikimedia Commons News from Wikinews Quotations from Wikiquote Data from Wikidata

Official website Sesame Street
Sesame Street
at Curlie (based on DMOZ) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
on PBSKids.org Sesame Street
Sesame Street
on IMDb Sesame Street-related interview videos at the Archive of American Television

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
on Muppet Wiki, an external wiki

v t e

Sesame Street

General

Fictional location Sesame Workshop

productions

Characters

Muppets human animated

Educational goals Format Influence Licensing Recurring segments Accolades

People

Joan Ganz Cooney Lloyd Morrisett Gerald S. Lesser Jon Stone Jim Henson Joe Raposo Kevin Clash Kermit Love Joey Mazzarino Carol-Lynn Parente List of guest stars List of puppeteers

Production

History Research International co-productions

characters

Elmo's World "Snuffy's Parents Get a Divorce" Music

discography songs theme song

Films

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Presents: Follow That Bird (1985) The Adventures of Elmo
Elmo
in Grouchland (1999)

Television specials

Julie on Sesame Street (1973) Out to Lunch (1974) Christmas Eve on Sesame Street
Christmas Eve on Sesame Street
(1978) A Special
Special
Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Christmas (1978) Big Bird
Big Bird
in China (1982) Don't Eat the Pictures: Sesame Street
Sesame Street
at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1983) A Muppet Family Christmas
A Muppet Family Christmas
(1987) Big Bird
Big Bird
in Japan (1988) Sesame Street… 20 Years & Still Counting (1989) Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake (1991) Sesame Street: 25 Wonderful Years (1993) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Jam: A Musical Celebration (1994) The Best of Elmo
Elmo
(1994) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Stays Up Late! (1993) Elmo
Elmo
Saves Christmas (1996) Elmopalooza (1998) The Best of Kermit on Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1998) Cinder Elmo
Elmo
(1999) Elmo's Christmas Countdown (2007) Abby in Wonderland
Abby in Wonderland
(2008) The Cookie Thief
The Cookie Thief
(2015) Once Upon a Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Christmas (2016) The Magical Wand Chase (2017)

U.S. spin-offs

Play with Me Sesame Sesame Beginnings Bert and Ernie's Great Adventures

International Sesame Street versions and spin-offs

Open Sesame (worldwide) 1, rue Sésame (France) 5, Rue Sésame (France) Alam Simsim (Egypt) Baghch-e-Simsim (Afghanistan) Barrio Sésamo (Spain) Batibot (Philippines) The Furchester Hotel
The Furchester Hotel
(UK) Galli Galli Sim Sim (India) Hikayat Simsim (Jordan) Iftah Ya Simsim
Iftah Ya Simsim
(Kuwait/Arab world) Jalan Sesama (Indonesia) Kilimani Sesame (Tanzania) Plaza Sésamo
Plaza Sésamo
(Mexico/Latin America) Rechov Sumsum (Israel) Sabai Sabai Sesame (Cambodia) Sesam Stasjon
Sesam Stasjon
(Norway) Sesame Park
Sesame Park
(Canada) Sesame Square (Nigeria) Sesame Tree
Sesame Tree
(UK) Sesamstraat
Sesamstraat
(Netherlands) Sesamstraße
Sesamstraße
(Germany) Shalom Sesame (Israel) Shara'a Simsim (Palestine) Sim Sim Hamara (Pakistan) Sisimpur
Sisimpur
(Bangladesh) Susam Sokağı (Turkey) Svenska Sesam (Sweden) Takalani Sesame (South Africa) Ulica Sezamkowa (Poland) Ulitsa Sezam (Russia) Vila Sésamo (Brazil) Zhima Jie (China) Sesamisutorīto (Japan) Szezám utca (Hungary)

Books

The Monster at the End of This Book
The Monster at the End of This Book
(1971) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Together Book (1971) Monster Bubbles: A Counting Book (1976) The Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Bedtime Storybook (1978) Ernie's Work of Art
Ernie's Work of Art
(1979) The House of Seven Colors (1985) Happy Birthday, Cookie Monster
Happy Birthday, Cookie Monster
(1986)

Literature

Children and Television: Lessons from Sesame Street Street Gang: The Complete History of Sesame Street The Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Dictionary Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Magazine

Video games

Alpha Beam with Ernie The Adventures of Elmo
Elmo
in Grouchland Elmo's A-to-Zoo Adventure Cookie's Counting Carnival Ready, Set, Grover! Once Upon a Monster Elmo's Musical Monsterpiece Kinect Sesame Street
Sesame Street
TV

Attractions

Air Grover Grover's Alpine Express Sesame Place Spaghetti Space Chase

Related

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
in the UK Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Live Comic strip Syndication packages The Muppets Being Elmo: A Puppeteer's Journey I Am Big Bird: The Caroll Spinney
Caroll Spinney
Story The World According to Sesame Street Big Bag Oobi Panwapa Teletape Studios Kaufman Astoria Studios The Joan Ganz Cooney
Joan Ganz Cooney
Center

v t e

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
characters

Muppets
Muppets
of Sesame Street

Abby Cadabby Barkley The Bear family Bert and Ernie

Bert Ernie

Big Bird Cookie Monster Count von Count Don Music Elmo Granny Bird Grover Grouches Grundgetta Guy Smiley Herry Monster Honkers Hoots the Owl Irvine Julia Kermit the Frog Mr. Johnson Mrs. Grouch Murray Monster Natasha Oscar the Grouch Prairie Dawn Roosevelt Franklin Rosita Roxie Marie Sherlock Hemlock Slimey the Worm Mr. Snuffleupagus Telly Monster Two-Headed Monster Yip Yips Zoe

