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Sappinia diploidea is a free-living[1] amoeba species.[2]

Background

Sappinia can be found around the world. It's usually found in elk and buffalo feces, places where farm animals are known to eat, soil containing rotting plants, fresh water sources.[3]

Clinical significance

It is capable of causing infectious disease in humans.[4][5][6]

Symptoms of Sappinia Infection

Symptoms of a Sappinia infection include: Headache, Sensitivity to light, Nausea or upset stomach, Vomiting, Blurry vision, Loss of consciousness. A scan of the one, infected patient’s brain also revealed a 2-centimeter tumor-like mass on the back left section of his brain.[3]

Treatment

Treatment for the one identified case of Sappinia infection included the removal of a tumor in the brain and a series of drugs given to the patient after surgery. This treatment lead to the patient’s full recovery.[7]

Specifically, it can cause amebic encephalitis.[8][9]

References

  1. ^ Visvesvara GS; Moura H; Schuster FL (June 2007). "Pathogenic and opportunistic free-living amoebae: Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, Naegleria fowleri, and Sappinia diploidea". FEMS Immunol. Med. Microbiol. 50 (1): 1–26. doi:10.1111/j.1574-695X.2007.00232.x. PMID 17428307. 
  2. ^ Brown MW; Spiegel FW; Silberman JD (2007). "Amoeba at attention: phylogenetic affinity of Sappinia pedata". J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 54 (6): 511–9. doi:10.1111/j.1550-7408.2007.00292.x. PMID 18070328. 
  3. ^ a b Brown; J.D. Silberman; F.W. Spiegel (2007). "Amoeba at attention: phylogenetic affinity of Sappinia pedata". J Eukaryot Microbiol: 511–9. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  4. ^ "Acanthamoeba: Overview - eMedicine". Retrieved 2009-01-11. 
  5. ^ Gelman BB, Rauf SJ, Nader R, et al. (May 2001). "Amoebic encephalitis due to Sappinia diploidea". JAMA. 285 (19): 2450–1. doi:10.1001/jama.285.19.2450. PMID 11368696. 
  6. ^ Wylezich, C.; Walochnik, J.; Michel, R. (2009). "High genetic diversity of Sappinia-like strains (Amoebozoa, Thecamoebidae) revealed by SSU rRNA investigations". Parasitology research. 105 (3): 869–873. doi:10.1007/s00436-009-1482-1. PMID 19495795. 
  7. ^ Gelman, B.B. "Parasites-Sappinia". Amoebic encephalitis due to Sappinia diploidea. JAMA, 2001. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  8. ^ Gelman BB, Popov V, Chaljub G, et al. (October 2003). "Neuropathological and ultrastructural features of amebic encephalitis caused by Sappinia diploidea". J. Neuropathol. Exp. Neurol. 62 (10): 990–8. PMID 14575235. 
  9. ^ Marciano‐Cabral F (2009). "Free‐Living Amoebae as Agents of Human Infection". J Infect Dis. 199 (8): 1104–1106. doi:10.1086/597474. PMID 19302009. 

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