HOME
The Info List - Schaumburg


--- Advertisement ---



Schaumburg
Schaumburg
is a district (Landkreis) of Lower Saxony, Germany. It is bounded by (clockwise from the north) the districts of Nienburg, Hanover
Hanover
and Hamelin-Pyrmont, and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia (districts of Lippe
Lippe
and Minden-Lübbecke).

Contents

1 History 2 Geography 3 Coat of arms 4 Towns and municipalities 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit] Landkreis Schaumburg
Schaumburg
was created on August 1, 1977 within the framework of the Kreisreform (district reform) of Lower Saxony
Lower Saxony
by combining the former districts of Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
and Grafschaft Schaumburg. The town of Hessisch Oldendorf was reallocated to Landkreis Hameln-Pyrmont. The communities of Großenheidorn, Idensermoor-Niengraben and Steinhude had already been allocated to the community of Wunsdorf and thereby became part of Landkreis Hanover. The Landkreis Schaumburg
Schaumburg
essentially duplicates the borders of Schaumburg
Schaumburg
at the time of the Middle Ages. Schaumburg
Schaumburg
was a medieval county, which was founded at the beginning of the 12th century. Shortly after, the Holy Roman Emperor
Holy Roman Emperor
appointed the counts of Schaumburg
Schaumburg
to become counts of Holstein
Holstein
as well. During the Thirty Years' War
Thirty Years' War
the House of Schaumburg
House of Schaumburg
had no male heir, and the county was divided into Schaumburg
Schaumburg
(which became part of Hesse-Kassel) and the County of Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
(1640). As a member of the Confederation of the Rhine, Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
raised itself to a principality. In 1815, Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
joined the German Confederation, and in 1871 the German Empire. In 1918, it became a republic. The tiny Free State of Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
existed until 1946, when it became an administrative area within Lower Saxony. Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
had an area of 340 km², and a population of 51,000 (as of 1934). Hessian Schaumburg
Schaumburg
was annexed to Prussia
Prussia
along with the rest of Hesse-Kassel in 1866. After World War II, Schaumburg
Schaumburg
and Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
became districts within the state of Lower Saxony, until they were merged again in 1977. Geography[edit] The district (Landkreis) of Schaumburg
Schaumburg
has its northern half located in the North German Plain
North German Plain
and the southern half in the Weser Uplands (Weserbergland). The Weser Uplands
Weser Uplands
consist of hilly ridges and include the Wesergebirge, Harrl, Süntel, Bückeberg and Deister. The Schaumburg Forest
Schaumburg Forest
is a continuous strip of woods running in a direction of approximately 60 degrees along the northern border of the district. Just beyond the northern border of the district is Lake Steinhude a 29,1 km2 shallow lake that is the largest in Northern Germany. The river Weser flows westward along the south of the Wiehengebirge through a broad valley and the town of Rinteln. The landscape is bordered to the west by the River Weser which is in the neighbouring district of Minden-Lübbecke. It flows north through the Westphalian Gap
Westphalian Gap
towards the city of Bremen
Bremen
and the North Sea. In the flat North German Plain
North German Plain
to the east of Schaumburg
Schaumburg
district lies Hanover, the capital city of Lower Saxony. Coat of arms[edit]

Coat of arms
Coat of arms
of the Landkreis Schaumburg

The coat of arms is almost identical to the old arms of Schaumburg, which had been used since the 12th century. Schaumburg
Schaumburg
Castle, in mediaeval times the seat of the Counts of Schaumburg, is located on the Nesselberg
Nesselberg
("nettle mountain") in Schaumburg, a locality in the town of Rinteln. The nettle leaf in the middle of the arms has become the heraldic symbol of Holstein, symbolising the historical connection between Holstein
Holstein
and Schaumburg. Towns and municipalities[edit]