Human characters

Alan Bob Johnson Chris Robinson Gordon Robinson David Gabi Rodriguez Gina Jefferson Hiroshi Linda Luis Rodriguez Maria Rodriguez Miles Robinson Mr. Hooper Mr. Noodle Natalie Olivia Robinson The Number Painter Susan Robinson Trash Gordon

Animated characters

Teeny Little Super Guy

International co-production characters

Abelardo the Dragon Basil Chaos Don Pimpón Espinete Kami Kippi Ben Kippod Moishe Oofnik Pong Pagong

Links to related articles

v t e

The Muppets

The Muppets
The Muppets
Studio

Characters

Kermit the Frog Miss Piggy Fozzie Bear Gonzo Rowlf the Dog Scooter Pepe the King Prawn Rizzo the Rat Animal Walter Sam Eagle Dr. Bunsen Honeydew Beaker Swedish Chef Statler and Waldorf Dr. Teeth and The Electric Mayhem

Cast performers

Current

Bill Barretta Dave Goelz Eric Jacobson Peter Linz David Rudman Matt Vogel

Former

Kevin Clash Brian Henson Jane Henson Jim Henson John Henson Richard Hunt Jerry Juhl Kathryn Mullen Jerry Nelson Frank Oz Steve Whitmire

Television

Series

Sam and Friends (1955–1961) The Muppet Show
The Muppet Show
(1976–1981) Muppet Babies
Muppet Babies
(1984–1991) Little Muppet Monsters
Little Muppet Monsters
(1985) The Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Hour (1989) Muppets Tonight (1996–1998) The Muppets
The Muppets
(2015–2016) Muppet Babies
Muppet Babies
(2018)

Segments

The Jimmy Dean Show
The Jimmy Dean Show
("Rowlf the Dog", 1963–65) The Mike Douglas Show
The Mike Douglas Show
(1966–79) The Ed Sullivan Show
The Ed Sullivan Show
(including The Great Santa Claus Switch, 1966–71) NBC's Saturday Night (The Land of Gorch, 1975–76)

Specials

Hey, Cinderella! (1969) The Muppets
The Muppets
on Puppets (1970) The Great Santa Claus Switch (1970) The Frog Prince (1971) The Muppet Musicians of Bremen
The Muppet Musicians of Bremen
(1972) The Muppets
The Muppets
Valentine Show (1974) The Muppet Show: Sex and Violence (1975) John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together (1979) The Muppets
The Muppets
Go Hollywood (1979) The Muppets
The Muppets
Go to the Movies (1981) The Fantastic Miss Piggy
Miss Piggy
Show (1982) Rocky Mountain Holiday
Rocky Mountain Holiday
(1983) The Muppets: A Celebration of 30 Years (1986) A Muppet Family Christmas
A Muppet Family Christmas
(1987) Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue
Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue
(1990) The Earth Day Special
Special
(1990) The Muppets
The Muppets
at Walt Disney World (1990) The Muppets
The Muppets
Celebrate Jim Henson
Jim Henson
(1990) Mr. Willowby's Christmas Tree (1995) Studio DC: Almost Live (2008) A Muppets
Muppets
Christmas: Letters to Santa (2008) Lady Gaga and the Muppets Holiday Spectacular
Lady Gaga and the Muppets Holiday Spectacular
(2013)

Films

Feature

The Muppet Movie
The Muppet Movie
(1979) The Great Muppet Caper
The Great Muppet Caper
(1981) The Muppets
The Muppets
Take Manhattan
Manhattan
(1984) The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992) Muppet Treasure Island
Muppet Treasure Island
(1996) Muppets from Space
Muppets from Space
(1999) The Muppets
The Muppets
(2011) Muppets Most Wanted
Muppets Most Wanted
(2014)

Television

The Christmas Toy
The Christmas Toy
(1986) It's a Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie
It's a Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie
(2002) The Muppets' Wizard of Oz
The Muppets' Wizard of Oz
(2005)

Direct-to- video

Muppet Classic Theater
Muppet Classic Theater
(1994) Kermit's Swamp Years
Kermit's Swamp Years
(2002)

Music

Albums

The Muppet Show
The Muppet Show
(1977) The Muppet Show
The Muppet Show
2 (1978) The Muppet Movie: Original Soundtrack Recording (1979) John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together (1979) The Great Muppet Caper: The Original Soundtrack (1981) The Muppets
The Muppets
Take Manhattan: The Original Soundtrack (1984) The Muppet Christmas Carol: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1992) Ol' Brown Ears is Back (1993) Muppet Beach Party
Muppet Beach Party
(1993) Kermit Unpigged
Kermit Unpigged
(1994) The Muppet Treasure Island: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (1996) The Muppet Show: Music, Mayhem, and More (2002) Best of the Muppets
Muppets
featuring The Muppets' Wizard of Oz
The Muppets' Wizard of Oz
(2005) The Muppets: A Green and Red Christmas (2006) A Muppets
Muppets
Christmas: Letters to Santa (2008) Muppets: The Green Album (2011) The Muppets
The Muppets
(2011) Muppets Most Wanted
Muppets Most Wanted
(2014)

Songs

"Rainbow Connection" "Bein' Green" "Mahna Mahna" "When the River Meets the Sea" "Bohemian Rhapsody" "Man or Muppet"

Web series

Statler and Waldorf: From the Balcony (2005–06) The Muppets
The Muppets
Kitchen with Cat Cora (2010)

Video games

Muppet Adventure: Chaos at the Carnival (1989) Muppets
Muppets
Inside (1996) Muppet RaceMania
Muppet RaceMania
(2000) Muppet Monster Adventure
Muppet Monster Adventure
(2000) Spy Muppets: License to Croak (2003) Muppets
Muppets
Party Cruise (2003) Disney Universe
Disney Universe
(2011) The Muppets
The Muppets
Movie Adventures (2014)

Other media

Muppet*Vision 3D
Muppet*Vision 3D
(1991–present) Muppet Mobile Lab
Muppet Mobile Lab
(2007–present) The Muppets
The Muppets
Present...Great Moments in American History (2016–present) Comics series Before You Leap

Puppet Heap The Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Company

Creature Shop Fraggle Rock
Fraggle Rock
characters

Sesame Workshop

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
Muppets

Muppets
Muppets
portal

v t e

HBO
HBO
programming

Former

Series

1970s debuts

Inside the NFL On Location Race for the Pennant Standing Room Only ("Vanities") Tennis on HBO Time Was

1980s debuts

1st & Ten America Undercover ("Autopsy", "Real Sex" and "Taxicab Confessions") Babar Braingames Encyclopedia Encyclopedia Brown Fraggle Rock The Ghost of Faffner Hall The Hitchhiker The Kids in the Hall Maximum Security Not Necessarily the News One Night Stand Philip Marlowe, Private Eye The Ray Bradbury Theater The Storyteller Tales from the Crypt Video Jukebox

1990s debuts

The Adventures of Tintin Arliss The Chris Rock Show The Country Mouse and the City Mouse Adventures Crashbox Def Comedy Jam Dennis Miller Live Dream On George and Martha Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child HBO
HBO
Comedy Half-Hour Hotel Room The Larry Sanders Show Lifestories: Families in Crisis A Little Curious The Little Lulu Show Mokku of the Oak Tree Mr. Show with Bob and David The Neverending Story Oz Perversions of Science Pippi Longstocking Rainbow Fish Reverb Sex and the City The Sopranos Spicy City Tenacious D Todd McFarlane's Spawn Tracey Takes On...

2000s debuts

Animated Tales of the World Big Love Bored to Death Carnivàle Cathouse: The Series Classical Baby Costas Now Da Ali G Show Deadwood Def Poetry Jam Eastbound & Down The Electric Company Entourage Extras Flight of the Conchords G String Divas Harold and the Purple Crayon Hung I Spy In Treatment Joe Buck Live John from Cincinnati K Street Kindergarten KO Nation The Life & Times of Tim Little Britain USA Lucky Louie The Mind of the Married Man The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency On the Record with Bob Costas Pinky Dinky Doo Pornucopia Project Greenlight Rome Six Feet Under Stuart Little: The Animated Series Summer Heights High Tales from the Neverending Story Tell Me You Love Me True Blood Tourgasm Unscripted The Wire

2010s debuts

After the Thrones Angry Boys Any Given Wednesday with Bill Simmons Boardwalk Empire The Brink Doll & Em Enlightened Family Tree Funny or Die Presents Getting On Girls Hello Ladies How to Make It in America Ja'mie: Private School Girl Jonah from Tonga The Leftovers Life's Too Short Looking Luck Masterclass The Newsroom The Ricky Gervais Show Togetherness Treme Vice Principals Vinyl

Miniseries

All the Rivers Run Angels in America Assume the Position with Mr. Wuhl Band of Brothers The Casual Vacancy The Corner Elizabeth I Empire Falls From the Earth to the Moon Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways Generation Kill House of Saddam The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst John Adams Laurel Avenue Mildred Pierce Mosaic The Night Of Olive Kitteridge The Pacific Parade's End Show Me a Hero Tanner '88

Current and upcoming

Current

All Def Comedy (since 2016) Animals.
Animals.
(since 2016) Ballers
Ballers
(since 2015) Barry (since 2018) Big Little Lies (since 2017) Boxing After Dark
Boxing After Dark
(since 1996) The Comeback (2005; since 2014) Crashing (since 2017) Curb Your Enthusiasm
Curb Your Enthusiasm
(since 2000) The Deuce (since 2017) Divorce (since 2016) Game of Thrones
Game of Thrones
(since 2011) Hard Knocks (since 2001) HBO
HBO
World Championship Boxing (since 1973) Here and Now (since 2018) High Maintenance
High Maintenance
(since 2016) Insecure (since 2016) Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
(since 2014) Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel
Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel
(since 1995) Real Time with Bill Maher
Real Time with Bill Maher
(since 2003) Room 104
Room 104
(since 2017) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(since 2016) Silicon Valley (since 2014) Tracey Ullman's Show
Tracey Ullman's Show
(since 2016) True Detective
True Detective
(since 2014) Veep
Veep
(since 2012) Vice (since 2013) Vice News Tonight
Vice News Tonight
(since 2016) Westworld (since 2016) The Young Pope (since 2017)

Upcoming

American Lion (TBA) Camping (TBA) Chernobyl (TBA) Confederate (TBA) Demimonde (TBA) Esme and Roy (TBA) Gentleman Jack (TBA) Lovecraft Country (TBA) Random Acts of Flyness (TBA) Sharp Objects (2018) Succession (2018) The Undoing (TBA) Wyatt Cenac's Problem Areas
Wyatt Cenac's Problem Areas
(2018)