Towns and municipalities in Landkreis Schaumburg

Towns

Town Capital Area(km²) Population (2015) Location

Auetal

Rehren 62,16 km² 6.315

Obernkirchen

Obernkirchen 32,48 km² 9.196

Rinteln

Rinteln 109,06 km² 25.187

Bückeburg

Bückeburg 68,84 km² 19.182

Stadthagen

Stadthagen 60,27 km² 21.814

Samtgemeinden (collective municipalities) with their member municipalities

Samtgemeinde Member municipalities Capital Area (km²) Population(2015) Location

Rodenberg

List

Apelern Rodenberg Hülsede lauenau Messenkamp Pohle

Rodenberg 86,2 km² 15.562

Nenndorf

List

Hohnhorst Haste Suthfeld Bad Nenndorf

Bad Nenndorf 51,4 km² 16.960

Eilsen

List

Bad Eilsen Ahnsen Bucholz Heeßen Luhden

Bad Eilsen 13,91 km² 6.715

Niedernwöhren

List

Niedernwöhren Meerbeck Lauenhagen Nordsehl Pollhagen Wiedensahl

Niedernwöhren 64,42 km² 8.115

Sachsenhagen

List

Sachsenhagen Auhagen Hagenburg Wölpinghausen

Sachsenhagen 62,44 km² 9.253

Nienstädt

List

Nienstädt Seggebruch Helpsen Hespe

Nienstädt 30,06 km² 10.111

Lindhorst List

Lindhorst Heuerßen Lüdersfeld Beckedorf

Lindhorst 34,34 km² 7.796

See also[edit]

Metropolitan region Hannover-Braunschweig-Göttingen-Wolfsburg Schaumburg, Illinois

References[edit]

^ Landesbetrieb für Statistik und Kommunikationstechnologie Niedersachsen, 102 Bevölkerung - Basis Zensus 2011, Stand 31. Dezember 2015 (Tabelle K1020014)

External links[edit] Media related to Landkreis Schaumburg
Schaumburg
at Wikimedia Commons

Official website (in German) Schaumburg- Lippe
Lippe
genealogy website (in English)

v t e

Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle
Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle
(1500–1806) of the Holy Roman Empire

Ecclesiastical

Cambrai (until 1678) Corvey1 Liège Minden2 Münster Stavelot–Malmedy1 Osnabrück Paderborn Utrecht (until 1548) Verden (until 1648)

The Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle
Lower Rhenish–Westphalian Circle
(red) within the Holy Roman Empire (white)

Prelates

Corvey2 Essen Herford Kornelimünster Stavelot–Malmedy2 Thorn Werden

Secular

Cleves with Mark East Frisia1 Jülich–Berg Guelders Minden1 Moers1 Nassau-Dillenburg1 Verden1

Counts and lords

From 1500

Bentheim Bronkhorst
Bronkhorst
(until 1719) Diepholz East Frisia (until 1667) Horne3 (until 1614) Hoya Lingen3 Lippe Manderscheid (until 1546) Moers (until 1541) Nassau

Diez Hadamar Dillenburg (until 1664)

Oldenburg (until 1777) Pyrmont Ravensberg3 Reichenstein Rietberg Salm-Reifferscheid Sayn Schaumburg Tecklenburg Virneburg Wied Winneburg and Beilstein

From 1792

Anholt Blankenheim and Gerolstein Gemen Gimborn Gronsfeld Hallermund Holzappel Kerpen-Lommersum Myllendonk Reckheim Schleiden Wickrath Wittem

Status uncertain

Delmenhorst Fagnolle Schaumburg

Hesse Lippe

Spiegelberg Steinfurt

Cities

Aachen Cologne Dortmund Duisburg? Herford? Verden (until 1648) Warburg?

1 from 1792 2 until 1792 3 without seat in Imperial Diet ? status uncertain Circles est. 1500: Bavarian, Swabian, Upper Rhenish, Lower Rhenish–Westphalian, Franconian, (Lower) Saxon

Circles est. 1512: Austrian, Burgundian, Upper Saxon, Electoral Rhenish     Unencircled territories

v t e

Urban and rural districts in the state of Lower Saxony
Lower Saxony
in Germany

Region

Hanover

Urban districts

Braunschweig Delmenhorst Emden Oldenburg Osnabrück Salzgitter Wilhelmshaven Wolfsburg

Rural districts

Ammerland Aurich Bentheim Celle Cloppenburg Cuxhaven Diepholz Emsland Friesland Gifhorn Goslar Göttingen Hamelin-Pyrmont Harburg Heidekreis Helmstedt Hildesheim Holzminden Leer Lüchow-Dannenberg Lüneburg Nienburg Northeim Oldenburg Osnabrück Osterholz Peine Rotenburg Schaumburg Stade Uelzen Vechta Verden Wesermarsch Wittmund Wolfenbüttel

Coordinates: 52°15′N 9°10′E / 52.25°N 9.17°E / 52.25; 9.17

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 158279100 LCCN: n80141

.