See also HBO
HBO
Storybook Musicals HBO
HBO
Latin America original series HBO
HBO
Canada original series

v t e

The Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Company

Henson Family

Jim Henson Jane Henson Lisa Henson Cheryl Henson Brian Henson John Henson Heather Henson

Major works

The Muppets† Sesame Street‡

TV series

Fraggle Rock
Fraggle Rock
(1983–1987) Fraggle Rock: The Animated Series (1987–1988) The Storyteller (1988–1991) The Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Hour (1989) The Ghost of Faffner Hall (1989) Jim Henson's Mother Goose Stories (1990–1992) Dinosaurs (1991–1994) Dog City
Dog City
(1992–1994) CityKids (1993–1994) Secret Life of Toys (1994) Jim Henson's Animal Show
Jim Henson's Animal Show
(1994–1997) Aliens in the Family (1996) The Wubbulous World of Dr. Seuss (1996–1998) Bear in the Big Blue House
Bear in the Big Blue House
† (1997–2006) Brats of the Lost Nebula (1998) Farscape
Farscape
(1998–2002) Construction Site (1999) Family Rules (1999) Mopatop's Shop (1999–2005) The Fearing Mind (2000) The Hoobs (2001–2003) Telling Stories with Tomie dePaola (2001) Animal Jam
Animal Jam
(2003) Bambaloo (2003-2007) Five Minutes More (2006) Pajanimals (2008, 2011–2013) Sid the Science Kid
Sid the Science Kid
(2008–2013) Dinosaur Train (2009–2017) Me and My Monsters (2010–2011) That Puppet Game Show
That Puppet Game Show
(2013–2014) The Doozers (2013–2014) Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Jim Henson's Creature Shop
Challenge (2014) Hi Opie! (2014–2016) Splash and Bubbles
Splash and Bubbles
(2016-present) Dot.
Dot.
(2016-present) Julie's Greenroom
Julie's Greenroom
(2017) The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (2019)

TV specials

The Great Santa Claus Switch (1970) Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas (1977) The Christmas Toy
The Christmas Toy
(1986) Monster Maker (1989) The Song of the Cloud Forest (1989) Mr. Willowby's Christmas Tree (1995)

Theatrical films

The Dark Crystal
The Dark Crystal
(1982) Labyrinth (1986) The Witches (1990) Buddy (1997) Rat (2000) Good Boy!
Good Boy!
(2003) Five Children and It (2004) MirrorMask
MirrorMask
(2005) Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (2014) The Star (2017) The Happytime Murders
The Happytime Murders
(2018)

Other projects

Time Piece (1965, short film) The Cube (1969, teleplay) Gulliver's Travels (1996, miniseries) Jack and the Beanstalk: The Real Story (2001, miniseries) Farscape: The Peacekeeper Wars (2004, miniseries) The Sam Plenty Cavalcade of Action Show Plus Singing! (2008, web series) Unstable Fables (2008, DTV film) Oscar's Hotel for Fantastical Creatures (2015, web series) Turkey Hollow
Turkey Hollow
(2015, TV film)

Henson Alternative

Puppet Up! (2006–present) Late Night Liars
Late Night Liars
(2010) Simian Undercover Detective Squad (2011) Neil's Puppet Dreams (2012–2013) No, You Shut Up!
No, You Shut Up!
(2013–2016) Good Morning Today (2013–2014)

Divisions

Jim Henson's Creature Shop Henson Recording Studios Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Home Entertainment Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Pictures Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Records Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Television

Related

Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Company Lot Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Foundation HIT Entertainment

† Sold to The Walt Disney Company
The Walt Disney Company
in 2004, ‡ Muppet characters only; sold to Sesame Workshop
Sesame Workshop
in 2000

v t e

PBS
PBS
Kids original programming

Former

1960s–1980s debuts

Mister Rogers' Neighborhood
Mister Rogers' Neighborhood
(1968–2001) The Electric Company
The Electric Company
(1971–1977) Zoom (1972–1978) 3-2-1 Contact
3-2-1 Contact
(1980–1988) Powerhouse (1982–1983) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(1983–2006) Newton's Apple
Newton's Apple
(1983–1999) Kidsongs
Kidsongs
(1985–1998) Square One Television
Square One Television
(1987–1992) Gerbert (1988–1991) Shining Time Station
Shining Time Station
(1989–1995) Long Ago and Far Away (1989–1993) Thomas & Friends (1989–2017)

1990s debuts

Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? (1991–1995) The Big Comfy Couch
The Big Comfy Couch
(1992–2006) Barney & Friends (1992–2009) Lamb Chop's Play Along (1992–1997) Ghostwriter (1992–95) Kino's Storytime (1992–97) Tots TV
Tots TV
(1993–1998) Theodore Tugboat
Theodore Tugboat
(1993–2001) Bill Nye the Science Guy
Bill Nye the Science Guy
(1993–1998) The Adventures of Dudley the Dragon (1993–1999) Katie and Orbie (1994–2002) The Magic School Bus (1994–1997) Globe Trekker
Globe Trekker
(1994–2010) The Huggabug Club (1995–2000) The Puzzle Place
The Puzzle Place
(1995–1998) Wimzie's House
Wimzie's House
(1995–1996) Wishbone (1995–2001) Groundling Marsh (1995–1997) Kratts' Creatures (1996) Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego? (1996–1997) Adventures from the Book of Virtues (1996–2000) In the Mix (1996–2012) Teletubbies
Teletubbies
(1997–2001) Caillou
Caillou
(1997–2010) The Charlie Horse Music Pizza (1998–1999) Noddy (1998–2000) Jay Jay the Jet Plane (1998–2005) Elmo's World
Elmo's World
(1998–2009) Zoom (1999–2005) Zoboomafoo
Zoboomafoo
(1999–2001) Redwall (1999–2002) Dragon Tales
Dragon Tales
(1999–2005)

2000s debuts

Between the Lions
Between the Lions
(2000–2010) The Dooley and Pals Show (2000–2003) Clifford the Big Red Dog (2000–2003) Corduroy (2000–2001) Elliot Moose (2000–2001) Marvin the Tap-Dancing Horse (2000–2002) George Shrinks
George Shrinks
(2000–2004) Seven Little Monsters (2000–2004) Timothy Goes to School
Timothy Goes to School
(2000–01) Anne of Green Gables
Anne of Green Gables
(2001–2002) Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat (2001–2002) DragonflyTV
DragonflyTV
(2002–2008) Angelina Ballerina (2002–2006) Liberty's Kids
Liberty's Kids
(2002–2003) Make Way for Noddy
Make Way for Noddy
(2002–2007) The Berenstain Bears (2003–2004) Boohbah
Boohbah
(2003–2006) Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks
Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks
(2003–2007) Clifford's Puppy Days
Clifford's Puppy Days
(2003–2004) Franny's Feet (2004–2011) Curiosity Quest (2004–2015) Peep and the Big Wide World (2004–2011) Maya & Miguel (2004–2007) Postcards from Buster (2004–2012) It's a Big Big World
It's a Big Big World
(2005–2010) Danger Rangers (2005–2006) The Zula Patrol
The Zula Patrol
(2005–2008) Signing Time!
Signing Time!
(2006–2008) Wunderkind Little Amadeus (2006) Fetch! with Ruff Ruffman
Fetch! with Ruff Ruffman
(2006–2010) Curious George (2006–2015) SeeMore's Playhouse (2006–2008) Design Squad
Design Squad
(2007–2011) WordGirl
WordGirl
(2007–2015) WordWorld (2007–2011) Super Why!
Super Why!
(2007–2016) Mama Mirabelle's Home Movies (2007–2008) Animalia (2007–2008) Biz Kid$ (2008–2012) Betsy's Kindergarten Adventures
Betsy's Kindergarten Adventures
(2008–2009) Sid the Science Kid
Sid the Science Kid
(2008–2013) Martha Speaks (2008–2014) Lomax, the Hound of Music (2008) The Electric Company
The Electric Company
(2009–2011) Angelina Ballerina: The Next Steps (2009–2010) Dinosaur Train (2009–2017)

2010s debuts

Mack & Moxy (2016)

Current

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(since 1969, second run since 2016) Arthur (since 1996) Cyberchase
Cyberchase
(since 2002) Bob the Builder
Bob the Builder
(since 2005) SciGirls
SciGirls
(since 2010) The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That! (since 2010) Wild Kratts
Wild Kratts
(since 2011) Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood
Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood
(since 2012) Peg + Cat (since 2013) Odd Squad (since 2014) Nature Cat
Nature Cat
(since 2015) Ready Jet Go! (since 2016) Splash and Bubbles
Splash and Bubbles
(since 2016) Pinkalicious & Peterrific (since 2018)

Upcoming

Luna Around the World (Fall 2018)

See also

PBS
PBS
network shows Educational television PBS
PBS
Kids Bookworm Bunch PBS
PBS
Kids Go! PBS
PBS
Kids Preschool Block

v t e

Daytime Emmy Award Lifetime Achievement

Charita Bauer, Larry Haines, Mary Stuart (1985) Pamela Ilott (1986) Mark Goodson
Mark Goodson
(1990) William J. Bell
William J. Bell
(1992) Douglas Marland (1993) Dick Clark
Dick Clark
(1994) Betty Corday, Ted Corday
Ted Corday
(1995) Phil Donahue
Phil Donahue
(1996) Fred Rogers
Fred Rogers
(1997) Oprah Winfrey
Oprah Winfrey
(1998) Bob Barker
Bob Barker
(1999) Barbara Walters
Barbara Walters
(2000) Ralph Edwards
Ralph Edwards
(2001) John Cannon (2002) Art Linkletter
Art Linkletter
(2003) Rachel Ames, John Clark, Jeanne Cooper, Eileen Fulton, Don Hastings, Anna Lee, Ray MacDonnell, Frances Reid, Helen Wagner, Ruth Warrick (2004) Merv Griffin
Merv Griffin
(2005) Caroll Spinney
Caroll Spinney
(2006) Lee Phillip Bell, James Lipton
James Lipton
(2007) Regis Philbin
Regis Philbin
(2008) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2009) Agnes Nixon
Agnes Nixon
(2010) Pat Sajak, Alex Trebek
Alex Trebek
(2011) Bill Geddie (2012) Monty Hall, Bob Stewart (2013) Russell Morash (2014) Betty White
Betty White
(2015) Sonia Manzano
Sonia Manzano
(2016) Mary Hart
Mary Hart
(2017)

v t e

Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Children's Series

Entertainment Children's Series (1974–1984, retired)

Zoom (1974) Star Trek: The Animated Series (1975) The Big Blue Marble (1976) Zoom (1977) Captain Kangaroo
Captain Kangaroo
(1978) Kids Are People Too
Kids Are People Too
(1979) Hot Hero Sandwich (1980) Captain Kangaroo
Captain Kangaroo
/ Once Upon a Classic ("A Tale of Two Cities") (1981) Captain Kangaroo
Captain Kangaroo
(1982) Captain Kangaroo
Captain Kangaroo
/ The Smurfs (1983) Captain Kangaroo
Captain Kangaroo
/ The Smurfs (1984)

Children's Instructional Programming (1976–1979, retired)

Schoolhouse Rock!
Schoolhouse Rock!
(1976) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1977) Schoolhouse Rock!
Schoolhouse Rock!
(1978) Schoolhouse Rock!
Schoolhouse Rock!
(1979)

Informational Children's Series (1976–1979, retired)

Go (1976) The Electric Company
The Electric Company
(1977) Animals, Animals, Animals (1978) The Big Blue Marble (1979)

Children's Informational/Instructional Series (1980–1984, retired)

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
/ 30 Minutes (1980) 30 Minutes (1981) 30 Minutes (1982) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1983) ABC Weekend Specials (1984)

Children's Series (1985–present)

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1985) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1986) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1987) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1988) Newton's Apple
Newton's Apple
(1989) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(1990) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1991) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1992) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(1993) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1994) Nick News with Linda Ellerbee
Nick News with Linda Ellerbee
(1995) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(1996) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(1997) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(1998) Bill Nye, the Science Guy (1999) Bill Nye, the Science Guy (2000) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(2001) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(2002) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(2003) Assignment Discovery (2004) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(2005) Zoom (2006) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(2007) Greatest Inventions with Bill Nye
Bill Nye
/ Jack Hanna's Into the Wild (2008) From the Top
From the Top
at Carnegie Hall (2009) The Electric Company
The Electric Company
(2010) The Electric Company
The Electric Company
(2011) The Electric Company
The Electric Company
/ Jack Hanna's Into the Wild (2012) R. L. Stine's The Haunting Hour (2013) R. L. Stine's The Haunting Hour (2014) R. L. Stine's The Haunting Hour (2015) Sea Rescue (2016) Give (2017)

Pre-School Children's Series (1995–present)

Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1995) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1996) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1997) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1998) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(1999) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2000) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2001) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2002) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2003) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2004) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2005) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2006) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2007) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2008) Between the Lions
Between the Lions
(2009) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2010) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2011) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2012) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2013) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2014) Dino Dan: Trek’s Adventures (2015) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2016) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2017)

v t e

TCA Award for Outstanding Achievement in Youth Programming

Faerie Tale Theatre
Faerie Tale Theatre
(1985) WonderWorks (1986) Pee-wee’s Playhouse (1987) Degrassi Junior High
Degrassi Junior High
(1988) The Jim Henson
Jim Henson
Hour (1989) Jim Henson
Jim Henson
(1990) War in the Gulf: Questions & Answers with Peter Jennings
Peter Jennings
(1991) Peggy Charren – Action for Children’s Television (1992) Nick News (1993) Nick News (1994) Nick News (1995) Wishbone (1996) Bill Nye the Science Guy
Bill Nye the Science Guy
/ Wishbone (1997) Blue’s Clues (1998) Blue’s Clues (1999) Between the Lions
Between the Lions
(2000) Between the Lions
Between the Lions
/ Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2001) SpongeBob SquarePants
SpongeBob SquarePants
(2002) Reading Rainbow
Reading Rainbow
(2003) Nick News (2004) Degrassi: The Next Generation (2005) High School Musical
High School Musical
(2006) Kyle XY
Kyle XY
(2007) WordGirl
WordGirl
(2008) Yo Gabba Gabba!
Yo Gabba Gabba!
(2009) Yo Gabba Gabba!
Yo Gabba Gabba!
(2010) Sesame Street
Sesame Street
(2011) Switched at Birth (2012) Bunheads
Bunheads
(2013) The Fosters (2014) The Fosters (2015) Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood
Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood
(2016) Speechless (2017)

v t e

Chuck Jones

Short subjects

The Night Watchman (1938) Dog Gone Modern (1939) Robin Hood Makes Good
Robin Hood Makes Good
(1939) Prest-O Change-O
Prest-O Change-O
(1939) Daffy Duck and the Dinosaur
Daffy Duck and the Dinosaur
(1939) Naughty but Mice (1939) Old Glory (1939) Snowman's Land (1939) Little Brother Rat (1939) The Little Lion Hunter (1939) The Good Egg (1939) Sniffles and the Bookworm (1939) The Curious Puppy
The Curious Puppy
(1939) Mighty Hunters (1940) Elmer's Candid Camera
Elmer's Candid Camera
(1940) Sniffles Takes a Trip (1940) Tom Thumb in Trouble
Tom Thumb in Trouble
(1940) The Egg Collector
The Egg Collector
(1940) Ghost Wanted
Ghost Wanted
(1940) Stage Fright (1940) Good Night, Elmer (1940) Bedtime for Sniffles (1940) Elmer's Pet Rabbit
Elmer's Pet Rabbit
(1941) Sniffles Bells the Cat (1941) Joe Glow, the Firefly
Joe Glow, the Firefly
(1941) Porky's Ant (1941) Toy Trouble (1941) Porky's Prize Pony (1941) Inki and the Lion (1941) Snow Time for Comedy (1941) The Brave Little Bat (1941) Saddle Silly (1941) Porky's Midnight Matinee (1941) The Bird Came C.O.D. (1942) Porky's Cafe (1942) Conrad the Sailor
Conrad the Sailor
(1942) Dog Tired (1942) The Draft Horse (1942) Hold the Lion, Please
Hold the Lion, Please
(1942) The Squawkin' Hawk (1942) Fox Pop
Fox Pop
(1942) The Dover Boys
The Dover Boys
(1942) My Favorite Duck (1942) Case of the Missing Hare
Case of the Missing Hare
(1942) Point Rationing of Foods (1943) To Duck or Not to Duck
To Duck or Not to Duck
(1943) Flop Goes the Weasel (1943) Super-Rabbit
Super-Rabbit
(1943) The Unbearable Bear (1943) The Aristo-Cat (1943) Coming Snafu
Coming Snafu
(1943) Wackiki Wabbit
Wackiki Wabbit
(1943) Spies (1943) The Infantry Blues
The Infantry Blues
(1943) Fin'n Catty (1943) Inki and the Minah Bird
Inki and the Minah Bird
(1943) Tom Turk and Daffy (1944) Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
and the 3 Bears (1944) Private Snafu vs. Malaria Mike
Private Snafu vs. Malaria Mike
(1944) The Weakly Reporter
The Weakly Reporter
(1944) A Lecture on Camouflage
A Lecture on Camouflage
(1944) Going Home (1944, unreleased) Gas (1944) Angel Puss
Angel Puss
(1944) Outpost (1944) From Hand to Mouse (1944) Lost and Foundling (1944) Hell-Bent for Election
Hell-Bent for Election
(1944) Odor-able Kitty (1945) In the Aleutians - Isles of Enchantment (1945) Trap Happy Porky (1945) It's Murder She Says
It's Murder She Says
(1945) Hare Conditioned
Hare Conditioned
(1945) Fresh Airedale (1945) No Buddy Atoll
No Buddy Atoll
(1945) Hare Tonic
Hare Tonic
(1945) Secrets of the Caribbean
Secrets of the Caribbean
(1945) Quentin Quail
Quentin Quail
(1946) Hush My Mouse (1946) Hair-Raising Hare
Hair-Raising Hare
(1946) Fair and Worm-er (1946) Roughly Squeaking (1946) Scent-imental Over You (1947) Inki at the Circus (1947) A Pest in the House (1947) Little Orphan Airedale (1947) House Hunting Mice (1948) A Feather in His Hare (1948) What's Brewin', Bruin? (1948) Rabbit Punch (1948) Haredevil Hare
Haredevil Hare
(1948) You Were Never Duckier
You Were Never Duckier
(1948) Daffy Dilly
Daffy Dilly
(1948) My Bunny Lies over the Sea
My Bunny Lies over the Sea
(1948) Scaredy Cat
Scaredy Cat
(1948) So Much for So Little (1949) Awful Orphan (1949) Mississippi
Mississippi
Hare (1949) Mouse Wreckers
Mouse Wreckers
(1949) The Bee-Deviled Bruin (1949) Long-Haired Hare
Long-Haired Hare
(1949) Often an Orphan (1949) Fast and Furry-ous
Fast and Furry-ous
(1949) Frigid Hare
Frigid Hare
(1949) For Scent-imental Reasons
For Scent-imental Reasons
(1949) Bear Feat (1949) Rabbit Hood
Rabbit Hood
(1949) The Scarlet Pumpernickel
The Scarlet Pumpernickel
(1950) The Ducksters
The Ducksters
(1950) Dog Gone South (1950) 8 Ball Bunny
8 Ball Bunny
(1950) The Hypo-Chondri-Cat
The Hypo-Chondri-Cat
(1950) Homeless Hare
Homeless Hare
(1950) Caveman Inki (1950) Rabbit of Seville
Rabbit of Seville
(1950) Two's A Crowd (1950) Bunny Hugged
Bunny Hugged
(1951) Scentimental Romeo (1951) A Hound for Trouble (1951) Rabbit Fire
Rabbit Fire
(1951) Chow Hound (1951) The Wearing of the Grin
The Wearing of the Grin
(1951) Cheese Chasers
Cheese Chasers
(1951) A Bear for Punishment (1951) Drip-Along Daffy
Drip-Along Daffy
(1951) Operation: Rabbit (1952) Feed the Kitty
Feed the Kitty
(1952) Little Beau Pepé (1952) Water, Water Every Hare
Water, Water Every Hare
(1952) Orange Blossoms for Violet (1952) Beep, Beep (1952) The Hasty Hare
The Hasty Hare
(1952) Going! Going! Gosh! (1952) Mouse Warming (1952) Rabbit Seasoning
Rabbit Seasoning
(1952) Terrier Stricken
Terrier Stricken
(1952) Don't Give Up the Sheep
Don't Give Up the Sheep
(1953) Forward March Hare
Forward March Hare
(1953) Kiss Me Cat (1953) Duck Amuck
Duck Amuck
(1953) Much Ado About Nutting (1953) Wild Over You (1953) Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century
Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century
(1953) Bully for Bugs
Bully for Bugs
(1953) Zipping Along (1953) Lumber Jack-Rabbit
Lumber Jack-Rabbit
(1953) Duck! Rabbit, Duck!
Duck! Rabbit, Duck!
(1953) Punch Trunk (1953) Feline Frame-Up
Feline Frame-Up
(1954) No Barking (1954) The Cat's Bah (1954) Claws for Alarm (1954) Bewitched Bunny
Bewitched Bunny
(1954) Stop! Look! And Hasten! (1954) From A to Z-Z-Z-Z (1954) My Little Duckaroo
My Little Duckaroo
(1954) Sheep Ahoy
Sheep Ahoy
(1954) Baby Buggy Bunny
Baby Buggy Bunny
(1954) Beanstalk Bunny (1955) Ready, Set, Zoom! (1955) Past Perfumance (1955) Rabbit Rampage (1955) Double or Mutton
Double or Mutton
(1955) Jumpin' Jupiter (1955) Knight-mare Hare (1955) Two Scent's Worth (1955) Guided Muscle (1955) One Froggy Evening
One Froggy Evening
(1955) A Hitch in Time (1955) 90 Days Wondering (1956) Bugs' Bonnets
Bugs' Bonnets
(1956) Broom-Stick Bunny
Broom-Stick Bunny
(1956) Rocket Squad
Rocket Squad
(1956) Heaven Scent (1956) Gee Whiz-z-z-z-z-z-z
Gee Whiz-z-z-z-z-z-z
(1956) Barbary Coast Bunny (1956) Rocket-bye Baby (1956) Deduce, You Say!
Deduce, You Say!
(1956) There They Go-Go-Go! (1956) To Hare Is Human
To Hare Is Human
(1956) Scrambled Aches (1957) Ali Baba Bunny
Ali Baba Bunny
(1957) Go Fly a Kit (1957) Boyhood Daze (1957) Steal Wool
Steal Wool
(1957) What's Opera, Doc?
What's Opera, Doc?
(1957) Zoom and Bored (1957) Touché and Go (1957) Drafty, Isn't It? (1957) Robin Hood Daffy
Robin Hood Daffy
(1958) Hare-Way to the Stars (1958) Whoa, Be-Gone! (1958) To Itch His Own (1958) Hook, Line and Stinker (1958) Hip Hip-Hurry! (1958) Cat Feud (1958) Baton Bunny
Baton Bunny
(1959) Hot-Rod and Reel! (1959) Wild About Hurry (1959) Fastest with the Mostest (1960) Hopalong Casualty (1960) Who Scent You? (1960) Rabbit's Feat
Rabbit's Feat
(1960) Ready, Woolen and Able
Ready, Woolen and Able
(1960) High Note (1960) Zip 'N Snort (1961) The Mouse on 57th Street (1961) The Abominable Snow Rabbit
The Abominable Snow Rabbit
(1961) Lickety-Splat (1961) A Scent of the Matterhorn (1961) Compressed Hare
Compressed Hare
(1961) Beep Prepared (1961) Nelly's Folly
Nelly's Folly
(1961) A Sheep in the Deep
A Sheep in the Deep
(1962) Zoom at the Top (1962) Louvre Come Back to Me! (1962) Martian Through Georgia
Martian Through Georgia
(1962) I Was a Teenage Thumb (1963) Now Hear This (1963) Hare-Breadth Hurry
Hare-Breadth Hurry
(1963) Mad as a Mars Hare
Mad as a Mars Hare
(1963) Transylvania 6-5000 (1963) To Beep or Not to Beep
To Beep or Not to Beep
(1963) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
(cartoon shorts, 1963–1967) War and Pieces (1964) The Dot and the Line (1965) The Bear That Wasn't
The Bear That Wasn't
(1967) Man: The Polluter (1973) Chariots of Fur (1994) Another Froggy Evening
Another Froggy Evening
(1995) Superior Duck (1996) From Hare to Eternity
From Hare to Eternity
(1997)

Television specials

How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1966) The Pogo Special
Special
Birthday Special
Special
(1969) Horton Hears a Who! (1970) The Cat in the Hat (1971, producer) The Cricket in Times Square
The Cricket in Times Square
(1973) A Very Merry Cricket (1973) Yankee Doodle Cricket (1975) The White Seal
The White Seal
(1975) Rikki-Tikki-Tavi (1975) Mowgli's Brothers (1976) Bugs and Daffy's Carnival of the Animals (1976) A Connecticut Rabbit in King Arthur's Court (1978) Raggedy Ann and Andy in The Great Santa Claus Caper (1978) Raggedy Ann and Andy in The Pumpkin Who Couldn't Smile
Raggedy Ann and Andy in The Pumpkin Who Couldn't Smile
(1979) Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales
Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales
(1979) Daffy Duck's Thanks-for-Giving Special
Special
(1980) Bugs Bunny's Bustin' Out All Over (1980) A Chipmunk Christmas
A Chipmunk Christmas
(1981) Peter and the Wolf (1995)

Feature films

Sleeping Beauty (1959, layout artist) Gay Purr-ee
Gay Purr-ee
(1962, screenplay) The Phantom Tollbooth (1970) The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie
The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie
(1979) Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales (1982) Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
(1983) Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Who Framed Roger Rabbit
(1988, animation consultant) Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990, animation sequences) Stay Tuned (1992, animation sequence) Mrs. Doubtfire
Mrs. Doubtfire
(1993, animation supervisor) Four Rooms
Four Rooms
(1995, animation sequences)

Books

Daffy Duck for President
Daffy Duck for President
(1997)

Comics

Crawford (1977–1978)

Characters

Bugs Bunny Charlie Dog Claude Cat Daffy Duck Elmer Fudd Gossamer Hubie and Bertie Marc Antony and Pussyfoot Marvin the Martian Michigan J. Frog Penelope Pussycat Pepé Le Pew Porky Pig Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog Sniffles The Three Bears Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner Witch Hazel

Other works

Chuck Amuck: The Movie Chuck Jones: Extremes & Inbetweens – A Life in Animation

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 183875289 LCCN: n79065347 GND: 4116482-9 SUDOC: 148449514 BNF: cb15661613c (data) MusicBrainz: d68700b6-aae7-478a

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